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    While many children grow up dreaming of becoming an astronaut, very few people see this dream become a reality.  This week, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced its first new cohort of astronauts in almost 15 years. The new astronauts have some impressive credentials to their names and include a former Paralympian, a helicopter test pilot, and a neuroscientist. So, would you have what it takes to become a professional astronaut? Here, MailOnline reveals the key criteria needed to be considered by ESA. Would you have what it takes to become a professional astronaut? Here, MailOnline reveals the key criteria needed to be considered by ESA RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 2 Next British father-of-three John McFall, 41, who had his right... European Space Agency's new astronauts REVEALED: Class of 17... What exactly IS Artemis doing? MailOnline's day-by-day guide... Share this article Share Meet ESA's new cohort of astronauts Career astronauts Rosemary Coogan - UK Sophie Adenot - France  Pablo Álvarez Fernández - Spain Raphaël Liégeois - Belgium Marco Sieber...
    – A professor from the University of Geneva was selected as an astronaut Raphaël Liégeois, assistant professor at the Faculty of Medicine, was one of the five candidates selected. Published today at 5:03 PM. Born in Belgium in 1988, Raphael Legios joined the University of Geneva in 2021. Notably, he teaches neuroengineering there. ESA They are among more than 22,500 people, including 668 Swiss, who applied to become European Space Agency (ESA) astronauts in 2021. On Wednesday, five selected files were made public by the agency. Among them, two are “Swiss”: the Bernese physician Marco Sieber and the Belgian neurologist Raphael Legios, who teaches at the University of Geneva. “Announced yesterday in Paris, the promotion of the European Space Agency’s new astronauts delighted the University of Geneva community,” the University of Geneva commented. His website. Raphaël Liégeois is truly part of the family. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics in the Faculty of Medicine. Visit to Switzerland Born in Belgium in 1988, the future astronaut studied biomedical engineering at the University of...
    Two Britons - including the first ever 'parastronaut' - are among the European Space Agency's first new cohort of astronauts in almost 15 years. John McFall and Rosemary Coogan have been named in a class of 17 men and women chosen from a whopping 22,523 applicants.  They join current British astronaut Tim Peake, who spent six months on the International Space Station in 2016. Mr McFall had to have his right leg amputated following a motorbike accident at the age of 19. He learned to run again and became a professional track and field athlete in 2005, going on to represent Great Britain and Northern Ireland as a Paralympic sprinter. Mr McFall has a background in sports and exercise science and completed his bachelor's degree from Swansea University.  He became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons in 2016 and is currently a Trauma and Orthopaedic Specialist Registrar working in the south of England.  People with physical disabilities have previously been excluded from one of the most exclusive and demanding jobs on Earth - and beyond - due to strict...
    Spectacular videos captured the meteor lighting up the sky over Niagara Falls and the CN Tower in Toronto. The “less than one meter” object, named #C8FF042, turned into a fireball, the European Space Agency confirmed. “A three-foot object struck Niagara Falls in the sky and turned into a harmless fireball,” the agency wrote on social media Saturday morning. The sound of dynamite in the dead of night Residents of cities in southern Ontario, from Oakville to Hamilton, took to social media to report being woken up by the loud noise. There was an explosion nearby and the house shook for about 5 seconds,” one user wrote. According to the European Space Agency, this is the sixth time that global warning systems have detected an asteroid before impact. The last time a meteorite was spotted near Greenland in Hungary was in March. Good to know: Meteorites are fragments of asteroids. Their variable size is much smaller than that of comets or asteroids. After all, it is characteristic of them that they were able to pass through the atmosphere and land...
    Posted October 20, 2022 4:49 PMUpdated on October 20, 2022, 4:55 PM Europe is finally returning to Space X to launch its next space missions. The Russian Soyuz launchers were lost and countered Ariane 6 test delay The European Space Agency (ESA) plans to launch two scientific missions with the Falcon 9 rocket from the American company, its director general announced. The European probes Euclid and Hera will both be launched by Falcon 9, designed by Elon Musk’s company, Joseph Aschbacher indicated during a press conference at the end of the ESA Council. Originally planned to launch from Kourou on a Soyuz rocket, it will study the expansion of the universe after liftoff in 2023. Meanwhile, Hera is due to launch towards the asteroid recently diverted by NASA at the end of 2024. Spear . Temporary action “This is a temporary measure we are taking while we await the interruption of Soyuz firings and the ramp-up of Ariane 6,” whose first flight has been delayed to the last quarter of 2023, said ESA’s general manager. . In February, the Russian...
