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    Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – guest host Aaron Gulbransen welcomed Senator Marsha Blackburn to the newsmaker line to discuss her recent op-ed that addresses issues surrounding rules, regulations, privacy and reforms for Section 230. Gulbransen: We have a very special guest on our newsmaker line joining us right now – U.S. Senator Marsha Blackburn. How are you, ma’am? Blackburn: Good morning. How are you? And I’m delighted to join you! Simon: Hi Marsha, it’s Roger. How are you? Blackburn: I am doing well, Roger. Always so good to hear from you. And keep up the great job writing. Simon: Thank you. But I gather you’re getting into my line of work here. I’m a little bit threatened. (Laughter) Gulbransen: Senator Blackburn wrote an op-ed, which is a great op-ed about a proposal being made by Google. And of course, you’ve had your run-ins with big tech that are well documented. And the proposal, as I understand it, that...
    Tim Hortons proposed a settlement to make up for spying on its consumers. The Canadian coffee and doughnut chain proposed giving its customers a free cup of coffee and pastry to settle four class-action lawsuits. The Tim Hortons app is accused of tracking users' location data without their permission for more than a year, for which it is currently being investigated by the Canadian government. "We're pleased to have reached a proposed settlement, subject to Court approval, in the four class action lawsuits in Quebec, British Columbia, and Ontario involving the Tim Hortons app. As part of the proposed settlement agreement, eligible app users will receive a free hot beverage and a free baked good," Tim Hortons told Motherboard. "All parties agree this is a fair settlement, and we look forward to the Superior Court of Quebec's decision on the proposal. We are confident that pending the Quebec court's approval of the settlement, the courts in British Columbia and Ontario will recognize the settlement." CABLE COMPANY TO PAY BILLIONS TO FAMILY OF WOMAN STABBED TO DEATH ...
    Joe Rogan blasted China-owned TikTok over it's 'crazy' terms of service, alleging the platform serves as a way for communist Beijing to harvest users' private data. Rogan expressed his concerns Tuesday on his podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, alleging the popular social media site can easily gain access to 'all the things you have filed away on your phone.' He also accused Bytedance, the app's parent company, of monitoring users' keystrokes and knowing 'every f***ing thing you type.' Rogan's remarks come as mothers on TikTok are removing pictures of their children after raising concerns about the amount of videos of the youngsters that are being saved by potential pedophiles online. Earlier this month, TikTok confirmed its China-based employees can access U.S. user data through robust cybersecurity controls and authorization approval protocols. U.S. government officials have believed TikTok 'is spying' on Americans for quite some time and are urging Apple and Google to remove the platform 'from their app stores for its pattern of surreptitious data practices.' Joe Rogan blasted China-owned TikTok over it's 'crazy' terms of service on his podcast Tuesday, alleging the...
    A TIKTOK tech guru is urging WhatsApp users to shield their messages from snoopers. In a recent video, user @letsdodiz showed how to lock conversations on the app behind a facial recognition or fingerprint scan on iPhone. 1TikTok user @letsdodiz shares handy tech tips with his followersCredit: TikTok It means your chats are protected from prying eyes even when your iPhone is unlocked. To set this up, head to your WhatsApp settings by opening the app and hitting the cog icon in the bottom right corner of your display. Tap Account > Privacy > Screen Lock. From here, you can switch on either Touch ID or Face ID. You'll also be able to pick the minimum amount of time you'd like to pass before your biometric ID is required again. Read more about WhatsAppUNDER THE RADAR WhatsApp plots new 'stealth mode' that totally changes how you use the appTAPPING IN WhatsApp to make HUGE change to one of its best features… but some might hate it Now, whenever you go to open WhatsApp, you'll be asked for your prints or...
    Australians are being warned to delete TikTok from their phone after a new report by cyber security experts discovered that sensitive information is being sent back to China. Security firm Internet 2.0 cracked the source code for the popular video sharing platform - downloaded by more than 7.5million Aussies - to uncover how an array of data being targeted without the user being aware. The Beijing-backed app taps into users' smartphone calendars, contacts list and scans the device's ID and hard drive to monitor all other apps that have been installed. TikTok also checks the device's location at least once an hour and will persist in seeking data from contacts even if permission is denied, according to the report. Mainly used by young people under the age of 18, the platform which beat out Google to become the globe's most popular website in 2021, largely consists of short dance videos and is widely viewed as harmless. But with the communist superpower a world leader in data collection, AI and facial recognition software, there are fears TikTok is being used by Beijing to...
    IPHONE users everywhere have to enable this setting to protect their private messages. Add another layer of protection with this quick tip. 1Face ID can do more than just protect the device as a wholeCredit: Getty Images - Getty Millions of iPhone users have grown accustomed to Face ID as a quick way to unlock their devices. Apple even introduced Mask ID to make the process even easier during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. But individual apps can be padlocked by tweaking a few minor settings. Add Face ID to WhatsApp to secure your messages in the event you leave your phone open and unlocked near prying eyes. Read More on WhatsAppCHANGING SHAPES Surprise WhatsApp update revealed – and it's changing your emoji AGAINBAD CHAT Warning for MILLIONS of WhatsApp users – your app might be 'hacked and dangerous' Open WhatsApp and navigate to Settings. Click on the Account tab, select Privacy and then tap Screen Lock - it's the last line on the bottom of the Privacy page. Toggle on Require Face ID - Touch ID is...
