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    ALMOST 50 percent of boomers "may not see their families for winter holidays this year due to the Covid-19 pandemic." New research suggests that four out of every 10 American boomers might not get to see their families for Thanksgiving or winter holidays like Christmas because of coronavirus. 13New research suggests that four out of every 10 American boomers might not get to see their families for ThanksgivingCredit: Reuters 13Coronavirus has scuppered many family plans Credit: AP:Associated Press 13Nearly half of the 2,000 Americans aged 56+ don't think they'll see loved onesCredit: Getty Images - Getty According to a recent survey of 2,000 Americans, nearly half of people over the age of 56 — and 60 percent across all age groups — don't think they'll be seeing loved ones at any point during this holiday season. Nearly nine in 10 (86 percent) Americans said keeping their family safe and healthy is their top priority this holiday season. As a result, 41 percent of respondents are already planning to skip their usual extended family holiday gatherings for 2020, due to...
    4 SURPRISE surprise! Two weeks into an unprecedented and draconian second national lockdown within one calendar year, the government still has NO IDEA if it’s actually working or not. Surprise surprise! With just two weeks before said lockdown is lifted, the public still has NO IDEA what our lives are going to look like in the lead up to a depressingly depleted Christmas. 4The consensus over the lockdown in March – seen as necessary to protect the NHS – has been smashedCredit: AFP or licensors Once again, the divisions over lockdowns within the upper echelons of our leadership seem to have been publicly exposed. The eternally optimistic Prime Minister Boris Johnson – keeping a smile on his face despite a ridiculous two weeks of isolation within Downing Street – is reassuring backbenchers that current national measures will end on December 2, while providing no specifics of what system will replace it. But lockdown dove Matt Hancock, who would love us to stay locked in our homes in perpetuity, has expressed doubts about whether the restrictions can be replaced with...
    A South Dakota nurse who cares for COVID-19 patients says one of the hardest parts of her job is convincing a number of those who are critically ill that the deadly virus is actually real. After sharing a thread of her experiences to Twitter over the weekend, nurse Jodi Doering appeared on CNN’s New Day on Monday to describe how many of her patients are still in denial about coronavirus, willing to believe almost anything else has made them sick. ‘I think the hardest thing to watch is that people are still looking for something else and they want a magic answer, and they don't want to believe that COVID is real,’ she told the network. ‘People want it to be influenza, they want it to be pneumonia, we’ve even had people say, “I think it could be lung cancer.”’ She continued: ‘Even after the positive test results come back, they still don’t want to believe it.’ Doering added that, in some cases, her patients’ dying words have been: ‘This can’t be happening, it’s not real.' Nurse Jodi Doering...
    Two floods in a week is the ordeal that the residents of Palm Avenue and West 28th Street in Hialeah have had to experience, who launched a request for help to local authorities. Jenia Bermúdez, a Hialeah resident, says she has called the authorities “and they told us it was not a disaster, that it was just rain, but this has a name and it’s called a hurricane.” The material losses are considerable, there are families that in 7 days have bought appliances and armchairs twice, but the floods spoiled everything. Yamileth López says that in her house “the walls are damaged, the baseboards, and what are the furniture and the refrigerators too”. As if that were not enough, the sanitary sewer is clogged by water and residents cannot use the toilet facilities. “Two days without going out with the car and there is a person who cannot do therapy because he cannot go out,” says Enrique Alvares, another affected resident in Hialeah The floods have caused so much psychological trauma in the affected...
    PATCHOGUE, New York -- Almost Home Animal Rescue not only saves animals but also provides a helping hand for lower-income families and their pets. Their training wheels program wanted to bring the efforts of the shelter into the community.Members help families keep their pets and not reach the point of surrendering them to the already overcrowded municipal shelters. The program is designed to build a more humane community, one family, at a time."We all have difficult times," said Rebecca Herlihy, Coordinator for Almost Home Training Wheels. "Reach out it's the life of your animal you're protecting and saving. If you need food, we will not judge you we are there to help you."The program facilitates a bond between owners and their pets while preventing the overpopulation of animals by providing no-cost spaying and neutering in areas where it is not accessible. Related: Pet Disaster Relief trailers are ensuring no pets go displaced during emergenciesIn addition to free spay/neutering services, volunteers provide food, supplies, pet care education, training, and medical care."Many of them do love their pets, but they just can't...
    But at least he's giving them free admission to national parks? Military families from Nevada casting valid absentee ballots have been blindsided by the revelation that Trump officials have accused them of "criminal voter fraud" in the 2020 election. On Nov. 5, the Nevada Republican Party filed a criminal complaint with Attorney General Bill Barr and the Department of Justice alleging that 3,062 voters outside of Nevada "improperly cast" absentee ballots in the election. "Thousands of individuals have been identified who appear to have violated the law by casting ballots after they moved from NV," Republicans claimed in the letter.
