Monday, Aug 08, 2022 - 03:42:05
16 results - (0.020 seconds)

the Tennessee General Assembly:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed John Harris, founder of the Tennessee Firearms Association, to the newsmaker line to discuss the nature of bills that he is tracking for 2022. Leahy: Now on the newsmaker line by our very good friend, the Founder and President of the Tennessee Firearms Association, John Harris. Good morning, John. Harris: Good morning. Leahy: And let me also add that you are the co-author, along with Claudia Henneberry and me of the Guide of the Constitution: Bill of Rights for Secondary School Students. That’s the supplemental text that we use as the standard for the National Constitution Bee. We will be holding the 6th National Constitution Bee for students in grades eight through 12 coming up on October 22nd in Brentwood. Five thousand dollars to the second-place winner, $10,000 to the first place winner educational scholarship. So thank you for that work as well. Now tell me,...
                        The two chambers of the Tennessee General Assembly met Wednesday in floor session for less than an hour to organize for the Third Extraordinary Session of the 112th General Assembly, which will focus on COVID-related issues. Special Session III was called on October 19 by Tennessee’s Lt. Governor and Speaker of the Senate Randy McNally and Speaker of the House of Representatives Cameron Sexton in response to the written request of two-thirds of the members of each house, even as legislators were engaged in the Second Extraordinary Session called by Governor Bill Lee taking up $884 million in taxpayer giveaways for Ford Motor Company’s $5.6 billion electric vehicle project to be located on the Memphis Regional Megasite known as “Blue Oval City.” Both chambers adopted rules, based upon on the standard rules of procedure, but tailored for the truncated timing of a special session related to the scheduling of when bills can be heard. While McNally kept in place the Senate’s standing committees, with the exception of Sen....
                        Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – guest hosts Grant Henry and Ben Cunningham talk in studio about the need for a special session in the Tennessee General Assembly and for Lt. Governor Randy McNally to identify the momentum. Henry: My name is Grant Henry. Enunciation for those in the know Ben Cunningham. I work for an organization called American’s for Prosperity. Ben’s over there. He’s just like anything and everything and uncomparable. You probably know him from the Nashville Tea Party. Cunningham: Wow. What an introduction. Henry: I tried my best on that one. (Laughter) I’ll give you $5 for that one. It’s great to be here. It’s fun to sit in when Michael is gone and rant and rave. There’s so much going on, you teether between total depression and slight optimism these days. But we’ve got a fight. And there are...
                        Forty-three Republican members of the Tennessee legislature signed on to two letters Tuesday asking the state’s governor and attorney general to oppose two rule changes proposed by the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). The letters, spearheaded by Second Amendment advocate and Chair of the House Criminal Justice Committee Representative Clay Doggett (R-Pulaski), state that the ATF rule changes would “violate state and federal Second Amendment rights and arbitrarily transform thousands of law-abiding Tennesseans into felons.” Governor Bill Lee and Attorney General Herbert Slatery have been called on by legislators to represent Tennesseans by using all means in their executive, legal and law enforcement powers to prevent the ATF from enforcing such criminal measures within the state. At issue are two rule changes proposed by ATF, 86 FR 27,720, Definition of “Frame or Receiver” and Identification of Firearms, and 86 FR 30,826, Factoring Criteria for Firearms with Attached “Stabilizing Braces.” The definition of a frame or receiver addressed in the first proposed rule change,...
                        The hymn “Amazing Grace” was approved as an official state song by the Tennessee General Assembly this week. On Thursday, House Speaker Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) signed the bill. The language of the bill itself explained the background and significance of the hymn. “Amazing Grace” was originally a poem penned by John Newton, an 18th century Christian minister who walked away from life as a slave ship captain. The poem, later set to music by American composer William Walker, was inspired by his newfound faith in God following his near-death experience while at sea. The bill acknowledged Newton’s influence within his community by opposing slavery. “Mr. Newton’s conversion from a merchant and slaver to a man of faith led him to speak out against slavery, and although many of England’s large port cities greatly benefited from the slave trade, Mr. Newton and other social critics began to speak out against the practice,” reads the bill. In the House Naming and Designating Committee, Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) Professor Emeritus of Music...