    In a major milestone for astronomers, more than 30,000 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have now been discovered in the Solar System.  According to the European Space Agency (ESA), there's now a total of 30,039 near-Earth asteroids that are known to science, and the number is rapidly rising.  Near-Earth asteroids are rocky bodies orbiting the Sun on a path that brings them close to Earth's orbit – and some have the potential to hit our planet. ESA claims 1,425 of the total have a 'non-zero chance of impact' with our planet and are therefore under the 'watchful eye' of a network of telescopes.  Near-Earth asteroids are rocky bodies orbiting the Sun on a path that brings them close to Earth's orbit. Pictured is an artist's impression of asteroid 21 Lutetia, which is located in the main asteroid belt It is estimated that there are about 10,000 NEAs larger than 460 feet (140 metres) in diameter. And there are also an estimated 1,000 NEOs larger than 3,280 feet (one kilometre) in diameter highlighting the need to keep track of these space rocks. WHAT ARE NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS? Near-Earth...
    Destination Tuesday The goal of the entire program is to establish a permanent human presence on the Moon, which will lead to an essential phase: construction Deep Space Gateway (DSG)A space station capable of providing a habitable module around the MoonGroups stay for 42 days. In fact, NASA has already set its sights further on Mars. Deep space exploration, a manned mission to Mars, is a long-term goal. Emmanuel Jehin, astrophysicist at ULiège, confirms these indirect objectives produced by the Artemis mission: “This is clearly aimed at preparing a mission to Mars, as the 2040s and 2050s will require a return to the Moon first.“, he explains.”Returning to the Moon is important on a scientific level to better understand the origin of the Moon but also the origin of the Earth because the two are linked. There are more puzzles in this level. And then, in fact, technologically, a whole series of new processes could be demonstrated, especially the use of water in the form of ice in some craters of the moon in the southern hemisphere. Especially the...
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — An Italian astronaut joined a Russian cosmonaut in a rare spacewalking show of unity Thursday, as tensions over Ukraine continued to ricochet back home. Italy’s Samantha Cristoforetti teamed up with Russia’s Oleg Artemyev to work on the International Space Station’s newest robot arm. The 37-foot (11-meter) mechanical limb — contributed by the European Space Agency — rocketed into orbit with a Russian lab last July. The Russian Space Agency’s recently replaced chief, Dmitry Rogozin, threatened to halt the installation work last week, putting the spacewalk in question. After Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in Feburary, Europe pulled out of its collaboration with Russia on a mission to Mars. Despite the turmoil on Earth, the space station’s seven residents have repeatedly stressed that they’re getting along fine up there, as have the flight control teams in Houston and Moscow. The current crew includes three Americans, three Russians and Cristoforetti. Russian cosmonauts typically pair up together for spacewalks, although NASA and European Space Agency astronauts occasionally ventured out with them years ago. Before tackling the arm installation...
    A SWARM of satellites has nearly missed space trash after European Space Agency officials had hours to make an emergency maneuver. The ESA planned and conducted the evasive action in just four hours after the satellite swarm suddenly moved onto a crash course to avoid damage from the sun. 1The European Space Agency's Swarm mission was saved after officials had hours to dodge incoming space trashCredit: ESA The European Space Agency's Swarm mission consists of three spacecrafts circling the Earth to study the planet's magnetic field. ESA officials said they oftentimes have to adjust the course of the satellite swarm, but the situation has gotten a little trickier thanks to the sun. "The sun has been moving into the active part of its eleven-year cycle when more and more powerful solar flares can bombard Earth's upper atmosphere," Forbes reported. "This increases the density where the satellites orbit, slowing them down, burning more fuel, and threatening to drag them back to the surface." Because of this, Swarm was moving to higher orbits to avoid the pull when the ESA detected a...