    Mstudioimages | E+ | Getty Images After last month's Supreme Court ruling reversing Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision protecting the legal right to an abortion, many people looked to the early 1970s for what life without the long-standing precedent would look like. But accessing abortions is much different in 2022, thanks in large part to technological innovations, including safe medication used to induce abortion. There are also new digital tools that can connect people with medical providers, friends, and other resources, making it much easier to find information about accessing abortions. With the reversal of the landmark ruling, many people are asking for the first time whether digital tools they use may put them or their loved ones at risk. Since the U.S. and most states lack digital privacy laws to safeguard consumer information, it often falls on companies and consumers themselves to protect their privacy online. Here's what to know about how digital tools collect data, how prosecutors may seek to use such information in abortion and pregnancy-related cases, and how consumers can be more mindful about...
    The very first question asked of new users of Flo, a popular period-tracking app is: “Are you pregnant?” People eager to begin using the app likely don’t think too hard before answering that question. But they should. As we face a likely future in which Roe v. Wade will be struck down by the Supreme Court, privacy experts and lay consumers alike are concerned that this and other digital data gathered by period-tracking apps could be used to prosecute women who seek or have abortions. The “FemTech” industry — a term coined by Ida Tin, the founder of another period-tracking app called Clue — is projected to grow to $60 billion globally by 2027, according to Emergen Research, a market research and strategy consulting company. And no wonder! Our friends tell us that digital health apps, including period-tracking apps, increase knowledge, help them manage premenstrual symptoms and help with fertility tracking. Our patients will often pull out their period-tracking app to show us that they couldn’t possibly be pregnant, or to remind themselves of the date of their last...
    One of Canada's most popular fast-food chains was caught eating up data from its app's users. The Canadian donut and coffee chain Tim Hortons violated Canadian privacy laws by tracking users' location data without proper consent or regulation, according to an investigation from Canadian privacy officials. SHERYL SANDBERG STEPS DOWN AS META COO AFTER 14 YEARS "Our joint investigation tells yet another troubling story of a company that failed to ensure proper design of an intrusive technology, resulting in a mass invasion of Canadians' privacy," Canadian Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien said at a Wednesday press conference. "It also highlights the very real risks related to location data and the tracking of individuals." The app tracked users when their app was not open, according to the investigation. "[Tim Hortons] says it never used this data for its intended purpose of marketing to individuals, only to analyze general consumer trends," Therrien noted. However, the company failed to adopt "an appropriate privacy management program and associated risk assessments," including contractual measures that would prevent Tim Hortons locations in...
    It’s estimated that millions of people in the U.S. use period-tracking apps to plan ahead, track when they are ovulating, and monitor other health effects. The apps can help signal when a period is late. After Politico published on May 2 a draft opinion from the Supreme Court indicating that Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that guarantees the constitutional right to an abortion, would be overturned, people turned to social media. They were expressing concerns about the privacy of this information — especially for people who live in states with strict limits on abortion — and how it might be used against them. Many users recommended immediately deleting all personal data from period-tracking apps. “If you are using an online period tracker or tracking your cycles through your phone, get off it and delete your data,” activist and attorney Elizabeth McLaughlin said in a viral tweet. “Now.” Similarly, Eva Galperin, a cybersecurity expert, said the data could “be used to prosecute you if you ever choose to have an abortion.” That got us wondering — are these concerns warranted,...
    A new app creating a wave of cartoon profile pictures for social media platforms has also sparked privacy concerns. NewProfilePic is an app by the Russian developer Linerock meant to recreate photos uploaded by its users. However, according to its privacy policy, it does share information with anonymous third parties. TWITTER UPDATES POLICY AND CREATES GAME TO HELP USERS UNDERSTAND PRIVACY New users input their name, email, location, social media accounts, and pictures in order to get an edited picture in return. All of that information, plus the IP address, a numeric designation that could identify a user's location, and browser type, is shared with the app's affiliates. #NewProfilePic app isn't messing around pic.twitter.com/HjI4eOCqfm— Daniel Burka (@dburka) May 13, 2022 The app makes money with ads and its $30 annual subscription. It is No. 1 on the photo and video chart on Apple's app store, and more than 25,000 have rated it on the Google app store. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER Linerock has roughly 50 other apps...
    GOOGLE is giving users access to details about their own technology privacy with a new folder called the Data safety section. The new data collection disclosure policy is Google's latest effort to force app developers to be transparent with Android owners. 1The Google Play store has over 2.5million apps available for download "The Data safety section on Google Play is a simple way for you to help people understand what user data your app collects or shares, as well as showcase your app’s key privacy and security practices," Google's support page writes. The Data safety section was deployed today after a delay. It will give users the opportunity to better understand what an app will log, and why. The new policy is Google's counter to Apple's App Tracking Transparency measure adopted in 2021. Read More in GoogleWATCH OUT Google gadget prototype 'accidentally left in US restaurant' revealed in imagesSTAY FOCUSED Google video shows line of tech that gives notifications with 'puffs of air' On the business-facing side, Google has provided a portal for app developers to submit information about...
