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    After a wild campaign that saw him turn from Donald Trump ally to Donald Trump tormentor, Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) ended up failing to win the title he really wanted: U.S. Senator from Alabama. On Tuesday night, Brooks was easily defeated in a Republican primary runoff election by Katie Boyd Britt, a former top aide to longtime Sen. Richard Shelby, whose retirement opened up this seat. Brooks, a MAGA-wing congressman best known outside Alabama for his incendiary rhetoric at the infamous Ellipse rally in Washington on Jan. 6, entered the race to replace Shelby last year with the ex-president’s enthusiastic endorsement. However, Brooks’ campaign struggled with the entry of Britt—who had the power of Shelby’s considerable machine behind her—and another candidate, Army veteran Mike Durant. In March, Brooks’ tanking poll numbers prompted the first-ever rescinding of a Trump endorsement, which Trump justified by claiming somehow that the far-right congressman had gone “woke.” But that bizarre turn of events seemed to enliven Brooks’ fading campaign. Armed with an ax to grind, Brooks surged in the polls. He began hitting Trump,...
    DALEVILLE, Alabama — Katie Britt never mentioned her opponent, Rep. Mo Brooks, or former President Donald Trump as she closed out her runoff campaign for the Republican Senate nomination a stone’s throw from her hometown in southeastern Alabama’s rural wiregrass region. In front of lifelong friends, family, and extended family who packed a dining hall at McLin’s, a popular local catfish restaurant, Britt ticked off a laundry list of priorities she plans to address as the successor to retiring Sen. Richard Shelby (R): business deregulation and support for the domestic agriculture and energy industries, “standing with Israel" and "holding China accountable,” education reform, and bringing down inflation. “I would be the only mom with school-age children on the Republican side of the aisle,” Britt, 40, said earlier Monday evening during an interview with a local TV station as the crowd of about 150 looked on, an attempt to emphasize her focus on inflation, the foremost issue on voters’ minds. TRUMP THINKS HE 'WOULD WIN' A PRIMARY FIGHT WITH DESANTIS But mostly, a visibly emotional Britt talked about her roots in...
    Katie Britt and Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) are squabbling over who pulled the plug on the one scheduled debate ahead of the Alabama Senate runoff as both Republicans jockey for advantage in a contest that will essentially determine Sen. Richard Shelby’s (R-AL) successor. Brooks, the underdog after finishing 15.5 percentage points behind Britt in last month’s primary, is accusing the front-runner of “being too scared to debate” and claiming she is responsible for canceling a media-hosted faceoff previously set for one week before the June 21 runoff. The Britt campaign is calling the congressman a liar, arguing he is “desperate” to improve his runoff prospects and would use any debate as a platform to launch ad hominem attacks. “If she is too weak to stand on a stage and take Mo Brooks on, how can anyone expect her to take on Chuck Schumer, Bernie Sanders, or any of the other Socialist Democrats that are destroying America,” Brooks said Thursday in a statement, referring to Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). “Katie Britt’s debate refusal is...
    The Republican primary for the seat being vacated by retiring U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby in Alabama has become a bitter, high-dollar race as candidates jockey for the nomination. The three highest-profile candidates in Tuesday’s primary are U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks, who won — and then lost — former President Donald Trump’s backing; Katie Boyd Britt, Shelby’s former chief of staff; and Mike Durant, the owner of an aerospace company who is best known as the helicopter pilot shot down and captured in the events that inspired “Black Hawk Down.” Lillie Boddie, Karla M. Dupriest and Jake Schafer are also seeking the GOP nomination. Trump had initially endorsed Brooks in the race but rescinded that backing in March, citing unhappiness with Brooks’ performance and accusing the conservative congressman of going “woke” for suggesting it was time to move on from Trump’s 2020 election fraud claims. Both Britt and Durant have courted Trump’s nod, but he has not committed to either. The fractured field increases the chances that the race will go to a June 21 runoff, which is...
    HOMEWOOD, Ala. (AP) — Republican Senate hopefuls made last-minute pitches to primary voters Monday in the tight race for the GOP nomination for seat being vacated by retiring Sen. Richard Shelby. The three leading candidates in Tuesday’s primary — U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks, former Shelby aide Katie Britt and veteran Mike Durant — concentrated their efforts in Republican strongholds in north Alabama, attempting to sway undecided primary voters and combat a flurry of negative attack ads in the race. The fractured field increases the chances the primary will go to a June 21 runoff, which will be required unless a single candidate captures more than 50% of the vote. Brooks planned a rally in Huntsville with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz as he seeks to overcome former President Donald Trump‘s harsh criticisms and decision to rescind his endorsement. Durant, running on his status as a military veteran and business owner without political experience, received a folded U.S. flag from supporter Ashlie Combs during a stop at a barbecue restaurant in the Birmingham suburb of Homewood. “I’m in it the for the...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday rescinded his endorsement of Rep. Mo Brooks in Alabama’s U.S. Senate race in a major blow to the congressman’s campaign. In a statement, Trump cited Brooks’ performance in the race, poor campaign staffing and what Trump perceived as a softening of Brooks’ stance on the former president’s debunked 2020 election fraud claims. Trump said he will be making another endorsement announcement in the “near future.” “Very sad but, since he decided to go in another direction, so have I, and I am hereby withdrawing my Endorsement of Mo Brooks for the Senate. I don’t think the great people of Alabama will disagree with me,” Trump said in a statement. Trump has backed Brooks since last April, more than a year ahead of the upcoming May 24 primary, rewarding the conservative firebrand and ally who whipped up a crowd of Trump supporters at the Jan. 6, 2021, rally that preceded the Capitol insurrection. Brooks has since found himself in a primary battle with two formidable opponents: Katie...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpFive takeaways as Jackson takes tough questions from GOP Raimondo announces deal with British counterpart on steel, aluminum tariffs Sanctions aimed at regime change in Russia, says Greek diplomat MORE has pulled an endorsement of Rep. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksRepublicans ramp up support for candidates snubbed by Trump Brooks vows to not back McConnell as leader amid Trump criticism Trump mulls rescinding endorsement of Brooks in Alabama Senate race MORE in this year's Alabama Senate primary, slamming the Republican as "woke" and disloyal to him for doubting his claims about the 2020 presidential election.  "When I endorsed Mo Brooks, he took a 44-point lead and was unstoppable. He then hired a new campaign staff who “brilliantly” convinced him to "stop talking about the 2020 Election," Trump said in a statement issued on Wednesday morning. "Very sad but, since he decided to go in another direction, so have I, and I am hereby withdrawing my Endorsement of Mo Brooks for the Senate. I don’t think the great people of Alabama will disagree with me. Election Fraud must be captured...
    Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyHouse passes stopgap bill to prevent shutdown Lawmakers say spending deal up to leaders This week: Democrats move to prevent shutdown MORE (R-Ala.), the senior Republican on the Senate Appropriations Committee, announced Wednesday that negotiators have reached “a breakthrough” agreement on the framework for an omnibus spending package that he predicts will help the two sides agree to the spending toplines very soon. “We have reached an agreement on framework,” Shelby told The Hill shortly before noon on Thursday. He said the top-line spending numbers for defense and non-defense discretionary programs, which have been a major sticking point in the talks, “will come from that” framework. He called the development “big.” Shelby later confirmed the breakthrough development in talks with Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyLawmakers say spending deal up to leaders Top Senate Republican: Congress 'probably' headed for third stopgap bill to prevent shutdown Biden relaunches cancer moonshot: 'Let's end cancer as we know it' MORE (D-Vt.), House Appropriations Committee Chair Rosa DeLauroRosa DeLauroHouse passes stopgap bill to prevent shutdown The Hill's Morning...
    Senate and House negotiators say they are getting closer to a deal on setting the top-line spending number for an appropriations package to fund government past Feb. 18 and avoid a shutdown.   The top Democrats and Republicans on the Senate and House Appropriations Committees met Thursday morning to chart a path for reaching agreement on a fiscal year 2022 omnibus government funding bill and said they would meet again soon.   Negotiators in the so-called “Four Corners” say they’re optimistic about reaching an agreement.   “I think we have a good chance of coming together on this,” Rep. Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerDemocrats return with lengthy to-do list Lobbying world Two women could lead a powerful Senate spending panel for first time in history MORE (Texas), the top-ranking Republican on the House Appropriations Committee, told reporters as she headed into the meeting.  One Democratic senator said he had been told that Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Pat Leahy (D-Vt.) and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyJohnson, Thune signal GOP's rising confidence Alabama GOP gears up for fierce Senate primary clash Senate Minority Whip...
    Donald Trump and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis holding a joint press conference in Belleair, Florida, on July 31, 2020. It hasn't been a great couple of weeks for Donald Trump. First, Republicans scored a splashy win in the Virginia gubernatorial contest with a candidate who mostly stiff-armed Trump publicly. Next, President Joe Biden accomplished in nine months what eluded Trump for four solid years. Even worse, the trillion-dollar plan—similar to one Trump floated in March 2020 but didn't have the skill to deliver—also garnered solid bipartisan support in both the Senate and the House. Biden's success entirely destroyed Trump's ridiculous claim to being a master dealmaker. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has recently caved to Trump on other critical issues, surely felt a hint of glee when he declared the Biden bill "a godsend for Kentucky." Overall, Trump still dominates the Republican Party and appears poised to continue snuffing out its more moderate, establishment elements in next year's midterms. But not everyone is bending to Trump's will, and if there's anything Trump craves, it's 100% fealty from everyone at all times. So in...
    Retiring Republican Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama plans to spend $5 million of his own campaign money to help his former chief of staff beat the candidate backed by Donald Trump to replace him, a new report said on Thursday. Shelby has told allies he will help fund an independent SuperPAC supporting Katie Britt, who, after leaving his staff, served as the CEO of the Business Council of Alabama, to win the GOP nomination to replace him, The Washington Post reported, citing two poeple who know of the senator's plans. The massive infusion of cash will likely have a deep impact on the race, where Republican Rep. Mo Brooks, who has pushed Trump's election conspiracies, has struggled to raise the funds needed to win the primary.  Shelby, who is retiring in 2022 after six terms in the Senate, has $9.7 million in cash in his campaign account and $6.5 million in his leadership PAC. Retiring Republican Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama plans to spend $5 million of his own campaign money to help his candidate defeat Donald Trump's in primary to...
    Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyDemocrats face monster December collision Black Hawk pilot shot down in Somalia jumps into Alabama Senate race Senate Democrats ditch Hyde amendment for first time in decades MORE (R-Ala.) on Tuesday said another continuing resolution will likely be needed in December to fund the government, following an initial meeting on Tuesday between top lawmakers on the House and Senate appropriations committees over fiscal year 2022 funding bills. Shelby, the vice chairman of the Appropriations Committee, told reporters after a meeting with House and Senate appropriators that an additional continuing resolution will clearly be needed to fund the government after Dec. 3, when funding from the stopgap bill passed in late September is set to expire. The vice chairman also said a handful of Republicans would be on board with a full-year continuing resolution. He told reporters that after Dec. 3 “If there’s no progress then, we could be headed for a yearly CR. A lot of people would like that. One, that keeps all the riders off, you know? Think of that from our standpoint.” No agreements made on...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Mike Durant, best known as the helicopter pilot shot down and held prisoner in the 1993 “Black Hawk Down” incident, is joining the U.S. Senate race in Alabama. Durant, now the founder and president of an aerospace company in Huntsville, announced his campaign Tuesday. He joins a crowded GOP field vying for the Republican nomination to the seat being vacated by retiring U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby. “Between ridiculous vaccine mandates, trillions in spending, and constant assaults on innocent life and the 2nd Amendment, it’s clear that we need to mobilize people from outside of politics to step forward and serve,” Durant said. Like other Republicans in the race, Durant expressed his admiration for former President Donald Trump. “President Trump showed us what’s possible when outsiders step forward and take on the insiders and the politicians. I’ve spent my life either in service to my nation or focused on growing a successful business in Alabama. I’m not going to sit idly by while Joe Biden and the career politicians wreck the country I love. I’m signing...
    Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 McConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE (R-Ky.) and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyMcConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike Crypto debate set to return in force Press: Why is Mo Brooks still in the House? MORE (R-Ala.) on Tuesday night offered a competing short-term government funding bill, just as House Democrats passed a stopgap that suspends the country's borrowing limit. The bill from McConnell and Shelby, the top Republican on the Senate Appropriations Committee, does not include a debt ceiling suspension, reflecting the GOP push to divorce government funding from the looming brawl over the nation's borrowing limit. The House-passed bill would suspend the debt ceiling, which kicked back in on Aug. 1, through 2022. The Senate GOP bill also includes funding for supporting the Iron Dome, Israel's air defense system. House Democrats stripped out a provision on Tuesday from...
    CULLMAN, Alabama — If there were such a thing as an all-star event for Alabama politics, Saturday’s Trump rally in north-central Alabama would have fit the billing. Former President Donald Trump hosted one of his signature rallies before a crowd of what event organizers tell Breitbart News was an estimated 30,000 people on a rain-soaked August night. Trump’s rally was a who’s who of Alabama politics. It featured Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-AL), Lt. Gov. Will Ainsworth (R-AL), Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall and Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-AL), which suggested an association with the former president is still vital for the political success for Republicans in the ruby-red conservative state. Also featured prominently during the rally, which the Alabama Republican Party organized, was Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), the Trump-endorsed congressman vying for the U.S. Senate seat occupied by Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), who is retiring after the 2022 midterms. While Brooks was the Trump-endorsed candidate, it did not stop his opponents, former Business Council of Alabama Katie Britt, former U.S. ambassador to Slovenia Lynda Blanchard and Prattville, AL businesswoman Jessica Taylor,...
    The United States Senate rejected an amendment to the Infrastructure Act. Specifically, a crypto compromise amendment between Senators Cynthia Lummis, Pat Toomey, and the United States Treasury, failed to enter the final version of the bill. To better understand, the debate on the infrastructure bill had already closed on Sunday night. The amendment could only be adopted into the bill by unanimous consent, a single negative vote would sink it. In this sense, Brian Armstrong said: “This debate in the United States Senate began because the government sees the growing cryptocurrency industry as a source of tax revenue.” In addition, he added: “We agree that everyone should pay their taxes. There is no debate on this topic. But destroying some of the most exciting innovations in the process is inconceivable. United States Senate rejects amendment In this regard, United States Senators Pat Toomey, Cynthia Lummis, and Rob Portman spoke in favor of the compromise amendment. Like Senator Ted Cruz, who predicted that some would speak out. I’m pleased to announce that Senators Warner, Toomey, Sinema, Lummis & I...
                      by Andrew Trunsky  A $2.1 billion bill to fund the Capitol Police, National Guard and resettlement of Afghans who helped U.S. troops sailed through the Senate Thursday afternoon on a 98-0 vote. The bill was brokered by Vermont Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy and Alabama Republican Sen. Richard Shelby, the two top lawmakers on the Senate Appropriations Committee. The deal, which also provides funding for COVID-19-related measures around the Capitol complex, was reached amid reports that the Capitol Police was set to run out of money in the coming weeks. Leahy and Shelby had been at odds over the bill’s ideal size for weeks, but reached an agreement Wednesday. “We have the responsibility to take care of the Capitol Police in the wake of their incredible service on January 6th, and to reimburse our National Guard for costs incurred protecting the Capitol,” Mr. Leahy said in a statement after the deal was reached. “We have the responsibility to pay for costs we have already incurred as a result of the pandemic. “It is also critical that...
    A $2.1 billion bill to fund the Capitol Police, National Guard and resettlement of Afghans who helped U.S. troops sailed through the Senate Thursday afternoon on a 98-0 vote. The bill was brokered by Vermont Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy and Alabama Republican Sen. Richard Shelby, the two top lawmakers on the Senate Appropriations Committee. The deal, which also provides funding for COVID-19-related measures around the Capitol complex, was reached amid reports that the Capitol Police was set to run out of money in the coming weeks. Leahy and Shelby had been at odds over the bill’s ideal size for weeks, but reached an agreement Wednesday. “We have the responsibility to take care of the Capitol Police in the wake of their incredible service on January 6th, and to reimburse our National Guard for costs incurred protecting the Capitol,” Mr. Leahy said in a statement after the deal was reached. “We have the responsibility to pay for costs we have already incurred as a result of the pandemic. “It is also critical that we not leave behind those who helped us in...
    Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), the longtime retiring senator from Alabama, plans to oppose former President Donald Trump in the primary to replace him and attack Trump’s pick for the nomination, Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), Breitbart News has learned. Shelby will, in a yet-to-be-published interview with National Journal, attack Brooks as “irrational.” “A lot of people would think so. Look at his record,” Shelby told National Journal’s Matt Holt when asked if Brooks would be an “irrational senator,” a transcript of their conversation provided to Breitbart News shows. Shelby also told National Journal he will “absolutely” be helping his former chief of staff Katie Britt—dubbed the “Alabama Liz Cheney” given her work for swamp consultancies—“everywhere I can.” “I mean, she has to run her own race, I don’t run people’s race. She’s highly qualified, and a very rational person,” Shelby said. While Shelby claims she is “qualified” to be a senator, Trump made clear she is not “qualified to be a senator” in a recent July 10 statement about Britt. Trump said on July 10, shattering the idea that Britt is...
    (CNN)With time running out, Republicans and Democrats remain at odds over how to move forward on a funding package designed to improve security on Capitol Hill and fill a massive funding gap for Capitol Police and the National Guard that was created in the wake of the January 6 insurrection.Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, the chairman of the Appropriations Committee, is pushing a $3.7 billion proposal that would fill the funding gap and also would provide funding to harden the Capitol's physical infrastructure and for security enhancements at federal courts. On the Senate floor Monday, Leahy argued that these security enhancements are just as immediate a need as funding the Capitol Police and National Guard."The Capitol and its office buildings are not impenetrable. It's not a fortress. The windows can be broken. The doors can be breached," Leahy said. "This complex is no longer shrouded with the protection of belief that is not possible to storm these halls. Much like the windows, that protection was shattered and it was broadcast to the whole world on January 6."But Republicans argue...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump took a whack at Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell last weekend, calling him an "Old Crow" as he railed against the Kentucky Republican.On Tuesday, McConnell took it in stride."Actually, it's quite an honor," McConnell told CNN. "Old Crow is Henry Clay's favorite bourbon."McConnell, who has long revered Clay, a fellow Kentuckian, was responding to Trump's attack of the retiring GOP senator from Alabama, Richard Shelby, for endorsing Katie Boyd Britt, a former Shelby chief of staff who is the head of the Business Council of Alabama. Trump has endorsed Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks to fill Shelby's seat next year, while McConnell has not picked a candidate in the race to this point."I see that the RINO Senator from Alabama, close friend of Old Crow Mitch McConnell, Richard Shelby, is pushing hard to have his 'assistant' fight the great Mo Brooks for his Senate seat," Trump said in his statement. "She is not in any way qualified and is certainly not what our Country needs or not what Alabama wants. For Mitch McConnell to be wasting money...
    (CNN)Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont and chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee, unveiled a new $3.7 billion proposal to supplement security funding at the Capitol and beyond in the wake of the January 6 Capitol Insurrection. The almost $4 billion plan is close to double what House Democrats have already passed in May. In addition to beefing up funding for Capitol Police and the National Guard, the Leahy plan also provided funding to help Afghan supporters of the US military obtain visas as the US ends its combat operations presence there, offers funding for the Department of Defense to help beef up Covid protections and provides a influx in cash to help harden the Capitol's security posture. Speaking on the Senate floor, Leahy urged his Senate colleagues, both Republican and Democrat, to support the plan. "We did not budget for an insurrection, and I am glad that my Republican colleagues have joined the negotiating table on this urgent matter, but their proposal falls far short of the needs of the moment. A violent insurrection happened. A pandemic happened....
    Former President Donald Trump accused Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of "wasting money" in the Alabama Senate primary, further exposing the rift between the two wings of the Republican Party. Trump said incumbent Sen. Richard Shelby's endorsement of Katie Boyd Britt to become his successor, along with McConnell's alleged funneling of money to Britt, is "absolutely outrageous." "She is not in any way qualified and is certainly not what our Country needs or not what Alabama wants," Trump said of Britt in a Saturday night tweetmail, calling on Alabamians to vote for Rep. Mo Brooks because "he stands for America First, and everything Alabama wants, [and] he also has my Complete and Total Endorsement." KATIE BRITT IS A BRIGHT NEW FACE IN ALABAMA SENATE RACE Britt, who served as Shelby's former chief of staff, entered the race for the open seat in early June and soon earned the backing of the incumbent senator, who told Politico she is "probably the best-qualified candidate to come along in a long time." Brooks, a Trump loyalist who was among the first to object...
    Jessica Taylor, an Alabama consultant, became the fourth Republican to jump into the state’s open Senate race Thursday.  Taylor, who also finished in third in the GOP primary in the state’s 2nd Congressional District last year, cast herself as a staunch conservative, hitting on a slew of Republican talking points in her launch video. “I fear everything we hold dear here in Alabama is under attack by socialists, big tech and the radical liberals in DC,” she said. “The woke police and the fake news media are destroying our democracy.” “It’s long past time serious conservatives like us rise up and help finish Trump’s mission of draining the swamp. The truth is the left wants to keep lying and cheating so they can steal our elections and silence our voices, indoctrinate our children, open our borders to criminals and terrorists, raise taxes to raise folks not to work and wonder why they don’t, print money until you need a mortgage to by a two-by-four, and then cancel us if we dare speak out.” “I’m Jessica Taylor. Send me to Washington, and...