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Wawa is thanking military troops and their families with free coffee on Veterans Day. On Wednesday, all of Wawa’s 900 locations are offering this special to veterans, active military members and their families. “At Wawa supporting our military is part of our DNA and each year, Veterans Day gives us a chance to thank our troops, and, in our own small way, give something back to these brave and dedicated men and women,” said Chris Gheysens, Wawa’s president and CEO. “Once again, we plan to honor our military and their families with free coffee on Veterans Day, and also through a socially-distanced care package assembly at our Wawa headquarters the Tuesday before Veterans Day. In its 10th year, we’ve been providing troops abroad with a taste of home through our coffee care packages, and we are passionate about continuing this tradition for years to come.” Along with this, Wawa is continuing its annual tradition of “Operation Taste of Home.” On Tuesday, Wawa associates along with members of the USO, Air National Guard and Army National Guard, packed...
    ALTON Towers are reopening their gardens to the public this weekend to allow more access for families stuck in lockdown. However, you will have to book ahead, with the gardens expected to be busy. 3The Alton Towers Gardens are opening this weekendCredit: Alamy From November 13, the gardens will open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sunday so families can visit the gardens which are part of the 550-acre resort. The park itself remains closed so don't expect to be able to go on any rides right now. Social distancing guidelines are in place, as well as temperature checks on arrival and only takeaway drinks and food available with card payment. James Walker, Marketing Director for Alton Towers said: "We are delighted to re-open our Gardens to the public on the next few weekends and offer guests the chance to enjoy them whilst taking their vital daily exercise." 3Guests can enjoy guided walks through the park - social distanced of course 3You must prebook, and its only open on weekends "The Gardens were greatly enjoyed and appreciated by guests over the...
    Lawyers cannot find the parents of 666 migrant children torn from their families at the US-Mexico border by the Trump administration, over 100 more than they previously thought.  The American Civil Liberties Union said in October that parents of 545 children had still not been located more than two years after being separated by Donald Trump's controversial 'zero tolerance' policy. But Steven Herzog, the attorney leading efforts to reunite the families, revealed the number of separated children for whom they have not been able to locate parents is even greater.   Herzog sent an email to Justice Department attorneys representing the Trump administration saying that 666 children - an additional 121 than previously reported - are still without their parents. Lawyers cannot find the parents of 666 migrant children torn from their families at the US-Mexico border by the Trump administration, over 100 more than they previously thought. Pictured children at the Tornillo Port of Entry encampment in 2018 The new group includes those 'for whom the government did not provide any phone number', he wrote in the email, obtained...
    (CNN)President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris addressed the nation for the first time Saturday night with their families by their side. After their victory celebration in Wilmington, Delaware, Biden's family -- including his wife, Jill, children Hunter and Ashley, their spouses and his six grandchildren -- joined him on stage, putting the tight-knit Biden family in the spotlight. Harris' family also took part in the celebrations, including her husband Doug Emhoff, sister Maya Harris, niece Meena Harris and grandnieces.Upon winning the 2020 race, Biden spent much of his day Saturday with his family. It was his grandchildren who informed him he had crossed the 270 electoral vote threshold to become the president-elect. Here's a look at who's who in Biden's and Harris' family:
    Advocates defend the DACA program outside the Supreme Court last year. Among the people anxiously watching election results trickle in Tuesday night was Luz Chavez in Gaithersburg, Maryland. While we all have a stake in who becomes the next president, it’s even higher for the 23-year-old Trinity Washington University student: both of her parents are undocumented, and she’s one of two children in her family protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.  “Every single policy put in place by folks that people elect into office directly impact my family, my community, and directly impact me,” Chavez told BuzzFeed News. “There's so much at stake here.” Chavez’s family first shared their story in a digital ad from pro-immigrant group United We Dream Action (UWDA) PAC last month. Her little brother, 18-year old U.S. citizen Teddy, was set to cast a vote in an election for the very first time. Chavez told BuzzFeed News that the family was so excited, they prominently displayed his voter registration document like a photograph. “My parents were so proud about him registering to vote,” she continued in the report. “Once he got his voter...
