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    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Democrats are poised to strip Iowa from leading off their presidential nominating process starting in 2024, part of a broader effort allowing less overwhelmingly white states to go early and better reflect the party’s deeply diverse electorate. The Democratic National Committee’s rule-making arm had planned to recommend on Friday which states should be the first four to vote, while considering adding a fifth prior to Super Tuesday, when a large number of states hold primary elections. But it delayed the decision until after November’s election, lest it become a distraction affecting Democrats in key congressional races. Still, the position of Iowa’s caucus remains precarious after technical glitches sparked a 2020 meltdown. More than a decade of complaints that caucus rules requiring in-person attendance serve to limit participation are reaching crescendo. That’s ignited a furious push for the No. 1 position between New Hampshire, which now goes second but traditionally kicks off primary voting, and Nevada, a heavily Hispanic state looking to jump from third to first. “I fully expect that Iowa will be...
    Rep. Cindy Axne (D-IA) is all tied up with Republican challenger Zach Nunn as she attempts to withstand a red electoral wave and win reelection in Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District. That is the assessment of the July 9–11 poll jointly commissioned by the Nunn campaign and the National Republican Congressional Committee. In the survey from GOP firm Moore Information Group, likely voters split their vote for Axne and Nunn 43% apiece, with 14% undecided. Problematic for Axne as the midterm elections approach is President Joe Biden’s abysmal, 37% job approval rating. TRUMP AND DEMOCRATIC GOVERNORS GROUP TEAM UP FOR MARYLAND GOP PRIMARY WIN Southwest Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District, anchored by Des Moines, is a swing seat drawn to give Republicans a narrow advantage. If Biden’s low standing persists, Republicans are confident those two data points will give Nunn, a state senator, the edge he needs to defeat Axne. Bolstering GOP confidence in this race is the congresswoman’s failure to grab a lead over Nunn despite investing in an early advertising campaign. “Despite Democrat incumbent Cindy Axne’s spending over $400,000 attacking...
    NEW YORK (AP) — As he considers another White House run, polls show former President Donald Trump is the most popular figure in the Republican Party. But it wasn’t always that way. Competing at one point against a dozen rivals for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016, Trump won only about a third of the vote in key early states. He even lost the Iowa caucuses, which kick off the nomination process. But he was able to prevail nonetheless because those in the party who opposed his brand of divisive politics were never able to coalesce around a single rival to confront him. And with Trump mulling another White House bid as soon as this summer, the same dynamic could repeat. With a growing list of candidates gearing up for their own presidential runs, even a Trump diminished by two impeachments and mounting legal vulnerabilities could hold a commanding position in a fractured, multi-candidate GOP primary. “I fear it could end up the same way as 2016, which basically was everyone thought everyone else should get out,” said Republican...
    (CNN)The first votes of the 2020 presidential cycle collide Monday with President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, setting up an epic clash over presidential power and the direction of America.After a brief respite over the weekend, senators will return to Washington to hear closing arguments from Democratic House impeachment managers and the President's legal defense team.Hours later, and after months of exchanges on the campaign trail, Democratic voters finally begin their search for a candidate to make Trump a one-term President in Monday night's Iowa caucuses.The commander-in-chief will hit back the next night, weaving a narrative of prosperity at home and strength abroad, as his reelection pitch reaches new intensity in his annual "State of the Union" address.And then after finally breaking their own enforced silence with speeches from the floor, senators will Wednesday undertake their gravest possible duty in voting on whether to make Trump the first impeached President to be ousted in US history. Spoiler: Republicans will ensure that Trump is acquitted of high crimes and misdemeanors and will leave it up to voters to decide his fate. Interactive:...
    Washington (CNN)2020 contender Pete Buttigieg said on Monday that Democrats must "galvanize and not polarize" American voters ahead of Iowa's first-in-the-nation caucuses that will be the first test this year between the progressive and moderate lanes of the Democratic Party."We've got to make sure that we are ready to galvanize and not polarize an American majority that is actually strikingly aligned, not just on being against Donald Trump but on what we're for," Buttigieg told CNN's John Berman on "New Day" when asked if there was a candidate who could win the caucuses but also have a hard time beating the President in the 2020 election."Most Americans, even in conservative states right now, want to see higher wages, want to see corporations paying their fair share in taxes. Even issues that have been very divisive in the past and tough for our party, like immigration and guns, are with us," the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor said. Interactive: An illustrated guide to the Iowa caucus Buttigieg, a moderate, also set himself apart from Sen. Bernie Sanders, one of the most...
    (CNN)In 2020, Joel Miller was one of three county auditors in Iowa who sent out pre-filled absentee ballot request forms to help people vote remotely amid the coronavirus pandemic. One of the end results: He was sued by then-President Donald Trump and his allies. Lawyers for Trump argued the pre-filled forms violated guidance given by the GOP secretary of state and could lead to voter fraud if the wrong person received a ballot application with another voter's information. Ultimately, Republicans' challenge prevailed in court, forcing Miller, the Linn County auditor, to send new forms. But the experience left the Democrat worried about the future of voting in his home state.And this year, he's ready to do something about it.Miller is one of two Democrats running to unseat incumbent Republican Secretary of State Paul Pate. The other candidate, Eric Van Lancker, currently serves as the Clinton County auditor. The two will face off in Tuesday's primary. Read MoreVan Lancker, similarly to his Democratic opponent, says he wants to be an "advocate for voters." The Democrat feels he is the best person...
