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    Wells Fargo is under criminal investigation after bank managers were accused of conducting sham interviews with minority and female candidates for roles that were already filled in order to boost the bank's diversity statistics. The probe is being led by the new civil rights unit within the criminal division of the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office. The new unit was started by Damian Williams, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. The investigation comes a month after a New York Times report in which former bank employees came forward, claiming they were instructed by higher ups to conduct interviews with black candidates despite the fact someone had already been picked for the jobs. Former Wells Fargo wealth management executive Joe Bruno, 58, told the Times that he was fired last August after he blew the whistle to his bosses about the bank's alleged 'fake interviews,' which he described as 'inappropriate, morally wrong, ethically wrong' Bruno claimed that he was instructed to conduct interviews with black candidates for the lower-paying financial adviser and financial consultant positions, despite the fact...
    Russian troops who were stationed at Chernobyl are being treated for radiation sickness in Belarus, an employee at the Ukrainian state agency overseeing the exclusion zone has claimed.   Yaroslav Yemelianenko said yesterday that 'another batch of Russians' had been taken to the 'Belarusian Radiation Medicine Center in Gomel' for treatment.  It comes after the nuclear power plant's workers said Russian soldiers' lack of anti-radiation gear when they seized the Chernobyl site last month was 'suicidal'.  At least seven busloads of Russian soldiers had arrived at the Republican Scientific and Practical Centre for Radiation Medicine and Human Ecology in Gomel this week, according to a Belarusian news Telegram channel.  Yemelianenko said the Kremlin's men had fallen ill because they failed to follow 'rules for dealing' with the Chernobyl nuclear plant and the surrounding highly toxic zone known as the Red Forest. 'With minimal intelligence in command or soldiers, these consequences could have been avoided,' he said, adding that radiation protection is 'mandatory because radiation is physics – it works without regard to status or shoulder straps.'   Workers at the site this week...
    ON January 7, 2022, the Supreme Court scheduled oral arguments in regard to Biden vaccine mandates. Many justices had reservations about whether the federal government held the authority to impose nationwide policies, such as vaccine mandates. 2US Supreme Court held meeting on January 7, 2022 to discuss vaccine mandatesCredit: Associated Press What has the Supreme Court said about vaccine mandates? Supreme Court Justices spent hours on Friday trying to decide whether the federal government's authority reaches into vaccine territory, as President Biden's proposed mandate at the end of 2021 raised concerns of power. "Traditionally, states have had the responsibility for overseeing vaccination mandates. I just rejected a challenge to one in New Mexico. Why isn't this a major question left to the states and Congress?" Justice Neil Gorsuch said. The OSHA is already requiring private employers of 100 or more employees to ensure vaccination or a mandatory mask-and-testing policy paid for by the companies themselves. The Department of Health and Human Services has also ordered health care facilities that treat Medicare and Medicaid patients to require vaccinations of all workers and...
    The CEO of a medic company hired to work at the deadly Astroworld music festival defended his staff who he said had to treat 11 patients in cardiac arrest during the crowd surge that has claimed 10 lives.  Alex Pollak, CEO of ParaDocs, the company hired by Astroworld organizers 'set the record straight' Monday about his team's efforts to save lives during the sold-out festival which 50,000 people attended November 5, CNN reported.  A crowd surge that started just before headliner Travis Scott took the Houston stage that night left hundreds injured and 10 people dead.  The dead, whose ages ranged from 9 to 27, include Rodolfo 'Rudy' Pena, 23; Jacob Jurinek, 20; Franco Patino, 21; Brianna Rodriguez, 16; Danish Baig, 27; Axel Acosta, 21; John Hilgert, 14; Madison Dubiski, 23, Baharti Shahani, 22, and nine-year-old Ezra Blount. Remington Richardson, (pictured) one of the EMTs contracted by ParaDocs, recounted in a series of TikToks the struggle medical personnel went through to save lives Alex Pollak,(pictured) the CEO of ParaDocs 'set the record straight' about the efforts his team went though to save lives...
    Outnumbered cohost Emily Compagno slammed Centers for Disease Control head Rochelle Walensky for saying people need to undergo a “reeducation” in order to “get these people on board” with taking the Covid-19 vaccine. The problem is, Walensky didn’t say those things in the clip Compagno herself actually aired and was purportedly quoting from. Compagno kicked off the segment on Monday by noting the scores of city employees in New York protesting the city’s vaccine mandate for municipal workers. The employees and some of their supporters walked across the Brooklyn Bridge to bring attention to their self-inflicted plight. City workers have until Friday to adhere to the mandate, or they will be placed on unpaid leave. “And now the CDC is planning to quote, ‘educate’ those who are hesitant to get the shot,” said Compagno. Walensky, did indeed use the word ‘educate,’ as Fox News viewers could hear in the clip the show aired. “We believe it is very important to get these people vaccinated,” said Walensky. “There is a plan – should these people not want be vaccinated – towards...
    The manager didn't appear to understand that Torres was talking about gender identity as opposed to sexuality, as he seemed to tell Torres that there are "gay" workers at his restaurant — and that angered the activist. "I'm not gay," Torres replied. "We're talking about my gender identity, not my sexuality." Soon the activist asked the manager, "I would like you to promise me that you will stop treating trans people this way." Finally, the manager asked Torres, "What are you?" in reference to gender identity, and Torres replied, "Why does it matter?" — and soon after, "What would you assume looking at me?" The manager replied, "I assume that you are a man." That's when the Torres ended the conversation and the recording. Here are the videos: (Video part 2: #transgender #discrimination) #Trans #GirlsLikeUs #woman #women #gender #transphobia #transwoman… https://t.co/bfEHVRwE1H — Eden Torres (@Eden Torres) 1633186859.0 What did Sonic Drive-In have to say? "Eden, we have a strict anti-discrimination policy and take this very seriously," the fast-food company...
