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    by Reagan Reese   The second-largest school district in the country is stocking its schools with naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal drug, following student deaths, according to a Thursday news release. In the recent weeks, nine students have died from overdoses in the Los Angeles Unified School District, with one student overdosing in the bathroom after obtaining a pill containing fentanyl from a peer, according to the Los Angeles Times. Every school in the district, beginning with elementary schools, will be stocked with the nasal spray version of naloxone, or Narcan, according to news release by the school. “We have an urgent crisis on our hands,” Superintendent Aberto Carvalho said in the press release. “Research shows that the availability of naloxone along with overdose education is effective at decreasing overdoses and death–and will save lives. We will do everything in our power to ensure that not another student in our community is a victim to the growing opioid epidemic. Keeping students safe and healthy remains our highest priority.” High schools will receive the doses of naloxone first over the next two weeks in...
    The Los Angeles Unified School District, the victim of a major cyberattack over Labor Day weekend, has received a ransom demand from the person or group that hacked into its systems, though officials have not indicated if they intend to pay or enter into any negotiations. “There has been communication from this actor, and we have been responsive without engaging in any type of negotiation,” Superintendent Alberto Carvalho told reporters outside the district’s headquarters on Wednesday, Sept. 21. “A financial demand has been made by this entity. We have not responded to that demand,” he added. District officials have not said how much money the hacker or hackers demanded nor what information they claim to have stolen. Officials previously acknowledged that the LAUSD student information system was “touched.” “We believe that some of the data that was accessed may have some students’ names, may have some degree of attendance data, but more than likely lacks personally identifiable information or very sensitive health information or Social Security number information,” Carvalho said Wednesday. “It is a containable risk that we’re dealing with...
    The private data of more than 400,000 students could be at risk as federal and local investigators assess the damage wreaked by a massive cyberattack against the Los Angeles Unified School District, which overcame a complete digital shutdown to open schools on schedule Tuesday. The district did not know whether student information — assessments, grades, class schedules, disciplinary records, reports about disabilities — was accessed by hackers through the district’s online student management system. “We’re still going through student files because ... the student management system was touched,” Supt. Alberto Carvalho said at a downtown news conference, accompanied by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore. He said the hackers have encryption skills to cover their tracks and “shut us out of what they have or what they saw.” “We have not seen evidence of health information being accessed or Social Security numbers for students being accessed,” Carvalho said. The payroll system too, he added, is functioning, and personnel data do not appear to have been compromised. “But any type of access is one that...
    The Los Angeles Unified School District said in a Monday announcement that the school district had been affected by a ransomware attack on its IT infrastructure but that it would not affect classes in the district. The school district said it had "detected unusual activity" throughout its IT systems, which the district subsequently confirmed was an "external cyber attack" that was "likely criminal in nature." TEACHERS UNION SAYS 70% OF LA EDUCATORS HAVE THOUGHT ABOUT QUITTING "While we do not expect major technical issues that will prevent Los Angeles Unified from providing instruction and transportation, food or Beyond the Bell services, business operations may be delayed or modified," the district said in a statement. "Based on a preliminary analysis of critical business systems, employee healthcare and payroll are not impacted, nor has the cyber incident impacted safety and emergency mechanisms in place at schools." "Los Angeles Unified has swiftly implemented a response protocol to mitigate districtwide disruptions, including access to email, computer systems and applications," the statement read. The district said it had contacted the...
    Los Angeles Supt. Alberto Carvalho, in his first back-to-school address, pledged Monday to bring rapid progress to the nation’s second-largest school district, which has long struggled to make modest, consistent gains. Carvalho made the promise to school district administrators and other district and community leaders during what is widely viewed as a “state of the district” event and a preview of the academic year ahead — plans that will later serve as benchmarks to gauge the superintendent’s own effectiveness. “Most view reform at an institution like Los Angeles Unified as necessarily protracted,” Carvalho said in his prepared remarks to a packed Microsoft Theater in downtown L.A. “Community reform by nature does not have to be protracted or slow. It can be quick. And we will be making changes and reforming the way Los Angeles Unified conducts business in a swift and unapologetic manner.” Carvalho pointed to his recently school board-approved strategic plan, calling it his guidepost, “laying out exactly how we will position Los Angeles Unified as the premiere urban school district of choice,” in a speech that was intended...