    So much of our sensitive personal data is being tracked and sold that trying to protect our privacy can seem like a pointless exercise. We can disable the location tracking on phone apps only to find new apps stalking us the next time we check. We can turn off personalized advertising and still get bombarded by marketers that ignore our wishes. We can be fooled by language that’s designed to protect companies’ access to data rather than our privacy. All this surveillance allows advertisers to manipulate us into spending more. People who are struggling financially can be targeted by predatory lenders and other seedy companies. If there’s a database breach, criminals can buy our information for just a few dollars and use it to impersonate or target us for various scams. As individuals, we have limited ability to stop the prying. Meaningful action typically must come from regulators and lawmakers. But we can take a few steps to reclaim small but significant chunks of privacy and send a signal to companies that we don’t like what they’re up to....
    THERE'S a new browser on the block and it could be set to turn the heads of even the staunchest Google Chrome fans. DuckDuckGo on Tuesday announced a beta version of its privacy-focused web browser for Mac, with a Windows version coming soon. 1DuckDuckGo is launching a beta version of its browser on MacCredit: DuckDuckGo The U.S. company, which is best known for its secure search engine, already has a mobile app with millions of downloads. A desktop version has been in the works for months and is said to make private browsing simpler than rivals such as Chrome and Safari. That means it blocks third parties from tracking your browsing, shields your search history and more by default. Other browsers offer these protections but they must be switched on by digging into your settings. Read more about browersTAP TIPS I'm an ex-Apple worker and these 2 tricks will totally change how you use SafariICONIC! Google Chrome has a NEW logo – and it's got a big secret if you look close enough DuckDuckGo said in a blog post: "Our...
    CUPERTINO (CNN) — Apple CEO Tim Cook blasted regulatory proposals by Congress and in the European Union on Tuesday, arguing that legislation aimed at cracking open the company’s app store will hurt user security and privacy. The remarks show how Apple is bringing out its heaviest hitters in opposing government policies that could let iPhone users install apps from non-official sources. READ MORE: Cain Velasquez Breaks Silence On Attempted Murder Arrest Ahead Of Court Appearance – 'This Story Is Complex'“We are deeply concerned about regulations that would undermine privacy and security in service of some other aim,” Cook said in a speech to the International Association of Privacy Professionals. “Here in Washington and elsewhere, policymakers are taking steps, in the name of competition, that would force Apple to let apps onto iPhone that circumvent the App Store through a process called sideloading.” “But,” Cook added, “if we are forced to let unvetted apps onto iPhone, the unintended consequences will be profound,” Apple has long argued that its rigorous platform policies and strict oversight of app makers ensure that iOS apps...
    Washington (CNN Business)Apple CEO Tim Cook blasted regulatory proposals by Congress and in the European Union on Tuesday, arguing that legislation aimed at cracking open the company's app store will hurt user security and privacy.The remarks show how Apple (AAPL) is bringing out its heaviest hitters in opposing government policies that could let iPhone users install apps from non-official sources. "We are deeply concerned about regulations that would undermine privacy and security in service of some other aim," Cook said in a speech to the International Association of Privacy Professionals. "Here in Washington and elsewhere, policymakers are taking steps, in the name of competition, that would force Apple to let apps onto iPhone that circumvent the App Store through a process called sideloading." What Apples surging stock says about the market"But," Cook added, "if we are forced to let unvetted apps onto iPhone, the unintended consequences will be profound," Apple has long argued that its rigorous platform policies and strict oversight of app makers ensure that iOS apps are safe and trustworthy. But critics of Apple, including numerous app developers,...
    Despite recent advances in privacy measures that have disrupted online tracking, new highly effective tracking methods have been deployed by the Masters of the Universe, who have grown used to the megabillions brought in by surveillance capitalism. In an article titled “You’re Still Being Tracked on the Internet, Just in a Different Way,” the New York Times reports that the online advertising industry was disrupted last year when Apple introduced its App Tracking Transparency feature that alerted users when apps were tracking them and allowed them to deny access to their online activity. Tim Cook CEO of Apple laughing ( Stephanie Keith/Getty) Sundar Pichai CEO of Google ( Carsten Koall /Getty) But less than a year later, online advertising has adapted to the changes and a new type of internet tracking has begun taking hold. The New York Times writes: For years, digital businesses relied on what is known as “third party” tracking. Companies such as Facebook and Google deployed technology to trail people everywhere they went online. If someone scrolled through Instagram and then browsed an online shoe store, marketers could use that information...
    ANDROID users will finally get a useful privacy feature that's long been on iPhone. Bizarrely, Google gave people on rival iOS a first taste last July, leaving those on Android to wait until now. 2Google finally rolls out new feature to AndroidCredit: Getty The handy option allows you to delete history from the last 15 minutes instantly. So if you've briefly visited sites you'd rather not keep stored on your device you can quickly remove any trace of it happening. Google had originally said it would be available on Android by the end of 2021 but it never happened. The feature appears in the account section of the Google app. Several people spotted it in the open but only now has the tech giant confirmed it's official. A spokesperson for the firm told The Verge: "We’re currently rolling this feature out on the Google app for Android and expect it to be available to everyone using the app in the next few weeks. "We’re continuing to explore ways to bring this helpful feature to other surfaces." Of course, anyone wanting...
