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Trump trial’s first day:

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    The first trial to emerge from Special Counsel John Durham's probe finally got underway Tuesday – as prosecutors accused former Hillary Clinton lawyer Michael Sussmann of trying to engineer an 'October surprise' when he sought out a top FBI official to discuss an allegation about Trump and Russia.  The allegation didn't pan out, but the meeting itself constituted an effort to 'use and manipulate' federal law enforcement for political ends, prosecutors argued.  Sussmann's defense team argued he was forthright when he acted on his own to bring information to authorities, and said the intervention did not benefit the Clinton camp in any way.  It all comes years after the first media reports about was described as suspicious computer traffic between the Trump Organization and a Russian bank, at a time when Trump and his campaign were under scrutiny for Russia ties in the election.  Lawyer Michael Sussmann contacted FBI general counsel James Baker with a 'tip' of information about apparently unusual traffic between Trump Organization and a Russian bank. He is charged with lying to the FBI when he said...
    This courtroom sketch shows Ghislaine Maxwell (C) entering court followed by 2 US Marshalls, for her trial on charges of sex trafficking, in New York City, on December 2, 2021.Jane Rosenberg | AFP | Getty Images Jurors at Ghislaine Maxwell's trial on Tuesday asked for transcripts of testimony given by three women who say she groomed them as underage girls to be sexually abused by Jeffrey Epstein. "We would like the transcripts/testimony of 'Jane,' Annie and Carolyn," the jury reportedly wrote in was their first note to Judge Alison Nathan shortly after beginning their first full day of deliberations at the British socialite Maxwell's trial in U.S. District Court in Manhattan. Jane is a pseudonym for one of the women who testified without using her real first or last name. The other two women testified using their first names only. The jury, comprised of six men and six women, began deliberating late Monday afternoon after hearing closing arguments and instructions from Nathan on the law, but went home for the day soon afterward. Maxwell, 59, is charged with crimes...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A top Chicago banking figure accused of approving multi-million dollar loans to Donald Trump's 2016 campaign chief in exchange for a big White House appointment told the ABC7 I-Team on Tuesday that his federal bribery trial is a venue to clear the air."Just want the truth," said Stephen Calk, founder and former CEO of The Federal Savings Bank headquartered in Chicago's Fulton Market, as he left court following the first day of jury selection.Calk is being prosecuted in New York on charges he greased the way for his bank to hand $16 million in loans to ex-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort. Prosecutors contend Calk was bidding for one of several government positions in an eventual Trump administration, from various cabinet positions to ambassadorships. Manafort had placed Calk on then-candidate Trump's economic advisory committee. Investigators say Manafort recommended Calk to become secretary of the Army in the alleged loans-for-job scheme. Other positions Calk wanted included treasury secretary, defense secretary and commerce secretary but the Chicago executive ended up with nothing when Trump was elected, except eventual criminal charges.RELATED...
    (CNN)On March 2, 1797, President George Washington wrote a letter comparing himself to a "wearied traveler who sees a resting place, and is bending his body to lean thereon." The idea of retiring after his controversy-filled second term was "most grateful to my soul," Washington confided to his former secretary of war, Henry Knox. "Tomorrow, at dinner, I shall as a servant of the public, take my leave of the President Elect," John Adams, "...And the day following, with pleasure, I shall witness the inauguration of my Successor."The first president was also the first person to hand over the power of his office peacefully, setting the template for more than two centuries of such transfers. That tradition was put at risk for the first time on January 6, when a mob invaded the US Capitol seeking to stop the final certification of Joe Biden's election victory. This week former president Donald Trump went on trial in the Senate, accused of setting the stage for that event, and was acquitted two days before the Presidents Day holiday that honors George Washington....