    America’s second-largest school district is teaming up with various left-wing organizations to promote child transgenderism. The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has teamed up with a number of leftwing organizations to provide teachers with children’s books that promote transgenderism and corresponding lesson plans. Open Books, previously named Gender Nation, is an organization that aims to “validate children with LGBTQ+ storytelling” by furnishing public schools with books that endorse child transgenderism. The LAUSD Human Relations, Diversity and Equity website explains that the district received “an enormous donation of LGBTQIA-themed books that are developmentally appropriate for elementary and span schools” from the organization. Among the books that the organization provided to the LAUSD is “I am Jazz” by Jazz Jennings, a story about a boy who wants to change his sex. The book description explains “From the time she was two years old, Jazz knew that she had a girl’s brain in a boy’s body.” The book is paired with a document on “Trans Topics” from the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, which recommends the book for students in grades K-five. The document articulates that teachers who read...
    A judge in has ruled Los Angeles Unified School District cannot require students to be vaccinated against COVID-19 in a decision with implications for the Bay Area where several large public school districts have adopted similar requirements. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Mitchell Beckloff’s Tuesday ruling is the second to find that a public school district lacks authority over vaccine requirements that are being set by the state. A judge in December ruled that a San Diego Unified School District COVID vaccine requirement exceeded its authority. “The court finds the vaccines required of schoolchildren for enrollment and continued attendance in school in this state has been so covered by statutes within the Health and Safety Code that the field has become exclusively a matter of state concern,” Beckloff wrote in his nine-page decision. Gov. Gavin Newsom in October said California would become the first state to mandate COVID-19 vaccines for school students, adding them to the list of 10 other already required inoculations for measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, polio, hepatitis B, bacterial meningitis, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. The state...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The Los Angeles Unified School District is dropping its mass testing requirements.Starting June 13, and continuing for the new school year, the district will only test those experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, or who have been exposed to someone who tested positive.The only exception, students "attending Early Education and Care settings will continue to test weekly with PCR testing through the end of their school year, which is June 30, 2022," LAUSD officials said in a statement.All tests will now be done with take-home rapid antigen tests, instead of the old PCR tests."All school campuses will also continue to use the Daily Pass portal for daily health screening questions, monitoring rapid antigen test results and to notify you and your child if they are a close contact of someone who has tested positive," LAUSD said.Although COVID-19 cases are rising again, the LAUSD says in-school transmission rates are low, and the risk to students and staff is minimal.
    The Los Angeles Unified School District on Tuesday dropped its outdoor mask mandate after the county allowed K-12 schools to lift the requirement last week. Students will no longer be required to wear masks at recess or during athletics, as long as they are outdoors. The new policy took effect for students and staff on Tuesday because schools were closed for the Presidents Day holiday on Monday, although those participating in athletics were allowed to unmask outside a day earlier. On Wednesday, L.A. County relaxed its outdoor masking requirements for K-12 schools and child-care facilities as well as at “mega” events, such as those at the Hollywood Bowl, Dodger Stadium, SoFi Stadium and Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. California Supt. Carvalho confronts his first big decision: Should LAUSD relax mask requirements? New L.A. Unified schools chief said he is conferring with medical experts and expects an announcement soon. L.A. Unified opted to keep its own outdoor mask rules in place but announced on Friday it would follow suit. L.A. Supt. Alberto Carvalho said it was...
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- Alberto Carvalho will officially take over as superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District Monday."We are all very excited to welcome Superintendent Carvalho to the Los Angeles Unified School District," the board said in a brief announcement last week after voting to formalize his start date.Carvalho, who comes to the district after leading the Miami-Dade County Public Schools system since 2008, was unanimously chosen by the board on Dec. 9 to succeed Austin Beutner, who stepped down in June. Megan K. Reilly has been serving as interim superintendent of the nation's second-largest school district.Carvalho is beginning a four-year contract with a base salary of $440,000 per year that was approved by the board on Dec. 14. He also received $50,000 in relocation costs, a district-provided vehicle and cell phone, retirement plan, and standard vacation, sick time and health benefits."I'm excited about this opportunity," Carvalho said at the time of his hiring.Speaking to the board following the vote on his contract, Carvalho added, "My excitement is a reflection not only of the opportunity that Los Angeles...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — It’s official – Alberto Carvalho’s first day on the job as superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District will be Monday. Alberto Carvalho, the new superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, holds a news conference at Elysian Heights Elementary School. Jan. 14, 2021. (CBSLA) READ MORE: Compton Cuts Ribbon On $8 Million Project To Repair Its Pothole-Ridden, Cracked StreetsThe Los Angeles Unified Board of Education voted Tuesday to formalize his start date as Monday, Feb. 14. READ MORE: Trevor Bauer Will Not Face Criminal Charges After Being Accused Of Sexual Assault“We are all very excited to welcome Superintendent Carvalho to the Los Angeles Unified School District next week,” the board said in a statement. Carvalho comes to Los Angeles from Miami, where he served as superintendent of the Miami-Dade County Public Schools system since 2008. He succeeds Austin Beutner, who stepped down in June. The board approved a four-year contract with a base salary of $440,000 per year, along with $50,000 in relocation costs, a vehicle and cell phone provided by...
