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    The Satellite communication Will they position themselves as the new flagship of high-end smartphones? This technology was introduced by Huawei Matte 50. Apple subsequently integrated it into its new iPhone 14. Now it’s Samsung’s turn to offer its functionality Galaxy S23 It will be released early next year. Send text messages and low-resolution images via satelliteNote that this is not official information. He belongs to the Korean media ETNews He who received an air A collaboration between Samsung and Iridium To install satellite communication system on Galaxy S23. For information, Iridium Communications An American company operating A constellation of 141 satellites Assets for satellite phone. There is an architecture that embodies it 100% of the planet. Thanks to this, Samsung’s next flagships will be able to communicate data via satellite. The Seoul company would have worked on this feature for two years. And like Apple and Huawei, it faces the same problem of miniaturization of antennas, a restrictive but necessary step to make satellite communications possible in smartphones. This restriction also restricts the type of content...
    Like the iPhone 14 before them, the Samsung Galaxy S23 will be on the verge of offering communications (presumably backup) via a satellite link. The Galaxy S23 will also be cut for emergency satellite communications // Source: NASA / Unsplash After Huawei on Mate 50 / Mate 50 ProAfter Apple with its iPhone 14Samsung and its future Galaxy S23 They can also provide satellite connectivity to their users. This is what we learn today from an articleETNews. Korean media reports that Samsung will rely on the Iridium satellite phone system in this case to allow satellite communications in its new generation of high-end smartphones, expected early next year. According to ETNews, whose information is somewhat sketchy (so we’ll take it with a grain of salt), Samsung has been working on the project for two years and is using a network of 66 low-orbit communications satellites powered by Iridium. . The Galaxy S23 will also look higher Like its competitors, the Korean company also had to tackle the problem of miniaturizing the antenna to allow satellite communications from a smartphone. This...
    In this article LHX VSAT Follow your favorite stocksCREATE FREE ACCOUNTViasat offices are shown at the company's headquarters in Carlsbad, California, March 9, 2022.Mike Blake | ReutersCalifornia-based satellite operator Viasat is selling a piece of its government business to defense contractor L3Harris, the companies announced on Monday, in a deal worth nearly $2 billon. Shares of Viasat surged 36% Monday to about $41 per share, while L3Harris stock climbed about 4% to roughly $216 per share. Viasat is selling its "Link 16 Tactical Data Links (TDL)" business, which is a military communications system that connects everything from aircraft to ground bases through a secured voice and data network. The Viasat unit brought in about $400 million in revenue over the past year, representing about 35% of the company's revenue from its government systems business. The sale of the Link 16 TDL unit is expected to net Viasat about $1.8 billion after taxes and fees. The satellite operator said it plans to use the proceeds of the sale to reduce debt and increase its liquidity. The news comes as Viasat...
    (CNN)Ukrainian authorities have detained a "hacker" who was allegedly helping the Russian military send instructions via mobile phone networks to its troops, Ukraine's SBU security service said Tuesday. The suspect, whom the SBU did not identify, was accused of being on "thousands" of phone calls to Russian officials, including senior military officers and of sending text messages to Ukrainian officials suggesting that they surrender. The equipment seized was used to route Ukrainian mobile phone traffic to Russian networks, according to Victor Zhora, a senior cybersecurity official in the Ukrainian government. It's the latest development in the ongoing battle for communications networks in Ukraine as the Russian military continues to shell the capital of Kyiv. From Moscow to the front lines of the war in Ukraine, the ability to communicate to troops and citizens alike has been contested by suspected Russian and pro-Ukrainian hackers.Hackers last week caused outages at a Ukrainian internet service provider Triolan, which has customers in major cities. Triolan blamed "the enemy," a reference to Russia, but did not provide evidence supporting that claim. Russias cyber offensive against...
    by Dr. Daniel Goure   Space is definitely the high ground when it comes to many military, scientific and economic activities. As the world becomes more information-intensive, the ability to move data rapidly, reliably, and cheaply will be of enormous advantage. Governments, private companies, and scientific organizations are rushing to build large satellite constellations to enhance surveillance of the Earth, explore space, and improve the movement of data. Nations able to deploy robust space-based laser communications systems will reap military, scientific and commercial benefits. Government and private satellite networks are growing in capability and scale. Currently, there are about 4,500 satellites in orbit, the vast majority in low Earth orbit (LEO). But there are plans to deploy thousands more over the next few decades to surveil both Earth and airspace and enhance reliable global communications. For instance, the U.S. Space Force is considering deploying two large satellite constellations, one to image the Earth and detect missile launches and a second to facilitate global communications. As for the private sector, SpaceX’s Starlink global information constellation could consist of up to 42,000 satellites. These...