    The third day of the second impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump reached beyond Trump's statements leading up to the Jan. 6 mob attack at the U.S. Capitol building, going as far back as 2015. Democratic impeachment managers played clips of Trump making inflammatory statements. Those included when he said that there were "very fine people on both sides" of the 2017 Charlottesville, Virginia, rally clash that included white supremacists, clips from Trump at campaign rallies in 2015 when he told protesters at his rallies to "get out of here" and noted to his supporters that he could "get a little violent," and when he praised Montana Republican Senate candidate (now governor) Greg Gianforte in 2018 after he assaulted a reporter: "Any guy who can do a body slam is my kind of guy." Impeachment managers showed the clips as part of an argument that Trump had repeatedly endorsed political violence and knew how to do so and that he did it again leading up to Jan. 6. Other highlights from the trial: ...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER, MARY CLARE JALONICK and JILL COLVIN WASHINGTON (AP) — Prosecutors unveiled chilling new security video in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Wednesday, showing the mob of rioters breaking into the Capitol, smashing windows and doors and searching menacingly for Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as overwhelmed police begged on their radios for help. In the previously unreleased recordings, the House prosecutors displayed gripping scenes of how close the rioters were to the country’s leaders, roaming the halls chanting “Hang Mike Pence,” some equipped with combat gear. Outside, the mob had set up a makeshift gallows. Videos of the siege have been circulating since the day of the riot, but the graphic compilation amounted to a more complete narrative, a moment-by-moment retelling of one of the nation’s most alarming days. In addition to the evident chaos and danger, it offered fresh details on the attackers, scenes of police heroism and staff whispers and cries of distress. At one dramatic moment, the video shows police shooting into the crowd through a broken window, killing...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER, MARY CLARE JALONICK and JILL COLVIN WASHINGTON (AP) — Prosecutors unveiled chilling new security video in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Wednesday, showing the mob of rioters breaking into the Capitol, smashing windows and doors and searching menacingly for Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as overwhelmed police begged on their radios for help. In the previously unreleased recordings, the House prosecutors displayed gripping scenes of how close the rioters were to the country’s leaders, roaming the halls chanting “Hang Mike Pence,” some equipped with combat gear and members of extremist groups among the first inside. Outside, the mob had set up a makeshift gallows. At one dramatic moment, the video shows police shooting into the crowd through a broken window, killing a San Diego woman, Ashli Babbitt. In another, a police officer is seen being crushed by the mob. Five people died. The vice president, who had been presiding over a session to certify Joe Biden’s victory over Trump — thus earning Trump’s criticism — is shown being rushed to safety, where...
    Prosecutors in the impeachment of Donald Trump said they will show that the then president was not an “innocent bystander” but the main instigator of the deadly attack on Capitol with which he tried to nullify his electoral loss to Joe Biden. On the first day full of allegations, the main prosecutor of the House of Representatives promised to present the evidence that the former president encouraged his followers in an act to go to the legislative palace on January 6 and then, far from doing anything to stop the violence, he observed with “jubilation” when a mob stormed the compound. Five people died. “It may have seemed like chaos and madness to us, but there was method in the madness that day,” said Rep. Jamie Raskin. The events of the day followed an emotional session on Tuesday that provoked the fury of the former president at the long and confusing arguments of his lawyers who were unable to prove the unconstitutionality of the trial. Some of his allies called for further changes to their defending team. Trump is the...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER, MARY CLARE JALONICK and JILL COLVIN WASHINGTON (AP) — Prosecutors unveiled chilling new security video in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Wednesday, showing the mob of rioters breaking into the Capitol, smashing windows and doors and searching menacingly for Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as overwhelmed police begged on their radios for help. In the previously unreleased recordings, the House prosecutors displayed gripping scenes of how close the rioters were to the country’s leaders, roaming the halls chanting “Hang Mike Pence,” some equipped with combat gear and members of extremist groups among the first inside. Outside, the mob had set up a makeshift gallows. At one dramatic moment, the video shows police shooting into the crowd through a broken window, killing a San Diego woman, Ashli Babbitt. The vice president, who had been presiding over a session to certify Joe Biden’s victory over Trump — thus earning Trump’s censure — is shown being rushed to safety, where he sheltered in an office with his family just 100 feet from the rioters. Pelosi...