    Halfpoint Images | Moment | Getty Images Families across America are facing repercussions from the coronavirus pandemic. From unemployment to career shifts to a loss or reduction in income, they are dealing with a new dynamic that may affect their relationships and their financial well-being. Millions of Americans have also moved in with family members because of the Covid-19 crisis. In July, 52% of young adults lived with one or both of their parents, up from 47% in February, according to a recent Pew Research Center analysis of Census data. That surpasses the peak hit during the Great Depression, Pew said. "Families have been happily coming together and looking at it as a way of survival that we haven't seen for generations," said Winnie Sun, co-founder and managing director of Irvine, California-based Sun Group Wealth Partners. More from Invest in You:How to negotiate your medical bills and lower your costsDeepak Chopra: We're experiencing 3 pandemics right now Genetic testing can assess your risk of getting cancer. Here are the costs Even before the pandemic struck, the family demographic was changing...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- On this special edition of Here and Now, hear from families in our area, featured in the national ABC series "Our America: Living While Black."We'll introduce you to the Fordham University professor who shares his childhood memories of being homeless and living on the subway with his mother.Antoine Lovell is a college professor now, but at one point he and his mother called the 3 train home. But poverty wasn't the end of Lovell's story.Also we'll introduce the Mckissack twin sisters, CEOs of the oldest minority owned, design and construction firm in the nation, with a proud family history dating back five generations and rooted in slavery.From millions of children during this pandemic, online learning is not a choice.Many children are being left behind due to a lack of internet access.National Urban Technology Inc. is lending parents the support they need to bridge the gap between classroom and home schooling, while addressing digital inclusion.And finally, Here and Now sheds new light on details surrounding Thelonious Monk, one of the greatest jazz musicians of all time.A rare...
    Unlawfully appointed acting DHS Sec. Chad Wolf and Donald Trump. Unlawfully appointed acting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sec. Chad Wolf took a break from using his government position to campaign for impeached president Donald Trump’s reelection to finally address the family separation disaster. No, he wasn’t announcing he was dropping his appearance at Trump’s stupid wall to help reunite families torn apart under the administration’s policy. He was instead saying that families are separated only because they chose to be separated. Parents, Unlawful Chad claimed to CBS News on Tuesday, “have chosen to have their kids remain here in the United States while they remain back in their home countries. They have chosen. They themselves have chosen to separate their children from themselves,” the report said. When then asked if he “had any regrets” about helping implement the state-sanctioned kidnapping of children at the southern border, Unlawful Chad “said he did not.” Advocacy group Families Belong Together tweeted that this coiffed mini-fascist “baselessly claimed that the families separated under the family separation policy are choosing to remain apart from their children. Here’s what he left out....
    Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf on Tuesday decried what he called "misinformation" surrounding the repercussions of the Trump administration's discontinued policy of separating migrant families at the southern border, saying some deported parents "have chosen" to remain separated from their children. Of the parents who could be located in other countries, Wolf told CBS News senior investigative correspondent Catherine Herridge, "almost in every instance — in fact, I can't think of one that they haven't — they have chosen to have their kids remain here in the United States while they remain back in their home countries. They have chosen. They themselves have chosen to separate their children from themselves." Wolf was asked to respond to a recent status report by the Justice Department and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) that said 545 parents remained "unreachable" after being separated from their children by U.S. immigration officials in 2017 and 2018. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The parents, two-thirds of whom the ACLU thinks were deported to their home countries, could request the U.S. government to...
    (CNN)If Breonna Taylor were alive today, she would have been at the polls.The 26-year-old, who was shot and killed in March by Louisville police officers after they broke open her apartment door, never missed an opportunity to vote, her aunt Bianca Austin told CNN. Whether the candidates on the ballot were running for president or local office, Breonna made sure to exercise her constitutional right, Austin said.So when Austin encounters people who aren't enthusiastic about either presidential candidate in the upcoming election, she reminds them about her niece."Please, if you don't have a candidate in mind, just vote because Breonna can't vote," she said.Read MoreBlack Americans are fired up and flocking to the pollsJust days before Election Day, the families of Taylor, George Floyd, Jacob Blake, and Alvin Cole are joining forces at a rally in Chicago on Thursday in an effort to encourage people to vote. Their message is clear: Lasting change won't come just by marching in the streets -- people must also cast their ballots.For Black Americans, the stakes in this election are especially high, say the...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. This story comes from a partnership of Wisconsin Watch and WPR. Harper Marten donned a mask, gown, gloves, face shield and booties for a July 10 visit with her father, Warren Shore. She had not seen him in person since March. Inside the memory care unit at Parkview Gardens, a senior living community in Racine, Marten held her father’s hand. Marten told him she loved him and sang “My Funny Valentine,” a song Shore taught her when she was a child. Those would be her last 30 minutes with her father, who died the next day — five days after testing positive for COVID-19. Article continues after advertisement Marten, a school teacher from Wauwatosa, knew her father didn’t have many years left, even before the positive test. Shore had lived with Alzheimer’s disease for a decade when Marten enrolled him in hospice care in March — one day before Department of...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – The Stillwater Prison is on medical lockdown after nearly half of the inmate population tested positive for COVID-19. At one point in October, 607 inmates had the virus, along with 62 staff members. Two inmates and one employee are hospitalized. The Department of Corrections says the rest have minor symptoms or none at all. From no cases in late September to Minnesota’s largest COVID-19 spread to date inside a prison, Corrections Commissioner Paul Schnell is looking closely at what has changed. “We are very concerned about the level of growth Stillwater has experienced,” said Schnell. “You start to ask how do you have this level of change this quickly, and that becomes one of the key factors.” A contractor is now focused on air flow inside the old facility, where bar doors – rather than steel – mean air circulation can’t be controlled as easily. Now, there is also less movement prison-wide. Schnell says inmates are eating and for the most part staying inside their now single-bunk cells. It’s likely community spread from dozens of confirmed employee cases...