    Wednesday, during an appearance on Hugh Hewitt’s nationally syndicated radio show, Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) said she did not believe the anticipated Dobbs decision from the U.S. Supreme Court, which is expected to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision on abortion later this year, would come into play as a factor in this year’s midterm election cycle. According to the Iowa Republican U.S. Senator, inflation, gas prices and a potential bad economy will be what guide voters and the Supreme Court decision would be “a little blip.” “Dan Balz has said in the Post this morning that the leaked opinion and any subsequent decision could upend the 2022 elections,” Hewitt said. “Do you think it would actually have much of an impact in Iowa where Senator Grassley is seeking election and Ashley Hinson and others are running?” “You know, I don’t, I don’t see that as being a decision point for Iowa voters,” Ernst replied. “They are concerned about 40-year high inflation, prices at the pump, a bad economy. That’s what they’re worried about, so I think it might...
    (CNN)Despite an apparent narrow victory in Iowa, Pete Buttigieg is unlikely to experience the same effects that Jimmy Carter or Barack Obama enjoyed after their respective victories there the first time they ran for office.The results from Monday's caucuses, assuming they hold, might give the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor a slight boost, but nothing that will transform his standing relative to Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren in the next rounds of voting. He will remain competitive, but this time, Iowa won't be a game changer. The secret to winning IowaWhy won't the Iowa caucuses have a similar effect as in those cases? After all, in 1976, Carter, the relatively unknown former Georgia governor, used his strong finish to catapult to victory in New Hampshire. This convinced the media that he was as formidable a candidate as the more experienced Democrats he was running against. The Iowa Democratic chairman called the results "striking."Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, who was then still a mystery to many voters, also benefited from his victory in Iowa. He used it to demonstrate to...
    The Iowa caucus has been the first presidential nomination contest for 50 years. Democrats are considering ousting it from its place. They should. They should replace it with Washington, DC. Iowa’s status is in jeopardy for a number of reasons. The main one is that the state party catastrophically fumbled the 2020 caucus results. Thanks to reliance on a new app and new technology, results weren’t finalized for weeks, leading to chaos, conspiracy theories and confusion. It was a debacle that exacerbated divisions in the party. No one wants to repeat it. Democratic critics have other reasons. Caucuses require people to gather at a particular time and place for long periods of time compared to primaries. (Caucuses are an open vote. Primaries are a secret vote.) That means caucuses are often difficult to access for disabled people as well as with inflexible hours and childcare needs. If the Democratic Party cares about disabled rights and economic equity, giving a caucus pride of place is a poor way to show it. Iowa is unrepresentative in other ways....
    The majority of Iowa voters now disapprove of President Joe Biden’s job performance, the latest Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll survey found. Just more than one-third of Iowans, 35 percent, approve of Biden’s job performance well into a year of his presidency. The vast majority, 59 percent, now disapprove, although the figure is what the Des Moines Register describes as a “modest improvement” from the 62 percent who disapproved of his job performance in November. However, Biden originally saw a 47 percent approval rating shortly after taking office, in March 2021 — a 12 percent drop from his current standing. However, his approval went underwater the following month, and he has failed to recover since. While a majority of Democrats approve of his job performance, less than a third of independent Iowan voters, 29 percent, give him the same stamp of approval. Additionally, the vast majority of Iowans believe the nation is headed off on the wrong track, 67 percent to the 23 percent who believe it is going in the right direction. Seventy percent of independents agree that the nation...
              moreby Mary Stroka   Nearly one-third (32%) of Iowa adults said they are “mostly doubtful or “very doubtful” that, “across the country,” votes in the 2022 general election will be counted as voters intended in a November Des Moines Register/Mediacom poll. The remainder were very confident (26%), mostly confident (37%) or not sure (6%) votes would be counted properly. Selzer & Co. conducted the poll of 810 randomly selected Iowan adults between Nov. 7 and Nov. 10. The votes of confidence appeared partisan. Independents’ votes of confidence echoed the overall results (62% confident, 34% doubtful). Democrats were much more likely to say they are “very confident” (48%) results will be counted correctly compared with Republicans (8%). Eighty-eight percent of Democrats said they are “very confident” or “mostly confident” while 9% are “mostly doubtful” or “very doubtful.” The survey found that 47% of Trump 2020 voters are “mostly doubtful” or “very doubtful” the results will be counted as voters intended. Former President Donald Trump challenged the results in the past presidential election in several states, claiming they were fraudulent. Rita Hart had...
    In the latest poll to show the political headwinds President Biden is facing, he trails former President Donald Trump 40-51 in a new survey out of Iowa. That is a greater margin than Trumps eight-point 53-45 2020 win over Biden in the state, which helped launch Trump's political career in 2016 during the GOP primaries there. Trump cracks an outright majority in the new Des Moines Register poll, winning 51 per cent support, with 4 per cent saying they wouldn't vote for either man, and 5 per cent saying they weren't sure.  A critical part of Biden's dip comes from independent voters. Independents back Trump in the survey by 45 to 37 per cent.   Former President Trump leads President Biden 51-40 in Iowa Former President Donald Trump leads President Joe Biden in Iowa, a state Trump carried in 2016 and 2020 'Trump won Iowa convincingly in 2020, and that's reflected in these data,' said pollster J. Ann Selzer, who conducted the survey. Trump held a campaign rally in the state in October, appearing with longtime Sen. Chuck Grassley, who said...