    (CNN)The European Space Agency terminated its cooperation with Russia to launch Europe's first planetary rover, the agency's chief said Tuesday.Roscosmos, the Russian space agency, and ESA were collaborating on a mission involving the European ExoMars Rover, designed to look for signs of life on Mars.The rover's September 2022 launch was initially suspended in March, just weeks after Russia's invasion of Ukraine. The European Space Agency created a prototype of the ExoMars rover.Now, the ESA Council has officially cut ties with Roscosmos on this joint project as a result of the war in Ukraine and ongoing sanctions, ESA's Director General Josef Aschbacher wrote Tuesday on Twitter.There will be more details shared about the future of the mission on July 20, he said. Read MoreThe ESA has been considering working more closely with NASA moving forward since it became clear the agency needed "to sever" its ties with Russia, Aschbacher said."Geopolitically, it is clear that we need to sever our ties with Russia, and this decision has been made by the member states," Aschbacher previously told CNN. "So yes, it's really...
    But what are we going to do on the moon? On Tuesday, France became the 20th country to join New wave of space exploration Quiet. By signing “Artemis Agreement”, He joins NASA’s U.S. program of the same name, which plans to fly to the moon in the next two or three years. The ultimate goals are to establish a sustainable human presence there, to create “safety zones” to protect extraterrestrial resources, or to create a springboard station for long-haul aircraft. Francis Rogart, head of solar exploration projects at the National Center for Space Research (CNES), explains. 20 minutes France’s role in this great space adventure. Why does France want to be a part of this project? Unlike the American Apollo missions that took place nearly fifty years ago, the Artemis missions offer a variety of collaborative opportunities. “Participation in the Artemis project is part of a larger international and ambitious program, which means giving ourselves the opportunity to send an astronaut to the moon through the European Space Agency (ESA),” says Francis Rogart, “because without NASA, there would be no...
    Make some space in your schedule to take a look at some brand new images of the sun released by the European Space Agency on Wednesday. The photos of the sun, taken by the ESA, include photos of a solar flare, the sun's south pole, the sun's magnetic activity, and a full view of the sun. Among the new photos is a solar activity in the sun nicknamed "the hedgehog" for having "a multitude of spikes of hot gas reaching out in all directions." "I was personally blown away by the quality and degree of details in these images," said Solar Orbiter Project scientist Daniel Muller. "By going three times closer, we can get the space resolution up by effect of three, and we see things that we haven't seen before, and that's of course the beauty of science, to explore the unexplored." SEE IT: IMAGE OF MARS 'DOORWAY' SPARKS CONSPIRACY THEORIES The "hedgehog" measures 25,000 kilometers across, making it a small feature on the sun but gigantic compared to Earth at twice its diameter....
    THE European Space Agency has asked the public to assess photos of a comet in a 'cosmic game of spot the difference'. On Thursday, the ESA revealed Rosetta Zoo, a citizen science project launched with Zooniverse (a web portal owned and operated by the Citizen Science Alliance). 2THE European Space Agency is asking the public to assess photos of comets in a 'cosmic game of spot the difference'. 2A 2014 and a 2016 model of the comet's surface, side by side.Credit: Rosetta/The European Space Agency Rosetta Zoo invites volunteers to engage in an online game of 'spot the difference'. And the subject in focus is a comet hundreds of millions of miles from Earth. Between 2014 and 2016, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft orbited and studied the rock dubbed Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Now, ESA is hoping that citizen scientists and volunteers can help them uncover secrets about the rocky object and, more broadly, the solar system. Read more on cometsROCKING UP Hubble reveals 80-MILE wide 'mega comet' in our solar systemINCOMING! Comet named 'single-most dangerous object to humanity' is 16 MILES...
    Russia has today announced it will end co-operation on the International Space station until Western-led sanctions over its Ukraine invasion are lifted.  The head of the country's space agency said it will no longer work with its partners, including NASA and the European Space Agency, on the groundbreaking orbiting laboratory.  The chief of Roscosmos, Dmitry Rogozin, revealed the move on Twitter and said he will submit a timetable for completion of current projects to the Kremlin. It follows weeks of threats, delays and cancelled projects from Roscosmos since a wave of sanctions were introduced against oligarchs linked to warring Russian President Vladimir Putin.  Most astronauts aboard the ISS currently return to Earth aboard Russian Soyuz flights, but Elon Musk's SpaceX Crew Dragon also now transports crew to the space station and has made four visits so far since its inaugural voyage in 2020.  The current crew is made up of three Americans (Kayla Barron, Thomas Marshburn, Raja Chari) three Russians (Oleg Artemyev, Denis Matveev, Sergey Korsakov) and one German (Matthias Maurer).  Rogozin previously said 'who would save the ISS?' if Russia were to withdraw from the...