    The US soldiers jailed in Venezuela after a failed military coup are seen for the first time almost six months since their capture. The two men, both former Green Berets, appeared healthy and in 'great spirits' as they spoke with their families on a Zoom call. In exclusive images from the video call, obtained by DailyMail.com, Airan Berry, 41, and Luke Denman, 34, who have been locked up since May, appear in good shape despite their ordeal. The call came as a surprise to the families of the two men who haven't seen or heard from them since their capture. It was a particular highlight for Berry's family, as it came on the ninth birthday of one of his children. ‘We were just over the moon excited and so very happy to be able to speak with Airan,’ his wife Melanie told DailyMail.com from her home in Germany. ‘He looked healthy and happy to see us.’ Denman's brother Mark said their family was 'thrilled' with the call but said it remains a 'very delicate situation'. Airan Berry, 41, and...
    Jennifer Parson, who served as a gestational surrogate for a couple, cared for the child she carried until the parents could travel to the United States. Jennifer Parson/@jennparson/TikTok Jennifer Parson, a teacher's assistant and mother from Arizona, recently went viral on TikTok after sharing her unique experience as a gestational surrogate.  Parson, who chose to be a surrogate as a way to help couples' complete their families, gave birth to a baby girl on June 9th. However, thanks to COVID-19 and international travel restrictions, the new parents were unable to make the trip to Tuscon from Shenzhen, China — so Parson and her family cared for the newborn for nearly three months.  On August 30, the new parents finally traveled to the United States and met their daughter, who they named Jennifer, in honor of Parson.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When Jennifer Parson signed on to be a gestational surrogate in 2019, she thought she knew what to expect, but after the coronavirus pandemic hit, she took on a lot more than she bargained for. Traditionally,...
    The more than 500 immigrant kids separated from their parents, with no hope of seeing them again, are kept in 'clean' facilities, Trump argued. Donald Trump on Thursday night defended his administration's policy of separating immigrant children from their families with no way of reuniting them, claiming they are "so well taken care of." Asked at the final presidential debate about the 545 detained immigrant kids taken forcibly from their parents at the southern U.S. border under his administration's zero-tolerance policy, whose families the Trump administration has been unable to locate, Trump first suggested without proof that some had been brought into the country by "coyotes." Former Vice President Joe Biden quickly refuted that argument, noting that the kids in question had come over with their families before being separated by border officials.
    A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday disputed a report that the parents of 545 migrant children separated from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border cannot be found. According to a report from NPR, court filings by the U.S. Justice Department and the American Civil Liberties Union indicate that 545 children separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy have not been reunited with their families because the government cannot find their parents. Under the controversial policy, the federal government attempted to prosecute each and every migrant who entered the United States illegally. As a result, thousands of migrant children who came to the United States illegally were separated from their parents or adult guardians while the government prosecuted the adults accompanying those minors. The policy of separating migrant children from parents being prosecuted for crimes did not originate with the Trump administration and was in fact in place during the Obama administration. However, because the Trump administration attempted to prosecute every migrant who crossed the border illegally, more children were separated from...
    Getty: "People join together for a procession and an interfaith service at St. Patrick Cathedral to show their solidarity with migrants on July 20, 2018 in El Paso, Texas." Children kidnapped from their parents by the Trump administration under a 2017 “piloting” of what was to become the family separation policy at the southern border are still separated three years later because advocacy groups haven’t been able to reunite them with their parents due to the U.S. quickly and intentionally deporting them without a trace, NBC News reports.  The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said in a new court filing that while advocates tasked with reuniting families by the court have reached the deported parents of more than 550 kids separated under the pilot, they still haven’t been able to contact the parents of 545 children. The filing said that of those 545 children, advocates can’t find the parents of 283 kids at all, even after “time-consuming and arduous on-the-ground searches.”  “Unlike the 2,800 families separated under zero tolerance in 2018, most of whom remained in custody when the policy was ended by executive order, many of the more than 1,000 parents separated...
