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    Fox News anchors Sandra Smith and John Roberts reacted to GOP nominee for governor of Arizona, Kari Lake, taking questions from reporters after casting her vote on Tuesday. Roberts noted Lake vowed to reform the media, which has been a regular target of her attacks, but challenged her on exactly what that means. “So there you have it. Kari Lake, the gubernatorial candidate there, speaking after she cast her vote. Obviously, John, she is speaking after Maricopa County election officials reported that 20% of the tabulation machines in and around Maricopa County are having some problems,” Smith began, adding: They say that they are trying to fix those problems. The election official, Bill Gates, said that right now. But some remarkable moments there where she said stay in line, don’t let all this craziness distract you. You do not get out of line. “Also saying that she intends to be the governor there for the next eight years, not be Donald Trump’s running mate, saying I’m going to be your worst frickin nightmare for the next eight years,” Roberts added,...
    President Joe Biden has appointed Karine Jean-Pierre to be the White House Press Secretary. The historic move makes Jean-Pierre the first Black person and first out LGBTQ person to be the top administration spokesperson. In a time when the civil rights of women, people of color, and LGBTQ people are being dismantled by the right Biden’s move sends a strong signal to not only the nation but the world that protecting civil rights and positioning exceptionally talented people for the world to see is among his top priorities. “Karine not only brings the experience, talent and integrity needed for this difficult job, but she will continue to lead the way in communicating about the work of the Biden-Harris Administration on behalf of the American people,” President Biden said in a statement Thursday afternoon. “Jill and I have known and respected Karine a long time and she will be a strong voice speaking for me and this Administration.” Jean-Pierre, currently the Principal Deputy Press Secretary and Deputy Assistant to the President will officially become Press Secretary and Assistant to the President...
    The juror on the Ghislaine Maxwell case who did not disclose his history of sexual abuse during jury selection will plead the Fifth when he testifies next week.  A lawyer for Scotty David said that he would invoke his right not to respond to questions when he appears before Judge Alison Nathan in a New York court on March 8th. Todd Spodek, the attorney for David, said he wanted to exercise his 'privilege against self-incrimination at the hearing'. After the bombshell filing, prosecutors immediately requested an order forcing David to testify. The filings raise the stakes significantly ahead of David's appearance, which could lead to a new trial for Maxwell. Scotty David, the juror on the Ghislaine Maxwell case who did not disclose his history of sexual abuse during jury selection, will plead the Fifth when he testifies next week. A lawyer for Scotty David said that he would invoke his right not to respond to questions when he appears before Judge Alison Nathan in a New York court on March 8th The British socialite was convicted in December of...
    Rep. Byron Donalds, R-Fla., appeared on NBC’s "Meet the Press" to discuss the subject of critical race theory in schools. Critical race theory (CRT) became a serious political topic in 2021 as parents continue to appear at school board meetings to criticize its teaching to their children. Throughout the country, several states have since taken steps to remove CRT or CRT-adjacent topics in classrooms. CHICAGO PARENT WARNS REMOTE LEARNING HAS ‘DEVASTATING EFFECTS’ FOR FAMILIES AS UNION MULLS ‘TEMPORARY’ SHIFT  Host Chuck Todd opened the segment appearing to criticize these laws, suggesting that they would prevent teachers in Oklahoma from teaching "why" the Tulsa Massacre occurred. New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb agreed with that sentiment. "It’s only because of the diligent work of historians that we even know that the public even has access to this information, much less that there was an epidemic of tides of these kinds of racial violence in the period following World War I into the 1920s. This wasn’t an uncommon phenomenon. We don’t know that and we don’t teach that and we don’t talk...