    Former President Donald Trump leads President Joe Biden in Iowa by 11 points in a hypothetical 2024 matchup, according to a poll released by the Des Moines Register. According to the survey released Saturday, 51 percent of likely Iowa voters would support Trump, which is 11 percent higher than Joe Biden’s 40 percent. Four percent of voters would not vote for either Trump or Biden, and five percent were undecided. Selzer & Co. took the poll of 810 Iowa adults from November 7-10, 2021. The survey has a ±3.4 percentage point margin of error. Trump’s poll numbers indicate an increase in support from his eight point victory in Iowa over Biden in the 2020 election. Trump carried Iowa with 53 percent compared to Biden’s 45 percent. According to the Des Moines Register, “Trump’s 2024 lead among likely Iowa voters appears to be driven by support among independents.” Iowa Independents support Trump by an eight percent margin, with Trump getting 45 percent support compared to Biden’s 37 percent. The poll also revealed that 61 percent of self-identified Iowa Republicans feel more allegiance to the Republican...
    IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Voters in Iowa’s eighth-largest city, Waterloo, reelected the city’s first Black mayor and chose three Black candidates for City Council, which will have its Black majority for the first time ever. The historic outcome of Tuesday’s election followed a campaign marked by bitter debates over policing and race in the city, where less than 17% of roughly 67,300 people are Black. Quentin Hart, who became Waterloo’s first Black mayor in 2015, won a fourth two-year term to lead the city by defeating a white challenger, Margaret Klein, who campaigned as a champion of the police. The four City Council seats that were on the ballot were won by three Black newcomers — pharmacist Rob Nichols, music educator John Chiles and artist Nia Wilder — and a white incumbent, Ray Feuss. All four defeated candidates that were endorsed by Cedar Valley Backs the Blue, a political action committee that formed in May to oppose Hart’s reelection and support what it called “pro-law enforcement candidates.” The outcome means four of the council’s seven members will be Black...
    Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGrassley calls for federal prosecutor to probe botched FBI Nassar investigation Woman allegedly abused by Nassar after he was reported to FBI: 'I should not be here' Democrat rips Justice for not appearing at US gymnastics hearing MORE (R-Iowa) leads former Rep. Abby FinkenauerAbby Lea FinkenauerCotton to stump for Iowa GOP candidate amid 2024 speculation Axne endorses Finkenauer Senate bid in Iowa 'Blue wave' Democrats eye comebacks after losing reelection MORE (D-Iowa) by 18 points in a hypothetical matchup, according to a Des Moines Register/ Mediacom Iowa poll released Tuesday. The survey of 620 likely voters found that Grassley leads Finkenauer 55 to 37 percent, while another seven percent said they were not sure who they would vote for. A separate 1 percent said they would not cast a vote.  The poll signals that Grassley, and 88-year-old lawmaker who has served over 40 years in the senate, would be a strong contender to hold his seat. The Iowa Republican has not said whether or not he would run for reelection, and Democrats have their eyes on...
    Rep. Cindy Axne, the lone congressional Democrat from Iowa, whom Republicans are looking to unseat, is trailing in a poll against a generic Republican as she sides with President Joe Biden’s partisan agenda. According to the latest poll from the American Action Network, Axne loses in a head-to-head election against a generic Republican on the ballot. The poll found that the respondents favor the Republican by nine percent, with 51 percent of the vote. Axne only received 41 percent in the hypothetical poll. Interestingly enough, the hypothetical poll shows the voters in the district are actually less favorable to Axne than to Biden. The poll found that Biden’s approval in the district sits at 43 percent, with 51 percent disapproving of the president. The voters from her district also said Biden has a net negative approval on the economy and foreign policy. He nets a negative ten on each policy topic: 42 percent approve, 52 percent disapprove. The majority of voters (51 percent) in Axne’s congressional district also believe government spending is to blame for the increase in inflation. This includes the majority of American voters that disapprove of the...
    WEST DES MOINES, Iowa — Republicans in this Midwestern battleground fiercely miss having Donald Trump in the White House, but, when asked if they want the former president to seek reelection a second time, in 2024, hesitation abounds. “That’s a good question,” said Jose Laracuent, 59, who lives in suburban Des Moines. “He set the bar in many ways, and I think there’s other politicians who can build on what he’s already built.” Laracuent’s wife, Shelley, was more decisive. “I’d like to see another generation.” Both spoke with the Washington Examiner while attending the annual Lincoln Dinner fundraising gala for the Iowa Republican Party, headlined by potential 2024 contender Nikki Haley, a former United Nations ambassador. Publicly, Trump is undecided on a third presidential bid, although he regularly alludes to another campaign. Privately, the former president is telling confidants he plans to run, and this month began hitting the road again for his signature rallies and pre-rally festivals. Trump remains extraordinarily popular with grassroots Republicans. Yet, there are signs even these loyal voters might want fresh leadership in 2024, with...
    (CNN)There have been a few constants over the past 40 or so years in Iowa: the butter cow at the state fair, the dominance of the University of Iowa's wrestling team and Chuck Grassley.The Republican senator has been in office continuously in Iowa since -- wait for it -- 1959. (He's currently 87 years old.) And he was elected to the Senate in 1980, which makes him the second-longest-tenured senator behind only Democrat Pat Leahy of Vermont, who was elected to the chamber in 1974.What's as remarkable as his long run in office is how popular he has remained among Iowa voters -- a notoriously fickle bunch -- over all that time. Aside from the 54% he received in his first Senate race in 1980, Grassley's winning percentage has never dipped below 60%(!) in six subsequent reelection races.So dominant a figure in Iowa politics had Grassley been that Democrats nationally have stopped seriously challenging him in his last few reelection races despite the overall swing-y nature of the state. THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each...