    Advocates have been unable to reach the parents of 545 children who were separated by U.S. immigration authorities at the southern border who could be eligible for court-mandated reunifications, according to a joint legal filing by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Justice Department.  These parents, designated as "unreachable" in Tuesday's court filing, are part of more than 1,000 migrant families who were separated by U.S. border officials before the Trump administration fully implemented its "zero tolerance" crackdown in the spring of 2018. The "zero tolerance" policy led to the separation of more than 2,800 migrant families before Judge Dana Sabraw of the U.S. District Court in San Diego brought an end to the practice in June 2018. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Most of the families who remained in the U.S. when the ruling was issued were eventually reunited, but Sabraw authorized a steering committee of advocacy groups to track down the hundreds of parents who were deported without their children. After being located, most opted to have their children brought to their home countries...
    THE average American kid has crashed 25 of their parents' work meetings each week since the beginning of the school year, according to new research. With many parents working from home and attempting to help with remote learning simultaneously, a new study pinpointed the frequency of these potentially embarrassing disruptions. 6With many parents working from home and attempting to help with remote learning simultaneously, a new study pinpointed the frequency of these potentially embarrassing disruptionsCredit: Getty Images - Getty 6 6 Results showed kids come stumbling into digital boardrooms, client calls and other work videos or calls as many as five times a day. But parents are also far from perfect, as the challenges of families living, working and studying shoulder to shoulder become increasingly apparent. In fact, the average parent has disturbed their child's lesson an average of six times since the beginning of the school year. Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Sittercity, the survey of 2,000 American parents of school-aged children took a by-the-numbers approach to assessing both the challenges and the opportunities unique to this school year....
    VIDEO2:5202:52Wealthy families rush to transfer wealth to children ahead of possible Biden winSquawk on the Street Wealthy families are racing to change their estate plans and pass hundreds of billions of dollars to their kids in the event of a Biden victory in November, according to attorneys and tax advisors to the wealthy. With the odds growing of a Biden win and possible blue wave, millionaire and billionaire families are speeding up their plans to pass down wealth, real estate and assets to their kids before the end of the year. Former Vice President and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's tax plan calls for steeper taxes on large gifts and inheritances to family members. So families want to make those gifts now before the tax window closes, possibly as early as January. "Everything is being fast-tacked because of the election," said Suzanne Thau, trusts and estates attorney with Schwartz Sladkus Reich Greenberg Atlas. "It's just an explosion in estate planning activity." Of course, if President Donald Trump wins reelection or if the Republicans hold or increase their grip on the...
    A prominent activist attorney appeared to make threats against Kansas City police officers during a megaphone tirade outside police headquarters Friday — a portion of which was shared on social media. What are the details?"We are seeking to revoke the peace officers' licenses," Stacy Shaw hollered while standing with a crowd of supporters. "We are going to start sharing things with your children's teachers." She added, "You don't think we don't know where your children go to school? Who the f*** do you think we are?" Shaw is leading a movement to get Kansas City Police Chief Rick Smith fired, among other demands, KCTV-TV reported. In her rant, she accused police of "terrorizing" citizens. "We are tired, and I don't make threats," she added in her megaphone rant. "I don't make threats, but we're going to start sharing this information so your children can see it." In the end, she said officers "will have no one, no one that loves you after we get done with this next campaign" and that "there will not be a place of peace, there...
            by Debra Heine  A radical lawyer and civil rights activist is under fire after threatening Kansas City police and their families in an speech addressing alleged police brutality last week. “You don’t think that we know where y’all live? You don’t think we don’t know where your children go to school?!” the attorney fumed in angry rant that was captured on video. Stacy Shaw is the attorney for a pregnant black woman who was arrested at a KC gas station late last month. For the past 10 days, Shaw has been leading an “occupation” of City Hall in Kansas City, Missouri to protest the arrest. “We are not being kind with you anymore,” said Shaw. “We have been courteous. We have been respectful, but we aren’t doing that anymore,” she warned. Shaw said she is seeking to have the licenses of the peace officers involved in the arrest revoked, and then threatened to use her allies in the education system to turn their children against them. “We are going to start showing things with your children’s...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City The clothing chain UNIQLO is donating thousands of masks to New York City residents. On Oct. 12, UNIQLO gave 25,000 AIRism face masks to District 75 (D75) in New York City. The masks will go to families and students with disabilities and their caretakers, as well as D75 teachers and faculty, as well as D75 students and staff who serve in school organizations throughout Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island, Brooklyn and the Bronx. “UNIQLO’s generosity is a testament to their commitment to our communities, and we thank them for being a strong ally,” said D75 Superintendent Ketler Louissaint. “We would also like to thank the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities and Commissioner Calise for their continued partnership and commitment to our District 75 community and all individuals with disabilities.” D75 provides specialized instructional support for students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), significant cognitive delays, emotional disturbances, sensory impairments and multiple disabilities. The masks will give staff, students and families with additional...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City By Katrina Makayan Entering the month of October not only means fall foliage and apple picking, but Halloween is just around the corner. While trick or treating plans may be pushed to next year, there are still ways you and your kids can enter the spooky spirit. You can follow along with Freeform’s 31 Nights of Halloween or feel free to check out these Halloween movies for kids on your own time. Best Halloween Movies for Kids Twitches – TV-PG Follow Alex and Camryn, played by twins Tia and Tamera Mowry. Separated at birth in the magical kingdom Coventry, they were sent to (spoiler alert!) Earth to escape evil forces’ dangers. Reunited on their 21st birthday, their powers start to form. Follow their adventure while watching Twitches. Matilda – PG Based on the great Roald Dahl’s novel, the adaptation follows a gifted young girl’s story. Matilda Wormwood dealing with distant parents and a crude school principal, she realizes her power of telekinesis. Airing in 1996, Matilda...