     President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial continues for day two on Wednesday, beginning at 12 pm ET. After showing a stunning video montage of footage from the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, House Democrats will present more evidence showing why they think Trump should be convicted for inciting the insurrection. Only six Republicans sided with Democrats in voting to proceed with the impeachment by the end of the first day. Five Republicans had originally joined Democrats on the last vote determining the constitutionality of the trial — but Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) ended up switching sides this time, joining Senators Mitt Romney (R-UT), Ben Sasse (R-NE), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Pat Toomey (R-PA). Trump was impeached by the House last month while still in office and is the first president ever to be impeached twice. Watch above, via PBS News. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    Former President Trump's second impeachment trial continues for its second day on Wednesday, February 10. Senators are considering whether to convict the former president of incitement of insurrection after a mob of his supporters overran the U.S. Capitol in a deadly attack on January 6. CBSN will air the trial in full and CBSN's Elaine Quijano will provide analysis after it has concluded for the day. CBSN coverage begins 30 minutes before the trial starts each day. On CBS television stations, "CBS Evening News" anchor Norah O'Donnell will anchor special report coverage of the impeachment proceedings from Washington, D.C.  On the first day of the trial, the Democratic House impeachment managers presented a dramatic 13-minute video that showed the chaos at the Capitol on January 6 juxtaposed with Mr. Trump's speech to supporters earlier in the day, when he urged his followers to "fight like hell."  The president's attorneys, in a sometimes disjointed presentation, argued Tuesday that the Senate has no authority to hold an impeachment trial for ex-officials under the plain language of the Constitution. The Senate, however, voted 56 to...
    What to Watch on Wednesday: Riverdale fast-forwards seven years Etihad’s Focus on Smaller Aircraft Puts Fleet Plans in Limbo Roundup: RIP Marty Schottenheimer; First Day of Trump Impeachment Trial; Mass Sports Radio Layoffs at Bell Canada © Provided by The Big Lead Marty Schottenheimer | Focus On Sport/Getty Images Former NFL head coach Marty Schottenheimer passes away at 77... First day of Trump impeachment trial is wrapped up... Shooting at health clinic in Minnesota leaves five injured... Chris Hemsworth's body double would like the actor to stop getting jacked... Mary Wilson, co-founder of The Supremes, passes away at 76... Alex Trebek's Jeopardy! suits donated to The Doe Fund... Hackers threaten to release Cyberpunk 2077 source code... Koala rescued after causing five-car pileup in Australia... Florida governor Ron DeSantis defends watching Super Bowl with no mask... Riot Games CEO being investigated by Riot Games after accusations of gender discrimination... Unplanned outages during Super Bowl place damper on demand for mobile sports betting... Four million bobbleheads left hanging about due to lack of fans at MLB games in 2020... Inside the...
    The opening statements in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump will begin on Wednesday, after an emotional first day that ended with the Senate vote in favor of holding the trial of the former president for inciting the assault on the United States Capitol even though he is no longer in office. . Miami World / Telemundo 51 The Democratic representatives who are leading the prosecution and the former president’s lawyers will present their arguments to the senators, who serve as a jury. The defense lost by 56 votes to 44 the vote in which they asked to suspend the process, claiming that it was unconstitutional. That provoked Trump’s anger at the work of his attorneys and made his allies question the defense strategy. Some called for new changes to their legal team. The indictment dragged senators and the entire country back into the deadly attack on Congress Tuesday, showing an explicit video of the January 6 violence that shocked the world when hundreds of insurgents stormed the building in an attempt to stop the certification of the electoral victory...
    Washington — The majority of Republican senators voted that the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is unconstitutional, after hearing nearly four hours of arguments from House impeachment managers and Mr. Trump's attorneys on the first day of proceedings.  However, while most GOP senators determined there is no constitutional basis for a trial, many were unimpressed by the presentation by the former president's lawyers. "President Trump's team was disorganized. They did everything they could but to talk about the question at hand. And when they talked about it, they kind of glided over it, almost as if they were embarrassed of their arguments," GOP Senator Bill Cassidy told reporters after the first day of the trial.  "If I'm an impartial juror and one side is doing a great job and the other side is doing a terrible job on the issue at hand, as an impartial juror I'm going to vote for the side that did a good job," added Cassidy, who was one of only six Republicans who voted in favor of the constitutionality of holding a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — House prosecutors on Tuesday wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly attack on Congress as they opened Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial with graphic video of the insurrection and Trump’s own calls for a rally crowd to march to the iconic building and “fight like hell” against his reelection defeat. The detailed and emotional presentation by Democrats was followed by meandering and occasionally confrontational arguments from the Trump defense team, which insisted that his remarks were protected by the First Amendment and asserted that he cannot be convicted as a former president. Even Trump’s backers in the Senate winced, several saying his lawyers were not helpful to his case. The senators sitting as jurors, many of whom fled for safety themselves the day of the attack, watched and listened, unable to avoid the jarring video of Trump supporters battling past police to storm the halls, Trump flags waving. While many minds are made up, the senators will face their own moment to decide whether to convict or acquit Trump of the sole charge “incitement...
