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    Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley considered resigning from the White House in the summer of 2020, accusing former President Donald Trump of causing “great and irreparable harm” to the country. In a drafted resignation letter that was never sent, Milley accused Trump of intentionally dividing the country and politicizing the military, actions the chairman said he could not ignore. The letter was drafted days after protesters were cleared from Lafayette Square outside the White House on June 1, 2020, just moments before Trump was escorted to a church across the street for a photo op. PHOTOS SHOW DOCUMENTS TRUMP PURPORTEDLY FLUSHED DOWN TOILET: REPORT “I regret to inform you that I intend to resign as your Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,” the letter said, according to an excerpt of the book The Divider by journalists Susan Glasser and Peter Baker. “It is my belief that you were doing great and irreparable harm to my country. I believe that you have made a concerted effort over time to politicize the United States...
    Drew Angerer/Getty Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Mark Milley, criticized former President Donald Trump in a never-sent draft resignation letter, according to an excerpt from Susan Glasser and Peter Baker’s forthcoming book The Divider. The letter was reportedly drafted on June 8th, a week after the events of Lafayette Square, where Black Lives Matter protestors were violently cleared from the area for Trump to get his infamous photo opportunity, posing outside the damaged St. John’s Church across from the White House, bible in hand. Milley’s resignation letter displays a rift between Trump and the nation’s military leadership toward the end of his term in office. “I regret to inform you that I intend to resign as your Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,” the letter read, “Thank you for the honor of appointing me as a senior ranking officer.” The letter continued, with Milley claiming that he could no longer justify the actions of Trump: The events of the last couple weeks have caused me to do deep soul-searching, and I can no longer faithfully support...
    Former President Trump complained that U.S. military generals were not 'loyal' like Nazis in one of a series of erratic outbursts that almost caused Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley to resign.  One week after the riots of June 2020, where Milley, an Army General, came under fire for marching with Trump in uniform toward St. John's Church - before peeling off as he realized the impropriety of his own presence - the chairman drafted his resignation letter, but did not send it.  Resigning would have been a highly unusual move, as those in military posts serve the nation before any political party. After seeking counsel from those across the political and military sphere, Milley decided not to send the damning resignation letter.  'The events of the last couple weeks have caused me to do deep soul-searching, and I can no longer faithfully support and execute your orders as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,' Milley wrote in the letter, according to a new book. 'It is my belief that you were doing great and irreparable...
    Tesla CEO Elon Musk lost his fight to delay Twitter's lawsuit against him as a Delaware judge on Tuesday set an October trial, citing the 'cloud of uncertainty' over the social media company after the billionaire backed out of a deal to buy it. Twitter had asked for an expedited trial in September, while Musk's team called for waiting until early next year because of the complexity of the case. 'Delay threatens irreparable harm,' said Chancellor Kathaleen St. Jude McCormick, the head judge of Delaware's Court of Chancery, which handles many high-profile business disputes. 'The longer the delay, the greater the risk.' Regarding the request by Musk's team for a later date, McCormick said they underestimated the Delaware court's ability to 'quickly process complex litigation.' Twitter is trying to force the billionaire to make good on his April promise to buy the social media giant for $44 billion — and the company wants it to happen quickly because it says the ongoing dispute is harming its business. Tesla and SpaceX Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk lost his fight to...