    (CNN)The mission to launch Europe's first planetary rover -- designed to search for signs of life on Mars -- has been suspended, the European Space Agency said Thursday.The ExoMars Rover, a collaboration between ESA and the Russian space agency Roscosmos, had been on track to leave for Mars in September this year. But ESA said last month that Russia's invasion of Ukraine had made that "very unlikely." The decision to suspend cooperation with Roscosmos on the project was made unanimously by ESA's ruling council, which met in Paris on Wednesday and Thursday to assess the situation arising from the war in Ukraine. The council said it had authorized a study to see whether there were any options "for a way forward" for the mission. Webb telescope shares new image after reaching optics milestoneLaunch windows are delicate and timely for missions heading to Mars from Earth. The rover, known as both ExoMars and Rosalind Franklin in honor of the English chemist and DNA pioneer, was initially scheduled to launch in July 2020 but was delayed by the coronavirus pandemic.The space...
    Russia's war on Ukraine is likely to delay the upcoming Rosalind Franklin mission to Mars, according to the European Space Agency (ESA).  In a statement published Monday, ESA said it has 'fully implemented sanctions' imposed on Russia by its 22 member states due to the armed conflict.   According to the ESA, the ambitious UK-built Rosalind Franklin rover is now 'very unlikely' to launch in 2022 as a result.   Part of the ExoMars mission, the rover is a joint project of the ESA and Russia's space agency Roscosmos. It was set to blast into space this September from southern Kazakhstan and was scheduled to land on Mars in June 2023.    The Rosalind Franklin Mars Rover (depicted here on Mars) was on course to blast off for the Red Planet in September 2022 - but launch this year is now 'very unlikely' Rosalind Franklin is a planned robotic Mars rover, part of the international ExoMars programme led by the European Space Agency and Russia's Roscosmos. Pictured is Rosalind’s twin on Earth, known as Amalia, has successfully left the platform in a Mars terrain simulator...
    BERLIN (AP) — The launch of a joint Europe-Russian mission to Mars this year is now “very unlikely” due to sanctions linked to the war in Ukraine, the European Space Agency said Monday. The agency said after a meeting of officials from its 22 member states that it was assessing the consequences of sanctions for its cooperation with Russia’s Roscosmos space agency. “The sanctions and the wider context make a launch in 2022 very unlikely,” for the Europe-Russia ExoMars rover mission, the agency said in a statement. The launch was already postponed from 2020 due to the coronavirus outbreak and technical problems. It was due to blast off from the Baikonur spaceport in Kazakhstan in September using a Russian Proton rocket. Postponing a launch often means waiting for months or years until another window opens when planets are in the right alignment. The goal is to put Europe’s first rover on the red planet to help determine whether there has ever been life on Mars. A test rover launched in 2016 crash-landed at Mars, highlighting the difficulty of putting a...
    The European Space Agency has whittled down more than 23,000 aspiring astronaut applications to a shortlist of 1,391 who could potentially fly to space and the moon.  ESA is on the lookout for a new cohort of six space travellers who will spend time on the International Space Station and may one day land on the lunar surface. The agency hasn't said where in Europe the shortlisted candidates are from, but during the last round 1,900 of the 23,000 who applied were from the UK. The UK Space Agency confirmed there are British candidates among the shortlist, but couldn't say who they were, or how many had made it through to the next stage, where those remaining will undergo further testing. Of the successful next round candidates, 39 per cent were female and 61 per cent male, according to ESA, with 29 'parastronauts' out of 287 being shortlisted.  The call for applicants was made in March 2021, and ESA says it has taken longer than expected to whittle it down due to 'a high volume and caliber of applications'.   The...