    Elon Musk will not allow his satellite-based Starlink satellite internet service to muzzle pro-Russian news services amid a global crackdown by western governments on disinformation coming out of Moscow about its war on Ukraine. The SpaceX chief, who on Feb. 27 deployed his communications in Ukraine after Russia invaded to ensure communication could not be cut off inside the besieged country, said it's a matter of free speech. His stance runs counter to social media platforms that are cutting off pro-Russian perspectives on the war. "We will not do so unless at 'gunpoint', sorry to be a free speech absolutist," Musk said in a tweet. FULL COVERAGE OF THE WAR IN UKRAINE FROM WASHINGTON EXAMINER Musk also said SpaceX is focused on protecting its Starlink system from cyber attacks and signal jamming, an effort that could cause delays for users. In recent says, some experts have warned that devices used for satellite communications within Ukraine could attract Russian airstrikes. Starlink has been told by some governments (not Ukraine) to block Russian news sources. We will not do so unless at...
    In a statement, the US Federal Communications Commission approved the licensing of the space agency to build, deploy and operate a set of satellites that provide broadband technology and communications services to residential, commercial, corporate and government buildings. With the help of experts in the United States and around the world. “ “Advanced satellite broadband services play a key role in connecting hard service communities,” said Jessica Rosenvorzel, chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, according to a report by technology website 360 ​​Gadgets on Thursday. The Federal Communications Commission has given the green light to launch 147 satellites, most of which will be in low orbit: 132 can be placed at an altitude of about 1,000 km, and 15 between 27,000 km and 44,000. Km The service is available first to customers in the United States and then to customers worldwide. “Boeing expects a number of orbital futures for satellite technologies,” the space agency said in a statement. “As the demand for satellite communications increases, diversity across systems and orbital frequencies will be required to meet individual customer needs,” the...
    A shopper walks past an ad for Apple's iPhone 12 outside a store in Hong Kong on May 24, 2021.Budrul Chukrut | SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images Shares of Globalstar, a satellite services provider, soared 60% Monday following a report that the next iPhone will have the ability to utilize satellite communications. TFI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo predicted in a note to investors on Sunday that Apple is "optimistic about the trend of satellite communications" and "will likely" include the ability to connect to extraterrestrial networks in its upcoming iPhone. The new iPhone is expected to launch this fall. Apple has not announced any details on the device yet. The phone doesn't have an official name, but many are referring to as the iPhone 13 for now. "If Apple enables the relevant software functions, iPhone 13 users can call and send messages via satellite when not within 4G/5G coverage," Kuo wrote. Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.TVWATCH LIVEWATCH IN THE APPUP NEXT | ETListen
    SpaceX has managed to put an end to two problems that they interrupted the communications of their reusable rockets during landing. One of them, known as the “reentry blackout”, even affected the ferries at the time. For a few seconds, it made everyone’s hair stand on end at mission control. The other drawback is unique to SpaceX’s Autonomous Offshore Platform System (ASDS). In any case, the company founded by Elon Musk is the first to achieve a stable connection of telemetry and video during all descent stages. This has already been seen in the landing of the Falcon 9 rocket from the GPS III Space Vehicle mission. This is the first time that a completely clean transmission has been achieved, that is, without cuts and pixelated images. As Primal Space explains, the first drawback arises in reentry into the atmosphere. When the rocket returns to earth at about 500 km / h, it goes through a critical period of time in which friction generates high temperatures, which in turn form a plasma cloud (on the same frequency as S-band...
    A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket boosted a high-power military communications satellite into space Thursday, the sixth and final relay station in a jam-resistant, blast-hardened constellation valued at more than $11 billion. The flight was the first national security space launch under authority of the newly established U.S. Space Force, carried out amid extensive precautions at the Cape Canaveral launch site to slow the spread of the deadly coronavirus. The Air Force and ULA reduced the number of on-site personnel by 20-25% respectively while implementing social distancing and other safety protocols for those who remained. A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket climbs away from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Thursday afternoon, carrying a $1.2 billion military communications satellites. William Harwood/CBS News "Obviously (personnel) can't necessarily telework on a launch, but ... we're limiting the crew to just the necessary folks that need to be there," said Brigadier General Douglas Schiess, commander of the 45th Space Wing and director of the Eastern Range at Patrick Air Force Base. "We are cleaning all of our [operation] centers ......