    Democrats are preparing to take aim at voting reforms under consideration in a number of states beyond Georgia, where state Republicans passed a slate of changes last month that sparked intense opposition on the Left. The Peach State battle could end up serving as the opening salvo in a nationwide battle over election laws, however. Liberals have staunchly resisted attempts in several states to roll back voting provisions that were put in place to accommodate public health concerns in 2020 amid the pandemic. In Georgia, for example, Democrats balked at a provision of the law that scaled back the number of ballot drop boxes from the 2020 level — even though the state used drop boxes for the first time last year on an emergency basis. HOW GEORGIA’S NEW VOTING LAW COMPARES TO OTHER STATES Lawmakers in Texas, Michigan, Arizona, Kansas, and several other states have proposed changes to their election laws that could invite legal challenges from left-leaning groups that have already sued in states where bills have advanced. In Iowa, for example, a left-leaning group called the League...
    (CNN)In the week before last November's general election, Iowa progressive activist Mitch Henry scoured neighborhoods on the east and south sides of Des Moines, in search of fellow Latino voters who had not yet returned their absentee ballots."Some of these people were homebound, and voting was probably the last thing they were thinking about, unless someone encouraged them to vote," Henry said. In all, he estimates that he helped return about 50 completed absentee ballots to his local election office.But under a sweeping election law enacted recently in Iowa, Henry's ballot collection practice is now considered a crime -- punishable by up to a year in prison. It's just one example of Republican-controlled legislatures adding new criminal penalties to their election laws as they race to restrict ballot access, following the record voter turnout in the 2020 election. The proposals range from bills that would make it a crime for election officials to buck state guidance to measures that criminalize more mundane activities, such as Georgia's controversial election law making it a misdemeanor to approach voters waiting in line to...
    (CNN)Iowa Democrat Rita Hart decided this week to withdraw her challenge to her defeat in Iowa's 2nd Congressional District last year. Her six-vote loss to Republican Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks capped off a successful year for Iowa Republicans who won the presidential race, Senate race and three of four House races in the state in 2020. Hart's loss is one of the strongest signs of a larger story: educational polarization in our politics dominating even in places it didn't previously exist, while income has become considerably less important in determining voting patterns. Iowa's 2nd District, in the state's southeastern quarter, simply doesn't fit the bill of a Democratic district anymore. According to the government's latest American Community Survey, 63% of the district's residents 25 years and older are Whites without a college degree. That puts the district in the top 66 of 435 (15%) of the nation for adults who match this description. Democrats represent a mere five seats of the 65 districts (8%) that have a higher proportion of Whites without a college degree in their ranks. All of those...
    At a press conference with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) Wednesday, Iowa Voters said Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-IA) is their congresswoman in the Second Congressional District because she was fairly elected. Michelle Crawford, who voted for Miller-Meeks, said she is a proud lifelong Iowan in Miller-Meeks’ area. “I was proud to vote for Mariannette Miller-Meeks, I’ve gotten to know over the past couple of years, and I knew she would represent Iowa values,” she said. “As an Iowa voter, that’s important to me that our Iowa values are represented by who people from Iowa want to speak and not who DC or Pelosi want to pick.” “We’ve all had elections where we didn’t get our chosen candidate elected, but we accept them and accept the results. That is what we the people of Iowa expect to happen as well,” Crawford continued to explain, “No matter how many voters or who has spoken, she was elected, and we want her representing us.” Kerry Gruenhagen, an Iowa voter who works in Agriculture, said, “whoever my congressperson is, I’m used to working with them.” Gruenhagen said before...
    National attention continues to focus on the contested election for Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District between U.S. Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks and challenger Rita Hart. This week’s actions included comments from top political officials and both legal teams’ filing replies on March 29. Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate wrote a letter March 26 to U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, urging her “to reject any attempts to overturn the will of Iowa voters.” Pate continued: “The recount boards in all 24 counties were bipartisan, comprised of one representative from the Miller-Meeks campaign, one representative from the Hart campaign and a third member who was agreed upon by the other two representatives or appointed by a district court judge.” Pate said in the letter. “The Hart campaign signed off on the recount procedures and results in all 24 counties. Following the recount, the bipartisan State Canvassing Board unanimously accepted the results and officially certified the election. At the end of this bipartisan process, Mariannette Miller-Meeks won: 196,964 to 196,958.” Pate refuted Hart's stated claim that Iowa law did not...
    Democrat lawyer Marc Elias argued Monday in a filing with the U.S. House Committee on House Administration that Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-IA) and the Republican Party have “hostility to fundamental democratic norms.” Elias claims there are 22 outstanding ballots that should have been counted, even though Iowa election officials rejected them as illegal. Rather than filing a challenge in state court, he has turned to the Democrat-run House to use its powers under the Federal Contested Elections Act (FCEA) to unseat Miller-Meeks and replace her with Rita Hart, who lost to Miller-Meeks in the 2020 election. The Republicans have allegedly taken to stop the voting procedure. Elias’s filings attack Miller-Meeks’s ties to the Republican Party, claiming the Party’s “hostility to fundamental democratic norms,” including the “baseless attempts of its standard-bearer”: Contestee Miller-Meeks’s adamant opposition to Contestant Hart’s efforts to count these lawful ballots is alarming, but not surprising. Her obstruction is consistent with her party’s outright hostility to fundamental democratic norms, from the baseless attempts of its standard-bearer and his allies to throw out hundreds of thousands of lawful votes and overturn the will of...
    Voters in battleground districts across the U.S. largely oppose an effort by Democrats to challenge the election results in Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District, internal polling from the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) obtained by The Hill shows. Iowa Democratic candidate Rita Hart called for the House Administration Committee to review the election results after Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-Iowa) won the House race by just six votes. Hart argued a handful of ballots were unjustly rejected by the state. According to the survey, 68 percent of those polled in U.S. battleground districts oppose the effort to contest the results of the Iowa congressional election, while 54 percent said they strongly oppose the move.  The poll showed that “62 percent of suburban voters, 66 percent of college graduates, 69 percent of independents and 62 percent of seniors” disagreed with contesting the election. Democratic voters were slightly more open to the challenge, with 44 percent saying they opposed the move.  Those polled overwhelmingly said they felt “House Democrats are being hypocritical” for supporting the effort after pushing back against Republicans’ efforts to challenge the election...