    CHICAGO — Mayor Lori Lightfoot has said all city workers need to get vaccinated to protect themselves and the public — but her office quietly revised that policy in a letter to workers. Instead, workers who don’t get vaccinated by the Oct. 15 deadline will be able to keep their jobs, though they’ll be required to test regularly, according to the letter. When announcing the vaccine mandate in August, Lightfoot said all workers would have to get their shots and be fully vaccinated by Oct. 15. That meant all workers would have to have their final shot as of Friday. Lightfoot did not mention testing in her August announcement, nor was it mentioned in a news release explaining the mandate at the time. Lightfoot has repeatedly pushed for workers to get fully vaccinated, saying it’s needed to ensure city staff is protected from coronavirus — and thereby protects the members of the public they interact with. “The only way that we can really, truly maximize safety in the workplace” is through vaccines, Lightfoot said at a news conference last week....
    Environmentalists protesting outside Amazon's shareholder meetingPaayal Zaveri | CNBC Amazon settled with two former employees who the National Labor Relations Board claimed were illegally fired for publicly speaking out about the company's climate record and labor policies. Terms of the settlement between Amazon and the two employees, Emily Cunningham and Maren Costa, weren't immediately disclosed. The settlement was announced by NLRB Administrative Law Judge John Giannopoulos at a virtual hearing, where Giannopoulos was expected to review the NLRB's complaint. Amazon declined to comment. Attorney James McGuinness, representing the Seattle chapter of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, who filed the NLRB complaint on behalf of Cunningham and Costa, couldn't immediately be reached for comment. Earlier this year, the NLRB found Amazon illegally retaliated against Cunningham and Costa when it fired them in April of 2020. Amazon previously said it disagreed with the NLRB's findings, claiming that it fired Costa and Cunningham for "repeatedly violating internal policies." In their complaint to the NLRB last October, Costa and Cunningham alleged Amazon violated federal labor law by firing them "based on discriminatory...
    Republican lawmakers, including Senator Ted Cruz, are upset with White House Chief of Staff Ronald Klain after he retweeted a post saying President Biden's new vaccine mandate is the 'ultimate work-around.' Klain retweeted MSNBC anchor Stephanie Ruhle Thursday after Biden made the announcement.    'OSHA doing this vaxx [sic] mandate as an emergency workplace safety rule is the ultimate work-around for the Federal govt [sic] to require vaccinations,' Ruhle wrote and Klain retweeted. Chief of Staff Ronald Klain retweeted a post saying President Biden's new vaccine mandate is the 'ultimate work-around' Klain retweeted MSNBC anchor Stephanie Ruhle Thursday after Biden made the announcement Republicans were quick to jump on the retweet, including Texas Senator and former presidential candidate Ted Cruz.  'Important,' Cruz tweeted. 'Foolish RT from WH chief of staff. He said the quiet part out loud. Biden admin knows it's likely illegal (like the eviction moratorium) but they don't care.' This followed up complaints from Republicans, including Arizona Governor Doug Ducey, about the mandate's constitutionality.  Republicans were quick to jump on the retweet, including Texas Senator and...
    Chicago police have said 'hell no' to Mayor Lori Lightfoot's plan to mandate vaccines for all city employees.  The Democrat told a press conference on Monday that shots 'are absolutely going to be required' hours after the FDA approved the Pfizer vaccine for over-16s - taking it beyond its emergency phase. The ruling prompted the Pentagon to order all 800,000 active service members to get the shot, while private firms including Delta Airlines and Goldman Sachs also told their staff to get the vaccine. Joe Biden has already signed an executive order requiring millions of federal staff to either get vaccinated or abide by a regular Covid testing scheme.  But cop union boss John Catanzara told Fox: 'This vaccine has no studies for long-term side effects or consequences. None. 'To mandate anybody to get that vaccine, without that data as a baseline, amongst other issues, is a "hell, no" for us. 'We are 100% against mandated vaccines for our members,' he added. Mayor Lori Lightfoot told a press conference on Monday that shots 'are absolutely going to be required' hours...
    More On: restaurants ‘Something great is happening’: De Blasio says NYC hotels are filling up Taco Hell! Fast-food chain latest to face supply shortages Kindness on the menu: Eatery takes a day break after enduring customers’ abuse Barstool bailout: Sports site’s fund a lifeline for NYC eateries hurt by COVID-19 City restaurateurs on Thursday panned President Biden’s advice that they offer higher wages to attract workers away from pandemic-fattened unemployment benefits, arguing that they might have to pass the cost onto customers — or eat it themselves. Grilled by an Ohio restaurant chain owner about the predicament during a Wednesday evening town hall event, Biden said that the industry might be “be in a bind for a little while” unless they ponied up bigger bucks for prospective employees. Chris Page, general manager of the White Oak Tavern in Greenwich Village, scoffed at the suggestion. “We can’t afford to raise wages because if we do that we just essentially become an employment agency,” said Page, 45. “We’re in business to make profits.” Page said that he could see why so...