    The campaign to reelect President Donald Trump has released a new advertisement that uses the photos of Jackie Robinson and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  The ad, titled “Say What You Will About America,” uses black and white historical images with an ominous voiceover espousing American exceptionalism. “Impossible? We treat that word as motivation,” the ad intones as pictures of Robinson and King flash.  The families of baseball icon Jackie Robinson (left) and civil rights legend Martin Luther King Jr. are furious that President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign is using their famous kin’s images in a new commercial. (Photos by Keystone/Getty Images and Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) The families of the two civil rights icons are blasting the campaign for using their photos.  “The Trump campaign is in opposition to all that Jackie Robinson stood for and believed in. We’re insulted and demand that his image be removed!” Robinson’s daughter, Sharon Robinson, tweeted Thursday. Jackie Robinson’s family strongly objects to the use of Jackie Robinson’s image in a Donald Trump @JRFoundation The Trump campaign is in opposition to all that...
    This is the adorable moment an emotional couple revealed on a Zoom call to their family that they were expecting a baby. The video clip shows a four-way zoom call between Jose and Laura Linardi, from Houston, Texas, Jose's parents and his sisters Elena and Fran. At the start of the call Jose and Laura held up a baby outfit with enormous grins on their faces. Joe and Laura Linardi, from Houston, Texas, hold up a baby outfit on a Zoom call with their family to announce they are going to be parents The couple had been separated from their family since January because of the coronavirus pandemic. Their family exploded with emotions when the announcement was made Elena at first was shocked as she stared in disbelief with her mouth open, but reality hit home and she soon jumped up and started cheering and dancing around in her room.  Meanwhile Jose's parents let loose their emotions straight away as his mother screamed and threw her arms in the air in excitement while his dad teared up with pride. ...
    Trump's refusal to take coronavirus seriously may have led to the infection of gold star families at the White House, continuing his trend of demeaning America's armed forces. Last week, Donald Trump called in to Fox News to blame the military for infecting his long time aide Hope Hicks with the coronavirus, a statement as cruel is it is absurd, given Trump's refusal to take the virus seriously. Now, recent reporting shows that Trump may have exposed Gold Star families to the virus. According to the Daily Beast, the Greatest Generation Foundation, which hosted an event for Gold Star families at the White House on September 27, was contacted by the White House for "contact-tracing purposes after alerting us on 10/2 of a possible COVID-positive person at the event so we could know there was a potential our attendees were exposed" Trump's recklessness in failing to protect himself from the coronavirus — and by extension, those in his immediate vicinity, including military families and the Joint Chiefs of Staff —...
    A new report revealed that the Justice Department under Jeff Sessions openly spearheaded intentional family separation at the border in 2018. A draft report of an investigation by Justice Department inspector general Michael Horowitz found that top department officials were the "driving force" behind a cruel policy that separated thousands of children from their families during Trump's time in office. Many of these immigrant parents were seeking asylum in an effort to escape violence in Mexico or Central America. The new draft report reveals that key DOJ officials didn't view tracking the children's whereabouts as the department's responsibility.
    By The Associated Press The transfer of two Islamic State members to the United States to face charges that they beheaded Western hostages is a giant step toward justice, U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire said Wednesday. El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Kotey are two of four men dubbed “the Beatles” by the hostages they held captive because of their British accents. They are expected to make their first appearance in the afternoon in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, where a federal grand jury issued an eight-count indictment. The charges are a milestone in a years-long effort by U.S. authorities to bring to justice members of the group known for beheadings and barbaric treatment of aid workers, journalists and other hostages in Syria. The families of journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff of New Hampshire, and Peter Kassig and Kayla Mueller “have waited a long time for this," Shaheen said in a statement. “These terrorists have been in legal limbo for years but thankfully that ambiguity is now over," she said. “The families of the Americans murdered by ISIS...