    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday overturned a lower state court’s ruling, declaring Governor Greg Abbott’s order to investigate parents of transgender children for possible child abuse can go back into effect. A lower court ruled the investigations had to cease temporarily. Abbott had filed an emergency appeal. The New York Times reports “the court said that officials could not resume the investigation into the plaintiffs that had brought the lawsuit, a family and a doctor, acknowledging that the inquiry would cause ‘irreparable harm’ and leaving in place the injunction as their case proceeds to trial.” It’s unclear currently why the court would allow other investigations to continue while acknowledging the investigation into the plaintiffs would cause harm. The 12-page ruling appears to focus more on the intricacies of the Texas constitution and what parts of the government have the authority to institute orders such as Governor Abbott’s ordering the state Dept. of Family and Protective Services to perform the investigations.From Your Site Articles
    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday overturned a lower state court’s ruling, declaring Governor Greg Abbott’s order to investigate parents of transgender children for possible child abuse can go back into effect. A lower court ruled the investigations had to cease temporarily. Abbott had filed an emergency appeal. The New York Times reports “the court said that officials could not resume the investigation into the plaintiffs that had brought the lawsuit, a family and a doctor, acknowledging that the inquiry would cause ‘irreparable harm’ and leaving in place the injunction as their case proceeds to trial.” It’s unclear currently why the court would allow other investigations to continue while acknowledging the investigation into the plaintiffs would cause harm. The 12-page ruling appears to focus more on the intricacies of the Texas constitution and what parts of the government have the authority to institute orders such as Governor Abbott’s ordering the state Dept. of Family and Protective Services to perform the investigations. This is a breaking news and developing story. From Your Site Articles
    After years of legal wrangling, the infamous Yankee Letter from Rob Manfred to Brian Cashman is now public, with a few redactions. Much of the text of the letter was published by SNY on Tuesday, after the Yankees lost a court ruling aiming to keep it sealed. It was set to be released later this week. Daily fantasy bettors had sued after the Astros cheating scandal, claiming they were cheated out of winnings. The suit was dismissed in 2020, but the battle over the letter continued for two more years. Was it worth the lengthy court fight the Yankees put up to keep it sealed? You judge for yourself: The Yankees illegally used a phone and the replay room to pass catcher’s signs to runners on second base in 2015 and 2016. That sounds bad, and the Yankees spent years paying expensive lawyers to argue that releasing the letter would cause the team “significant and irreparable reputational harm.” Cashman, for his part, has nursed an intense grudge against the Astros for years. His gripes that the Yankees would have made...
    A mom gatecrashed a press conference held by Mayor Eric Adams on LGBT rights to grill him on why he'd axed plans to lift mask mandates for under 5's from April 4.  Daniela Jampel, a lawyer from Washington Heights, successfully posed as a reporter to breach Monday's Q&A session, and quickly took Adams to task. 'Three weeks ago, you told parents to trust you that you would unmask our toddlers,' she said.  'You stood right here, and you said that the masks would come off April 4. That has not happened. 'Not only did you renege on your promise, you had your lawyers race to court on Friday night arguing that there would be irreparable harm if children under 5 are allowed to take off their masks today along with their older siblings in school. 'So my questions are, what is the irreparable harm to children aged 2 to 4 take off their masks, just as they do in Long Island, just as they do in Westchester? When will you and will you unmask our toddlers?' Adams realized Jampel was...
    A federal appeals court on Thursday ordered further review of United Airlines’ coronavirus vaccine mandate, calling it “coercive” and reversing a lower court ruling. A three-judge panel in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit ruled 2-1 to return the issue to District Judge Mark Pittman, who previously rejected employees’ request for a preliminary junction. In his opinion, Pittman was sympathetic to employees but said he was bound by court precedent, and he declined the request because employees could not prove “irreparable harm,” one of four variables which need to be satisfied in court in order for a judge to issue an injunction and preserve the “status quo” during litigation. Federal Judges Andy Oldham and Jennifer Elrod reversed Pittman’s ruling, pointing to the “rather unique” nature of the case. “Plaintiffs allege a harm that is ongoing and cannot be remedied later: they are actively being coerced to violate their religious convictions. Because that harm is irreparable, we reverse the district court,” Oldham, a President Donald Trump appointee, and Elrod, a George W. Bush appointee, wrote in their opinion. ...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) – An Orlando judge agreed with a request from Bob Saget’s family and temporarily prohibited the release of any photos, video or other records related to the investigation into his death, saying that doing so would cause them irreparable harm. Saget’s wife, Kelly Rizzo, and his three daughters filed a lawsuit the previous day in Orlando, Florida, asking the state judge for a ruling that would prohibit the release of any records from the local medical examiner’s office and the Orange County Sheriff’s Office involving the probe into Saget’s death. READ MORE: Florida Senate, House Clash On Medicaid Dental CareCircuit Judge Vincent Chiu issued the temporary injunction, saying that Saget’s family would suffer “severe mental pain, anguish, and emotional distress” if the request wasn’t granted. He said the injunction was in the public’s interest as he decides whether the family’s privacy concerns outweigh any claims for the records to be released. Saget, 65, was found dead Jan. 9 in a room at the Ritz Carlton in Orlando. He had performed in the area the night before as part...