    Chinese-owned TikTok is frantically working to move all data it holds on US users to the US, and putting an American team in control, according to reports.  ByteDance, owner of the popular social video app, has launched Project Texas, which will also see an end to US employees reporting to its managers in Beijing.  Efforts to bring data to the US started a year ago, with thousands of TikTok staff  involved in the effort, including limiting access to the data from outside the US.   According to a BuzzFeed report, this is the way ByteDance has decided to handle concerns from US regulators that the Chinese government could use the app to access sensitive information on people living in the US. As well as moving data, a number of core TikTok systems, including those that check how viral a video has become, will be cloned and operated from the US for the first time, and so will the algorithm that power the 'For You' page recommendations.  Chinese-owned TikTok is frantically working to move all data it holds on US users to...
    Additionally, the state of Texas last month opened its own investigation into TikTok, alleging that the app violated children's privacy and contributed to online sex trafficking. In a Wednesday statement, TikTok responded to the investigation by saying, "We care deeply about building an experience that helps to protect and support the well-being of our community, and appreciate that the state attorneys general are focusing on the safety of younger users. We look forward to providing information on the many safety and privacy protections we have for teens." While TikTok's popularity has grown exponentially in the United States, particularly among younger users, its growth has not been without controversy. In addition to concerns about its marketing practices to young users, which prompted a federal investigation last year, online privacy experts have repeatedly cautioned that the app — which is owned by Beijing-based ByteDance — may be feeding private information to the Chinese government. Those concerns led former president Donald Trump to engage in an abortive attempt to ban the app in the United States or force its merger with a...
    Recent studies have revealed that the Chinese-owned social media TikTok can bypass security protections on Apple and Google app stores to gain full access to user data. The Wrap reports that according to two recent studies, TikTok can bypass security protections on Apple and Google app stores and gain full access to user data. The studies were conducted by “white hat” cybersecurity experts that hack and infiltrate systems for the good of the public. ByteDance CEO Zhang Yiming (STR/Getty) Three girls watching TikTok videos (Luiza Nalimova/Getty) The studies were completed in November 2020 and January 2021. The summaries of the studies suggest that TikTok is able to bypass code audits on the Apple and Google app stores. The research also found that TikTok is able to change the app’s behavior without users’ knowledge and access device tracking features that give the Chinese company and third parties access to full user data. This far exceeds the access that U.S.-made apps like Facebook and Twitter have to user data. Frank Lockerman, a cyber threat engineer at cybersecurity firm Conquest Cyber who reviewed the studies,...
    New York (CNN Business)Google (GOOG) plans to develop new privacy measures that remove the ability to track users across apps on Android devices, potentially rattling digital advertising-based businesses like Facebook that have already been disrupted by app tracking changes introduced by Apple last year. Google said Wednesday that it is launching a multi-year effort to build privacy-focused advertising solutions that will limit the sharing of user data with third parties. These solutions will operate without the individual identifiers that allow developers to track user activity across various mobile apps and enable them to create ads targeted to a user's behavior and interests. Google (GOOGL) said it is also exploring technologies that would reduce the potential for a user's data to be collected without their knowledge. The announcement — which comes as Google and other Big Tech companies face mounting regulatory scrutiny for privacy concerns and other issues — was light on specific details about how the new system would work. But it was enough to unnerve some investors in companies reliant on targeted digital advertising. Shares of Facebook-parent Meta (FB),...
    An app that China is using to track attendees at the Beijing Olympics next month has raised concerns from a cybersecurity watchdog about "a simple but devastating flaw" that it says poses privacy concerns. The Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto, said in an extensive report by research associate Jeffrey Knockel that the mandatory MY2022 app fails to validate some SSL certificates, which could leave open information to being intercepted by a malicious host, as reported by The Canadian Press. Those who attend the Olympics, including athletes and journalists, are required to download the app and upload their health and vaccination information to track potential outbreaks of COVID-19. The report warns that sensitive data even unrelated to medical information could leak given the flaws in the app, which was built by the Beijing Organizing Committee. A man wearing a face mask with the image of China's President Xi Jinping joins other human rights activists holding Olympic Rings as they protest in Taipei against the 2022 Beijing Olympic Games to mark Human Rights Day on Dec. 10, 2021....
    GENEVA (AP) — The Swiss army has told its ranks to stop using foreign instant-messaging services like WhatsApp, Signal and Telegram for official communications. Instead, it’s opting for a Swiss alternative —- in part over concerns about legislation in Washington that governs how U.S. authorities can access information held by tech companies. Army leaders, in a letter to top commanders last month, called for use of the Swiss instant messaging service Threema, and a promotion for the service was posted Dec. 29 on the Swiss army’s page on Facebook, which, like WhatsApp, is owned by the U.S. company now known as Meta. Officials have cited an enhanced need for secure communications as Swiss soldiers have fanned out to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the Alpine country. A letter sent to army chiefs last month said Threema “must be used for all service communications,” adding that “no other messaging service will be authorized.” Army spokeswoman Delphine Schwab-Allemand, in an e-mail on Wednesday confirming reports on the issue in Swiss media, seemed to soften the army’s position, saying that...