    Though Denver Public Schools will be shut down until October 16, the Denver Public Library is just starting a soft reopening, and many workers for the City and County of Denver are doing their gigs from home, Halloween is still happening. The holiday comes as coronavirus cases rise nationally and President Donald Trump, who is dealing with COVID-19, mugs as though he's doing fine and encourages residents of the United States not to be scared. But plenty of people are, especially as they contemplate kids and trick-or-treat activities. And so the Denver Department of Public Health and Environment has released a set of guidelines regarding what people can do to reduce their risk of transmitting or catching the virus as they celebrate Halloween. The guidelines are based on the county's current status on the state's COVID-19 Dial Dashboard, where Denver falls somewhere in the middle, under Safer at Home, Level 2 Concern, with enough cases to require restrictions but not enough to shut things down outright. The DDPHE recommends that kids trick-or-treat with people they live with, and stay six feet away from other...
    Unlike other major purchases in life, families know little about what they will actually pay for a college education when they begin the search. Without clarity on the eventual price, families think more about the academic and social fit of campuses rather than the financial fit. They believe, often incorrectly, that they can figure out a way to pay the cost through a combination of scholarships, loans, and savings. After all, they’ve heard that every school offers a discount to entice you to enroll (hint: they don’t). As a result, emotions steer choices, and many wind up disappointed when the hoped-for financial aid doesn’t materialize. During the year I spent inside the admissions process, what I came to see, and prospective students and their families should too, is that colleges are either “buyers” or “sellers” of spots in the freshman class. Sellers are the “haves” of admissions. They have something to sell that consumers want, typically a brand name that signals prestige in the job market and social circles. They are overwhelmed with applications, many from top...
    The parents of three Britons stuck in coronavirus quarantine in Italy have told of their fears for the boys' mental health after two months in isolation. Quinn Paczesny, 20, Will Castle, 22, and Rhys James, 23, had been teaching English in northern Italy and planned on going travelling before they tested positive for coronavirus in Florence on August 17. The trio were taken to a converted hotel for coronavirus patients, placed in separate rooms, and told they could not leave until they twice tested negative for the virus. They have been there ever since, as the results keep coming back positive. Quinn Paczesny, 20 (left), Will Castle, 22 (centre), and Rhys James, 23 (right), have been in coronavirus quarantine in Italy since August 17 - and say they are now 'really struggling' Mark Paczesny (right), Quinn's father, said he is now concerned for the boys' mental health, saying that 'the cracks are starting to show' Speaking to Good Morning Britain, father Mark Paczesny said: 'It's very frustrating. Week after week the results are always the same.  'We are...
    RIVER VALE, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — The coronavirus pandemic is bringing new meaning to a Jewish tradition. The holiday of Sukkot is a time families eat and pray outside in a temporary enclosure called a sukkah, but this year, many are putting their own do-it-yourself spin on it. One day before the holiday of Sukkot begins, the Gerhardt family in River Vale is building their very first sukkah. “We had camped outside,” Amy Gerhardt said. “We thought what better year to do it. “We thankfully got advice from our rabbi on where to look, and of course everything was already gone,” Ira Gerhardt said. Sukkah kit websites show the kits are sold out, but the family snagged on of the last ones. A homemade sukkah in Jamaica Estate (Credit: Instagram user bakentakeny) Rabbi Noah Fabricant, of the Kol Dorot Synagogue, says other families are getting creative. “We have people who are buying lumber, who are buying PVC piping,” Fabricant told CBS2’s Lisa Rozner. A Judaica store in Cedarhurst, Long Island, sells decorations so families can spruce up the inside. For the...
    Many families living on the road have been homeschooling their children for years. @themomtrotter/Instagram/@thefites/Instagram Children are spending more time learning at home. While some are learning virtually, others are being homeschooled for the first time this school year.  Insider spoke to four families who lived in RVs while homeschooling their children. They shared advice they have for families who are now taking the reigns on their children's learning. Sign up for our new parenting newsletter Insider Parenting here. Ash Fite's first year of homeschooling her daughter was sprinkled with stress and freak-outs. Not from her daughter Everly, who was 5 at the time; the stress came from Fite. She said she was constantly nervous that she wasn't doing enough or teaching the right way. But over time, Ash noticed that Everly would pick things up and learn in all types of circumstances.  "We put a lot of pressure on ourselves to create this kid," she told Insider. "When really, our children are using us as guides."  Ash and her husband, Mars Fite, have two children: Everly, 6, and...
    Wash your hands as soon as you walk in the door (59 percent), clean doorknobs and other high-contact surfaces regularly (49 percent), shower when returning home from a highly-populated area (48 percent) and wipe packages down before opening (43 percent) are among new house rules families have adopted since the beginning of the pandemic. According to a new survey of 2,000 American parents of school-aged children, being more lax about existing house rules since the beginning of quarantine has proved common as well. Seventy-five percent of respondents confirmed having everyone home more often has caused them to relax some of the house rules. SWNS No eating in front of the TV (37 percent), no staying up past bedtime (27 percent), don’t leave wet towels or dirty clothes on the floor (24 percent) and no using your phone at the dinner table (23 percent) topped the list of house rules about which parents have been less strict. Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BISSELL Homecare, Inc., the survey also revealed that 74 percent of respondents agreed — as a result of...