    Nearly 500 Los Angeles Unified School District employees were fired this week for refusing to comply with a mandate that they get vaccinated against Covid-19, while some 34,000 students have not yet been vaccinated as required. The school board voted 7-0 in separate motions on Tuesday to terminate 496 employees, who make up less than 1 per cent of the district's approximately 73,000 workers.  Most of those fired had likely been on leave since mid-October when LAUSD staffers were to have received at least their first vaccine dose, the Los Angeles Daily News reported. Employees were required to receive their second dose by November 15.  But they may be eligible to get their jobs back if they choose to get vaccinated against Covid-19.  Nearly 500 Los Angeles Unified School District employees were fired this week for refusing to comply with a mandate that they get vaccinated against Covid-19. Pictured: Anti-vaccine mandate protesters rally outside the garage doors of the Los Angeles Unified School District headquarters in LA on September 9 'Parting ways with individuals who choose not to be vaccinated...
    The Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation’s second largest school district, fired almost 500 employees on Dec. 7 for failing to comply with the district’s vaccine mandate. The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) school board voted 7-0 in separate motions to terminate workers who did not receive their first dose of a vaccine by Nov. 15, the Los Angeles Daily News reported. The district terminated 496 employees. A district spokesperson refused to tell the Daily Caller how many terminated employees were teachers and how these terminations could impact students. In October, the district reported that 97% of its employees were “at least partially vaccinated” or had received medical or religious exemptions. The district bumped its vaccination rate by 2 percent before implementing terminations. A district spokesperson told the Daily Caller that employees who become vaccinated post-termination may be eligible for reemployment with the district. “The Los Angeles Unified School District confirmed that 496 employees were separated due to non-compliance with the District’s vaccine requirement,” the spokesperson said. “Vaccinations are a term or condition of employment in the District....
    Hundreds of Los Angeles school employees have been fired for not complying with a district vaccine requirement, the Los Angeles Unified School district said. As of Tuesday, 496 LAUSD employees were terminated but may be eligible for re-employment if they chose to get vaccinated against COVID-19.  MIXING PFIZER AND MODERNA VACCINES GIVES A BETTER IMMUNE SYSTEM RESPONSE AGAINST COVID-19, STUDY FINDS A student waits to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at the Woodrow Wilson Senior High School in Los Angeles, California, the United States, on Aug. 30, 2021. The Los Angeles Unified School District has fired nearly 500 employees for not complying with its vaccine mandate. (Photo by Xinhua via Getty Images) "We care deeply about all of our employees," Interim Superintendent Megan Reilly said in a statement. "Parting ways with individuals who choose not to be vaccinated is an extremely difficult, but necessary decision to ensure the safety of all in our school communities. We wish everyone the best in their future endeavors and encourage everyone to get vaccinated." The district, the second largest in the United States,...