    AN urgent warning is being issued for iPad and iPhone users due to looming privacy and security concerns. Apple developer Kosta Eleftheriou revealed that the App Store hosted a series of illegal movie streaming services. 2Apple developer Kosta Eleftheriou revealed that the App Store hosted a series of illegal movie streaming apps for monthsCredit: Getty Eleftheriou showcased a series of apps discussing themselves as legitimate services—using movie trailers and photo filters to fool users.  The app encourages users to enter codes or share the app to unlock more features. There are also premium subscription tiers in the apps that are processed through Apple Pay, which Apple receives a 15-30 percent cut from. Eleftheriou stated that the apps have been available in the app store for months despite negative reviews revealing them to be illegal.  Ads for the apps have been pushed, using social media influencers with “millions” of followers to promote them, says Eleftheriou. “While Apple is failing to police its App Store, these apps have amassed over 2M downloads and are now generating ~16,000/day or about $6M per year,”...
    SMARTPHONE users are advised to download an app if they're tired of Google and Facebook secretly tracking your device. DuckDuckGo says its new protection helps to "block third-party trackers like Google and Facebook lurking in other apps." 1DuckDuckGo is the latest popular search engine that helps to 'block third-party trackers like Google and Facebook lurking in other apps'Credit: Getty The company emphasizes protecting searchers' privacy and avoiding the filter bubble of personalized search results. The move means that smartphone users worried about their privacy can join a waitlist to protect their data. "No complicated settings, no misleading warnings, no "levels" of privacy protection – just robust privacy protection that works by default, across search, browsing, email, and more," explained a recent blog post about the new browser. DuckDuckGo is now averaging over 100million daily search queries and has grown by almost 47 percent in 2021. In 2020, the company received over 23billion total search queries and achieved a daily average of 79million search queries by the end of December of that year. The jump in popularity comes amid increasing scrutiny of how giant...
    ADVERTISERS and tech companies can track your every move online. Security experts are warning about ad tracking in which every website you visit, every item you buy online, is being watched by advertisers and marketers trying to figure out how to get your attention. 1Advertisers can track your every move onlineCredit: Getty By following each website you visit, advertisers can then build a profile on you, figure out your likes and dislikes, and ultimately try to sell you products with pesky ads. Typically, according to PrivacySavvy, advertisers will use third-party cookies to collect your data. Marketers likely know your age, race, education level, where you live, what you do for work, and what your interests and hobbies are. They also likely know your browser preferences, operating system, IP address, time zone, and online location, among others.  While they won’t know your name or postal address, what they potentially know is your: Ad tracking could be seen as helpful to some because it shows you items you might be interested in buying. Most read in TechREADY FOR LAUNCH Nasa's top-secret Supersonic...
    IF you want to protect your data while you're using unknown WiFi on your smartphone you should use a virtual private network (VPN). Luckily, this is very easy to do on iPhone and you could be browsing safely after taking a few steps. 1Using a VPN can protect your data when using unknown WiFI networksCredit: Getty - Contributor What is a VPN? VPN stands for 'virtual private network'. It is software which when activated changes the "address" of a computer, laptop, tablet or mobile. Software which uses VPN technology adds an extra layer of security to computers, laptops, tablets or smartphones. VPNs make it much harder for snoopers to monitor your online activity, helping to protect personal data and information. And because of an increase in concern around personal data protection - and keeping online activity from prying eyes - VPNs are more common than ever. They can help secure your browsing on public WiFi (in cafes, shoppings centres or on public transport), and overseas - although they are banned in some countries. Most read in Phones & GadgetsFESTIVE FILMS...
    Norway’s data privacy watchdog on Wednesday fined gay dating app Grindr 65 million kroner ($7.16 million) for sending sensitive personal data to hundreds of potential advertising partners without users' consent — a breach of strict European Union privacy rules. The Norwegian Data Protection Authority said it imposed its highest fine to date because the California-based company didn't comply with the EU’s tough data protection regulations. Norway isn’t a member of the 27-nation bloc but closely mirrors EU rules. Grindr said the agency's findings related to consent policies from years ago, not its current practices, and that it is considering its next steps, including an appeal. The data watchdog "relies on a series of flawed findings, introduces many untested legal perspectives, and the proposed fine is therefore still entirely out of proportion with those flawed findings," said Grindr's chief privacy officer, Shane Wiley. MAN HIDES BRITAIN'S LARGEST MODEL TRAIN SET FROM GIRLFRIEND In 2020, Norway's Consumer Council filed a complaint against Grindr for disclosing information about its users, including GPS locations, IP addresses, ages, gender and their use of the app,...
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Norway’s data privacy watchdog on Wednesday fined gay dating app Grindr 65 million kroner ($7.16 million) for sending sensitive personal data to hundreds of potential advertising partners without users’ consent — a breach of strict European Union privacy rules. The Norwegian Data Protection Authority said it imposed its highest fine to date because the California-based company didn’t comply with the EU’s tough data protection regulations. Norway isn’t a member of the 27-nation bloc but closely mirrors the rules of the European Union. In 2020, Norway’s Consumer Council filed a complaint against Grindr for disclosing information about its users, including GPS locations, IP addresses, ages, gender and their use of the app, to several third parties for marketing purposes. That allowed users to be identified and third parties to potentially share personal information further. The data privacy watchdog said users “were forced to accept the privacy policy in its entirety to use the app” and were not asked specifically if they wanted to allow their data to be shared with third parties “for behavioral advertisement.” “Furthermore, the...