    Amazon apologized to a Democratic congressman after a dispute over whether the company's employees urinate in water bottles. The online retailer expressed remorse to Wisconsin Rep. Mark Pocan in a blog post Friday. Pocan accused the online retailer of engaging in "union-bust[ing] & mak[ing] workers urinate in water bottles" March 24. "We apologize to Representative Pocan," Amazon wrote after initially pushing back on Pocan's claim. AMAZON SHOOTS BACK AT CONGRESSMAN WHO SAID IT MAKES WORKERS URINATE INTO WATER BOTTLES "You don’t really believe the peeing in bottles thing, do you?" the Seattle-based corporation wrote March 24. "If that were true, nobody would work for us." 1/2 You don’t really believe the peeing in bottles thing, do you? If that were true, nobody would work for us. The truth is that we have over a million incredible employees around the world who are proud of what they do, and have great wages and health care from day one.— Amazon News (@amazonnews) March 25, 2021 Amazon acknowledged some truth to Pocan's claims in its Friday blog post. "We know that drivers...
    Amazon rebutted a lawmaker who claimed that Amazon workers have had to urinate into water bottles to save time while on the job. “Paying workers $15/hr doesn't make you a ‘progressive workplace’ when you union-bust & make workers urinate in water bottles,” said Rep. Mark Pocan in a Wednesday evening tweet. Amazon shot back at the Wisconsin Democrat soon after. “You don’t really believe the peeing in bottles thing, do you?” Amazon News responded. “If that were true, nobody would work for us. The truth is that we have over a million incredible employees around the world who are proud of what they do, and have great wages and health care from day one." ‘WE ARE NOT ROBOTS’: SANDERS TARGETS BEZOS WITH AMAZON WORKER TESTIMONY “We hope you can enact policies that get other employers to offer what we already do,” it added shortly after, in an apparent reference to the push by some on the Left to increase the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour, a policy which Amazon independently enacted. ...
    Tate's Bake Shop is known for its cookies. Photo by Bob Fila/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images Tate's Bake Shop, known for its chocolate chip cookie, has been a Hamptons staple for decades. Employees says management has threatened them with deportation ahead of their union vote. A majority of Tate's 450 workers are undocumented immigrants, who are protected under US labor laws. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Employees at Tate's Bake Shop in Long Island, New York, said management threatened them with deportation over their attempts to unionize, local outlet News 12 reported Wednesday. Tate's, located in Southampton, is famous for its chocolate chip cookie and has been a staple in the Hamptons for decades. It was locally owned by its founder, Kathleen King, until 2018 when it was sold to food giant Mondolēz International for $500 million. Through an interpreter, employees told News 12 that they are being harassed at work, and that management has threatened to call Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The employees asked to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation. "They began...
    (CNN)What's a fair wage for a fair day's work? Hopes of raising Americans' federal minimum wage from $7.25 per hour to $15 have been punted down the road for now after being stripped from the Covid-19 rescue bill. Here's what Meanwhile readers said about the idea."I live in Eastern Washington state and we are fortunate to have a much higher minimum wage for our workers. Our neighbors in Idaho are not so lucky. Many people who are able to live in Idaho work in Washington to benefit from the higher wage," wrote Billie. Minimum wage in Washington state is 13.69 per hour, compared with $7.25 in Idaho."The wage a person earns should be equal to the amount of effort that is required to do the work," Billie added. "I would really like to know though why our politicians think they deserve to make so much money. They say they care about the average worker and want a better life for all Americans, but when was the last time they tried to live on minimum wage?" From the UK -- where...
    FLORIDA CITY, Fla. (AP) — A Florida vaccination site had so few eligible takers Saturday that is started inoculating any adult who wanted a shot rather than let the vaccine on hand go to waste. Word spread and on Sunday the Florida City site was overwhelmed, particularly after local state Sen. Annette Taddeo incorrectly tweeted that the federally run site would again take all comers. The Democrat, who was the party's lieutenant governor candidate in 2014, later deleted that tweet and corrected herself. Police had to calm the crowd Sunday when the site again enforced the state's eligibility rules: 65 and older; frontline medical workers and police officers, teachers and firefighters over 50; and younger people with a physician's note saying they would be endangered if they caught the virus. According to the Miami Herald, a Florida City police officer through a megaphone told 200 people waiting in line, “If you do not meet the criteria, you will not be vaccinated today." Vaccines must be refrigerated at extremely cold temperatures and used that day once they are removed. The site,...
    FLORIDA CITY, Fla. (AP) — A Florida vaccination site had so few eligible takers Saturday that is started inoculating any adult who wanted a shot rather than let the vaccine on hand go to waste. Word spread and on Sunday the Florida City site was overwhelmed, particularly after local state Sen. Annette Taddeo incorrectly tweeted that the federally run site would again take all comers. The Democrat, who was the party’s lieutenant governor candidate in 2014, later deleted that tweet and corrected herself. Police had to calm the crowd Sunday when the site again enforced the state’s eligibility rules: 65 and older; frontline medical workers and police officers, teachers and firefighters over 50; and younger people with a physician’s note saying they would be endangered if they caught the virus. According to the Miami Herald, a Florida City police officer through a megaphone told 200 people waiting in line, “If you do not meet the criteria, you will not be vaccinated today.” Vaccines must be refrigerated at extremely cold temperatures and used that day once they are...
    AN evil stepdad beat a five-year-old boy to death with such ferocious violence he looked like a car crash victim, an inquest heard. Days later James Roberts joked with the boy's mother: "We should kill a kid more often" as they lapped up gifts and money from wellwishers. 5Leon Jayet-Cole had at least 44 injuries including head trauma similar to a car crash victim 5Stepdad James Roberts beat him four times a week after moving in with his mother Emma Jayet Roberts beat Leon Jayet-Cole and other children in the house up to four times a week after moving in with their mother Emma, a coroner heard. Their natural father Michael Cole suspected abuse and warned social services. But a damning coroner's verdict today found social workers, police and health officials failed to stop it. It came at the end of a long-running inquest that began in 2018 in Christchurch, New Zealand. Little Leon, who was on the autistic spectrum, died in hospital in May 2015. A day earlier his stepfather Roberts called an ambulance claiming he found him pale...