    The latest entrant into Alabama’s open Republican Senate primary race took her campaign launch literally, featuring a rocket lifting off. “I’m putting it all on the pad to send the liberal agenda into outer space where it belongs,” small businesswoman Jessica Taylor said in her launch video as she pressed a button to set off a rocket behind her. A native of rural Alabama who grew up in a mobile home park, Taylor is the founder of a Montgomery-based grant consulting firm. She previously worked in the office of former Alabama Gov. Bob Riley. GOP FUNDRAISING ARM HITS BACK AGAINST BLUE-STATE ATTORNEYS GENERAL Taylor promised to be “Kamala’s worst nightmare,” a reference to Vice President Kamala Harris. “The Left wants to keep lying and cheating so they can steal our elections and silence our voices, indoctrinate our children, open our borders to criminals and terrorists, raise taxes to pay folks not to work and wonder why they don't, print money until you need a mortgage to buy a 2x4, and then cancel us if we...
    Alabama Republican Senate candidate Katie Britt announced that she raised $2.24 million since launching her campaign, shattering the state’s quarterly fundraising records. Britt, the former chief of staff to retiring Republican Sen. Richard Shelby, announced her campaign on June 8, reaching her record-breaking milestone in just 23 days, according to local outlet Yellowhammer News. She resigned from leading the Business Council of Alabama to run for Shelby’s seat. It’s official: I’m running, and I’m all-in! I will put Alabama First, deliver results for our state and never apologize for it. Because we don’t just need a senator from Alabama, we need a Senator for Alabama. #BrittForAlabama #AlabamaFirst WATCH: ⬇️https://t.co/ni9Sc57Z9D pic.twitter.com/aGGzGYBWDl — Katie Britt for AL (@KatieBrittforAL) June 8, 2021 Britt added that over 90% of donations came from within Alabama. (RELATED: Alabama Senate Candidate Drops Out After Being Confronted About Affair) “It is clear that the people of our state know that we don’t just need a senator from Alabama, we need a Senator FOR Alabama,” she said Tuesday. “Our Alabama First message is resonating strongly with hardworking families...
    Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbySEC removes Republican watchdog after progressive lobbying effort Biden releases T budget that foresees decade of trillion-dollar deficits Drama scrambles Schumer's China bill MORE (R-Ala.) says he will support his former chief of staff Katie Boyd Britt in the race to succeed him in the Senate, opting to not back former President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer House Republican to challenge DeWine for Ohio gubernatorial nomination GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot Overnight Defense: Austin directs classified initiatives to counter China | Biden emphasizes alliances in speech to troops | Lockdown lifted at Texas base after reported shooting MORE’s endorsed candidate, Rep. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksGOP lawmaker deletes tweet that appeared to mistakenly reveal email password The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Harris take US goals abroad Mo Brooks served with Swalwell lawsuit MORE (R-Ala.). Shelby’s office confirmed to The Hill that the senator said he will throw his support behind Britt, who officially announced her candidacy on Tuesday, following an interview he gave to Politico. “She's like family. She'd make a...
    A former senior aide to Sen. Richard Shelby has jumped into the Alabama Senate race, a sign former President Donald Trump’s endorsement of Rep. Mo Brooks is not scaring away competitors. Katie Britt, Shelby’s former chief of staff, announced her candidacy Tuesday, forging ahead with a bid to succeed her old boss, who is retiring in 2022, despite the weight Trump’s endorsement carries with Alabama Republicans. In a nod to that reality, Britt, most recently CEO of the Business Council of Alabama, is framing her campaign around the work she did with Shelby to shepherd the Trump agenda through Congress. Britt’s ability to outflank Brooks with grassroots Republicans is questionable. Most GOP insiders in Alabama do not expect her, or any other candidate, to pull it off unless the congressman falters on his own. But she does have some early support from members of the vast Shelby alumni network, connected Republican operatives who have worked for the senator over the more than four decades he has spent in Washington. “It was an honor to stand with Sen. Shelby to bring...
    (CNN)Katie Boyd Britt, the president and CEO of the Business Council of Alabama, is expected to jump into the Alabama Senate race next month as some Republicans in the state seek an alternative to Rep. Mo Brooks, who has already earned former President Donald Trump's endorsement, according to multiple sources familiar with the matter. Some Republicans are unnerved at the slash-and-burn politics of Brooks -- who led the charge in Congress to overturn the 2020 election results -- and view him as an unreliable ally to the business community. They hope the next Alabama senator will continue the legacy of the retiring Sen. Richard Shelby, the top Republican on the Appropriations Committee, who delivered federal funding and largesse for the state. Britt previously served as Shelby's chief of staff.Britt would not confirm her intentions in a statement to CNN. "I continue to serve as President and CEO of the Business Council of Alabama, and as long as I do, it would be inappropriate for me to comment on anything else," Britt said.But sources with knowledge of the matter say that...
    Despite a continued conference ban, some Senate Republicans will begin requesting earmarks for district projects. “If you don’t want to earmark, don’t ask for one,” Republican Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby told The Wall Street Journal Wednesday. Both parties in the House voted to end their earmark bans, which they instituted in 2011, as did Senate Democrats. Earmarks are line items inserted into bills that direct money towards a specific recipient. By directing spending toward a specific Congress member’s district, they can be used to gain a reluctant member’s support for a piece of legislation. Republicans did not change their rules 2allow earmarks so no republican can participate in that reprehensible act — ChuckGrassley (@ChuckGrassley) April 21, 2021 At least two Republicans have already suggested that they may request earmarks, however. Maine Sen. Susan Collins said that she would do so if they are “subject to certain guidelines if they’re for public purposes.” South Dakota Sen. Mike Rounds said that he would “do what I think is right for South Dakota,” while trying “to make sure it’s aboveboard.” At least...