    A pair of satellites designed to observe the sun have captured video of the bright green Comet Leonard as it speeds past the Earth for the first time in 70,000 years.  Since its discovery in January this year, the comet has been fast approaching both the Sun and Earth, at nearly 160,000 miles per hour.  The ball of ice and dust is about half a mile wide, and was captured by the NASA Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Aspacecraft (STEREO-A), and the European Space Agency (ESA) Solar Orbiter observatory. STEREO-A has been focused on following the green comet since November, and the team from NASA were able to produce a short animation from dozens of images. NASA published a 'difference image' to highlight 'outbursts' from the comet, caused when it throws off volatile material like gas and water ice - changing its brightness. The ESA spacecraft, a joint project with the US space agency, captured a video of the comet streaking across its field of view between December 17 and 19, 2021. But according to scientists, it may already be splitting...
    Credit: Domain Public CC0 Glaciers around the world have lost more than nine trillion tons of ice in half a century. What will glaciers look like in the next few decades? “It depends on what humans are doing now in terms of greenhouse gas emissions:” was the message sent by a scientist during a voyage led by the European Space Agency to Corner Glacier in Switzerland, one of the largest glaciers in the Alps. Watch the exclusive premiere of the documentary following the European Space Agency’s astronaut Luca Permitano with a group of astronomers and scientists at the 26th United Nations Conference of Parties on Climate Change. Climate expertOn the way through the Alps to learn how to ride Global warming Negatively affects glaciers. In this documentary they show amazing views of the Corner Glacier and interviews with climate experts, explaining how to track glaciers using satellite data and on-site measurements. Credit: European Space Agency An astronaut from the European Space Agency joins a mission to an iceberg in the Alps IntroductionEuropean Space Agency...
    A Barbie doll designed to look like European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, has been sent on a zero-gravity flight.  The trip on the 'vomit comet', which provides 20 seconds of near-weightless as the plane enters freefall before pulling up again, marks the start of World Space Week.  This years theme is 'Women in Space,' and the Barbie brand hopes to encourage girls to become the next generation of astronauts, engineers and space scientists. The doll will join Cristoforetti when she travels to the International Space Station in 2022, where the Italian astronaut will become its first female European commander. The stunt comes after recent studies have shown women are still underrepresented in STEM careers, despite significant moves to encourage take-up. Mattel, makers of Barbie, said part of the proceeds of the new doll of Cristoforetti will fund a Women in Aerospace bursary, supporting a woman studying STEM.  A Barbie doll designed to look like European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, has been sent on a zero-gravity flight  The trip on the 'vomit comet', which provides 20 seconds of near-weightless as the plane...
    5 km long landslide on Mars Now, just as landslides cause damage on Earth, so do landslides on Mars. This landslide was recorded for the first time by the Exo-Mars Orbiter. Researchers at the Space Research Center say the landslide, which formed on Mars, was more than 5 km long. Images recorded by the European Space Agency’s Orbiter The European Space Agency (ESA) is currently sharing shocking photos of the landslide on Mars via Instagram and its social media pages. According to the Space Agency, the Exo-Mars Orbiter captured the landslide orbiting the Red Planet. People who uninstall Close-Hotstar throughout the same series: What’s in it? Landslide on Mars like a landslide on Earth Landslides are geological processes that occur under specific environmental conditions. Furthermore, the research institute says that we can try to understand the Earth by using analogies to understand similar processes found in the bodies of Mars. What is the crash site on Mars like? For this particular landslide, the research institute said, the area where the material collapsed was out of the frame. However,...
    The European Space Agency (ESA) has asked for patience as it wades through more than 23,000 astronaut applications, including 1,979 from the UK. ESA says the number of applicants far exceeded even its most optimistic forecasts, describing it as a positive indication of the level of interest in space activities.  The agency is looking for six full time astronauts and up to 20 reservists that will travel to the International Space Station (ISS) and one day on to the NASA Lunar Gateway, in orbit around the moon. It had hoped to begin moving candidates on to the next stage by this point, but that has slipped until November due to the sheer volume of applicants. The final six will be announced by the end of 2022, early 2023, at which point they will begin their training with ESA for a future trip to the ISS or the moon.  The European Space Agency (ESA) has asked for patients as it wades through more than 23,000 astronaut applications, including 1,979 from the UK  ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet is currently on...