                        Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Congressman Scott Cepicky to the newsmakers line to weigh in on Major League Baseball’s decision to withdrawl from Georgia, cancel culture, and the upcoming agenda in the Tennessee General Assembly. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line, by our good friend, state Representative Scott Cepicky from Maury County. Scott, welcome to The Tennessee Star Report. Cepicky: Michael, how are you doing today? Leahy: Well, I’m doing great. You are, of course, our favorite state legislator who is a former professional baseball player. You played for the AA Nashville Express and the AAA Nashville Sounds and almost made it to the bigs had not been for a trade between the Chicago White Sox and the Montreal Expos that brought Tim Raines to Chicago. I just got to ask you, what are they thinking in...
                        The General Assembly is considering several bills to further expand upon the protected rights of free speech. These bills address free speech in areas of public life such as college campuses, social media, state governments, and elections. Several legislators proposed a bill to create accountability for social media companies and the government entities that use them. State Senator Frank Niceley (R-Strawberry Plains) and State Representative Jerry Sexton (R-Bean Station) introduced legislation that would prohibit state agencies from utilizing any social media platforms that censor the free speech of others on the basis of political ideology, viewpoint discrimination, or personal animus. The language of the bill claimed that using those platforms was a “tacit acceptance” of the practice to limit or censor free speech and therefore a violation of the state constitution. That legislation is in committee currently in both the House and Senate. The General Assembly is also considering whether Tennessee colleges and universities may have to modify their free speech policies. State Senator Mike Bell (R-Riceville) and...
              The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced a resolution Tuesday that would change the way the state’s Attorney General and Reporter for Tennessee is selected. Senate Joint Resolution 1 would make the current process for nominating the attorney general more transparent and give the Tennessee General Assembly a say in the selection through a change to the Tennessee Constitution. SJR 1 passed the nine-member Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday with a 6 to 3 vote. Senator Ken Yager (R-Kingston), who is the Senate Republican Caucus Chairman and the sponsor of SJR 1, explained part of the reason for his proposal in a statement issued after Tuesday’s vote. “This is one of the most important appointed positions in the state.  The State Attorney General has over 340 employees and a budget of over $50 million, not to mention the important decisions that are made which affect the lives of the people of Tennessee.” Yager’s proposal changes the process so that the nomination of the Attorney General by the Supreme Court would be held in an open court...
              Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Tennessee State Senator Mark Pody to the newsmakers line. During the first hour, Pody discussed his news bills he would be putting forth in the Tennessee General Assembly’s legislative session citing the importance of vaccination requirements and the right to claim a religious exemption. He added later that he was committed to upholding the country and state constitutions and believed that keeping the Capitol closed from the public while bills are being decided that affect them was wrong. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line by our very good friend State Senator Mark Pody from Wilson County. Good morning Senator Pody. Pody: Good morning! It’s great to be here this morning! Leahy: Well you sound very chipper at 5:30 a.m. in the morning. What time do you usually get up Senator Pody? Pody: It’s close to this time....
              The Washington County Schools (WCS) announced plans to bring back all students for in-person classes five days a week starting Monday – but hazardous road conditions led the district to announce school closures through Tuesday. The move comes as lawmakers consider a potential bill, HB 7021, that would curtail funding for schools that did not open up for a minimum of 70 days before June 30. The school district’s Board of Education voted last week to bring students back. The bill has not passed, but the tight deadline means that school districts have to consider if it will pass and change current policy accordingly. The WCS vote reversed a previous decision to have the district remain virtual through next week, February 8. WCS Director of Schools Dr. Bill Flanary (pictured above) told the board on January 26, “We’re aware of a bill making its way through the Tennessee General Assembly that would require school systems to have 70 days of in-person learning in school here or risk being de-funded.” Flanary said, “We can...
              Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed (R) Tennessee Rep. Bud Hulsey of District Two in Sullivan County to the newsmakers line to discuss his background and focus moving forward in the upcoming legislative session in the Tennessee General Assembly. Leahy: We are joined Now by state Representative Bud Hulsey from Sullivan County and the Kingsport area. Welcome to the Tennessee Star Report. Hulsey: Thank you, Michael. I appreciate it. Leahy: You have a fascinating background. You’re a retired police lieutenant. How long did you serve as a police officer? Hulsey: 36 years. Leahy: All in Kingsport? Hulsey: Yes, sir. All in Kingsport. Leahy: That is quite a career. And so you certainly have a perspective on what’s been going on in this country over the past year. And I think that’s probably served you very well in your service in the state legislature. Hulsey: I think...