    WENDY Williams has claimed she is suffering “irreparable financial harm,” and has given over her rights to a Power of Attorney after Wells Fargo bank allegedly locked her out of her accounts.    In a new lawsuit, the troubled Wendy says she has been frozen out of her accounts containing millions of dollars for over two weeks.  4Wendy Williams says she's suffering from 'irreparable financial harm' after Wells Fargo allegedly froze her bank accountsCredit: Splash 4Wendy admitted she has a Power of Attorney after her bank advisor claimed she is of 'unsound mind'Credit: Splash The host of The Wendy Williams Show - who has not appeared on the daytime series in several months as she suffers from multiple health problems- said in the lawsuit's latest filings that her frozen accounts have caused her “irreparable financial harm."  Wendy and her representatives claim that Wells Fargo had told them they would be given a ruling after she provided them with a “properly executed, witnessed, and notarized Power of Attorney and signed letter of representation." A power of attorney gives a designated individual the...
    PHOTO VIA DESANTIS/TWITTERSaying the state is trying to prevent “immediate irreparable harm,” Attorney General Ashley Moody’s office is seeking a preliminary injunction to block Biden administration efforts to require employees of federal contractors to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Lawyers in Moody’s office filed a 26-page motion for a preliminary injunction Tuesday in federal court in Tampa. The motion is part of a lawsuit that the state filed last week challenging vaccination requirements for federal contractors. The state contends, in part, that President Joe Biden overstepped his authority with the requirements and that Florida would be injured because state agencies have contracts with the federal government. As an example, it cited a $12 million contract that the University of Florida received last year from NASA. “Defendants (Biden and other federal defendants) are already pressuring Florida to modify existing contracts, and Florida understands that failing to do so will exclude Florida from consideration for future opportunities,” Tuesday’s motion said. “As a matter of Florida law, however, state entities may not require vaccination of state employees. The challenged actions, therefore, require Florida to...
    Democrats are running out of room to move legislation to reform elections and expand voting access—and a core constituency who put Democrats in charge is running out of patience. On Wednesday, congressional Democrats hit an inflection point after months of pushing for election reforms. When the Freedom to Vote Act—a comprehensive bill to overhaul all kinds of election rules—came to the floor, all 50 Republican senators voted to filibuster it. Despite unified Democratic support, the legislation is dead unless Democrats decide to change Senate rules to allow it to pass with a simple majority instead of 60 votes. But there are no signs that will happen anytime soon and the window for the party to enact voting legislation ahead of the 2022 midterms is already starting to look more like a wall. In the wake of Wednesday’s vote, civil rights groups made some of their most unequivocal statements yet about the political perils for Democrats if they don’t pass voting reforms. “If Democrats fail to protect the vote, the breach of trust with Black voters would be massive and...
    Washington, DC (CNN)As voting rights groups look to register new voters on National Voter Registration Day, some organizers are sounding alarms about how new voting laws in Florida and Kansas are affecting voter registration efforts. In Florida, part of the state's new voting law requires any third-party organization that conducts voter registration work to tell residents that the organization might not deliver their application on time for the next election, and to also explain to residents that they can submit a registration form on their own rather than relying on the group to send it in."It almost ties our hands," said Democratic state Rep. Anna Eskamani, who started People Power for Florida, a political committee focused on voter registration.Eskamani, who represents parts of central Florida including Orlando, said she believes the new law is a form of "intimidation.""It intimidates organizations and volunteers from even trying to do registration because if you do it wrong you could get in trouble," she said. Read MoreEskamani said her organization is moving "full speed ahead" with voter registration, focusing especially on college campuses in...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBE IMAGESPointing to potential “irreparable harm,” attorneys for a group of parents argued Thursday night that school districts should be able to require students to wear masks while an appeals court weighs a challenge to Gov. Ron DeSantis’ efforts to prevent mask mandates. In a 33-page court filing, the parents’ attorneys urged the 1st District Court of Appeal to reject a request by the DeSantis administration to stay a circuit judge’s ruling that said the governor overstepped his constitutional authority in a July 30 executive order. If the Tallahassee-based appeals court issues a stay, it could at least temporarily lead to school districts facing penalties if they require students to wear masks during the COVID-19 pandemic --- though some school districts have refused to comply with DeSantis’ efforts and said parents need to provide documented medical reasons for their children to avoid wearing masks. The filing Thursday night said a potential stay creates “the very real prospect of irreparable harm” and pointed to the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus that has caused a spike in COVID-19...