    Before the end of the year, Los Angeles school board members intend to announce the most consequential decision of their tenure — the hiring of a new superintendent. The job, considered to be one of the most challenging in public education, is being filled at a critical moment for the nation’s second-largest school district. The system is flush with billions of dollars in coronavirus relief aid, additional federal funding and surging state tax revenues. But there is mountainous work ahead. Students are in crisis — struggling to recover from deep pandemic-related learning setbacks as well as mental health issues brought on by extended periods of isolation and other hardships. The district also is beset with declining enrollment and a long-term structural budget deficit. “The last 21 months have been devastating for so many of the families we serve in L.A. Unified,” said school board President Kelly Gonez. “The pandemic has delivered an unequal burden of illness, death, job loss and trauma that has disproportionately fallen on communities of color. Our superintendent will need to reckon with the profound impacts...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The Los Angeles Unified School District said it welcomes a COVID-19 vaccine for children, but it's not adding younger students to its mandate.According to a statement issued by the district on Tuesday, children aged 5 to 11 won't be required to get the shot, though the district says it's "highly encouraged."Their mobile vaccination sites will start offering doses of the Pfizer vaccine to children aged 5 to 11 on Monday, Nov. 8. The following week, 13 school-based clinics will offer the vaccine.The district said those clinics will also administer shots on select Saturdays. You can find more information on LAUSD's website."COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective and the best way to protect our students, staff and families, and public schools are natural sites for our students and families to receive this life-saving vaccine," said the district.On Tuesday, Los Angeles County received its first shipment of pediatric doses of the vaccine. Officials said they could start administering them as early as Wednesday or Thursday.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the pediatric shots last week, and a CDC...
    The Los Angeles Unified School District has been slapped with a lawsuit over its mandate that students 12 and older get their COVID-19 shots, a requirement which attorneys for the plaintiff contend is unlawful because it does not allow for religious or personal belief exemptions. The lawsuit was filed last week on behalf of a parent of a 12-year-old student who claims that their child, along with other LAUSD students who do not comply with the mandate, would be discriminated against by being denied an in-person education and the opportunity to participate in extracurricular programs. The plaintiff, identified in court documents only by the initials G.F., contends their child would be denied participation in two extracurricular activities that he’s currently involved in, when he misses the Oct. 31 deadline for LAUSD students in extracurricular programs to receive their second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, and that he would be banned from campus second semester for not meeting a mid-December deadline for all other age-eligible students to receive their second dose. The complaint states that banning unvaccinated students from campus or...
    Proof of a student's vaccination will need to be uploaded to Los Angeles Unified's Daily Pass, according to the district. "In order to reduce transmission and ensure students can remain on campus in the safest possible environment and receive the best education possible, Los Angeles Unified is now requiring all students who are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccination to be fully vaccinated by Monday, January 10, 2022, unless they have a qualified exemption. Proof of vaccination must be uploaded to the Daily Pass," the district said, regarding the student vaccination mandate. "All students who are 12 years of age and older and are part of in-person extracurricular programs must receive their first vaccine dose by no later than October 3, 2021 and their second dose by no later than October 31, 2021. All students who are 12 years of age and older must receive their first vaccine dose by no later than November 21, 2021 and their second dose by no later than December 19, 2021. All other students must receive their first vaccine dose by no later than...
    Los Angeles County school officials voted unanimously on Thursday to order COVID-19 inoculations for all students aged 12 and over, the largest school district in the United States to take that step. School board members approved the shots over the objection of several parents who said in Spanish they were concerned about the safety of vaccines and should have the right to make that decision for their children. 'I do not see this as your choice or my choice,' board member Jackie Goldberg said. 'I see this as a community necessity. That means people have to do things they're not comfortable with, they're not sure of, that may even contain some risk.' The board's vote Thursday makes Los Angeles by far the largest of a handful of districts with a vaccine requirement. Nearby Culver City imposed a similar policy last month for its 7,000 students. LA has about 630,000 students. 'I do not see this as your choice or my choice,' board member Jackie Goldberg (above) said. 'I see this as a community necessity. That means people have to...
    (CNN)Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second largest, is set to vote on mandating Covid-19 vaccines for all eligible students in a special meeting Thursday afternoon. "By the start of spring semester, every student 12 and up who is eligible and doesn't have an exemption will have received a vaccine," LAUSD school board member Tanya Ortiz Franklin told CNN affiliate KCBS/KCAL, adding the district will be providing the vaccines. According to a report included with an online copy of Thursday's agenda, all students who are 12 or older and are attending school in-person would be required to have received their first dose no later than November 21 and be fully vaccinated by December 19. Students participating in extracurricular activities in-person would need to be fully vaccinated by the end of October. The report says "students with qualified and approved exemptions and conditional admissions" would be excluded from the mandate, but it doesn't provide additional detail about potential exemptions.Board member Jackie Goldberg said the mandate was "to save lives," KCBS/KCAL reported. Read More"That's why there isn't measles and mumps and...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has identified a COVID-19 outbreak at Grant Elementary School, Los Angeles Unified confirmed Wednesday. According to a Los Angeles Unified spokesperson, the cases are concentrated in a single classroom and Los Angeles Unified is fully cooperating with the Department of Public Health. READ MORE: Discovery Of Womans Body In Pico Union Home Prompts Harvard Heights Standoff With Police “The District has alerted all those potentially impacted and the quarantined class has been provided with instructional materials to continue their studies,” the spokesperson said. READ MORE: Ron Jeremy Indicted On Over 30 Counts Of Sexual Assault Involving 21 Victims Weekly COVID testing is required for students and employees, regardless of their vaccination status. Meanwhile, all district employees must be fully vaccinated by Oct. 15. MORE NEWS: Help Needed To Identify Canyon Country Kidnapper District officials told the LAUSD Board of Education Tuesday that 3,000 students had tested positive for the virus prior to the start of the school year or during the first week of classes, which began Aug....
    LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Unified School District has yet another scandal on its plate after the state of California determined it broke federal law in keeping more than $5 million in funds meant to help low-income students at private Catholic schools. The California Department of Education stated in an investigation report the district’s actions were “egregious,” and it must provide “agreed-upon services” to eligible archdiocesan students by the time school starts, according to Angelus news service. The district received more than $349 million in Title I funds during the 2019-2020 school year but distributed money to only 17 Catholic schools even though more than 100 had been eligible, according to a complaint filed by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. In prior years, the district received $291 million and distributed between 2%-2.6% to private schools. However, during the last fiscal year they doled out just .5% to the diminished group, the state report said. DANGEROUS LEVELS OF E. COLI FOUND IN ECHO PARK LAKE WITH NO WARNING TO PUBLIC “There has been a very clear and — one...
    In a statement, Interim Superintendent Megan K. Kelly said, "This is in accordance with the most recent guidance from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health." Baseline testing for students returning to campus begins Monday, she added, according to the Los Angeles Times. The district previously stated that fully vaccinated students and employees would not be required to test for the coronavirus, the outlet reported, but rescinded the plan earlier this month. "In addition to regular testing, safety measures will include: masking for all students, staff, and visitors; maximizing physical distancing as much as possible; continuing comprehensive sanitizing efforts, including frequent hand-washing; upgraded air filtration systems; and collaborating with health partners and agencies to support free COVID-19 vaccination," the statement added. The district's statement continued, "Ultimately, the greatest protection against COVID and the Delta variant is vaccination. We encourage everyone who is eligible to be vaccinated." The district's website instructed students and employees on how to schedule their weekly, ongoing COVID-19 tests. The site told users: ...
    Parents in Los Angeles are suing the local teachers union and school district over continued remote learning due to the coronavirus, which they say has harmed children socially, mentally, and emotionally. "UTLA has been holding the children of Los Angeles hostage as the price of advancing a political agenda,” civil rights attorney with the Freedom Foundation, Timothy Snowball, wrote in an announcement. FAMILY SEEKS DAMAGES FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOOL DISTRICT OVER TEACHER'S RACIST COMMENTS ON ZOOM CALL The four families, represented by the Freedom Foundation pro bono, filed the suit on Tuesday and named the Los Angeles Unified School District, United Teachers Los Angeles union, and UTLA President Cecily Myart-Cruz as defendants. “Since the beginning of the pandemic, UTLA has been more interested in scoring political points it couldn’t achieve without holding Los Angeles children and parents hostage. While state and local officials try desperately to come up with a way to satisfy UTLA and other teacher union demands, it is the children of Los Angeles that continue to suffer,” Snowball wrote. One of the plaintiff's children has autism...
    CALABASAS, Calif. (KABC) -- Thousands of middle and high schoolers in the Calabasas area were set to return to school on Monday for the first time in over year.Three middle schools and two high schools within the Las Virgenes Unified School School District will be the first campuses to reopen for in-person instruction in Los Angeles County, welcoming back some 7,000 students.The district will operate under a hybrid plan, where students will spend half their time on campus and the other half continuing to learn from home.A number of health safety protocols will be in place to bring students back. Children must complete a health screening before entering campus, undergo temperature checks, wear masks and practice physical distancing.The district's teachers aren't yet fully vaccinated, though many of them are halfway there. Some 1,000 educators received their first dose of the Moderna vaccine a few weeks ago at a clinic put on by the district.Meanwhile, the restart of Los Angeles Unified schools is moving closer to reality as the teachers union has now approved a deal to resume in-person instruction.The agreement...