    A TIKTOK star has highlighted a neat way to sheld your WhatsApp chats from snoopers. In a recent video, user @azzharuddin2009 showed how to lock conversations on the app behind a facial recognition or fingerprint scan on iPhone. 2A TikTok star has highlighted how to lock your WhatsApp chats behind Touch ID or Face IDCredit: TikTok It means your chats are protected from prying eyes even when your iPhone is unlocked. To set this up you need to head to your WhatsApp settings by hitting the cog icon at the bottom of your display. Tap Account > Privacy > Screen Lock. From here, you can switch on either Touch ID or Face ID. Most read in TechWHATS-ZAPPED WhatsApp crashes for Apple iPhone users globally as customers complain onlineCYBER SEX 'Cyber Brothel' launches free VR world where sex dolls and humans get freakyROBO GANGS Drug cartels 'could kill anyone with deadly slaughterbots' while they sleepMONEY TALK Snapchat has handed out $250MILLION – how to get cash from the app today You'll also be able to pick the minimum amount of time...
    IF you want to prevent people snooping on your private messages this quick iPhone hack is a must. You'll already be familiar with Face ID to unlock your phone but it can be used to access individual apps as well. 2This simple trick will keep prying eyes out Many already take advantage of this for things like banking apps and even WhatsApp. And Facebook Messenger is no exception. TikToker Kadama has revealed to his 1.8million followers just how easy it is to do. First you need to open the Facebook Messenger app and select your profile photo at the top left. From there, tap on the privacy tab. You'll then see an option for app lock. Most read in TechWHATS-ZAPPED WhatsApp crashes for Apple iPhone users globally as customers complain onlineCYBER SEX 'Cyber Brothel' launches free VR world where sex dolls and humans get freakyROBO GANGS Drug cartels 'could kill anyone with deadly slaughterbots' while they sleepTYPE TERROR Facebook read my texts to show me ads and I have proof, TikTok user claims In there, just switch the require Face...
    A FREE app can stop Google and Facebook secretly tracking your Android phone. DuckDuckGo says its new protection helps to "block third-party trackers like Google and Facebook lurking in other apps." 1The new feature on DuckDuckGo helps to 'block third-party trackers like Google and Facebook lurking in other apps'Credit: Alamy The move means that Android users worried about their privacy can join a waitlist to protect their data after Apple offered similar features. It comes amid increasing scrutiny of how giant tech companies are handling their data and who is harvesting that data. In a press release DuckDuckGo said: "These hidden app trackers are super creepy because they can track everything you do in an app and also can continue to track you even when you’re not using the app. "App Tracking Protection for Android is free and blocks trackers it identifies in other apps from third-party companies." The tracking issue was highlighted over Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal which revealed how companies can compile valuable information as users scour the internet. The tech companies compile the information in order...
    ANDROID users have been warned that Google Chrome automatically shares their phone’s motion data with the websites they visit on their device, prompting calls to delete the app permanently. The shocking discovery was recently made by Security researcher Tommy Mysk revealed in a thread of tweets on October 29. 1Google Chrome automatically shares Android users' location data In his posts, Mysk wrote that "the Chrome browser on Android gives any website you visit access to your phone’s accelerometer data.” Smartphone accelerometers detect a user's orientation and position and are considered to be very sensitive. That sensor makes it possible to switch from portrait to landscape mode, as well as track your position on a map. Researchers have previously found that using that sensor alone, an app or site can gather information about your emotional state, heart rate, sleeping habits, and more. By design, Mysk found that Google Chrome allows any website a user clicks on to request that motion data. Websites do so to monitor ad interactions, check ad impressions, and track a device. Google even does this when...
    APPLE'S system that exposes creepy apps that track your location or snoop on your browsing history has finally arrived. The iPhone's new "Privacy Report" feature gives users an overview of what information their apps have access to and what they're sharing. 2Apple unveiled its upcoming iPhone 'Privacy Report' feature in JuneCredit: Apple It sits in Settings, and was launched with the release of a new beta version of the iOS operating system this week. Betas are early forms of software sent out to testers and developers. You can only access iOS betas if you're part of Apple's beta programme. Apple announced Privacy Report at its WWDC 2021 conference in June. You can use it to see what permissions apps have and how often they have used those permissions over the past seven days. For instance, the report will show the number of times an app has accessed your location, photos, camera, microphone, contacts and more. To find out who your data might be shared with, you can also view which other web domains the app is contacting. Most read in...