    Former President Trump reportedly asked a Florida judge for a preliminary injunction that would compel YouTube to reinstate his access on Monday.  Trump's lawyers argued that failure to issue an injunction would cause irreparable harm to the former president as a potential political candidate down the line and to the Republican Party as a whole.  Trump's lawyers said they will make similar requests in cases involving Facebook and Twitter in the coming weeks, according to the New York Post.  The injunction would be a huge boon to Trump's fundraising efforts as it would allow him to keep selling merchandise on YouTube.  Trump remains banned indefinitely on YouTube, permanently from Twitter and Facebook will reassess his ban again in 2023. The former president was deplatformed after he Jan. 6 Capitol riot.  Susan Wojcicki, CEO of Google’s parent company, Alphabet, which also owns YouTube, said in March that the former president’s channel “remains suspended due to the risk of incitement to violence” and would be reinstated if that risk lessened.  Trump filed the class-action suits against the Big Tech Titans last month,...
    Democrats did not include raising the debt ceiling in their budget document released Monday, paving the way for a massive fight this fall with Republicans over raising the nation's borrowing limit. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellin signaled the move in a statement before the budget document was released when she urged both Democrats and Republicans to support the raise in order to avoid a default on the nation's debt. 'The vast majority of the debt subject to the debt limit was accrued prior to the administration taking office,' Yellen said. 'This is a shared responsibility, and I urge Congress to come together on a bipartisan basis as it has in the past to protect the full faith and credit of the United States.' Treasury Secretary Janet Yellin reminded lawmakers failure to raise the debt limit 'would cause irreparable harm to the U.S. economy' By not including it in the budget reconciliation legislation, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer will need 10 Republican senators to agree to passage, something the GOP lawmakers have said they will not do.  The Democrats' move is...
                      by Andrew Trunsky  Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned congressional leaders Friday that failing to raise the debt ceiling would risk “irreparable harm to the U.S. economy and the livelihoods of all Americans.” In a letter, Yellen said that she did not know how long the Treasury Department could prevent the U.S. from defaulting on its debt, which could carry catastrophic economic consequences. The debt ceiling is set to expire on Aug. 1. “In recent years Congress has addressed the debt limit through regular order, with broad bipartisan support,” Yellen wrote. “I respectfully urge Congress to protect the full faith and credit of the United States by acting as soon as possible.” The debt ceiling does not affect government spending, but instead limits how much additional debt the government can take while paying for provisions that have already been passed by Congress and signed into law. Congress last raised the debt ceiling in 2019. Yellen’s letter was sent to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Chuck...
    Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned congressional leaders Friday that failing to raise the debt ceiling would risk “irreparable harm to the U.S. economy and the livelihoods of all Americans.” In a letter, Yellen said that she did not know how long the Treasury Department could prevent the U.S. from defaulting on its debt, which could carry catastrophic economic consequences. The debt ceiling is set to expire on Aug. 1. “In recent years Congress has addressed the debt limit through regular order, with broad bipartisan support,” Yellen wrote. “I respectfully urge Congress to protect the full faith and credit of the United States by acting as soon as possible.” The debt ceiling does not affect government spending, but instead limits how much additional debt the government can take while paying for provisions that have already been passed by Congress and signed into law. Congress last raised the debt ceiling in 2019. Yellen’s letter was sent to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and the top Democrats and Republicans...
    An Indiana judge said the state must continue paying enhanced unemployment benefits until a lawsuit on the issue is decided, ruling that ending the payments could cause "irreparable harm" if out-of-work residents can't pay for housing or food.  The preliminary injunction comes as 26 states — with all but one, Louisiana, run by a Republican governor — are in the process of ending pandemic-related unemployment benefits for millions of people. On June 19, Indiana ended the supplementary federal unemployment aid, which included an extra $300 a week in payments, rather than allowing them to expire in early September.  Indiana's Department of Workforce Development, which handles unemployment benefits, told CBS MoneyWatch that it is "determining how to proceed because the federal programs no longer exist after their termination on June 19."  Last month, Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb announced he was shutting off the extra unemployment aid before federal funding ends in early September, citing "help wanted signs posted all over Indiana" and comparing the state's economy to "an Indy 500 race car engine."  Like Holcomb, other governors have argued that the...