    DEAR HARRIETTE: I met a psychic at the supermarket the other day. Harriette Cole  We were both in the produce department waiting for the stocker to bring out more vegetables. The pandemic has been causing a lot of shortages in some items, so grocery runs have been difficult. We were able to share a moment together, talking about the challenges we’ve faced. She asked for my birthday and my sign, and she told me all about myself and my past. She knew about my family and my fight to keep my father healthy. I couldn’t believe the connection I felt with her; she felt what I have been feeling this past year. One thing we talked about that I cannot shake is my love life. I told her about a friend who has been dropping off supplies and calls me all the time, and she said that the love I’ve been looking for is right in front of me — meaning him. Now, I don’t know this lady. My friends say it’s crazy, but I need some advice from someone...
    DEAR HARRIETTE: Last month I found out that my boss was an alcoholic. It came to my attention that he had begun drinking again, and it was clear to me that it was affecting his job performance. Harriette Cole  I work in a warehouse with machinery, and it is extremely unsafe to work under the influence. I went to the board to make a complaint, and he was removed temporarily from his position; our district manager offered the higher-up position to me. I never imagined being offered a promotion. Now my co-workers are beginning to whisper, saying that I turned in my boss in order to steal his job, but that is not how it went. I want everyone to trust me and not think I am a sneaky liar. I was thinking about stepping down, but the salary and benefits are great, and I love having the extra responsibility — despite the rumors. Was I wrong for accepting this job? Or should I work hard and ignore the whispers? Job Climber DEAR JOB CLIMBER: You should keep your job...
    There are still about 60,000 ballots left to count in Georgia as the presidential race there comes down to the wire, the Georgia secretary of state's office announced in a press conference Thursday morning. In a press release, the office confirmed that as of 9:15 a.m. ET, there were approximately 61,367 outstanding mail-in absentee ballots that remain uncounted. The updated number came as a surprise to many watching the election closely, as only hours before, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger indicated that the number of uncounted ballots was under 25,000. During the press conference, when asked about the discrepancy, Georgia's statewide voting system implementation manager, Gabriel Sterling, explained that the number could fluctuate as counties intermittently report results. He even said that some of the discrepancy could be due to the simple human error of precinct workers forgetting to hit "upload." He also described the number of absentee ballots as a "moving target," but assured that all things are proceeding smoothly and accurately. UPDATE: The Secretary of State's Office says there are actually 50,000-60,000 uncounted ballots...
    These are the clumisest names in America New Report Reveals Chick-fil-A Has the Slowest Drive-Thru Service—It’s Also the Most Popular An Amazon worker said the company reinstated a dangerous work productivity tool during Prime Day delivery rush © Reuters A truck with the logo of Amazon Prime Delivery arrives at the Amazon logistics center in Lauwin-Planque. Reuters An Amazon worker told a New York state judge that the company is reinstating disciplinary action for time spent "off task" — for hand-washing and sanitizing — because "Amazon needed its employees to work faster during peak season." Amazon had previously said they would not reprimand employees for spending time cleaning or hand washing, but workers said in a court filing that managers would not be following this protocol during Prime Day, Amazon's biggest shopping event.  After a Staten Island warehouse employee died of COVID-19, six fellow workers sued the company for creating an unsafe work environment during the coronavirus pandemic.  According to the latest filing, four Staten Island warehouse workers have tested positive since mid-September.  "We have reinstated a portion...
    The public debate over whether U.S. employers should reopen for business even as the coronavirus continues to rage has tended to obscure another thorny issue: With COVID-19 showing few signs of letting up, regular testing of millions of workers is becoming an enormous task. Screening is complex, costly and, by the way, no guarantee against potentially lethal outbreaks. Experts said there's more at stake for workers and their employers than just spiting in a tube. "There are different reasons for testing — either you have someone who has symptoms, or you're conducting asymptomatic screening or surveillance to find positive cases in the workplace before they start to spread," said Megan Ranney, an emergency physician at the Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. "But even with negative tests, you still need to wear a mask and social distance. Tests aren't meant to take the place of other measures."  Part of the challenge for companies is simply figuring out what kind of test is most suitable to their needs, with each approach having pros and cons.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your...
    (CNN Business)Amazon said Thursday that 19,816 of its front-line employees at Amazon and Whole Foods have tested positive or been presumed positive for the coronavirus, shedding light for the first time on how its workforce has been impacted by Covid-19.The company had resisted sharing comprehensive data with the public and with its own workers since the start of the pandemic.This story is developing ...
    Democrat presidential candidate Joe Biden said 20,000 non-unionized Delphi workers “did fine” after they had their earned pensions gutted via the Obama administration’s taxpayer-funded auto bailout of General Motors (GM). In 2009, as part of the Obama-Biden administration’s bailout of GM, the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) terminated the pension plans of about 20,0000 non-unionized  American workers with the auto parts supplier Delphi Automotive Systems. In some cases, workers had their pensions gutted by 30 to 70 percent. A federal report in 2013 detailed that the Delphi workers would likely have their pensions cut by an estimated $440 million. In 2012, Biden downplayed the impact that the pension gutting scheme had on working and middle-class retirees at Delphi, as Politico noted: “Some of them got hurt,” Biden tells the interviewer. “The vast majority, because of the federal pension board they have out there to make up differences when companies go under like this, most did fine.” [Emphasis added] This isn’t the way the Delphi workers see it, as the interviewer explains. Biden insists it’s out of the White House’s control. [Emphasis added] Despite Biden’s...