    After four hours of emotional testimony and bitter debate, Day One of the Trump impeachment trial has drawn to a close in the Senate.  Here’s a recap of six key moments:  Senate votes trial is constitutional  The Senate voted to move ahead with the historic impeachment trial, despite some Republican concerns that impeaching a president already out of office would be unconstitutional.  The vote was 56-44. The six Republicans who joined with the Democrats on voting to continue the trial were Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Cassidy had switched his vote from a previous point of order brought up last week by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. He said he did not view the 55-to-45 vote on Paul's resolution as revealing how senators would vote when it comes to whether or not to convict Trump.  DEMOCRATS IN TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL RESORT TO GRAPHIC VIDEO OF POLICE UNDER ATTACK "It was a vote in a moment of time. And so, based...
    New York : The impeachment of former President Donald Trump for his responsibility in the assault on Capitol It began this Tuesday with a sharp contrast between the strategies of the prosecution and the defense, and with a vote in which the Senate declared that the process is legitimate and constitutional. More than a month after Trump will urge his supporters to march to Congress and when a mob of them broke into the Capitol by force, the Senate began the second impeachment (impeachment, in English) against the former president, who left power three weeks ago. “The Charges against former President Trump are the most serious ever brought against a president in US history“Said the leader of the Democratic majority in the Senate, Chuck Schumer, at the beginning of the session. The first debate, on the Constitution The fact that Trump is the first US president to face impeachment when no longer in power centered the inaugural session of the “impeachment”, the second that is celebrated in the Senate against the now ex-president. Trump’s lawyers argued that it was...
    (CNN)The second impeachment trial of President Donald J. Trump is underway. It is only the fourth impeachment trial in US history, and the first time a president has been tried after leaving office -- as well as for a second time. The House managers prosecuting Trump will not make acquitting him easy for Republicans. Their opening -- in the very building that was the scene of the crime -- was effective and emotional. They began the trial, which today was focused on the constitutionality of an impeachment trial for a former president, with a shocking montage of video of Trump egging on supporters who quickly became rioters. The case to proceed with impeachmentYou can make video do whatever you want. But this was a remarkable presentation, which was followed by a Constitution- and history-heavy examination of why it's not only right, but necessary to hold these proceedings. It culminated with the lead House manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, a newly bereaved parent, talking about the fear sparked in him and his remaining children by the President's mob. Watch him describe the...
    (CNN)A wide array of Senate Republicans harshly criticized former President Donald Trump's defense team on the opening day of his second impeachment trial, arguing that Trump attorney Bruce Castor had delivered a rambling and unfocused argument in making the case that the proceedings are unconstitutional."I thought the President's lawyer, the first lawyer, just rambled on and on and on," John Cornyn of Texas, a member of Senate GOP leadership, said of Castor, adding that the lawyer "didn't really address the constitutional argument. Finally the second lawyer got around to it, and, I thought, did an effective job."Trump unhappy with his impeachment attorneys performance, sources sayCastor opened Trump's defense with a meandering presentation and warned that a second impeachment trial in 13 months would "open the floodgates" to future impeachments, even making the rhetorically unfounded suggestion that former Obama administration Attorney General Eric Holder could be impeached.Prominent Republicans argued on Tuesday that it was hard to understand exactly what Castor's argument was, while emphasizing that they thought attorney David Schoen was more skilled in his role.GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska...
    House Democrats on Tuesday launched their impeachment case against former President  Trump with a stirring video montage of violence and mayhem at the Capitol on Jan. 6 — a highly charged opening salvo, stripped of all subtlety, that at once implicated the former president in the deadly attack and heightened the pressure on Republicans to convict him. The 13-minute video, introduced by Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDemocrats say Trump impeachment defense 'wholly without merit' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial READ: Trump attorneys deny request for impeachment testimony MORE (D-Md.), the lead impeachment manager, featured a sampling of Trump’s fiery rhetoric leading up to the deadly siege, mashed up with scenes of mob violence in and around the Capitol building in the subsequent hours. The extraordinary demonstration — violent, profane and highly visceral — set an early tone for this week’s trial in the Senate, where lawmakers will decide if Trump’s conduct surrounding the unprecedented assault should disqualify him from ever holding high office again. It’s highly unlikely that...