    A rendering of Lockheed Martin's 400 series satellite buses, which range from 400 kg to 800 kg in weight.Lockheed Martin Lockheed Martin's space division on Tuesday announced a strategic interest agreement with satellite start-up Omnispace, "to explore jointly developing 5G capability from space." "This really stems from a common vision of a global 5G network, which enables users to seamlessly transition between the satellite [and the] terrestrial network," Omnispace CEO Ram Viswanathan told CNBC. Viswanathan highlighted Lockheed Martin's "depth of expertise" in a variety of markets, most notably with a wide swath of customers from the Department of Defense. "Their appetite never dulls and the kind of need they have for communications across the board," Lockheed Martin Space executive vice president Rick Ambrose told CNBC. "Omnispace has a very powerful vision of how to offer the service ... [and] how you get it down to a mobile device." Ambrose said the two companies have been interacting for about a year. The strategic interest agreement further cements the pair working toward a hybrid network that combines the reach of a global...
    SpaceX already has over 1,000 Starlink satellites in orbit, but that’s just a tiny fraction of the full constellation the company plans to deploy. While it originally asked the FCC for permission to launch 12,000 satellites, it could have as many as 42,000 in orbit within a few decades. Since those satellites could collide with other spacecraft in orbit — and having that many increases the chances of an accident happening — NASA and SpaceX have signed (PDF) a joint agreement in an effort to prevent their assets from crashing into each other. As TechCrunch notes, NASA already works with other entities launching objects into orbit using a standard Conjunction Assessment process that determines the risks of a close and high-speed approach between objects in space. This agreement with SpaceX, however, will ensure they’ll actively work together in the coming years to actively prevent collisions from happening.  NASA has agreed to provide SpaceX with information about its missions in advance, as well as not to move its assets in the event of a possible collision: It trusts SpaceX’s Starlink...
    Originally Published by: Delta, JetBlue latest major airlines to ban emotional support animals Thieves throw wine bottles at police during chase following $430G booze heist: report Alaska Airlines may ban 14 passengers who refused masks, exhibited unacceptable behavior on flight from DC Following a very busy 2020 that saw it make a number of achievements, including the launch of the first astronauts to space from American soil since 2011, SpaceX completed its first rocket launch of 2021 on Thursday. The Elon Musk-led company sent a communications satellite for Turkey into orbit via its Falcon 9 rocket, lifting off from Cape Canaveral, Fla. at 9:15 p.m. EST. Shortly thereafter, SpaceX confirmed it successfully deployed the Turksat 5A satellite, which is said to be used to increase Turkey’s presence in space. Later this year, SpaceX will also send the Turksat 5B satellite into space, according to Space.com. SpaceX, which has helped Musk become the richest person in the world, was also able to successfully land the first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket on the Just Read The...
    Following a very busy 2020 that saw it make a number of achievements, including the launch of the first astronauts to space from American soil since 2011, SpaceX completed its first rocket launch of 2021 on Thursday. The Elon Musk-led company sent a communications satellite for Turkey into orbit via its Falcon 9 rocket, lifting off from Cape Canaveral, Fla. at 9:15 p.m. EST. Shortly thereafter, SpaceX confirmed it successfully deployed the Turksat 5A satellite, which is said to be used to increase Turkey's presence in space. SPACEX LAUNCHES SIRIUSXM SATELLITE FROM CAPE CANAVERAL Later this year, SpaceX will also send the Turksat 5B satellite into space, according to Space.com. SpaceX, which has helped Musk become the richest person in the world, was also able to successfully land the first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket on the Just Read The Instructions droneship, which floated in the Atlantic Ocean. This is the fourth launch for this particular first stage. It had previously been used to send up a GPS satellite for the U.S. Space Force and the company's growing Starlink Internet satellite business,...
    NATO is creating a "space command" war room following tests of anti-satellite weapons by Russia and China. The new intergalactic missiles could be used to blast communications or navigation technology outside the Earth's atmosphere, it is feared. 2Nato is developing a war room to combat the potential threat posed by Russia and China's anti-satellite missilesCredit: Getty - Contributor And with more than 3,000 satellites currently in orbit, with half belonging to Nato, a command centre has been created in at the Ramstein airbase in Germany. The United States and Russia have been developing lasers and rockets to destroy objects in spade since the days of the Cold War. But now there are concerns that these weapons could be used to wage war among the stars. Jens Stoltenberg, Nato’s secretary-general, said the alliance wants to protect its satellites and does not intend on "militarising" space, reports The Times. He said: “Fast, effective and secure satellite communications are essential for our troops. “The space environment has fundamentally changed in the last decade. "Some nations, including Russia and China, are developing anti-satellite systems...