    Senate Republicans are opening the door to embracing earmarks, as Democrats prepare to plow forward with using the spending to funnel funds back to their home states.  GOP members of the Senate Appropriations Committee met on Monday evening to discuss what they should do about earmarks with Democrats, led by Appropriations Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Dakota Access pipeline to remain in operation despite calls for shutdown | Biden hopes to boost climate spending by B | White House budget proposes .4B for environmental justice Biden .5T budget proposes major hike in social programs Biden hopes to boost climate spending by billion MORE (D-Vt.), who is expected to go resurrect them with or without GOP buy-in.  Top GOP senators said there wasn't a formal group decision. But they think Republicans will land on letting each member make a decision about if they want to request the congressionally directed spending, rather than enforcing a unified caucus-wide stance.  "I think the decision is headed toward letting every member decide if they want to participate in the earmark process," Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThune: 'There are Republicans...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Rep. Mo Brooks in Alabama’s 2022 Senate race, siding with the conservative firebrand who riled up the crowd before the Capitol riot over other contenders in the state’s all-important Republican primary. Trump announced his support in a statement shared by the Brooks campaign for the seat being vacated by six-term Sen. Richard Shelby. “Few Republicans have as much COURAGE and FIGHT as Alabama Congressman Mo Brooks,” Trump said in the statement, adding that Brooks “will stand up for America First no matter what obstacles the Fake News Media, RINOs, or Socialist Democrats may place in his path.” In a state where Trump won 62% of the vote in 2020, the former president’s backing is an important prize. When Shelby, 86, announced that he won’t seek reelection to the seat he’s held since 1987, he ignited what is expected to be a messy GOP primary at a time when the national Republican Party is trying to chart a direction following Trump’s departure. Brooks already faces Trump ambassador Lynda Blanchard in...
    Rep. Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellAmazon union battle comes to Washington GOP leader to try to force Swalwell off panel Lawmakers, activists remember civil rights icons to mark 'Bloody Sunday' MORE (D-Ala.) will not run to replace retiring Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden's next act: Massive infrastructure plan with tax hikes Senate Republicans torn over return of earmarks Mo Brooks launches Senate bid in Alabama MORE (R-Ala.) next year, saying that “the unfinished business” in her congressional district is “far too important” for her to mount a statewide campaign.  “After careful consideration and consultation with my family and closest advisors, I have decided that the unfinished business of my home district, Alabama’s 7th Congressional District, is far too important for me to seek higher office at this time,” Sewell said in a statement.  “I will remain actively engaged in the U.S. Senate race in Alabama and will throw my full weight behind the Democrat candidate who emerges as the strongest advocate for protecting voting rights, expanding economic opportunity, and strengthening access to health care.” Sewell,...
    Republican Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks, a conservative lawmaker who has been eyeing the Alabama U.S. Senate seat opening in 2022, is holding a campaign event on Monday with top Trump adviser Stephen Miller.  "Please join Congressman Mo Brooks with Special Guest Stephen Miller for an exciting announcement," a post from Brooks' campaign account says. Fox News did not immediately receive a response to a request for comment to Miller or an email address associated with Brooks' campaign asking if he is in fact running for Senate. But the presence of Miller at the event shows how, if Brooks runs, he will portray himself as the pro-Trump candidate in the race.  Brooks previously ran for Senate in 2017 during the special election to replace former Attorney General Jeff Sessions but didn't make it past the Republican primary. Before working for Trump, Miller was a top staffer to Sessions when the Alabamian served in the Senate. TRUMP'S AMBASSADOR TO SLOVENIA LAUNCHES SENATE BID IN ALABAMA Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., announced last month that he will retire after his current Senate term ends. Shelby, who was...
    Most Republican senators signed onto a letter to the Government Accountability Office accusing Joe Biden of 'unlawful' acts in stopping construction of Donald Trump's southern border wall on Day One of his presidency. '[I]n one of the first official acts of his presidency, Joseph Biden suspended border wall construction and ordered a freeze of funds provided by Congress for that purpose,' the 40 senators wrote. 'In the weeks that followed, operational control of our southern border was compromised and a humanitarian and national security crisis has ensued.' The group, led by Ranking Member of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, claims the president can not provide a sweeping action to freeze funds that were already appropriated for construction of the wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. In the letter, they also allege that Biden signing the executive order stopping construction on January 20 is to blame for recent massive influx in immigration at the southern border and the ensuing overcrowding crisis, which they claim was 'entirely avoidable.' 'The President's actions directly contributed to this unfortunate,...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama Lt. Gov. Will Ainsworth said Friday he will not run for the U.S. Senate seat being given up by longtime incumbent Richard Shelby next year. Ainsworth, a first-term Republican from Guntersville, announced on social media that he had considered a bid but decided against running because his three children need a father who’s present and involved in their lives. “I feel strongly that God’s plan currently calls for me to continue leading on the state, not federal, level of government,” he said in a tweet. Elected lieutenant governor in 2018, Ainsworth served a term in the Alabama House before that. Shelby, 86, announced earlier this month that he won’t seek a seventh term. Several other people are considering campaigns, but only former Trump administration ambassador and businesswoman Lynda Blanchard has announced a run. Rep. Mo Brooks of Huntsville has said he is considering a campaign, as is Secretary of State John Merrill. Another possible candidate is Shelby’s former chief of staff, Katie Boyd Britt, who now heads the Business Council of Alabama and likely would...
    The Tennessee Senate approved legislation Monday evening that would allow Gov. Bill Lee to order schools to offer in-person learning. Senate Bill 103, by Germantown Republican Sen. Brain Kelsey and Collierville Republican Rep. Kevin Vaughan, would authorize the governor to issue an executive order requiring all schools statewide to offer in-person learning. Kelsey proposed the bill in response to outcry from Shelby County parents and students as schools had remained closed for nearly a year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Senate approved the bill Monday in a party-line vote, 27-5. It now will be considered by the House. In recent weeks, Tennessee’s last two school districts to offer only virtual learning options – Metro Nashville Public Schools and Shelby County Schools – have announced plans to return to in-classroom learning. Nashville students began a phased-in return to classrooms earlier this month. Shelby County Schools announced students will begin returning to classrooms beginning March 1. “Every Tennessee family deserves the choice of in-person learning,” Kelsey said in a statement. “We have many students,...