    DEAR HARRIETTE: My co-workers are always gossiping. I am very open and friendly, but I don’t appreciate them talking about other co-workers’ business. I do not take part in it. Harriette Cole  One day, someone asked me why I always ditch them mid-conversation. They said if I plan on being rude, I should stop joining them altogether. I said, “As soon as we go from talking regular to talking crap, you lose my respect.” Looking back, I think I could have said this differently, but I felt attacked for trying to do the right thing and walk away from a bad conversation. When I was questioned and dismissed, I kind of snapped. How can I, walking away from that type of conversation, not be obvious as to why? How am I the one ridiculed? I don’t want negative energy at work, but I feel like it’s already present, and now I’m probably the topic of their little clique. I want to neutralize the situation and go back to associating with co-workers and respectfully excusing myself when I become uncomfortable. Neutral Co-worker...
    Pregnancy is not a life-threatening illness: Ted Cruz takes heat for claim in call for abortion pill ban How actor Mark Wahlberg, Detroit car dealer became best friends, business partners Amazon said to track "labor organizing threats" against company Amazon may be stepping up its monitoring of workers involved in labor activities at the ecommerce company, according to a job listing that recently appeared on its website. © Jane Barlow - PA Images Amazon fulfillment centre A screenshot of the ad (see below), which has since been removed, shows Amazon seeking to recruit an analyst to collect information related to "labor organizing threats against the company." Other job duties include tracking the "funding and activities connected to corporate campaigns internal and external against Amazon." The job listing was posted in January, according to a Vice report, but only drew public attention this week after surfacing on Twitter. Amazon said the listing "was not an accurate description of the role" and removed it from its site. The company also indicated that it employs a team of analysts to monitor and prepare...
    FORT WORTH, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – A tip from a maintenance worker led to the arrest of capital murder suspect Yaser Said, who was on the run since the slayings of his teenage daughters in 2008. Two relatives of Said were also arrested and charged with helping him evade capture for more than 12 years. Islam Yaser-Abdel Said, Yaser’s 32-year-old son, and Yassein Said, Yaser’s 59-year-old brother, were arrested Wednesday in Euless by the FBI’s Dallas Violent Crimes Task Force and charged via criminal complaint with concealing a person from arrest. Both made their initial appearances before U.S. Magistrate Judge Hal R. Ray in Fort Worth Friday afternoon. “For years, Islam and Yassein Said — Sarah and Amina’s own brother and uncle – allegedly harbored the girls’ killer,” said U.S. Attorney Erin Nealy Cox. “In concealing Yaser Said from arrest, not only did these men waste countless law enforcement hours in the hunt for a brutal fugitive, they also delayed justice for Sarah and Amina. Thankfully, their day of reckoning has finally arrived. We are hopeful all three arrests will bring...
    Organizers of a national workers strike say tens of thousands are expected to walk off the job Monday in more than two dozen U.S. cities to protest systemic racism and economic inequality that has only worsened during the coronavirus pandemic. Dubbed the "Strike for Black Lives," labor unions, along with social and racial justice organizations from New York City to Los Angeles, will participate in a range of planned actions. Where work stoppages are not possible for a full day, participants will either picket during a lunch break or observe moments of silence to honor Black lives lost to police violence, organizers said. "We are ... building a country where Black lives matter in every aspect of society — including in the workplace," said Ash-Lee Henderson, an organizer with the Movement for Black Lives, a coalition of more than 150 organizations that make up the Black Lives Matter movement. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "The Strike for Black Lives is a moment of reckoning for corporations that have long ignored the concerns of their Black workforce and...
    Getty As parents consider whether to send their children back to daycare or school, they can look to childcare centers that remained open during the pandemic to learn what that might look like. YMCA USA served up to 40,000 children of essential workers during the pandemic and said there were reports of isolated coronavirus cases, but no outbreaks. The childcare centers took a number of precautions, including disinfecting surfaces every hour, not allowing children from sharing supplies and organizing no-contact activities. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. As more people return to work, parents have to decide whether to send their children to camp, daycares, and school, knowing that it could potentially expose their kids to the coronavirus.  About two-thirds of parents have already decided that they will send their children back to school in the fall. To get a sense of what daycares and schools might look like, and how protective they can be against the disease, families can look to childcare centers that remained open throughout the pandemic to serve children of essential workers.  Since...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Two frontline nurses from Astoria shared their love with the world as they tied the knot during a live wedding ceremony on NBC’s TODAY show on June 25.  Vanessa Baral, 27, a float nurse from Long Island Jewish Forest Hills Hospital, and Herwyn Silva, 28, a nurse at Lenox Hill Hospital, were married by TODAY co-anchor and ordained minister Hoda Kotb as the couple’s coworkers held watch parties for the ceremony at both hospitals.  Baral’s LIJ Forest Hills coworkers celebrate the couple’s nuptial. (Photo courtesy of Northwell Health) Silva’s coworkers at Lenox Hill Hospital cheer on the newlyweds. (Photo courtesy of Northwell Health) NBC is sending the newlywed couple to Fiji for their honeymoon.  “It definitely caught us by surprise. We still can’t believe it and we’re still processing it,” the couple told QNS. “We went back to work and everyone said, ‘You’re going to Fiji!’ We are definitely in disbelief and excited to take a trip next year.’”  NBC had contacted Lenox...