              Lt. Gov. and Speaker of the Senate Randy McNally (R-Oak Ridge) announced Wednesday the state Senate committee assignments for the 112th General Assembly. McNally praised his fellow Senate members in announcing the assignments. “This Senate is made up of some of the smartest and strongest leaders with whom I have had the privilege to serve,” Lt. Governor McNally stated. “Each of our Senators could serve on any number of our committees and do well. I am grateful to have such a strong membership. I am confident we have assembled the best team to do the people’s business.” McNally himself was re-elected Tuesday for his third term as speaker of the Senate, after a unanimous vote by the Senate Republican Caucus in November. Sen. Jack Johnson (R-Franklin) and Sen. Ken Yager (R-Kingston) will continue in their roles as majority leader and caucus chair, respectively. McNally reappointed Sen. Ferrell Hale (R-Gallatin) as Speaker Pro Tempore and Sen.  Janice Bowling (R-Tullahoma) as deputy speaker. Changes to Senate committee leadership, and even committee membership, reflected the departure...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed TN (R) Senator Paul Bailey to the newsmakers line. At the top of the second hour, Bailey discussed plans for the upcoming special session which would revisit education options for students and offering a potential summer session while managing budget expectations. He also outlined plans for TennCare and Medicaid ensuring that people currently served would not suffer any reduction in services. Leahy: We are joined now by State Senator Paul Bailey who is the chairman of the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee. Welcome, Senator Bailey. Bailey: Well, thank you very much for having me this morning Michael Patrick. Leahy: Well, we’re delighted to have you on here Senator Bailey. And I just have to say your official portrait at the Tennessee General Assembly is just is fantastic. (Bailey chuckles) You’ve got a cowboy hat on and you just you...
              Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Andy Roth from The Club for Growth to the newsmakers line. During the second hour, Roth disclosed percentages for the newly released scorecard for the Tennessee General Assembly which is conducted by The Club for Growth. He outlined how the scores were calculated citing disappointment in the percentages which revealed a lack of fiscal conservatism among Republicans and a less than favorable voting trend nationwide. Leahy: In the studio with me is the all-star panelist, good friend, and long time Tea Party activist in Nashville Ben Cunningham. And on the newsmaker line, our friend Andy Roth with The Club for Growth is going to talk about a scorecard for the Tennessee General Assembly. Good morning, Andy. Roth: Hi, thanks for having me. Leahy: And you know Ben don’t you? Ben Cunningham? Roth: Hey, yeah, I know both of you...
              Three members of the Tennessee General Assembly co-signed a letter this week calling for the swift confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. This, they said, because of her support for limited government, free markets, and federalism. The three Tennessee legislators — State Rep. Martin Daniel (R-Knoxville), State Sen. Janice Bowling (R-Tullahoma), and State Sen. Shane Reeves (R-Murfreesboro) — co-signed the letter alongside several other state legislators nationwide. The Arlington, Virginia-based American Legislative Exchange Council published the letter on their website Monday. ALEC is the largest voluntary membership organization of state legislators who support limited government, free markets and federalism, according to its website. “As state legislative members dedicated to those principles, we believe Judge Barrett is tremendously qualified to serve on the Supreme Court and has a keen understanding of the country’s federalist principles,” the state legislators said. “Judge Barrett has a proven track record of originalism and judicial precedent. She has also promised to follow in the footsteps of one of her mentors, Justice Antonin Scalia, applying the law as written...
              The second session of the 111th Tennessee General Assembly wrapped up Wednesday evening after passing the legislation called for in Governor Bill Lee’s proclamation. Over the course of three legislative days, the state Senate and House passed measures related to COVID-related liability protection, expansion of telemedicine and criminal laws related to protests. The Senate addressed the legislation through its existing standing committees, while the House used a combination of standing committees and those established specifically for the extraordinary session, including COVID Related Liability Committee, Public Safety Committee and Electronic Delivery of Healthcare Committee. In all, five bills were passed in the second extraordinary session of the 111th Tennessee General Assembly. SB 8001 / HB 8006 – a governmental entity, defined as a governing body, board, commission, committee or department of a municipality, county or other political subdivision of the state, shall not intentionally prohibit or prevent law enforcement or fire and rescue services from accessing a specifically bounded area within the entity’s jurisdiction during a public demonstration, unless the services are replaced by like services...
1