    KESTER, Belgium — To a few of the locals, the top-secret, fenced-off installation on the hill is known as “the radar station.” Some folks claim to have seen mysterious Russians in the area. Over the years, rumors have swirled that it might be a base for U.S. nuclear warheads. It’s easy to see how the rumors start. The site is visually striking. Four huge white Kevlar balls sit like giant spherical spacecraft in a compound in the middle of open farm country 16 miles west of Belgium’s capital, Brussels. But the Kester Satellite Ground Station is both safer and more sophisticated than local lore might suggest. It’s central to space communications at NATO — the biggest and most modern of four such stations the military alliance runs. Around 2,000 satellites orbit the earth, over half operated by NATO countries, ensuring everything from mobile phone and banking services to weather forecasts. NATO commanders in places like Afghanistan or Kosovo rely on some of them to navigate, communicate, share intelligence and detect missile launches. This week, the site at Kester is...
    By LORNE COOK, Associated Press KESTER, Belgium (AP) — To a few of the locals, the top-secret, fenced-off installation on the hill is known as “the radar station.” Some folks claim to have seen mysterious Russians in the area. Over the years, rumors have swirled that it might be a base for U.S. nuclear warheads. It’s easy to see how the rumors start. The site is visually striking. Four huge white Kevlar balls sit like giant spherical spacecraft in a compound in the middle of open farm country 25 kilometers (16 miles) west of Belgium's capital, Brussels. But the Kester Satellite Ground Station is both safer and more sophisticated than local lore might suggest. It’s central to space communications at NATO — the biggest and most modern of four such stations the military alliance runs. Around 2,000 satellites orbit the earth, over half operated by NATO countries, ensuring everything from mobile phone and banking services to weather forecasts. NATO commanders in places like Afghanistan or Kosovo rely on some of them to navigate, communicate, share intelligence and detect missile launches....
    Kymeta Satellite antenna builder Kymeta announced Tuesday that it closed a significant new round of fundraising led by Bill Gates, as the start-up looks to increase manufacturing and sales of its mobile communications product. "At the end of the day, the problem that our customers want to solve is highly reliable broadband service," Kymeta executive chairman Doug Hutcheson told CNBC. Kymeta raised $85.2 million in this latest round, with Gates himself making up $78.5 million of that. The company has now raised about $300 million in cumulative funding since its founding in 2012, with investment from Lux Capital, Intelsat, Liberty Global and others. The company's core product is its "electronically steered" flat satellite antenna, built to replace the dish technology that track moving satellites but also capable of connecting with cellular networks. It looks to fill a gap in connecting satellite networks to the ground, as Kymeta says other antenna aren't durable enough to support mobility. Kymeta's latest antenna is the u8 terminal, which it is beginning a beta trial for this month and aiming to launch to market before...
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida -- It's another small step for the SpaceX program.A reused rocket launched from Cape Canaveral Monday night carrying a communications satellite, ANASIS-II. Liftoff! pic.twitter.com/Tn1kU6LtkB— SpaceX (@SpaceX) July 20, 2020The same rocket booster traveled into space just a couple of months ago on SpaceX's first-ever mission with humans on board.The Falcon 9 rocket is the only launch vehicle in the world that features a reusable first-stage booster.Falcon 9’s first stage has landed on the Just Read the Instructions droneship pic.twitter.com/fPbckYFySh— SpaceX (@SpaceX) July 20, 2020SpaceX tweeted about the rocket's progress.Meantime, SpaceX and NASA officials say they're targeting an August 1st departure of SpaceX's Dragon Endeavour spacecraft from the International Space Station. It would return to Earth on August 2nd, but the dates are weather dependent.NEWS: Were targeting an Aug. 1 departure of @SpaceXs Dragon Endeavour spacecraft from the @Space_Station to bring @AstroBehnken and @Astro_Doug home after their historic #LaunchAmerica mission. Splashdown is targeted for Aug. 2. Weather will drive the actual date. Stay tuned. pic.twitter.com/VOCV51gzLi— Jim Bridenstine (@JimBridenstine) July 17, 2020RELATED: Mission to Mars in the works
    After standing down last week to resolve an unspecified technical issue, SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket Monday, lifting a South Korean military communications satellite into orbit. Using the same first stage that helped launch two astronauts on a May flight to the International Space Station, the 229-foot-tall Falcon 9 roared to life at 5:30 p.m. EDT and and raced away from pad 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket climbs away from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, boosting a South Korean military communications satellite toward space. William Harwood/CBS News The rocket quickly powered through the sound barrier and the region of maximum aerodynamic stress as it consumed propellants, lost weight and steadily accelerated, arcing to the east and out of sight over the Atlantic Ocean. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The first stage then fell away and headed for touchdown on a SpaceX droneship stationed several hundred miles off shore while the second stage continued the climb to space. An issue of some sort with the second stage prompted SpaceX...
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