    CBS News is chronicling what has changed for the lives of residents across the nation in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Spring and summer in San Francisco are typically the busiest seasons of the year for Stephanie Mufson.  Her small business, Parade Guys works with a group of 30 to 40 contractors to create floats and large displays for many of the parades in Northern California. A team of painters, builders, and sculptors would typically be producing floats for events like the San Francisco Pride parade or Fourth of July celebrations. Stephanie Mufson's small business, Parade Guys, works with a group of 30 to 40 contractors to create floats and large displays for many of the parades in Northern California. Since large outdoor festivals are being cancelled and celebrations are moving to virtual formats, independent workers who rely heavily on seasonal events are now searching for new ways to make a living.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "I'm highly qualified for all event work, but with no events, I'm not qualified for anything," Mufson said.  In California 1.6 million workers rely...
    HYDERABAD, India (AP) — At least two workers were killed and four others sickened by a gas that leaked from a pharmaceutical plant Tuesday in an Indian industrial city where another fatal gas leak occurred less than two months ago. “The fire brigade immediately reached the scene and plugged the leak,” police commissioner Rajeev Kumar Meena said of the incident that occurred around 2 a.m. at the Sainor Life Sciences pharmaceutical plant in Visakhapatnam in India’s Andhra Pradesh state. The injured workers were hospitalized in stable condition, authorities said. Benzimedazole, a chemical compound found in many antifungal and antiparasitic drugs that contains cancer-causing benzene, was released in a gas form, Meena said. An investigation was ordered to establish the cause of the leak. On May, 7 another industrial accident in the same city killed 12 people, and about 1,000 others were hospitalized due to exposure from the gas in the community around a plastics factory. Styrene gas leaked from the LG Polymers’ plant in Visakhapatnam as workers restarted the plant after a six-week coronavirus lockdown ended. The latest...
    The Los Angeles City Council is poised to offer thousands of city employees cash payouts to retire, part of a major push to cut payroll costs during an unfolding financial crisis. About 2,850 employees, or roughly 8.2% of the city workforce, would be eligible for buyouts of up to $80,000 if they retire in the coming year, city budget analysts said. The program would result in a major downsizing of the workforce, the largest since the 2008 recession, triggering new reductions in services. Still, Mayor Eric Garcetti praised the initiative, saying it would cut employee costs while relying on fewer employee furlough days to balance the budget. “It’ll save money. It’ll save costs. And it can perhaps lessen the furloughs,” he said. The council’s Budget and Finance Committee endorsed the buyouts Monday, setting the stage for a full council vote on Tuesday. If approved, city employees who are eligible to retire — and have been facing the threat of furloughs — can begin applying for the retirement payouts next week. The proposal comes as City Hall faces a range of...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Supporters of police reform say homeless outreach should not be the responsibility of the NYPD. They also want social workers, not the police, to respond to calls about the mentally ill, CBS2’S Aundrea Cline-Thomas reported Monday. NYPD officers said they knew Ricky Bellevue had a mental illness, but thought he posed a threat when they violently restrained him in Rockaway Beach. One officer is accused of using an illegal chokehold and is facing criminal charges. It comes as city leaders consider transferring the responsibility of responding to people with mental illness from police to social workers as part of broader reform efforts. “My approach has to be one of understanding that I am not reasoning with a mind that is fully there,” said Dr. Claire Green-Forde, the executive director of New York City’s chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. GEORGE FLOYD PROTESTS CBS2’s Maurice DuBois, Documentary Filmmaker Marshall Curry Discuss Where The Conversation About Race Goes From Here Public Advocate Jumaane Williams On What’s Next With Race In America Having The Difficult But...
    CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuelan medical personnel face increasing risks of being infected with the coronavirus due to a lack of protective equipment, an opposition legislator and a health-focused non-government organization said on Monday. The OPEC nation, which has been in quarantine since March 17, is struggling under a hyperinflationary economic crisis that weakened basic services including running water and left many hospitals without basic sanitation. "In four months of quarantine, hospitals did not receive materials, medical equipment was not repaired, beds were not acquired, ventilators were not installed," Jose Manuel Olivares, a lawmaker and doctor, said in an online press conference. Health workers have died "for want of a mask ... for want of gloves," he said, adding that hospitals have "no water, no power, no medicine." The country's opposition-run congress and Doctors United for Venezuela say six doctors died of COVID-19 between June 19 and 28 in the western state of Zulia, which has emerged as a hot spot for COVID-19. [L1N2DZ1FM] Doctors United for Venezuela says a nurse also died of the disease during that period. Venezuela's Information...
    MADRID (Reuters) - Health workers in scrubs and face masks gathered in central Madrid's Puerta del Sol Square on Monday, demanding better terms for work in a system that was overwhelmed by one of the world's worst outbreaks of the coronavirus. In a gathering called by a group representing 10,000 contracted health workers in the Spanish capital, they waved banners reading, "Who will look after the people who look after you?" Ivan Zanon, who works at the emergency unit of Madrid's Gregorio Maranon hospital, said they wanted social and financial recognition for their work. "Since the pandemic started I have signed three different contracts in less than two months. My biggest fear is my future, which is like lots of other people's," he said. "It's fear of instability. Where will we be in two years, when will they give us fixed contracts?" Some in the crowd wept as they slowly sang, "I Will Resist", a 1980s pop track that thundered from balconies during a lockdown imposed in response to an outbreak which has killed more than 28,000 people. (Reporting by...