    A group of parents in Los Angeles is asking a court to force their children's school district to open its classrooms “to the greatest extent possible” within seven days, arguing that coronavirus-related school closures are causing their children to suffer “irreparable harm.” The complaint, filed on Wednesday on behalf of the group California Students United, asks the Los Angeles County Superior Court to order the Los Angeles Unified School District to reopen schools and to prevent it from enforcing 6-foot social distancing protocols and mandatory student testing provisions, which the group argues are unduly standing in the way of reopening. “There is no reason Plaintiffs’ children should have to suffer through shorter school days with limited instructional hours and/or two- or three-day-per-week on campus distance learning models while other similarly situated students throughout California — and even in Los Angeles County — enjoy a full schedule of in-person learning five days per week,” the filing says. “LAUSD schoolchildren and their families are suffering irreparable harm.” PUBLIC SCHOOLS FACING ENROLLMENT DIP TRY TO ENTICE PARENTS BACK The complaint goes through the...
    Former Assistant Secretary for Health Brett Giroir asserted Monday that states are causing "irreparable harm" to kids by keeping schools closed. Students need to return to school "immediately", Gioir told "America’s Newsroom"  and jurisdictions like California, Washington D.C., and Oregon are negatively impacting children by sticking with virtual learning. "One thing I want to make sure that everybody knows is we should have our children back in school now no matter what," he said. Giroir added that once individuals have gotten both doses of a vaccine, they should be able to meet with extended family and gather for upcoming holidays such as Easter. CALIFORNIA BOARD MEMBER COMPARES REOPENING SCHOOLS TO 'WHITE SUPREMACIST IDEOLOGY' AND 'SLAVERY' However, Gioir stopped short of saying that vaccinated people can freely go out to stores or restaurants without a mask, citing potential "public health issues" and "uncertainty" until more people get vaccinated. VideoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has said that schools can open for in-person learning without vaccinating teachers "even in areas of the highest community spread" with proper safety precautions. CLICK HERE TO...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Fall’s orange skies warn of climate apocalypse As a little girl, I would look up at the sky and be in awe of the beautiful stars that covered this vastness. Slowly, I began to observe apocalyptic orange-colored skies caused by the various wildfires. The generations after me may live in a world where these orange skies are normalized. In an article by Paul Rogers (“Rainy season starting later,” Page A1, Feb. 5 ), climate scientist Jelena Luković states that “The onset of the rainy season has been progressively delayed since the 1960s, and as a result, the precipitation season has become shorter and sharper in California.” Overall, these changes mean that the dry season will last longer and can cause vegetation to be more prone to burning. We need to stop our dependence on dirty energy like oil and gas and switch to clean energy sources. California needs Gov. Gavin Newsom to commit the state of California to 100% renewable energy by 2030. Saheli Shah...
    Tucker Carlson ripped into President Joe Biden's administration for allegedly releasing thousands of illegal immigrants into the US without testing them for coronavirus in a scathing monologue.  The Fox News host opened his show on Monday night with the rant, in which accused Biden of 'punishing' and endangering the lives of Americans by releasing the migrants without tests.  Carlson then invited the sheriff of Jackson County, Texas, A.J. Louderback, on to the show to explain why Biden's immigration policies are hurting communities along America's border with Mexico.  The host started his monologue by mentioning how the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is requiring international air travelers to obtain a COVID-19 test before they can enter the US. Then he shifted to immigration, saying that migrants entering the US illegally are not being held to the same safety standards.   'Tonight we learned that the Joe Biden administration is releasing thousands of foreign nationals living here illegally into American neighborhoods without bothering to test them for the coronavirus,' he said.   Scroll down for video  Tucker Carlson ripped into President Joe Biden's...
    Jackson County, Texas sheriff A.J. Louderback says the Biden administration is enforcing its no deportation policy and creating “lawlessness” at the southern border. “Every peace officer in the United States should be extremely concerned about the attitude, the lawlessness, the complete abject removal of law,” Louderback told Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” Under President Joe Biden’s non-deportation rules, immigrants can’t be deported if they get a DUI, commit fraud, tax crimes, or assault, Fox News reported, noting that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will be stood down. “The memo that I received this last week it’s essentially a defund ICE by memo, by memorandum. It was sent out by [Transportation Security Administration Administrator] David Pekoske on Jan. 20, 2021,” Louderback continued. (RELATED: ‘Why Should Non-Citizens Be Treated Better?’ Texas AG Blasts Biden Decision to Vaccinate Illegals) The sheriff called the memo “a particularly devastating document for Texans and Americans here in the United States” because he said “”t’s a message to the world:  you can come here illegally, you can commit crimes here against Americans and remain illegally.” Louderback...