    ABC7 Chicago's No. 1 news is seeking an energetic, enthusiastic and creative producer to help create next generation newscasts.Job DescriptionWe are looking for a multi-skilled producer with experience and vision who will launch live daily news programs for ABC7 Chicago's streaming channel. The producer will identify interesting ways to create high-impact content for digital platforms. The ideal candidate must have rock solid news judgment and be aggressive when it comes to covering breaking news. The successful candidate will have strong writing, communication and organizational skills. The individual must be multi-skilled and will be required to book and conduct interviews, write, shoot, edit, and post content. Must be able to work unpredictable hours and work under deadline pressure, and new tasks may be assigned as the position develops. The ability to connect with our local community and understand important issues facing Chicago is a must.Responsibilities Craft fast-paced, visually compelling daily newscast; manage all aspects of the show Pitch story ideas on a daily basis Book guests and creating relevant feature segments Communicate with reporters about the focus and format of...
    By Samantha Murphy Kelly | CNN Business As some US cities start requiring proof of vaccination to enter restaurants, events and workplaces, smartphone makers such as Apple, Samsung and Google are rolling out ways to make it easy for users to show their Covid-19 vaccine status with just a tap. It could be Big Tech’s shot at making a dent with pandemic solution tools following its failed attempt last year at contact tracing apps, which used Bluetooth technology to alert people if they’ve been in close proximity with someone who tested positive for the virus. Those products were plagued by issues around measuring proximity while keeping data anonymous, notifications that failed to trigger and slow adoption rates among states. On paper, this latest effort should be much simpler, but the companies face a crowded app market and the potential for privacy concerns among some Americans. Samsung recently announced Galaxy device users can load their vaccination record from the CommonHealth app — created by Commons Project Foundation, the same healthcare nonprofit working with some airlines for proof of vaccination — and...
    Rockets were launched toward Kabul's international airport Monday morning as the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan entered its second-to-last day. There was no immediate word on who fired them. White House press secretary Jen Psaki issued a statement saying President Biden was briefed "on the rocket attack" and "was informed that operations continue uninterrupted at HKIA, and has reconfirmed his order that commanders redouble their efforts to prioritize doing whatever is necessary to protect our forces on the ground." The Associated Press cited witnesses as saying the rockets hit Kabul's Salim Karwan neighborhood. Gunfire then broke out, but it wasn't clear who was shooting, the AP said. The Reuters news service reported that as  many as five rockets were fired but were intercepted by a missile defense system, according to a U.S. official. There were no initial reports of casualties.  Trending News U.S. airstrike takes out ISIS-K vehicle packed with explosives in Kabul Here's what we know about the 13 U.S. service members killed in Kabul Florida resident detained in Haiti president's assassination Police arrest Bangladesh factory owners after fire...
    Ed Asner, the longtime TV icon who holds the record for most Primetime Emmys earned by a male actor, died on Sunday, his publicist said. He was 91. Charles Sherman, of Charles Sherman Public Relations, confirmed Asner's death to CBS News. A statement from Asner's family on his Twitter account also confirmed his death. "We are sorry to say that our beloved patriarch passed away this morning peacefully. Words cannot express the sadness we feel," the tweet said. "With a kiss on your head- Goodnight dad. We love you." Luis Giraldo contributed reporting. This is a developing story and will be updated. Trending News Live Updates: Hurricane Ida makes landfall in Louisiana as an Category 4 storm U.S. airstrike takes out ISIS-K vehicle packed with explosives in Kabul Landlord faces homelessness as tenants fall behind on rent 13 U.S. service members killed in Kabul airport attack identified Lindsey Graham predicts "parade of horribles" in Afghanistan First published on August 29, 2021 / 1:58 PM © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. Download our Free...
    A NEW iPhone update is giving users the option to bolster privacy from apps that can track both data and search history. The feature, available for phones that updated with iOS 14.5 and later (the most recent is 14.7), gives you the option to toggle the ad tracking of your digital activity. 2A new iPhone update is giving users the option to bolster privacy from apps that can track both data and search historyCredit: Getty 'FUNDAMENTAL HUMAN RIGHT’ First introduced in April, the App Tracking Transparency (ATT) seeks to provide users with stronger abilities to protect how and what is done on the iPhone. The extra security blanket is part of Apple’s effort to increase transparency and privacy, which its CEO Tim Cook first called "fundamental human right" in a 2018 tweet. He also echoed that protection declaration again over the summer in a six-minute video.  “At Apple, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right,” Cook says. “We work relentlessly to build it into everything we make.  “It’s fundamental to how we design and engineer every product and service...
    The Reverend Jesse Jackson and his wife, Jacqueline, have both been hospitalized after testing positive for COVID-19, according to a statement from Jackson's Rainbow/Push Coalition. The 79-year-old civil rights leader and his wife, 77, are both being treated at Northwestern Hospital. "Doctors are currently monitoring the condition of both," the statement said, adding, "there are no further updates at this time." Jackson was vaccinated in January, and had encouraged other elderly people to get their shots, CBS Chicago reports. Jackson in 2017 disclosed that in 2015 he had been diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. Despite his diagnoses, he has continued his work as an activist. This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available. Coronavirus Crisis More Phil Valentine, radio host and vaccine skeptic, dies of COVID-19 University of Virginia disenrolls 238 students who did not get COVID vaccine ICU beds in short supply as COVID-19 cases continue to spike What to know about COVID-19 as fall approaches Florida city declares water shortage linked to COVID-19 surge More First published on August 21, 2021...