    Lynda Blanchard, a businesswoman and former President TrumpDonald TrumpFederal prosecutors investigated Proud Boys ties to Roger Stone in 2019 case: CNN Overnight Defense: One-third of service members decline coronavirus vaccine | Biden to take executive action in response to Solar Winds hack | US, Japan reach cost sharing agreement Trump 'won't say yet' if he's running in 2024 MORE’s ambassador to Slovenia, announced Thursday she will run next year for the Alabama Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyIowa Republican announces Senate bid with Grassley's 2022 plans unclear Tester to chair defense appropriations panel Democratic group targets GOP senators with ads ahead of impeachment vote MORE (R). Blanchard is the first Republican to officially jump into what is expected to be a crowded GOP primary in the race to fill the solidly red seat that Shelby has held since 1987. In a nearly three-minute-long video announcing her campaign, Blanchard cast herself as an outsider and fierce defender of former President Trump. “I’m a Christian conservative and business builder, a mother of eight wonderful children. I’m a proud...
    A former Trump administration official announced her candidacy in Alabama for a U.S. Senate seat. Lynda Blanchard, who served as the U.S. ambassador to Slovenia from 2019 through the end of the Trump administration, announced on Thursday that she’ll be running to fill the vacancy that will be left by Republican Richard Shelby, who is not running for reelection in 2022. Touting herself as “a proud member of the MAGA movement” in a video announcing her candidacy, the former ambassador said she planned to push Trump's “America first” policies if she's elected by pushing back against Democratic leadership in the federal government. "[President] Biden, [Senate Majority Leader Chuck] Schumer, [House Speaker Nancy] Pelosi, and the Squad are working fast to erase triumphs of the Trump administration from our history," she said. "If you're sick of career politicians, insiders, and swamp creatures that stand for socialism or cheerlead for censorship, then I'm asking for your vote to stand strong for Alabama by sending a true outsider to the Senate." FORMER OHIO GOP CHAIRWOMAN JANE TIMKEN ANNOUNCES BID FOR OPEN SENATE...
    Republican Lynda Blanchard is the first candidate to jump into the Senate race to succeed longtime GOP Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama. "If you’re sick of career politicians, insiders and swamp creatures that stand for socialism or cheerlead censorship, then I’m asking for your vote to stand strong for Alabama by sending a true outsider to the Senate," Blanchard said Thursday in a  video announcing her candidacy. ALABAMA'S SHELBY ANNOUNCES HE'LL RETIRE FROM THE SENATE AFTER NEXT YEAR The 61-year old Blanchard, who served as U.S. ambassador to Slovenia during the final two years of the Trump administration, emphasized that "my pledge to you is simple: together, guided by God’s blessings and your support, we will give the Swamp a heckuva dose of the common sense and conservative principle that it needs to truly ‘Make America Great Again’ – just like President Trump did."  The lifelong Alabama resident and businesswoman nearly 30 years ago co-founded the Montgomery-based real estate investment company B&M Management, which is currently valued at roughly more than $1 billion. Blanchard is making an initial $5 million deposit in...
    In announcing that he will retire next year rather than run for a reelection for a seventh six-year term in the Senate, Republican Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama explained: "For everything, there is a season." Shelby's retirement "season" comes as the GOP will try to reclaim in the 2022 midterms the Senate majority it just lost in the 2020 election cycle. With the new announcement, the Senate Republicans now find themselves defending four open seats, including two in very competitive battleground states. ALABAMA'S SHELBY ANNOUNCES HE'LL RETIRE FROM THE SENATE AFTER NEXT YEAR Besides Shelby, GOP Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, and Rob Portman of Ohio are also stepping down after 2022 rather than seek another term in the Senate. "Retirements are a natural course of events for both parties," Brian Walsh, a former NRSC communications director and former senior adviser to GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, told Fox News. And veteran GOP strategist and former Republican National Committee communications director Doug Heye said, "I think for a lot of them, it’s just time." Heye noted that that...
    Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby (R) The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● AL-Sen: Republican Sen. Richard Shelby announced Monday that he would not seek a seventh term next year in Alabama, a decision that will likely set off a competitive GOP nomination fight in this dark red state. Three other Republican senators had previously announced that they wouldn’t be running again: North Carolina’s Richard Burr, Pennsylvania’s Pat Toomey, and Ohio’s Rob Portman. Most politicos had anticipated that the 86-year-old Shelby, who had switched to the Republican Party in 1994 after spending nearly eight years in the Senate as a Democrat, would retire, and the Associated Press reported days earlier that the incumbent was indeed telling people this was his plan. Shelby’s departure will mean that 2022 will feature the first Alabama Senate race without an incumbent running since 1996, when Republican Jeff Sessions flipped the seat held...
    Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) announced Monday that he will not run for re-election in 2022 after 40 years in the U.S. Senate. “For everything, there is a season,” Shelby, 86, wrote in a statement. “I have been fortunate to serve in the U.S. Senate longer than any other Alabamian. During my time in the Senate, I have been given great opportunity, having chaired four committees.” He added: In these positions of leadership, I have strived to influence legislation that will have a lasting impact — creating the conditions for growth and opportunity. Although I plan to retire, I am not leaving today. I have two good years remaining to continue my work in Washington. I have the vision and the energy to give it my all. “I look forward to what is to come for our great state and our great nation,” he concluded. Shelby is Alabama’s longest-serving senator, a presence in the upper chamber since 1987. Shelby’s retirement comes just weeks after Democrats regained control of the Senate by the slimmest of margins. The split is 50-50 in the chamber, with...