    E. Jean Carroll is offering to delay collecting testimony and DNA evidence in her defamation case against President TrumpDonald TrumpJill Biden: Doctorate is one of the things I'm 'most proud of' Azar tells Health Department staff his wife has COVID-19: 'Mild symptoms but otherwise doing well' Michigan reinstates pandemic-related moratorium on water shutoffs MORE, who she's accused of sexual assault, if he gives up other records related to the case. The offer comes as the Department of Justice appeals a ruling from District Judge Lewis Kaplan, in which he found that the president is not an employee of the government and that Carroll’s allegations are not connected to actions in his official capacity. Lawyers for Trump have argued that proceedings should be halted pending the Second Circuit’s decision, arguing that the president would suffer irreparable harm from discovery. In a legal filing on Thursday, Carroll’s lawyers argued that discovery in the case should continue while the appeal is ongoing. However, they said depositions and Carroll’s request for a DNA sample can wait until the Second Circuit Court of Appeals...
    MARTINEZ (KPIX) – The latest stay-at-home orders have drawn criticism and even outright defiance from some businesses, but in Contra Costa County a group of restaurants is taking a different approach. They are taking the county to court. When the Bar Cava Wine Bar and Eatery, in Martinez, had its outdoor seating area shut down, owner Corey Katz’s income quickly went to almost nothing. “I made $25 last Wednesday,” he said. Katz says he hasn’t seen any data that shows outside dining is spreading COVID-19 so he and three other restaurant owners in the county filed a lawsuit, Friday, to overturn the ban. His attorney, Joseph Tully, says the county has failed to prove harm. “All laws must be based in reason and they can’t be arbitrary,” he said. “And here they’re saying all outdoor dining has to be shut down but they’re not citing any science that would allow for that.” In response to the legal claim, the county said because the restaurants can still do takeout sales, they also haven’t suffered “irreparable harm.” So, in a hearing on...
    A judge in Pennsylvania has rejected a request from three TikTok content creators to temporarily block a ban on the app set to go into effect Sunday night, which would bar new downloads from Google and Apple’s app stores in the US. Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alec Chambers said they “earn a livelihood from the content they post on TikTok,” saying the platform’s “For You” page is unique among social media platforms, because its algorithm allows “little-known creators to show their content to a large audience,” according to the court filing. Marland has 2.7 million TikTok subscribers, Rinab has 2.3 million, and Chambers has 1.8 million. The three argued that they would “lose access to tens of thousands of potential viewers and creators every month, an effect amplified by the looming threat to close TikTok altogether.” “They will still be able to create, publish, and share content for their millions of current followers” Judge Wendy Beetlestone said that the ban would pose “undoubtedly an inconvenience,” but said in denying the request that the three had failed...
    The Job Creators Network Foundation has blamed Joe Biden for inflicting "irreparable harm" on the Veterans Affairs while he served as vice president with President Barack Obama. "Joe Biden must think voters have as short of memories as he does," Alfredo Ortiz, President and CEO of the Job Creators Network said in a press release. "The Obama administration, which he was part of, oversaw the VAs wait-list scandal, toxic culture, and widespread misconduct." The Job Creators Network Foundations (JCNF) Healthcare for You initiative educates voters about how the Affordable Care Act left holes for millions. It also delivers personalized healthcare information that "encapsulates peace of mind, affordability, protection, freedom to choose, and control." "The pervasive rot in the VA under Obama and Biden caused irreparable harm to our nations veterans," Ortiz said. "Despite his promises of reform, Biden already failed veterans once. He doesnt deserve a second chance. In contrast, under President [Donald] Trump, the VA has made reforms to put veteran patients first and give them more healthcare choices — exactly what JCNFs Healthcare for You reform framework emphasizes...