    The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) released an ad Monday morning targeting Rep. Cindy Axne (D-IA) for her support of Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Rita Hart’s effort to overturn the state-certified election results in Iowa’s Second Congressional District. The ad, which will run on radio stations in Axne’s Iowa Third Congressional District, outlines her support for overturning the certified election in Iowa’s Second Congressional District, which was won by Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-IA) by six votes. “Though shall not steal. A simple commandment. A rule to live by. But Cindy Axne and Nancy Pelosi are working to steal an election here in Iowa,” the digital ad’s voice-over artist said. “A Pelosi power play, backed by Axne, to overturn the will of Iowa’s voters. So call Cindy Axne, tell her though shall not steal… our trust.” NRCC spokesman Mike Berg doubled down in a statement saying, “Cindy Axne is more loyal to Nancy Pelosi than Iowans and we are going to make sure every Iowa voters understands that.” Breitbart News reported last week Axne’s office had used the same exact statement for nearly four months...
    Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), told SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Sunday House Democrats led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) are “trying to subvert democracy” and “disenfranchise the Iowa voters” by attempting to “overturn certified election results” in Iowa. Recently, the House Administration Committee, chaired by Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), has been working on a push to overturn Iowa’s state-certified Second Congressional District election. Rita Hart claims 22 legal votes should be counted but were wrongfully tossed out. Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-IA) officially won the election by six votes. Emmer told host Matthew Boyle, “Nancy Pelosi and her radical left socialist Democrat majority are literally trying to subvert democracy and overturn certified election results, and they are going to deny any Iowa voter. Frankly, they’re going to disenfranchise the Iowa voters who have already decided this thing.” He went on, “As we go forward, Matt, I can guarantee you we at the National Republican Congressional Committee will make sure that the voters hold them accountable for this partisan power grab in November of ’22 if, in fact, they do it. That will be the...
    ATLANTA (AP) — A key element of voting restrictions pushed by Republican state lawmakers this year focuses on cleaning voter rolls to ensure only those eligible are registered. Maintaining accurate voter rolls is a bipartisan concern, but there is little agreement on the best way to do it. Democrats say some of the actions proposed by Republicans are too aggressive and will end up purging eligible voters. Republicans say Democrats are too lax, resulting in bloated voter rolls that undermine confidence and invite fraud. In Congress, a Democratic voting rights bill would prohibit states from using a person’s failure to vote to initiate their removal from the rolls. Here is an explanation of how voter rolls are maintained, how states do it differently and the conflicts over this year’s legislative proposals. WHAT ARE VOTER ROLLS AND HOW ARE THEY MAINTAINED? Every state except North Dakota requires voters to register in advance of an election. A growing number allow for same-day registration during early voting periods and, in some cases, on Election Day. Under federal law, voters can be removed upon...
    (CNN)Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley hasn't made up his mind about whether to run for an 8th(!) term in 2022. But Iowa voters have! And they're ready for Grassley to retire.That's the finding of a new Des Moines Register poll that showed 55% of Iowans want Grassley to end his political career next year as compared to just 28% who said they would like to see him run for another term. Most remarkable -- and concerning for Grassley -- is that more than 1 in 3 self-identified Republicans (35%) say they think the time has come for him to retire.At issue for Grassley is his age. At 87, he is the second-oldest member of the chamber -- only California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein is older -- and if he did run and win an 8th term, Grassley would be 95 by the time it ended.Read More"I can almost feel the tension as Republican respondents are dealing with it," J. Ann Selzer, who conducted the poll, told the Des Moines Register of the Grassley numbers. "He's the most popular senator since the inception...
    Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-IA) told Breitbart News on Sunday how Rita Hart, her defeated Democrat opponent in November’s election for Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District, is attempting to overturn the election results and disenfranchise Iowa’s voters. Miller-Meeks explained that her opponent is asking the House Committee on Administration — run by a six-to-three Democrat majority — to overturn the election results. In Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District, 394,439 people voted in the 2020 election, with Miller-Meeks ultimately winning by 6 votes. Hart argues 22 Democrat ballots deemed illegitimate should have been counted, giving her the election. “They are disenfranchising 400,000 voters,” Miller-Meeks determined. “They are disenfranchising all of these voters by this process.” “What [my opponent’s campaign] did was avail themselves to a provision of the Constitution that says Congress will seat its members, and appeal to the House Committee on Administration to overturn the election based upon 22 ballots that … in all likelihood would have been rejected by Iowa courts,” Miller-Meeks commented. “That takes it from a campaign election process with election law to a political process and it’s a partisan political process.” The Des...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi leaving the door open to overturning the certified House election results in Iowa is hypocritical and unfair, Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, asserted on "Fox & Friends Weekend." Just six votes separated Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks from Democrat Rita Hart. Miller-Meeks' win was certified after a recount process. Ernst pointed out that Hart appealed directly to the House Committee on Administration instead of further challenging the result in Iowa courts. "Rep. Miller-Meeks has been seated in Congress. She won this election," Ernst said. "It was certified by Iowans ... and now Nancy Pelosi, perhaps, will overturn it. And that is horribly unfair to the voters in the second district in Iowa, and we are pushing back." PELOSI: 'OF COURSE' THERE'S A SCENARIO WHERE GOP WIN IN TIGHT IOWA RACE OVERTURNED Pelosi in a press conference Thursday told reporters there could "of course" be a scenario where the results are re-examined and overturned. Video"Because we know she would love to overturn this election," Ernst said. Miller-Meeks has asked the House Administration Committee to dismiss Hart's petition, saying Hart "failed to exhaust state judicial procedures before filing her...