    The New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb battled Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL) over critical race theory on Sunday on NBC’s Meet the Press. The weekly show aired part of a recent discussion host Chuck Todd did with Donalds, Cobb and Brenda Sheridan, the chair of the Loudoun County Public Schools, which has been at the center of controversy over coronavirus protocols and school curriculum such as critical race theory. “Congressman Donalds, I think this is the concern. You’ve heard this concern, which is – and I brought up the Tulsa race massacre because I didn’t – I wasn’t taught it in schools, with the public schools in Florida,” said Todd. “Something I learned in the last two years was Ax Handle Sunday, which was a horrible racial violence in Jacksonville, Florida. I assume you think we should be teaching these events in our public schools.” “Absolutely,” said Donalds. “So how would you do it,” asked Todd. “And – and what is banning critical race theory, in your mind, do to impact the teaching of, say, Ax Handle Sunday?” “Look, the number one...
    President Joe Biden has the most expensive payroll in White House history with 22 aides, including press secretary Jen Psaki and chief of staff Ron Klain, making the maximum yearly salary of $180,000. The White House on Thursday released its annual staff report to Congress, revealing the salaries of 567 White House employees, which cost taxpayers $49.6 million. The projected four-year costs of Biden's White House payroll could top $200 million, according to an analysis by Forbes, which would top the staff costs of the past two presidents. Adjusted for inflation, the Trump administration spent $164.3 million during his one term in office and the Obama administration spent $188.5 million in his first term. The Biden White House has the most expensive payroll in history with 22 aides, including press secretary Jen Psaki (above), making the maximum yearly salary of $180,000 Other high-profile names making the staff maximum include Neera Tanden, who serves as a senior adviser to the president after her nomination for Office of Management and Budget director was withdrawn; National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan, senior adviser to...
    But this did not happen for decades: first in 1991 under President George HW Bush by Judy Smith. “Today is a big day at the White House,” White House spokeswoman Jen Zaki tweeted, so he temporarily led his deputy. “It is a great honor to be here today,” the latter said, knowing the “historical dimension” of his existence. Born in Martinique, Haitian parents, Karin Jean-Pierre became the first woman to confront journalists on the prestigious stage of the “James S. Brady Press Briefing Room” and openly homosexual. Forty-one French-speakers who have long been in the sub-world served in two campaigns for Barack Obama (2008 and 2012), before joining his team at Joe Biden’s White House in 2020. During his presidential travels, he has already made press conferences from Air Force One. But these are less impressive than the daily “conference”, which is broadcast live on television and can be a little misleadingly expensive. The appearance of Karen Jean-Pierre on the table is particularly relieving, as Jen Saki, the current owner of the prestigious position of “White House press secretary”, has...
    Deputy White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre made some history when she took the White House podium Wednesday, as the first black woman to conduct the briefing since 1991. The longtime Democratic operative was filling in for Press Secretary Jen Psaki, who congratulated her on her 'big day' before she faced the press. She fielded questions for more than 50 minutes, occasionally reading from pre-prepared talking points. She also displayed a knack for tactics her predecessors used for not providing much new information in response to questions.  Karine Jean-Pierre held her first press briefing at the White House and became the first black woman to conduct the daily briefing since 1991 'I don’t have that information to share with you right now,' she said in response to a direct question about the U.S. Intelligence Community and China.  Several reporters acknowledged her debut at the podium, although she has also held less formal 'gaggles' with the press on prior trips aboard Air Force One. When one asked her to share her thoughts on the moment, she responded: 'It's a real...
    An East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) ranger stumbled upon hundreds of 5 to 10 million-year-old fossils in the Mokelumne River watershed while out on patrol in 2020, the district announced Tuesday. Greg Francek made the discovery within the 28,000 acres of protected land in the Sierra Nevada Foothills, California, according to the EBMUD. “This historic discovery has revealed that the Mokelumne Watershed plays a much deeper role in our understanding of the natural history of North America,” EBMUD Board President Doug Linney said in the press release, calling it “simply wondrous.” (RELATED: Researchers Say They Discovered A New Dinosaur Species) Petrified tree in the ground (Photo Credit: East Bay Municipal Utility District/Press Release) Francek said he noticed petrified trees in the region during the summer of 2020. Scientists then went into the area and began work, unearthing samples of “hundreds” of specimens from fossils belonging to about a dozen prehistoric species in the area. EBMUD and experts from California State University (CSU) Chico’s Geological and Environmental Sciences Department have set up excavation sites across EBMUD land as part...