    A former principal has been charged with grand theft after authorities said he illegally pocketed tens of thousands of dollars while working at two Los Angeles County schools. Kyle Douglas, 50, is charged with one count each of misappropriation of public funds, forgery and grand theft. In 2017, while he was principal at Inglewood High School, Douglas negotiated a contract with a company for it to use the campus parking lot, prosecutors said, noting that he did not have authorization from the school board. He is accused of taking in about $57,000 from the transaction. Two years later, while he was principal at Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Pasadena, Douglas collected about $10,000 for a student trip to China but never paid the company that he’d hired to organize the trip, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. “Betraying students, their parents and school administrators is the ultimate failure for those who are the face and voice of a school,” Dist. Atty. George Gascón said in announcing the charges against Douglas. Douglas pleaded not guilty Thursday to...
    The Pasadena Unified School District on Thursday joined a growing number of Los Angeles County school systems that are swiftly putting plans in place to begin bringing elementary students back to campus by the end of the month, ending a year of pandemic-forced closures. The discussion in Pasadena typified those unfolding in many school districts in the county as board members consider a host of issues: safety measures, vaccines for teachers and staff, parent decisions — some who are eager to send their children back and others who are worried and want to continue distance learning. “This weighs heavily on us,” said Pasadena Supt. Brian McDonald, after three hours of public comment, with many people voicing concern about returning to in-person instruction. Some teachers pushed back against the idea of reopening campuses without fully vaccinating staff. But the board agreed it is time to begin a phased-in reopening in the 17,400-student district. “Given the safety measures that we have in place, and the fact that every single employee will have the opportunity to receive the vaccine, we believe it’s...
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- The Los Angeles Unified School District on Monday announced the launch of "Daily Pass,'' the first comprehensive system in the nation that coordinates health checks, COVID-19 tests and vaccinations in one online tool.In a statement, the district called Daily Pass "a critical component of Los Angeles Unified's Safe Steps to Safe Schools' reopening plan."The Daily Pass sets the highest standard possible for school safety,'' said LAUSD Superintendent Austin Beutner. "MERV-13 upgraded air filters in every school, COVID testing for all students and staff at least every week and now the Daily Pass -- Los Angeles Unified is proud to lead the nation in creating the safest possible school environment.''"The LAUSD said it's the first school district -- and likely the largest employer in nation -- to adopt the technology, the district said.Daily Pass was developed with support from Microsoft Corp. and can be accessed from any mobile phone, tablet or a computer, the district said.LAUSD parents planning Zoom blackout to call for schools to reopenEMBED More News Videos LAUSD parents planning Zoom blackout to call for...
    The L.A. schools superintendent and the head of the teachers union have responded with outrage over an L.A. City Councilman’s proposal to sue the school system to force campuses to reopen — and also are taking on others after a week of intensifying pressure to swiftly restore in-person classes. The litigation gambit was announced late Thursday afternoon by City Councilman Joe Buscaino, who said he hopes to win support from a majority of council members. He is modeling the effort on litigation filed by San Francisco last week against its school district. L.A. schools Supt. Austin Beutner responded forcefully Friday. “Grandstanding political stunts like this are precisely why schools in Los Angeles remain closed,” Beutner said. “Elected leaders from Sacramento to Los Angeles City Hall need to put deeds behind their words and take the steps necessary to actually put schools and the children they serve first.” Beutner then took a wide swing beyond Buscaino — at the city, county and state — for failing to take steps that could have more quickly controlled the virus, for choosing...
    The Los Angeles Board of Education on Tuesday agreed to authorize litigation against Gov. Gavin Newsom’s plan to reopen schools and, separately, to file litigation to recover the costs of providing free meals to adults in the community during the COVID-19 pandemic. The board on Tuesday also passed a resolution that formally expressed the district’s dissatisfaction over the level of funding assistance from other government agencies. The board vote, taken during a closed-session meeting, does not commit the Los Angeles Unified School District to legal action, but it provides the superintendent with a tool for leverage without having to return to the board a second time for permission to file suit, said a district spokesperson. “Efforts to seek support from both county and state government agencies tasked with regional emergency response in Los Angeles have as yet gone unanswered,” said Shannon Haber. “We hope to avoid the need to seek legal action.” If pursued, the litigation would be part of L.A. Unified Supt. Austin Beutner’s ongoing efforts to obtain funds to help the nation’s second-largest school system foot the cost...