    A majority of Iowa voters surveyed in a new poll said they do not wish to see Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - House passes relief bill; Biden set for prime time address Senate votes to confirm Garland as attorney general Ashcroft declines run to replace Blunt in Missouri MORE (R-Iowa) run for reelection again. The Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll found only 28 percent of respondents said they hope Grassley decides to run again, and 55 percent hope he does not. Another 17 percent indicated they are undecided.  Grassley, who has represented the Hawkeye State in the upper chamber since 1959, would be 95 at the end of his next term if he were to run for reelection in 2022 and win.  “With some of these people who are in their 80s, you kind of want them to be out being a grandparent, not in office,” said Austin McMinemee, a 38-year-old poll respondent, according to the Register. “Go enjoy life! There are younger people who can take on that role with...
    Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, joined "Special Report" Friday to react to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi leaving the door open to overturn the result of Miller-Meeks' November race, in which she defeated Democrat Rita Hart by just six votes. MILLER-MEEKS: There is no doubt in my mind, and there is no doubt in the bipartisan executive council who certified me the winner. It was not only the secretary of state, it was the bipartisan executive council.  Let me elucidate the facts. I won by a very large margin on election night. Then per Iowa law, all the counties in the 2nd Congressional District have their official county canvas. After that country canvas, I was still ahead in votes. Then my opponent requested a recount. Throughout the recount process, which is a bipartisan recount board of three members of each county having to recount, I was still ahead through all of that process. I was then sworn in on January 3rd. Interestingly enough, during the swearing-in ceremony, there was a vote taken [on whether] all of the members from every state should be seated. Every Democrat voted that every member should be seated, and no one contested, no one stood up on the House floor and contested my being...
    A Latino civil rights group is suing Iowa officials over the state's new law shortening the window for mail-in and Election Day voting in the state. The League of United Latin American Citizens of Iowa, aided by high-profile Democratic lawyer Marc Elias, filed a lawsuit against Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate and Attorney General Thomas Miller on Tuesday, claiming the GOP-backed changes place unreasonable restrictions on voters. The lawsuit, which was shared online, asks the Iowa District Court for Polk County to declare that several sections of the measure violate the state constitution and block its implementation. The group also asks for an order "awarding Plaintiff its costs, disbursements, and reasonable attorneys fees." "What makes the Bill baffling — and fatally unconstitutional — is that it lacks any cognizable justification for these burdensome effects on the franchise," the lawsuit said. "The Bill is largely a grab-bag of amendments and new restrictions that lack any unifying theme other than making both absentee and election day voting more difficult for lawful Iowa voters." DEMOCRATS ERUPT WITH 'VOTER SUPPRESSION' CLAIMS AFTER IOWA...
    By DAVID PITT, Associated Press DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — An organization representing Iowa’s Hispanic population filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging new restrictions on voting in the state, a day after Gov. Kim Reynolds signed the measure into law. The League of United Latin American Citizens, represented by Washington-based voting rights lawyer Marc Elias, filed the lawsuit in state court in Des Moines. The measure, which passed with only Republican votes in the Iowa Legislature, includes numerous changes to the state's voting laws that Democrats and advocacy groups said will make it harder for minority, elderly and disabled voters to cast ballots. Among the changes, the law shortens time for voters to cast mail ballots, reduces days voters can request a ballot and shortens the time polls are open on Election Day. The lawsuit claims the new law, which Reynolds signed on Monday, creates an undue burden on the fundamental right to vote, citing numerous violations of voters’ constitutional rights. Republicans in the House and Senate quickly approved the changes over the opposition of all Democratic legislators. Republicans said the...
    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — An organization representing Iowa’s Hispanic population filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging new restrictions on voting in the state, a day after Gov. Kim Reynolds signed the measure into law. The League of United Latin American Citizens, represented by Washington-based voting rights lawyer Marc Elias, filed the lawsuit in state court in Des Moines. READ MORE: Senate GOP Approves $20 Million For Chauvin Trial, But Seeks To Delay New Police Requirements The measure, which passed with only Republican votes in the Iowa Legislature, includes numerous changes to the state’s voting laws that Democrats and advocacy groups said will make it harder for minority, elderly and disabled voters to cast ballots. Among the changes, the law shortens time for voters to cast mail ballots, reduces days voters can request a ballot and shortens the time polls are open on Election Day. The lawsuit claims the new law, which Reynolds signed on Monday, creates an undue burden on the fundamental right to vote, citing numerous violations of voters’ constitutional rights. Republicans in the House and Senate quickly approved...
    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — An organization representing Iowa’s Hispanic population filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging new restrictions on voting in the state, a day after Gov. Kim Reynolds signed the measure into law. The League of United Latin American Citizens, represented by Washington-based voting rights lawyer Marc Elias, filed the lawsuit in state court in Des Moines. The measure, which passed with only Republican votes in the Iowa Legislature, includes numerous changes to the state’s voting laws that Democrats and advocacy groups said will make it harder for minority, elderly and disabled voters to cast ballots. Among the changes, the law shortens time for voters to cast mail ballots, reduces days voters can request a ballot and shortens the time polls are open on Election Day. The lawsuit claims the new law, which Reynolds signed on Monday, creates an undue burden on the fundamental right to vote, citing numerous violations of voters’ constitutional rights. Republicans in the House and Senate quickly approved the changes over the opposition of all Democratic legislators. Republicans said the rules are...