    New York (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.In a pair of new interviews, White House press secretary Jen Psaki is sharing a lot about her approach to the job; the frantic news cycle; media fragmentation, and the role of Twitter.In a candid interview with her former Obama White House colleague David Axelrod on "The Axe Files" podcast, which came out Thursday morning, Psaki likens President Biden to "a storyteller." She says "he's always looking to tell the story, and he is always pushing and testing whether we're speaking about things in an accessible way."Here are six more takeaways from the conversation: -- Psaki defends Biden's accessibility to the press corps while saying, of the times he spontaneously fields questions, "that is not something we recommend." She says, "In fact, a lot of times we say 'Don't take questions,' you know, but he's going to do what he wants to do because he's the president."Read More -- Psaki says, bluntly, "We're never going to satisfy the...
    Donald Trump was acquitted after a second trial before the US Senate, which this time tried for his role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. American press review. Por the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty verdict on Saturday after a historic trial before the US Senate, which tried him for his alleged role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. An acquittal which is, unsurprisingly, the front page of the media across the Atlantic. Senators were a majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for a conviction of the billionaire. But it would have taken two-thirds of the upper house (67 votes) to reach a guilty verdict which could have been followed by a sentence of ineligibility. Which is “historic” according to the Washington Post. For the daily newspaper in the capital, “of course, Trump was not condemned. But he suffered the most bipartisan vote on record to convict a president in an impeachment trial – and one of the largest reprimands in American history against a...
    Donald Trump was acquitted after a second trial before the US Senate, which this time tried for his role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. American press review. Por the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty verdict on Saturday after a historic trial before the US Senate, which tried him for his alleged role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. An acquittal which is, unsurprisingly, the front page of the media across the Atlantic. Senators were a majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for a conviction of the billionaire. But it would have taken two-thirds of the upper house (67 votes) to reach a guilty verdict which could have been followed by a sentence of ineligibility. Which is “historic” according to the Washington Post. For the daily newspaper in the capital, “of course, Trump was not condemned. But he suffered the most bipartisan vote on record to convict a president in an impeachment trial – and one of the largest reprimands in American history against a...
    (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.The news media (once again) finds itself covering a moment unlike any other in history. President Trump is set to become the first president in US history to have been impeached twice — this time for inciting a deadly riot on Capitol Hill after weeks of peddling disinfo and promoting conspiracy theories aimed at undermining the results of a free and fair election.But unlike last time, Trump is starting to see some cracks in his stronghold over the GOP. Meanwhile, Trump's allies in right-wing media aren't putting up nearly as aggressive of a defense they did the last time he faced impeachment. (Last time, you'll remember, Trump's most prominent propagandists constructed an alternate reality in which Democrats did what he was accused of. This time the argument mostly amounts to impeachment being divisive.)So how should the press cover this monumental moment? I reached out to WaPo's Margaret Sullivan, NBC's Ben Collins, Baltimore Sun's David Zurawik, Politico's Jack Shafer, and Princeton...