      Longtime Alabama Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbySen. Shelby considering retirement: AP The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats chart path to pass Biden's COVID-19 relief plan Overnight Energy:  Automakers withdraw from litigation over California vehicle emissions standard |Senate confirms Buttigieg as Transportation secretary | Republicans introduce long shot bill to circumvent Biden on Keystone XL MORE’s (R) retirement is setting up what is expected to be a contentious Republican primary in 2022. A number of names have already been floated for the seat, including Reps. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksDemocrats should make the 'Bee-Gees' the face of the Republican Party Ocasio-Cortez says she is survivor of sexual assault while recounting riot Freedom Caucus chairman blasts 'sensational lies' after Capitol riot MORE and Gary PalmerGary James PalmerCapitol Police tribute turns political OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Nine, including former Michigan governor, charged over Flint water crisis | Regulator finalizes rule forcing banks to serve oil, gun companies | Trump admin adds hurdle to increase efficiency standards for furnaces, water heaters READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE, Alabama Secretary...
    On Monday, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) made it official and announced he would not seek a seventh term for the U.S. Senate in 2022. Among the possible names mentioned to be a contender for the upcoming vacancy is Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL). While Brooks has been roundly criticized for being an outspoken critic of the handling of the 2020 presidential election, that is not thought to be something that would work against him in a possible Republican U.S. Senate primary match-up in Alabama. Brooks told Breitbart News he would be running in an election in 2022 but did not specify whether it was for the U.S. House or U.S. Senate. “I am running for election in 2022, either for my House seat or for the Alabama Senate seat,” Brooks said in a statement provided to Breitbart News. “Quite frankly, the last three months of scurrilous and palpable false attacks on me by Socialist Democrats and their Fake News Media allies have been a wonderful blessing because they have sent my state-wide name ID and Republican primary support through the roof.” Other...
    On Monday, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) announced he would not seek a seventh term representing Alabama in the U.S. Senate. The announcement, coming on the heels of an Associated Press report teasing the announcement, was not a huge surprise to political watchers in Alabama but will make for a wide-open 2022 race for the open seat. Before Democrats’ takeover of the U.S. Senate with the victories in the two Georgia Senate elections last month, Shelby held the coveted Senate Appropriations Committee chairmanship. Statement as follows: “Today I announce that I will not seek a seventh term in the United State Senate in 2022. For everything, there is a season. “I am grateful to the people of Alabama who have put their trust in me for more than forty years. I have been fortunate to serve in the U.S. Senate longer than any other Alabamian. During my time in the Senate, I have been given great opportunity, having chaired four committees: Appropriations, Rules, Banking, and Intelligence. In these positions of leadership, I have strived to influence legislation that will have a lasting...
    More On: senate What to expect as the Senate begins Trump impeachment trial this week House Democrats push new child tax credit Trump impeachment trial will be paused on Jewish Sabbath Republicans blast Dems for Senate impeachment trial: ‘Zero chance of conviction’ Alabama Republican Sen. Richard Shelby announced on Monday that he would not seek reelection to a seventh term in 2022. “Although I plan to retire, I am not leaving today. I have two good years remaining to continue my work in Washington. I have the vision and the energy to give it my all​,” he said in a statement. ​ “Thank you again for the honor you have given me – the honor to serve the people of Alabama in Congress for the last 42 years. I look forward to what is to come for our great state and our great nation​,” said Shelby, 86, the ranking member on the powerful Senate Appropriations Committee.​ Shelby’s decision comes amid a number of Republican senators – including Sens. Rob Portman of Ohio, Richard Burr of North Carolina and Pat...
    (CNN)Alabama is, um, not a swing state. Former President Donald Trump won the state by more than 25 points in 2020 and Tommy Tuberville (R) crushed Sen. Doug Jones (D) by 20.So, the not-all-that surprising news Monday that Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby (R) would not run for a seventh-term next November doesn't really change the overall battle for Senate control. Democrats just aren't likely to win an open seat race in Alabama -- particularly if Roy Moore (R) is gone from the scene. But that doesn't mean Shelby's retirement doesn't matter, or won't have an impact on the Senate landscape going forward.Here's why: The Senate is a place where everyone is always watching to see what their colleagues do. It's very much a copycat place. If someone makes a move, everyone who didn't make the move wonders whether they should have -- or still should.In short, momentum matters. And Shelby's retirement adds to the momentum of Republican senators announcing they will not be running reelection in November 2022.Read MoreAlthough we are just more than a month into the 117th Congress,...
    Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., speaks with reporters in the Senate subway on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018.Bill Clark | CQ-Roll Call Group | Getty Images Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., said Monday that he will not seek reelection next year, bringing to a close a four decade career representing the southern state in Congress. "Today I announce that I will not seek a seventh term in the United States Senate in 2022.  For everything, there is a season," Shelby said in a statement. The announcement comes days after the Associated Press reported Shelby had told colleagues that he planned to retire. The AP reported that colleagues of the 86-year-old senator were encouraging him to reconsider that decision. The GOP faces a perilous election map in its 2022 Senate elections. The retirement of the elder conservative could make the party's efforts to regain the majority of the upper chamber more difficult. Shelby is currently the top Republican on the powerful Appropriations Committee. He previously served as the chairman of the panel while the GOP held the Senate. Shelby has chaired three other committees...
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