    Amazon said it’s shelling out $500 million in one-time worker bonuses this month as pressure continues to mount on the online shopping giant to do more to protect and pay workers during the coronavirus pandemic. The bonuses will pay between $150 for part-time employees at its warehouses and Whole Foods stores and up to $3,000 for owners of its contracted delivery service operations, the company said in a blog post. Full-time Whole Foods employees can expect $500 bumps, while front-line Amazon “market leaders” should see $1,000. “Our front-line operations teams have been on an incredible journey over the last few months, and we want to show our appreciation with a special one-time Thank You bonus,” senior vice president Dave Clark said in a blog post. Amazon’s warehouse workers in Germany are striking this week, claiming the company is not doing enough to protect its employees from COVID-19. Germany is Amazon’s second-largest market outside the US and labor unions there have been leading aggressive campaigns to increase pay for Amazon’s hourly workers there.
    GREELEY, Colo. (CBS4) – Friends, loved ones, and fellow union members gathered in Greeley Sunday to remember the six JBS employees who died due to COVID-19. The memorial event was held by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 7, which represents many employees at the meat packing plant. (credit: CBS) The JBS plant in Greeley was home to one of the state’s earliest and largest coronavirus outbreaks. Since the beginning of April, 281 employees at the plant have tested positive for COVID-19 and 6 have died. According to state data, one employee from the corporate office also died. “They had a name, they had a face, they had a heartbeat, they had a soul,” said Kim Cordova, president of UFCW Local 7. “We should never let anybody forget what happened to these workers.” During the memorial, UFCW Local 7 members, as well as several local leaders, paid tribute to the six plant employees who died this year: Saul Longoria Sanchez, Tibursio Rivera López, Eduardo Conchas de la Cruz, Way Ler, Daniel Avila Loma, and Tin Aye. Family members...
    One dry, summer day several years ago a mother watched as her adult son broke furniture and smashed the walls of their trailer-park home. The Eugene, Oregon woman dialed 911 for help. She pleaded to the emergency dispatcher: Don’t send police. Her son carried a history of traumatic encounters with law enforcement, and she feared how he would react to an armed officer. Though Eugene officers still went, the dispatcher also routed the call to a radio in a white van that happened to be parked near the trailer park. Inside sat Ben Brubaker, a crisis worker for Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets, or CAHOOTS, a fleet of two-person teams that respond to such calls. He and his partner, a medic, had just finished another call. Brubaker heard about the man’s fear of police, which he refers to as “institutional trauma,” common among people living in low-income communities and communities of color, he said, with many having lived through traumatic experiences with law enforcement. From his van, he called the mother, who was afraid and upset. He spoke...
    MAIDUGURI (Reuters) - Islamist militants have abducted four aid workers and a private security worker in northeast Nigeria, the hostages said in a video seen by Reuters on Monday. The hostages identified themselves and said they each worked for different organizations. With just their heads and shoulders showing against leafy plants outdoors, they named large aid groups Action Against Hunger, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and REACH. "I am appealing to the International Rescue Committee to come and rescue me," said one of the hostages, who gave his name as Luka Filibus. The incident underscores the increasing risk for aid workers in northeast Nigeria, where a decade-long conflict with Boko Haram and Islamic State's regional ally has fuelled one of the world's worst humanitarian crises. The abduction is also a sign of how dangerous the region has become since Nigeria's military withdrew into garrison towns they call "super camps", leaving previously safe major roads, much of the countryside and smaller towns unprotected. Nigeria's army has this year touted major victories against the insurgents, but recent attacks and the abductions undermine...
    HOUSTON (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — Health departments in Texas and across the country that are using contact tracers to contain coronavirus outbreaks are scrambling to bolster their ranks amid a surge of cases and resistance to cooperation from those infected or exposed. With too few trained contact tracers to handle soaring caseloads, one hard-hit Arizona county is relying on National Guard members to pitch in. In Louisiana, people who have tested positive typically wait more than two days to respond to health officials — giving the disease crucial time to spread. Many tracers are finding it hard to break through suspicion and apathy to convince people that compliance is crucial. Contact tracing — tracking people who test positive and anyone they’ve come in contact with — was challenging even when stay-at-home orders were in place. Tracers say it’s exponentially more difficult now that many restaurants, bars and gyms are full, and people are gathering with family and friends. “People are probably letting their guard down a little … they think there is no longer a threat,” said Grand Traverse County, Michigan, Health...
    MINNEAPOLIS — 3M Co. says global demand for N95 masks continues to far exceed supply. The Maplewood-based conglomerate corporation says it has doubled production of N95 masks this year. But, with too few N95 respirators to go around, nurses and other health care workers are being forced to reuse the masks even though the coronavirus can live on surfaces for up to 72 hours. Hospitals are taking steps to extend the use of a single mask, including using ultraviolet light to kill the virus or treating them with vaporized hydrogen peroxide, the Star Tribune reported. Used masks can also be placed in separate paper bags where they can air out until any virus dies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health care workers, including hospital staff, make up about 10 percent of Minnesota’s 35,549 confirmed cases, officials said. That number of positive cases grew by 523 cases Sunday, according to the Minnesota Department of Health. Eight more people have died of COVID-19 in Minnesota, bringing the number of deaths to 1,425 across the state, health...