    In recent days, two space missions of the European Space Agency have flown over our neighboring (and infernal) planet Venus. The Solar Orbiter and BepiColombo they used the planet to perform a gravitational boost and continue your journey. Taking advantage of the unique moment, they collected all the possible data from Venus, some of this data has been translated into sounds. BepiColombo took advantage of the gravitational help of Venus a few days ago before leaving the planet and continuing with its journey. Gravitational aid causes objects to propel themselves considerably, something that BepiColombo was able to record thanks to the accelerometer you have on board. This accelerometer recorded the acceleration of the probe and after sending the data back to Earth, the engineers have translated it into sound frequencies so that we better understand what it was like. According to ESA engineers, the sound and the changes it undergoes can be attributed to the gravity of Venus and how it affected the probe. They also try to reflect with it the way in which BepiColombo collected the temperature changes...
    The European Space Agency's (ESA) BepiColombo spacecraft has made its close approach to Venus, coming just 340 miles from the surface of Earth's twin planet. BepiColombo, launched in partnership with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), arrived for its gravity assist on the way to Mercury just 33 hours after fellow ESA probe, the Solar Orbiter, made its close approach to Venus.   They were both using the gravitational pull of Venus to help them drop a little bit of orbital energy to reach their destinations at the centre of the solar system. The Mercury-bound BepiColombo spacecraft swung by Venus, flying 340 miles from the surface of the planet, at 15:52 BST on Tuesday, August 10.   It is on a seven year mission to study the structure and atmosphere of the innermost planet in the solar system and learn more about how it interacts with our star. JAXA tweeted: '[It] will not begin orbiting Mercury until the end of 2025, the spacecraft will make the first swing-by of Mercury this October. Stay tuned!' The double flyby offers ESA astronomers a chance...
    The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter spacecraft has made its second flyby of Venus, just 33 hours before the BepiColombo craft makes its close approach.   They are both using the gravitational pull of Venus to help them drop a little bit of orbital energy to reach their destinations at the centre of the solar system. Solar Orbiter is on its way to study the polar regions of the sun in a bid to better understand its 11-year cycle, and made its approach at 05:42 BST, ESA said, coming within 4,967 of the planet.  ESA's New Norcia monitoring station in Australia lost contact with the solar orbit for six minutes, as expected. ESA tweeted: 'A few minutes ago, as the spacecraft swung behind the planet for its Venus Flyby, New Norcia station lost contact as expected.' Six minutes later, it regained contact, writing: 'New Norcia has you in sight again - we're back in contact!'  BepiColombo is heading to Mercury on a seven year mission to study the structure and atmosphere of the innermost planet in the solar system and makes...
    The European Space Agency (ESA) probe 'Solar Orbiter' had a chance encounter with the exploded Comet ATLAS, flying through its dusty tail. Doing so provided astronomers with a unique opportunity to study the remnants of a frozen object formed in the most distant regions of the solar system. ATLAS was discovered in December 2019 and initially it was suggested it would become one of the brightest comets visible to the naked eye, but it began to disintegrate in March 2020 as it made its closest approach to the sun.  It left its tail behind when it disintegrated, and in June 2020 the ESA Solar Orbiter passed through the tail of the comet while travelling to the sun to begin its mission. Studying data from the probe's instruments, Imperial College London experts found the sun's background magnetic field 'drapes' over the comet, carried by solar winds. They hope that as the probe, and the NASA Parker Solar Probe also studying the sun, will be able to explore the remnants of the comet in more detail in the coming years.  Hubble...
    A unique exoplanet with a mass almost nine times that of Earth has been discovered after it unexpectedly 'photobombed' its star 48 light-years away. The world was found in the constellation of Lupus, also known as Wolf, and is 'sure to be a golden target for future study' because there is 'no known equivalent', scientists have said. It is the first time an exoplanet with an orbit of more than 100 days has been spotted transiting a star bright enough to be visible to the naked eye.  Scroll down for video Discovery: A unique exoplanet has been found after it unexpectedly 'photobombed' its star 48 light-years away. An artist's impression of the Sun-like Nu2 Lupi and its three planets is shown Orbit comparisons: This graphic shows how long it takes planets B, C and D to circle Nu2 Lupi 48 light-years away, compared to the planets of Venus and Mercury in our solar systemWHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PLANET 'D' IN THE NU2 LUPI SYSTEM? The newly-discovered planet 'd' is one of three exoplanets orbiting a Sun-like star...