    The Job Creators Network Foundation hammered Joe Biden after he spoke about Veterans Affairs during a campaign stop in Florida on Tuesday, pointing to the “irreparable harm” he and President Barack Obama inflicted on America’s veterans. “Joe Biden must think voters have as short of memories as he does. The Obama administration, which he was part of, oversaw the VA’s wait-list scandal, toxic culture, and widespread misconduct,” said Alfredo Ortiz, President and CEO of the Job Creators Network, one of the country’s largest pro-jobs organizations. “The pervasive rot in the VA under Obama and Biden caused irreparable harm to our nation’s veterans,” Ortiz said. “Despite his promises of reform, Biden already failed veterans once. He doesn’t deserve a second chance. In contrast, under President Trump, the VA has made reforms to put veteran patients first and give them more healthcare choices — exactly what JCNF’s Healthcare for You reform framework emphasizes for all Americans.” The Job Creators Network Foundation’s (JCNF) Healthcare for You framework provides education for voters about the wholes Obamacare leave for millions and provides information on personalized healthcare that “encapsulates peace of mind, affordability, protection, freedom to...
    (CNN)Portland prosecutors will not "leverage the full force of the criminal justice system" on protesters who gathered peacefully in the wake of George Floyd's death, the district attorney said. Why dont all cities with high rates of crime get similar Trump treatment?The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office will decline to prosecute cases against protesters in which the most serious offense does not include property damage, theft, threats or use of force against another person, District Attorney Mike Schmidt said Tuesday. Charges of resisting arrest and assaulting a public safety officer will be further scrutinized before prosecution, he said."If we leverage the full force of the criminal justice system on individuals who are peacefully protesting and demanding to be heard, we will cause irreparable harm to them individually and to our society," Schmidt said. Portland has been a site of ongoing demonstrations since Floyd's death in May in Minneapolis police custody, with large groups calling for an end to racial injustice and police brutality. Though the protests have been largely peaceful, protesters have clashed with police, and a demonstration over...
    NYC poised to pass $88B budget with significant changes to NYPD He really needs help: Family seeks help for Dodgers outfielder Andrew Toles, who is homeless and hospitalized Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli resigned from the elite Bel-Air Country Club amid internal debate over the couples irreparable reputational harm to the club © Emma McIntyre/GettyImages Lori Loughlin pleaded guilty in the college admissions scandal in May. Emma McIntyre/GettyImages Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are resigning from the elite Bel-Air Country Club following an internal debate among current and former board members. Reports from TMZ, People magazine, and Vanity Fair cited a letter from a former club president saying the board should not welcome back "known felons." A source close to Loughlin and Giannulli told People magazine Loughlin and Giannulli were "upset" about resigning, but "didn't want to be a part of drama and hostility." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, have resigned from the Bel-Air Country Club just a month after pleading guilty in the college admissions scandal,...
    Lori Loughlin pleaded guilty in the college admissions scandal in May. Emma McIntyre/GettyImages Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are resigning from the elite Bel-Air Country Club following an internal debate among current and former board members. Reports from TMZ, People magazine, and Vanity Fair cited a letter from a former club president saying the board should not welcome back "known felons." A source close to Loughlin and Giannulli told People magazine Loughlin and Giannulli were "upset" about resigning, but "didn't want to be a part of drama and hostility." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, have resigned from the Bel-Air Country Club just a month after pleading guilty in the college admissions scandal, according to multiple reports. TMZ, People magazine, and Vanity Fair cited an internal debate among Bel-Air Country Club board members as the reason why Loughlin and Giannulli were leaving the elite establishment. Loughlin and Giannulli had been suspended from the club while facing charges in the college admissions scandal. Federal prosecutors say the couple paid...
    The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's tell-all book has been denied.  Judge Royce Lamberth denied the request to block the sale of the former national security adviser's memoir, 'The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir' in a ruling Saturday.   Lamberth, a Reagan appointee, heard arguments Friday over Zoom from Bolton's lawyer Charles Cooper and Deputy Assistant Attorney General David Morrell, representing the government.  This came after the Trump administration sued Bolton on Tuesday in order to postpone the release of his book because of concerns that classified information could be exposed The book was leaked to the media the next day.  It contains a number of explosive claims about President Trump, including that he asked China for help with his re-election bid - a move similar to how Trump interacted with Ukraine, which led to him being impeached.   The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's (left) tell-all book has been denied. The book makes some explosive claims about President Trump (right) The federal judge ruled in favor of...
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