    MINNEAPOLIS — 3M Co. says global demand for N95 masks continues to far exceed supply. The Maplewood-based conglomerate corporation says it has doubled production of N95 masks this year. But, with too few N95 respirators to go around, nurses and other health care workers are being forced to reuse the masks even though the coronavirus can live on surfaces for up to 72 hours. Hospitals are taking steps to extend the use of a single mask, including using ultraviolet light to kill the virus or treating them with vaporized hydrogen peroxide, the Star Tribune reported. Used masks can also be placed in separate paper bags where they can air out until any virus dies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health care workers, including hospital staff, make up about 10 percent of Minnesota’s 35,549 confirmed cases, officials said. That number of positive cases grew by 523 cases Sunday, according to the Minnesota Department of Health. Eight more people have died of COVID-19 in Minnesota, bringing the number of deaths to 1,425 across the state, health officials said....
    (Reuters) - Amazon.com Inc said on Monday it would spend $500 million on one-time bonuses to its front-line employees and partners working through the coronavirus crisis. Employees and partners who have been with the e-commerce company through June will receive bonuses ranging from $150 to $3,000, the company said (https://blog.aboutamazon.com/operations/a-thank-you-bonus-for-amazon-front-line-employees-and-partners?utm_source=social&utm_medium=tw&utm_term=amznnews&utm_content=thankyoubonus&linkId=92219661) in a blog post. The world's largest online retailer, which delivers about 10 billion items a year, has been facing intense scrutiny from U.S. lawmakers and unions over whether it is doing enough to protect staff from the COVID-19 pandemic. Earlier in the day, workers at six Amazon sites in Germany decided to go on strike in protest over safety after some staff at logistics centres tested positive for coronavirus, labour union Verdi said on Sunday. (Reporting by Akanksha Rana in Bengaluru; Editing by Saumyadeb Chakrabarty) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter (HealthDay) MONDAY, June 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Working at home during a pandemic isn't an option for about three-quarters of U.S. workers, putting them at increased risk of infection, a new study finds. Those 108 million workers tend to be among the lowest paid and are more likely to face pandemic-related job disruptions, including layoffs, furloughs or reduced hours. "This pandemic has really exacerbated existing vulnerabilities in American society," said study author Marissa Baker. She's an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. Stress, anxiety and other mental health problems that can be brought on by job disruptions could persist after the economy reopens and social activities resume, she said in a university news release. The 25% of U.S. workers (35.6 million) who can do their jobs at home are typically in high-paid sectors such as finance, administration, engineering and technology, Baker noted. As the economy reopens, she said, these workers will continue to be less vulnerable to COVID-19 exposure and pandemic-related job disruptions but more...
    BROOK PARK, Ohio (AP) — Two Little Caesars workers have been fired after an Ohio couple found pepperonis placed to form a backward swastika on their pizza. Misty and Jason Laska made the discovery when they opened the box that they had purchased at the store on Smith Road in Brook Park on Saturday. Misty Laska posted a photo on Twitter and wrote she was “truly disappointed.” (Photo Credit: Misty Laksa/Twitter) She wrote there was nothing funny about the incident. In a statement to WOIO-TV, Little Caesar Enterprises said it has “zero tolerance for racism and discrimination in any form.” It said the franchise store employees were immediately terminated. (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — 3M Co. says global demand for N95 masks continues to far exceed supply. The Maplewood-based conglomerate corporation says it has doubled production of N95 masks this year. But, with too few N95 respirators to go around, nurses and other health care workers are being force to reuse the masks even though the coronavirus can live on surfaces for up to 72 hours. Hospitals are taking steps to extend the use of a single mask, including using ultraviolet light to kill the virus or treating them with vaporized hydrogen peroxide, the Star Tribune reported. Used masks can also be placed in separate paper bags where they can air out until any virus dies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health care workers, including hospital staff, make up about 10% of Minnesota’s 35,549 confirmed cases, officials said. That number of positive cases grew by 523 cases Sunday, according to the Minnesota Department of Health. Eight more people have died of COVID-19 in Minnesota, bringing the number of deaths to 1,425 across the state, health officials said....
    FRANKFURT – Workers at six Amazon sites in Germany will go on strike on Monday in protest over safety after some staff at logistics centers tested positive for coronavirus, labour union Verdi said. Verdi said on Sunday that the strike would last at least 48 hours, under the motto ‘Good and healthy work’, to denounce what it called a lack of transparency by the US retail giant after workers tested positive for COVID-19. “We have information that at least 30 to 40 colleagues were infected,” said Verdi representative Orhan Akman. Amazon has faced a long-running battle with unions in Germany over better pay and conditions for logistics workers, who have staged frequent strikes since 2013. Verdi said the strikes will hit Amazon sites in Leipzig, Bad Hersfeld, Rheinberg, Werne and Koblenz. It said Amazon was putting profit ahead of the safety of its workers. Amazon rejected the accusations in a statement and said that as of June it had invested $4 billion on measures to protect its global workforce and clients from the risk of COVID-19 infections. In Germany,...
    FRANKFURT – Workers at six Amazon sites in Germany will go on strike on Monday in protest over safety after some staff at logistics centers tested positive for coronavirus, labour union Verdi said. Verdi said on Sunday that the strike would last at least 48 hours, under the motto ‘Good and healthy work’, to denounce what it called a lack of transparency by the US retail giant after workers tested positive for COVID-19. “We have information that at least 30 to 40 colleagues were infected,” said Verdi representative Orhan Akman. Amazon has faced a long-running battle with unions in Germany over better pay and conditions for logistics workers, who have staged frequent strikes since 2013. Verdi said the strikes will hit Amazon sites in Leipzig, Bad Hersfeld, Rheinberg, Werne and Koblenz. It said Amazon was putting profit ahead of the safety of its workers. Amazon rejected the accusations in a statement and said that as of June it had invested $4 billion on measures to protect its global workforce and clients from the risk of COVID-19 infections. In Germany, its...