    More On: european space agency French lecturer reaches for stars with astronaut application Talking to the moon: Europe pitches lunar satellites plan Latin America looks to space, despite limitations on ground NASA, SpaceX Crew-2 prepare for another historic flight PARIS — The European Space Agency says it was “blown away” by the record number of applicants — more than 22,000 — hoping to become the continent’s next generation of space travelers, including more women than ever and some 200 people with disabilities. In releasing the results of a new recruitment drive aimed at more astronaut diversity, the agency acknowledged Wednesday that it still has work to do on gender balance. Just 24 percent of the applicants were women, up from 15 percent at the last hiring drive in 2008. The hiring campaign didn’t specifically address ethnic diversity, but stressed the importance of “representing all parts of our society.” The agency received applications from all 25 member nations and associate members, though most came from traditional heavyweights France, Germany, Britain and Italy. ESA specifically sought out people with physical disabilities,...
    A little wood is set to go a long way. The European Space Agency is helping launch a four-inch square satellite (known as a CubeSat) made of coated plywood to test how it survives and fares in the harsh conditions of space. Known as WISA Woodsat, the 2.2-pound satellite designed by Arctic Astronautics will go to space on a Rocket Lab Electron rocket before the end of 2021. It will be monitored thanks to its two cameras, one of which has a selfie selfie stick to see how it deals with the space environment.  In addition to the two cameras, Woodsat will have pressure sensors to help monitor the pressure in its cavities, run an experiment to test 3D-printing cables in space and will be powered by nine small solar cells, Space.com reported.  Woodsat will also have an amateur radio payload 'allowing amateurs to relay radio signals and images around the globe,' the ESA explained.  'It's been a tight schedule but we welcomed the opportunity to contribute to Woodsat's payload in return for helping assess its suitability for flight,' Riccardo Rampini, heading...
    Just days after NASA announced it was sending two missions to study Venus, the European Space Agency has joined the party. On Thursday, the ESA said it will send a probe, known as EnVision, to study 'Earth's evil twin,' targeting a launch in the early 2030s. NASA's missions to the second planet in the Solar System, DAVINCI+ and VERITAS, will launch within the next 10 years. Scroll down for video  'A new era in the exploration of our closest, yet wildly different, Solar System neighbor awaits us,' said Günther Hasinger, ESA Director of Science, in a statement.  'Together with the newly announced NASA-led Venus missions, we will have an extremely comprehensive science program at this enigmatic planet well into the next decade.'    In 2019, researchers said Venus may have had stable temperatures in its past and could have had 'liquid water' for 2 to 3 billion years, similar to Earth. Approximately 700 million years ago, it underwent a 'dramatic transformation' -possibly due to volcanic eruptions - that completely altered the planet and resulted in what is now considered a hellish atmosphere. ...
    C ‘An ambitious project driven by the desire to make Europe a key player in the new lunar conquest. The European Space Agency plans to launch a galaxy of three to five satellites into orbit around the moon by ESA 2028. Earth’s natural satellite is enough to provide real telecommunications service and navigation service inspired by European GPS Galileo. With more than two dozen lunar missions in the pipeline, including the US Artemis project, the satellite system, known as Moonlight, will make it possible to reduce the cost of future European missions. People in other countries can use it for a fee. They no longer have to carry their own navigation and communication system, which is complicated and expensive. Read moreClearspace-1: The first garbage truck in space will be European In terms of the range of services that Moonlight can offer, it is much broader than one could have imagined … First, it will definitely allow astronauts to communicate with each other, with the future station in lunar orbit and Earth, while connected to the Internet while they are...
    The European Space Agency (ESA) has launched an ambitious new project to build a sat-nav and communication satellite network in orbit around the moon. This new infrastructure could one day turn our natural satellite into the 'eighth continent' as humanity spreads its wings and builds cities on the lunar surface. ESA says the project, known as Moonlight, will support the Lunar Gateway space station, multiple agencies working on moon missions and human exploration. In what will be the world's first commercial service of its kind, a number of British firms have won contracts to investigate how it might work, worth over £2 million. 'We are entering a new phase - the systematic exploration of our "eighth continent", the Moon,' ESA's David Parker told BBC News.  'The Moon is a repository of 4.5 billion years of Solar System history, but we've hardly begun to unlock its secrets. And so Moonlight is something that we see as really exciting, as a necessary infrastructure to support sustained exploration.' No details on the final cost of the mission or when it might be ready...