    Washington (CNN)Republican Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds on Monday signed into law a controversial bill aimed at limiting voting and making it harder for voters to return absentee ballots, her office announced Monday. The legislation, which passed both Republican-controlled chambers of the state legislature last month, will reduce the number of early voting days from 29 days to 20 days. It will also close polling places an hour earlier on Election Day (at 8 p.m. instead of 9 p.m.).The bill additionally places new restrictions on absentee voting including banning officials from sending applications without a voter first requesting one and requiring ballots be received by the county before polls close on Election Day."It's our duty and responsibility to protect the integrity of every election. This legislation strengthens uniformity by providing Iowa's election officials with consistent parameters for Election Day, absentee voting, database maintenance, as well as a clear appeals process for local county auditors," Reynolds said in a statement Monday. "All of these additional steps promote more transparency and accountability, giving Iowans even greater confidence to cast their ballot." Read MoreThe...
    Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed a Republican-championed bill on Monday that shortens the state's early voting period and closes the polls earlier on Election Day. The Iowa governor announced she had placed her signature on Senate File 413 along with a number of other bills, months after Iowa reported a record number of voters in the 2020 election. Under the law, Iowa’s early voting period is reduced from 29 days to 20 days, and polls are scheduled to close at 8 p.m. for state and federal elections rather than 9 p.m. Any absentee ballots are required to arrive before the polls close, rather than the previous requirement of being in the mail the day before Election Day and arriving before noon the following Monday. The newly signed law also forbids auditors and election officials from not enforcing state election laws or going against Iowa’s secretary of state guidelines, saying they could potentially face fines of up to $10,000. The law had passed both chambers of the Iowa legislature last month after every Republican present voted to approve it, and every Democrat present...
    By DAVID PITT, Associated Press DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa Democrats are beginning to consider changes to their get-out-the-vote plans under the assumption that Gov. Kim Reynolds will sign into law a Republican-backed bill that makes it harder to vote early, potentially eroding a key aspect of Democratic campaigns. Republicans in the House and Senate quickly approved the voting changes over the opposition of all Democratic legislators. Republicans said the new rules were needed to guard against voting fraud, though they noted Iowa has no history of election irregularities and that November's election saw record turnout with no hint of problems in the state. Reynolds earlier expressed openness to the changes, but the Republican has declined to discuss the measure since its approval in late February. Democrats, however, take little solace from her silence and said they're examining their reliance on early voting, which in the last election resulted in more than 70% of Democrats voting early. “We don’t have to wait to get people registered to vote. We don’t have to wait to have Democrats talking with their...
    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa Democrats are beginning to consider changes to their get-out-the-vote plans under the assumption that Gov. Kim Reynolds will sign into law a Republican-backed bill that makes it harder to vote early, potentially eroding a key aspect of Democratic campaigns. Republicans in the House and Senate quickly approved the voting changes over the opposition of all Democratic legislators. Republicans said the new rules were needed to guard against voting fraud, though they noted Iowa has no history of election irregularities and that November’s election saw record turnout with no hint of problems in the state. Reynolds earlier expressed openness to the changes, but the Republican has declined to discuss the measure since its approval in late February. Democrats, however, take little solace from her silence and said they’re examining their reliance on early voting, which in the last election resulted in more than 70% of Democrats voting early. “We don’t have to wait to get people registered to vote. We don’t have to wait to have Democrats talking with their neighbors in rural and metropolitan...
    CHICAGO - Months after record-high U.S. voter turnout propelled Democrats to victory in the 2020 elections, giving them control of the White House and both houses of Congress, Republicans are attempting to reshape election laws in state legislatures across the nation. In state after state, Republicans seek to limit opportunities for early and absentee balloting that Americans flocked to last year — Democratic voters in particular. In America’s heartland, Iowa is among the first examples of the trend. More than 2 million Iowans were registered to vote in the 2020 general election, a record in a state with a population of just over 3.1 million. Of 1.7 million ballots ultimately cast in Iowa last November, more than 1 million were submitted through the mail as absentee ballots — also a record — as many voters shunned the polls during a pandemic. Former President Donald Trump, a Republican, won Iowa but lost the national election to Democrat Joe Biden. Now Republicans, who control Iowa’s state legislature, have passed a bill limiting early, in-person voting and shortening the time allotted for absentee...
    CHICAGO - Months after record-high U.S. voter turnout propelled Democrats to victory in the 2020 elections, giving them control of the White House and both houses of Congress, Republicans are attempting to reshape election laws in state legislatures across the nation. In state after state, Republicans seek to limit opportunities for early and absentee balloting that Americans flocked to last year — Democratic voters in particular. In America’s heartland, Iowa is among the first examples of the trend. More than 2 million Iowans were registered to vote in the 2020 general election, a record in a state with a population of just over 3.1 million. Of 1.7 million ballots ultimately cast in Iowa last November, more than 1 million were submitted through the mail as absentee ballots — also a record — as many voters shunned the polls during a pandemic. Former President Donald Trump, a Republican, won Iowa but lost the national election to Democrat Joe Biden. Now Republicans, who control Iowa’s state legislature, have passed a bill limiting early, in-person voting and shortening the time allotted for absentee...
    CHICAGO - Months after record-high U.S. voter turnout propelled Democrats to victory in the 2020 elections, giving them control of the White House and both houses of Congress, Republicans are attempting to reshape election laws in state legislatures across the nation. In state after state, Republicans seek to limit opportunities for early and absentee balloting that Americans flocked to last year — Democratic voters in particular. In America’s heartland, Iowa is among the first examples of the trend. More than 2 million Iowans were registered to vote in the 2020 general election, a record in a state with a population of just over 3.1 million. Of 1.7 million ballots ultimately cast in Iowa last November, more than 1 million were submitted through the mail as absentee ballots — also a record — as many voters shunned the polls during a pandemic. Former President Donald Trump, a Republican, won Iowa but lost the national election to Democrat Joe Biden. Now Republicans, who control Iowa’s state legislature, have passed a bill limiting early, in-person voting and shortening the time allotted for absentee...