    The first day of Donald Trump's impeachment trial was dedicated to the legal debate and nuances over the constitutionality of trying a former president. But the opening minutes of the trial instead focused on the still-raw emotions from Jan. 6 as House managers played dramatic footage from the Capitol riots to help build their case for convicting Trump. It's a strategy the nine House impeachment managers plan to incorporate over the course of the week: making a personal and emotional appeal to the 100 senators – who are sitting as both jurists and witnesses – that Trump should be held accountable for "incitement of insurrection" even as he no longer occupies the White House. Trump's team, meanwhile, maintains that the Senate doesn't have the authority to convene a trial against a private citizen.[ WATCH: Democrats' Graphic Trump Impeachment Video ]After a weeks-long delay, the Senate resumed its historic and speedy trial on Tuesday against Trump, who is the first former president to face possible conviction. Before both sides present oral arguments later this week, the trial kicked off with nearly four hours...
    The second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump—this time for inciting an insurrection—is underway, with Tuesday bringing four hours of debate on whether it’s constitutional to hold an impeachment trial for someone who is no longer in office. If that sounds familiar, it’s because the Senate already voted once on this question, with five Republicans joining Democrats to say yes, it is. The quality of the Trump team’s argument was previewed when one of the lawyers they cited in a pre-trial document said they misrepresented his work. Assuming Republicans once again join Democrats in moving the trial forward, the coming days will bring up to 16 hours of arguments over two days from both the House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team, followed by up to four hours of questions from senators, possibly followed by debate over whether to allow witnesses and subpoenas. At no point should we lose sight of the fact that this trial is about an insurrection aimed at preventing Congress from certifying the presidential election, in which five people lost their lives. Tuesday, Feb 9, 2021...
    New York : Former President Donald Trump heads to his mansion in Mar-a-Lago after arriving at the West Palm Beach airport in Florida. Photo: Michael Reaves / . “We will do something, but not yet.” That was the brief statement of the former president Donald trump on Friday when he was approached by a person from the Washington Examiner while he was at a table in the restaurant Grill Room at Trump International Golf Club, West Palm Beach, Florida. It is not clear if Trump was referring to the impeachment trial that the United States Congress will initiate against him in early February or to what exactly. Before the exchange could spread, an assistant to the magnate interrupted the meeting. The day before, on his first day out of the White House, the Republican had left his mansion in Mar-a-Lago escorted by a parade of automobiles. On Thursday he was seen playing in the morning, but on Friday he did not arrive at the space until 1:20 pm, and he went straight to lunch. Trump’s...
    Contrary to his predictions, President Trump won't have a coronavirus vaccine ready by Election Day, vaccine experts tell CNN after reviewing data from Moderna, the first company to begin its Phase 3 clinical trials of a coronavirus vaccine in the United States."There's no way. There's just no way," said Dr. Peter Hotez, a vaccinologist at Baylor College of Medicine and a CNN medical analyst.Last week President Trump said he was "optimistic" a vaccine would be ready around Election Day on November 3."I believe we'll have the vaccine before the end of the year, certainly, but around that date, yes. I think so," Trump said Thursday.CNN obtained part of an email Moderna sent on Friday to the principal investigators of its vaccine trials. It says 4,536 study subjects have enrolled in the trials.The trial started the morning of July 27 and intends to enroll 30,000 study subjects. The company has said it's "on track to complete enrollment in September."Moderna won't make that 30,000 in September if they continue at the rate of the first two weeks, but it's likely the speed...
    A defamation trial against Christopher Steele began in London on Monday, with revelations of the ex-spy’s efforts to disseminate his infamous dossier through the late Sen. John McCain and a longtime ally of the Clintons.  A lawyer for a Russian businessman suing Steele read his text messages with Strobe Talbott, the former president of Brookings Institution, and with David Kramer, a former State Department official who worked with McCain.  In another text, Steele told Sir Andrew Wood, a former British diplomat, that McCain was ‘compromised’ because he was provided a copy of the dossier.  Text messages read out during the first day of a defamation trial against Christopher Steele in London on Monday revealed new details about how the former British spy strategized with associates on how to disseminate the infamous anti-Trump dossier. In one message after Donald Trump’s election win in November 2016, Steele asked Strobe Talbott, who then served as president of the prestigious Brookings Institution, how he wanted to handle “the package” — a reference to the dossier. In another message from early 2017, Steele...
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