    THIS snap of two sleepy red squirrels in a tree is a front ­runner in the 2021 Wildlife Photo­grapher of the Year contest. The cuddly duo were captured by Brit Neil Anderson who is up for the People’s Choice category in the contest run by the Natural History Museum. 21Two cuddly red squirrels snapped by Neil Anderson are a front ­runner in the 2021 Wildlife Photo­grapher of the Year contestCredit: PA:Press Association 21A photo by Guillermo Esteves shows a curious moose nuzzling a car wing mirror while a labrador looks onCredit: PA:Press Association Most read in NewsROYAL RUMBLEThe Crown 'is fiction & must not be mistaken as fact', warns Culture SecretaryExclusiveBARE HOSTESSBA stewardess selling sex and even offers clients on-board experienceHIDDEN WEAPONCan you spot camouflaged sniper hiding in thick forest as he monitors enemy?SICKO DEADMan who injected heroin into his baby's mouth dies in jail months before releaseGETTING SMASHEDMoment shopper chucks 500 booze bottles on floor in store wrecking rampageSOLO CRIMEWAVETeen, 17, who sexually assaulted lawyer & stole Merc caged after spree Another, taken in the US by Guillermo Esteves,...
    LONDON (AP) — A book that looks at The Beatles from a playful kaleidoscope of angles won Britain’s leading nonfiction literary award on Tuesday. Craig Brown’s “One Two Three Four: The Beatles in Time” was named winner of the 50,000-pound ($66,000) Baillie Gifford Prize at a virtual ceremony in London. Brown’s “composite biography” juxtaposes the stories of John, Paul, George and Ringo with relatives, partners, artists, imitators, hangers-on and others drawn into their orbit. Broadcaster Martha Kearney, who chaired the judging panel, said Brown’s “joyous, irreverent, insightful celebration” of the Fab Four was “a shaft of light piercing the deep gloom of 2020.” “Who would have thought that a book about The Beatles could seem so fresh?” she said. The award recognizes English-language books in current affairs, history, politics, science, sport, travel, biography, autobiography and the arts. Brown beat a shortlist that included Sudhir Hazareesingh’s Haitian revolution history “Black Spartacus,” Matthew Cobb’s “The Idea of the Brain” and Christina Lamb’s book about women and war “Our Bodies, Their Battlefield.” The other finalists were Amy Stanley’s “Stranger in the Shogun’s City,”...
    Fired election security chief Chris Krebs called out President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani after he and a team of Trump campaign lawyers held a rambling press conference Thursday.  'That press conference was the most dangerous 1hr 45 minutes of television in American history. And possibly the craziest,' Krebs tweeted. 'If you don’t know what I’m talking about, you’re lucky.' Giuliani, along with lawyers Sidney Powell and Jenna Ellis, wove together a number of conspiracy theories tying boogeymen like Antifa, communists, George Soros, the Clinton Foundation and Hugo Chavez to the results of the election - claiming, of course, that Trump had actually won.   Chris Krebs, the fired director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, called Rudy Giuliani's bizarre Thursday press conference 'dangerous'  Krebs, before he was fired by Trump via tweet on Tuesday, was among the government officials who came out publicly and called the election, 'the most secure in American history.'    He was the director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency - and was a Trump appointee.   'All of the states with close results in the 2020...
    Kevin Hagen/Getty Images Chris Krebs, the Department of Homeland Security official who President Donald Trump fired via tweet this week, decried the Trump campaign’s conspiracy-filled press conference challenging the results of the 2020 election as “dangerous” on Thursday. As the head of the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, Krebs was charged with securing voting technology. He was fired by Trump after publicly contradicting the president’s false claims that the election was stolen from him. Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, and several other members of the Trump campaign’s legal team, pushed those false claims at a bizarre press conference on Thursday. The lengthy spectacle included a mind-boggling quantity of baseless claims, as well as an elaborate theory that a series of nefarious actors — from George Soros to Hugo Chavez and Hillary Clinton — conspired to steal the election from Trump. “That press conference was the most dangerous 1hr 45 minutes of television in American history,” Krebs wrote on Twitter Thursday afternoon. “And possibly the craziest. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, you’re lucky.” That press...