    Students will not return to campuses located in the Los Angeles Unified School District when the spring semester begins Jan. 11, the Los Angeles Times reports. Superintendent Austin Beutner issued a statement Monday about school closures. He did not provide a timetable for schools to reopen as he discussed the rising number of virus cases. "It will not be possible for us to reopen school campuses by the time next semester starts on Jan. 11," Beutner said in a Monday pre-recorded briefing. "Well remain in online-only mode until community health conditions improve significantly." He noted 10% of students coming in to school-based campus coronavirus testing sites are positive for the virus. "The most recent data from our testing program is alarming," Beutner said. "Over the past week, 5% of adults — who did not report any exposure or symptoms — tested positive, and close to 10% of children." He pointed out, "1 in 10 children being tested at schools show no symptoms but have the virus. Its clear were a long way from reopening schools with the level of virus...
    By AMY TAXIN, Associated Press Nine parents filed a lawsuit Thursday alleging that the Los Angeles Unified School District’s distance learning program implemented during the pandemic fails to meet state educational standards and disproportionately harms Black and Latino students. The parents, who are supported by educational non-profits Parent Revolution and Innovate Public Schools, sued on behalf of the 600,000 children in the nation’s second-largest school district, said Seth Litt, Parent Revolution’s executive director. They contend the district is failing to engage their children online at the same rate as other large California school districts and that state-mandated instructional minutes often lack actual instruction with teachers dismissing kids after checking they turned in their work. Some parents said they’re still unable to connect to the district’s online platform and that teachers sometimes end classes early without going over new material. Akela Wroten Jr. said the district failed his daughter in the spring with twice-weekly, 40-minute Zoom sessions that were difficult to connect to. Now in the second grade, she’s so far behind he said he had to hire a private tutor....
    The Los Angeles school district plans to test around 700,000 students and 75,000 employees for COVID-19 within the next few months while classes begin online, the district superintendent said Monday. The testing will occur while the Los Angeles Unified School District waits for schools reopen in-person classes, Superintendent Austin Beutner said, according to a video transcript of a presentation. The testing will cost approximately $300 per student, Beutner said. (Related: California’s Department Of Public Health Director Resigns) “Extraordinary circumstances call for extraordinary actions, and while this testing and contact tracing effort is unprecedented, it is necessary and appropriate,” Beutner said, according to the press release. The testing and contact tracing program began Monday and will first be administered to current staff and their children, according to a Los Angeles Unified School District press release. All students and staff will eventually be tested regularly “based on epidemiological modeling.” Testing is also available for any staff member or student’s “household members” who either “show symptoms” or test positive for the virus, according to the school district press release. “This will provide a...
    PASADENA (CBSLA) — Pasadena Unified School District Superintendent Brian McDonald recommended Tuesday that campuses in the district remain closed for the beginning of the school year due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases in Los Angeles County. McDonald said the district’s 23 schools will begin instruction on Aug. 17 with a 100% distance-learning model. “All of us would like to see students back in school when it’s safe to do so. But Los Angeles County has recorded a surge in new cases in the last week, with a 9% rate of positive cases,” McDonald wrote in a letter to the PUSD community. “We cannot and will not take chances with the health and safety of our students and staff. I plan to bring a recommendation to the Board of Education at a special meeting on July 16 that Pasadena Unified open in a 100% distance learning model on August 17.” McDonald also said the district has been preparing for the possibility of distancing learning and will continue to monitor and evaluate public health conditions and guidelines. The district’s school...
    SANTA ANA, Calif. (CNS) -- Officials with the Santa Ana Unified School District said Tuesday that they will pivot entirely to distance learning to start the upcoming school year in August due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic."During these challenging times, the safety of our school community continues to be our top priority. While we hope at some point to have our students attend our schools alongside their classmates and teachers, now is not the time,'' Superintendent Jerry Almendarez said. "Meanwhile, we are working to develop a rigorous distance learning plan that will allow students to continue their education at home.''"We want to proceed with extreme caution as we move forward with our efforts to offer a robust education,'' Board of Education President Rigo Rodriguez said."Making the decision now to shift to a virtual education model gives the district more time to make sure our teachers are fully prepared, our parents are well informed, and our students have access to devices and internet needed for us to deliver the highest quality service during this time,'' he added.On Monday, the Orange County...
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