    By RYAN J. FOLEY, Associated Press IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa’s Republican-controlled Legislature advanced a bill Wednesday to significantly limit voting by mail and early voting, threaten criminal charges against county auditors who depart from state election guidance and remove many inactive voters from the rolls. The far-reaching bill would cut the mail and in-person early voting period from 29 to 18 days, after Republicans whittled it down from 40 days just four years ago. It would bar counties from mailing absentee ballot applications to voters, tightly regulate how absentee ballots can be returned and potentially cut many early voting locations. Republicans praised the bill during a Senate subcommittee hearing, one day after its introduction. A House subcommittee was scheduled later Wednesday to consider the bill, which follows an election in which Iowa Republicans swept major races and that both parties said went smoothly despite the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats and voting rights advocates called the changes anti-democratic and intended to cement the GOP's growing dominance in Iowa through voter suppression. GOP Sen. Jason Schultz said the changes address “shady...
    Rep. Ashley Hinson (R-IA) said in a video statement Thursday that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is trying to “steal” Iowa’s Second Congressional District from Rep. Marianne Miller-Meeks (R-IA). Even though Iowa state officials have certified that Republican Miller-Meeks defeated Democrat Rita Hart by six votes in Iowa’s Second Congressional District, Hart filed a petition to the House Administration Committee to overturn the election results. This has drawn the ire of Iowa Republicans, including Hinson. Hinson said Thursday: Speaker Pelosi is moving forward with her plan to overturn the will of Iowa voters, who elected Dr. Marianne Miller-Meeks to serve them here in Congress. Pelosi fully intends to overturn the voices and, most importantly, the votes of Iowans and install someone that Iowans rejected at the ballot box, and she’s doing this for her own political gain. She asked rhetorically, “How hypocritical is that? Pelosi’s majority in the House is already razor-thin, so her only goal here is to add more numbers to her ranks.” Hinson said, “She thinks Republicans will stay silent as she steals this seat and silences...
    (CNN)President-elect Joe Biden proved a lot of detractors wrong by winning the 2020 presidential election. It wasn't easy for Biden, as he took an unusual path to the White House. As we enter the new year and now stand 19 days until Biden's inauguration, a look back at the primary and general election results show Biden broke many supposed political rules on his way to becoming the 46th president of the United States. Biden led the national polls during the entire leadup to the Iowa caucuses. He then proceeded to fall flat on his face in the first contest of the primary season. Biden came in a distant fourth place in the Iowa caucuses. Many future presidents lose the Iowa caucuses (e.g. Trump), but they're usually competitive. No future president in the modern primary era (i.e. since 1972) finished below third place in Iowa. John McCain was, before Biden, the only eventual major party nominee to come in fourth place in Iowa. But he at least came within 0.3 points of third place. Biden finished more than 2 points behind...
    By RYAN J. FOLEY, Associated Press IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Democrat Rita Hart is asking the U.S. House to investigate and overturn the race that Iowa says she lost by six votes, arguing that 22 ballots were wrongly excluded and others weren't examined during the recount. In an election contest released Tuesday, Hart argues that she would have netted 15 votes and defeated Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks had the 22 ballots been tallied in Iowa's 2nd Congressional District. Hart is asking the Democratic-led House to count those votes and conduct a uniform recount throughout the district's 24 counties, saying she is confident she will be ahead after that process and declared the winner. “Although it is admittedly tempting to close the curtain on the 2020 election cycle, prematurely ending this contest would disenfranchise Iowa voters and award the congressional seat to the candidate who received fewer lawful votes," Hart lawyer Marc Elias writes in the 176-page notice, which includes affidavits from several voters who say their ballots were improperly rejected. The campaign provided the notice to The Associated Press and...
    IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Democrat Rita Hart is asking the U.S. House to investigate and overturn the race that Iowa says she lost by six votes, arguing that 22 ballots were wrongly excluded and others weren’t examined during the recount. In an election contest released Tuesday, Hart argues that she would have netted 15 votes and defeated Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks had the 22 ballots been tallied in Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District. Hart is asking the Democratic-led House to count those votes and conduct a uniform recount throughout the district’s 24 counties, saying she is confident she will be ahead after that process and declared the winner. “Although it is admittedly tempting to close the curtain on the 2020 election cycle, prematurely ending this contest would disenfranchise Iowa voters and award the congressional seat to the candidate who received fewer lawful votes,” Hart lawyer Marc Elias writes in the 176-page notice, which includes affidavits from several voters who say their ballots were improperly rejected. The campaign provided the notice to The Associated Press and was set to announce its...
    Iowans would view Democratic candidate for Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District Rita Hart as an illegitimate candidate should she be successful in challenging her election loss in the House, a new poll shows. Losing by just six votes, Hart lost her bid to Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks after Iowa certified the election results on Nov. 30. Following her loss, Hart announced Dec. 2 that she would be taking her case to the House Committee on Administration under the Federal Contested Elections Act, which gives the House or Senate the final authority when it comes to deciding a contested election. Congressional decisions supersede state legislatures and courts, as stipulated by Article I, Section 5 of the Constitution which says that “Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members,” while Section 4 allows Congress to “make or alter” state regulations regarding an election. (RELATED: ‘Our Message Is Really, Really Flawed’: Sen. John Tester On Democrats’ Failure To Connect With Voters) Should Hart’s bid to challenge the results be successful, the House could call for a new...