    Wash your hands as soon as you walk in the door (59 percent), clean doorknobs and other high-contact surfaces regularly (49 percent), shower when returning home from a highly-populated area (48 percent) and wipe packages down before opening (43 percent) are among new house rules families have adopted since the beginning of the pandemic. According to a new survey of 2,000 American parents of school-aged children, being more lax about existing house rules since the beginning of quarantine has proved common as well. Seventy-five percent of respondents confirmed having everyone home more often has caused them to relax some of the house rules. SWNS No eating in front of the TV (37 percent), no staying up past bedtime (27 percent), don’t leave wet towels or dirty clothes on the floor (24 percent) and no using your phone at the dinner table (23 percent) topped the list of house rules about which parents have been less strict. Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BISSELL Homecare, Inc., the survey also revealed that 74 percent of respondents agreed — as a result of...
    Chris Cuomo and Ted Cruz came to blows in a lengthy shouting match on CNN on Wednesday night where they traded insults about Trump, Cuomo's brother, New York Governor Andrew, Cruz's wife and COVID-19 testing.  The 20-minute bicker began when Cuomo asked why Cruz didn't stand up to the President and confront him over his controversial remarks about Proud Boys, an alt-right group, at Tuesday night's debate.  From there, it descended into Cuomo saying Cruz had watched from the side lines, 'stroking his beard like a wise man', while the country suffered from COVID-19, and reminding him that Trump once called his wife Heidi ugly. Texas Senator Cruz repeatedly bashed the CNN host's brother for his handling of the crisis in New York, and called him a hypocrite for criticizing the federal response to the pandemic while ignoring what had happened in New York nursing homes.  Chris Cuomo and Senator Ted Cruz argued for 20 minutes straight during a segment on Cuomo's CNN show on Tuesday night Towards the end of their clash, Cruz said it was no surprise...
    TALTY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Teachers in one North Texas school district are being praised for sending police to the home of two very young students Monday after they’d missed class and their parent, 71-year-old Connie Taylor, couldn’t be reached. Officers arrived to find their mother dead and the 5 and 7-year-old boys fending for themselves. Teachers in the Forney Independent School District called police reporting that the children hadn’t been in class since September 21. When officers went to their home, in the small town of Talty, both the boys opened the door and told them that ‘their mom had passed out’ and was laying on the floor. According to Talty Police Chief Bill Carmack, the kids had tried to use a cell phone to call for help, but didn’t have the password to unlock it. The boys said they didn’t know their neighbors and were scared to go outside, so they just stayed in the house and fended for themselves. They survived by eating food from the pantry and the refrigerator and officers said they appeared healthy when...
    The Netflix docuseries, "Challenger: The Final Flight," tells the tragic story of the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. On January 28, 1986, only 73 seconds into its flight, the shuttle exploded and killed all seven crew members aboard as the world watched in horror. The crew consisted of five NASA astronauts and two payload specialists: Commander Francis R. Scobee, pilot Michael J. Smith, mission specialists Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka and Judith Resnik, payload specialists Gregory Jarvis and Christa McAuliffe, who was also a teacher. In the four-part series, audiences learn who these brave people were, what malfunction caused the fatal incident and how the Challenger's story serves as a cautionary tale of space travel and exploration. CHALLENGER EXPLOSION AMONG THE DEADLIEST SPACE DISASTERS "Telling the stories of the astronauts and their families was really the driving creative force behind the series," executive producer Glen Zipper told Fox News. "One of the few things in our recent history that has brought us together is our imagination for space exploration," he said. "And we thought that telling this story now might remind us of that, that we have things in...
    MIDLAND, PA (KDKA) – It was an evening filled with phone calls for students enrolled with PA Cyber, but these robocalls informed parents that their child was now unenrolled in the program. “Technology, it can sometimes give you unexpected results,” said Brian Hayden, the CEO at PA Cyber. Hayden told KDKA that technology got the best of them on Wednesday. “It just sounded like something was wrong. It said they had the record that my child had withdrawn from the school and that they had not received the technology back — the laptop,” said Laura Doheny, whose child is enrolled in the second grade at PA Cyber. That robocall went out to over 11,000 families enrolled with the school and not just once. “As I was listening to that recording, another call was coming through again from that same phone number. Honestly, we kept getting those calls about every five minutes for a half-hour,” Doheny said. Hayden said the call was only to supposed to go to a handful of families who did actually unenroll a student. Now the school...