    Texas Governor Greg Abbott has tested positive for COVID-19, his office announced on Tuesday. Abbott is fully vaccinated and so far is experiencing no symptoms, his office said.  Coronavirus Crisis More Even some Trump hotels requiring masks as COVID spreads Travelers are canceling trips with COVID numbers rising again Catholic cardinal, a vaccine skeptic, on ventilator with COVID-19 Falcons say they're first NFL team to be 100% vaccinated Doctors fight "two pandemics": COVID surge and misinformation More First published on August 17, 2021 / 5:10 PM © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. Download our Free App For Breaking News & Analysis Download the Free CBS News app iOS Android Fire TV Apple TV Roku All Smart TV Apps Copyright © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy California Privacy/Information We Collect Do Not Sell My Personal Information Ad Choice Terms of Use Mobile User Agreement About Advertise Closed Captioning CBSN on Paramount+ CBS News Store Site...
    APPLE has accidentally promoted an iOS scam in its app store that set Americans back hundreds of dollars each year. Around two percent of the top-grossing apps on the marketplace are scams, according to a Washington Post investigation. 2Scams in the Apple App Store could set Americans back hundreds of dollars each yearCredit: Reuters Some "Slime" games on the marketplace offer subscriptions of $10 a week but they don’t work, Forbes reports. It's reported that some fake apps start charging users automatically within days after Americans are tricked into submitting their payment details. It’s unknown how much Apple made from scam app purchases. But, spending on apps on the Apple Store and Google Play marketplace reached almost $64.9bn in the first half of 2021, according to Sensor Tower estimates. This was almost 30 percent higher than spending in the first half of 2020. A senior Apple engineer described AppStore security as “bringing a plastic butter knife to a gunfight”, the Financial Times reports. There are concerns among tech giants that a "factory" of scam apps is emerging where developer accounts...
    Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin announced Monday that all active-duty troops will be required get the COVID-19 vaccine by mid-September.  "I have every confidence that Service leadership and your commanders will implement this new vaccination program with professionalism, skill, and compassion," Austin said in a memo to all Defense Department employees. This is a breaking story. It will be updated. First published on August 9, 2021 / 1:49 PM © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. Download our Free App For Breaking News & Analysis Download the Free CBS News app iOS Android Fire TV Apple TV Roku All Smart TV Apps Coronavirus Crisis More Job openings surpass 10 million, another record high Businesses large and small say: Mask up, again Church becomes vaccine site after 6 members die from COVID-19 Austin, Texas, activates emergency alert system for COVID Judge OK's Norwegian Cruise Line requiring vaccination proof More Copyright © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy...
    New York City will soon require proof of COVID-19 vaccination for indoor dining, fitness and entertainment. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the "Key to NYC Pass" on Tuesday. He said the mandate will apply to workers and customers in those indoor spaces. The policy will be phased in over the coming weeks. The final details will be announced and implemented during the week of August 16, with full enforcement by mid-September. Mark Levine, who chairs the City Council's Health Committee, called it a "critical measure" to slow the spread of the Delta variant and incentivize getting vaccinated. This story is developing and will be updated.  First published on August 3, 2021 / 10:35 AM © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. Download our Free App For Breaking News & Analysis Download the Free CBS News app iOS Android Fire TV Apple TV Roku All Smart TV Apps Coronavirus Crisis More Delta variant drives COVID surge, prompting new mandates U.S. to continue migrant...
    A CYBERSECURITY expert is warning anyone with the Gmail app to delete it from their iPhone immediately as it's been dubbed a "privacy nightmare." Zak Doffman, a cybersecurity contributor for Forbes, has warned about Gmail's "alarming privacy labels" and urged users of the app to remove it from their phones. 2Google's Gmail has been slammed as a 'privacy nightmare'Credit: SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett Doffman urged that a recent Apple update should push cellphone users to delete the Gmail app. He also slammed Google's Gmail as "a privacy nightmare compared to Apple’s alternative." Doffman explained via Forbes: "Earlier this year, Google cleverly allowed Facebook to play the role of minesweeper when Apple’s privacy labels exposed the sheer extent of the previously invisible data harvesting taking place. "Google let its own iOS apps run stale, delaying updates until the furor had settled, before showing that its own apps were no better. "And so, one by one, we saw Google’s flagship iOS apps – Gmail, Maps, Photos, Chrome, YouTube, Docs – fill in the alarming blanks. "And because this is Google, it was suddenly very important...
    We live in constant concern for privacy. Generally, we are not aware of the extent of our personal data once it is launched on the network. On the other hand, the use of messaging applications is a constant. Since WhatsApp appeared in 2009, similar applications have emerged to facilitate the task of communication. Be it WhatsApp, Telegram or a simple SMS, communicate in a non-verbal way it is a necessity. But the beginning of the year was not very positive for the green application owned by Facebook. Some draconian accepting terms of acceptance of their privacy guidelines put the cry in the sky of millions of users. Some began switching to other options en masse, but a tweet from Elon Musk was enough to make Signal the favorite. Although this app had been available for some time, the recommendation of the founder of Tesla triggered interest in Signal. What is Signal? A messaging application like another, but which has the virtue of being extremely secure and of not collecting personal data of any kind, something that, for example, WhatsApp does...