    Comedian Norm Crosby, The Master of Malaprop, dead at 93 CRA to Retirees: Here’s How Much You’re Paying Into CPP Beef History: Hakeem Olajuwon vs. the Houston Rockets When’s the best time to ask your boss for a $15 million contract extension? For most of us, never. For Hakeem Olajuwon, it was the winter of 1992. Sure, the Rockets weren’t doing so hot annnnnd had just fired coach Don Chaney, but Hakeem was making less than the league’s other elite centers, so what’s the harm in asking? Beef? Is beef the harm in asking? Yes. First, owner Charlie Thomas and GM Steve Patterson refused to negotiate with him. Then Olajuwon strained his hamstring, and the Rockets brass was like “Oh yeah right, you’re not hurt, you’re just refusing to play until we negotiate your contract.” They suspended Olajuwon and took to the press with their fake-injury allegations. Hakeem fired back in the press, really going after Thomas and Patterson’s intelligence. The word “stupid” was used quite a bit. Oh, and he also demanded a trade. The 92-93...
    A TREE-hugging tiger helps a snapper get his paws on a Wildlife Photographer of the Year award. The image was taken by Sergey Gorshkov in eastern Russia after an 11-month stakeout. 10Sergey Gorshkov's breathtaking image The Escape scooped the Wildlife Photographer of the Year awardCredit: PA:Press Association 10Natural History Museum patron Kate Middleton unveiled the winners last nightCredit: PA:Press Association 10In the Behaviour: Birds category, Jose Luis Ruiz Jimenez's Great Crested Sunrise came up trumpsCredit: PA:Press Association 10Sam Sloss's A Mean Mouthful took home the top prize in the 11-14 categoryCredit: PA:Press Association Winners were announced last night by the Duchess of Cambridge at the National History Museum in London. She said: "The skill and creativity of this year’s images provide a moving and fascinating insight into the beauty and vulnerability of life on our planet." Other pictures picked from 49,000 entries include a clown fish in Indonesia, a proboscis monkey in Borneo and a family of great crested grebes in Spain. Kate had earlier teased the announcement in a short clip posted online by Kensington Palace. The Duchess,...
    /Star Max/IPx For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.It’s the political party whose members openly mock masks, lambast the nation’s top infectious disease expert as a partisan hack for simply doing his job, and protect a president whose chief response to a pandemic has been to deny, deny, deny. But when it comes to re-anointing Donald Trump as the Republican Party standard-bearer, coronavirus safety suddenly matters. When Donald Trump is renominated for president later this month in Charlotte, North Carolina, it will be a private affair, according to a Republican National Convention spokesperson on Saturday. No press allowed. According to the Associated Press: While Trump called off the public components of the convention in Florida last month, citing spiking cases of the virus across the country, 336 delegates are scheduled to gather in Charlotte, North Carolina, on 24 August to formally vote to make Trump the GOP standard-bearer once more. Nominating conventions are traditionally meant to be media bonanzas, as political parties seek to leverage the attention the events draw to spread their message to...
    Democratic New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany traded blows Monday after the press secretary called Ocasio-Cortez an advisor to 2020 presidential candidate Joe Biden. McEnany discussed the “Defund the Police” movement at a White House press conference Monday afternoon where she criticized “sitting congresswomen,” including “Biden advisor AOC,” for “wanting to defund our police across this country.” Ocasio-Cortez responded by suggesting that McEnany’s comment was “mired in racist history” and demanding an apology. Ocasio-Cortez accused the press secretary of erasing the fact that she’s a congresswoman. “I’m a Congresswoman,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted at the White House press secretary. (RELATED: Ocasio-Cortez: Tara Reade Allegations ‘Not Clear Cut,’ But ‘Certainly Seems As Though Something Has Happened’) .@PressSec wouldn’t be the first person to mistake a women of color for having a lower position or title than she does, but Kayleigh – in case you haven’t picked up a newspaper in two years, I’m a Congresswoman. https://t.co/3FRHo7dpTL — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) June 8, 2020 “The @PressSec comment is steeped in a long, hurtful, & horrendous history of...
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