    A massive slab of ice, roughly the shape of Manhattan but more than 70 times larger, has sheared off from Antarctica and floated into the Weddell Sea. It is now the largest iceberg in the world, the European Space Agency (ESA) said.  Newly-calved iceberg A-76 was captured by satellites by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, ESA said Wednesday. The space agency said that the surface area of the iceberg is 1,668 square miles, measuring 106 miles long and 15 miles wide. The name of the iceberg refers to the region it first calved from. It is the 76th iceberg to be tracked by the U.S. National Ice Center.   For scale, the iceberg is larger than the state of Rhode Island. ESA notes that it is slightly larger than the Spanish island of Majorca.  Newly-calved iceberg A-76 was captured by satellites by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission. The European Space Agency compares its size to the Spanish island Majorca.  European Space Agency A-76 broke away from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf, one of the largest of Antarctica's ice...
    A huge 1,667 square mile block of ice has broken away from the Antarctic ice shelf, according to the European Space Agency, making it the world's largest iceberg. The splitting of an iceberg is known as 'calving' and this mammoth beast, slightly larger than Majorca, came away from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf. The iceberg, dubbed A-76, was spotted in images captured by the ESA Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission on May 14, and is now floating in the Weddell Sea in Antarctica.  It measures around 1,667 square miles in size, or 105 miles long by 15 miles wide – currently making it the largest iceberg in the world.  Experts from the British Antarctic Survey say this latest iceberg calving is a natural event that was expected, rather than something linked to climate change. A huge 1,406 square mile block of ice has broken away from the Antarctic ice shelf, according to the European Space Agency, making it the world's largest iceberg A-76 has snatched first place for largest berg in the world from the iceberg A-23A, which is...
    BERLIN — Scientists said Tuesday they have switched on a new telescope at the European Southern Observatory as part of an effort to create an automated network for spotting asteroids that might pose a risk to Earth. The 56-centimeter telescope that’s now seen “first light” at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, known as TBT2, will work together with a twin in Cebreros, Spain, to test whether the same object in space can be detected with one device and then tracked by another. The tests are a precursor to a planned network of automated telescopes being developed by ESO and the European Space Agency. The project, called Flyeye, will survey the night sky for fast-moving objects and flag those that could become a threat to human researchers for further investigation. More than 900,000 asteroids have been catalogued in the Solar System and about 25,000 have an orbit that brings them close to Earth. The European Space Agency keeps a risk list of more than 1,000 such objects that are closely tracked. A meteor that crashed near Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013,...
    In-flight internet access for airline passengers may be provided via laser systems as early as the middle of next year, the European Space Agency has claimed.  The 'UltraAir' concept stems from a collaboration between satellite manufacturer Airbus and the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research.  The laser-based tech could replace existing satcom radio-frequency systems, whose bands are experiencing bottlenecks as demand for satellite services grows. Ground-based tests of the system are expected to begin later this year in Germany, with the first in-flight trial, connecting down to Earth, expected for early-2022.  It is expected that UltraAir will ultimately be able to reach data transmission rates of several gigabits-per-second and will be nearly impossible to jam or intercept. This also makes the system good for military applications — such as relaying data collected by drones and linking aircraft systems to form an 'air combat cloud'. The narrow beam of laser communication which makes it hard to intercept also means that terminals can be lighter and less power-intensive than radio. UltraAir will also form part of the European Space Agency (ESA)'s 'ScyLight' programme, which...
    PARIS — The European Space Agency is holding its first astronaut recruitment drive in 11 years and says greater diversity is one of the goals. The European equivalent of NASA is seeking to recruit more women astronauts this year, as well as people with disabilities who have always dreamed of going into space. “We are looking towards the Moon … and Mars. We need very excellent astronauts for the future,” ESA Director General Jan Woerner said Tuesday. “To go farther than we ever have before, we need to look wider than we ever have before.” Only 65 of the more than 560 people who have ever gone into space have been women. Of those 65 women, 51 were American. ESA has sent only two women into space — Claudie Haigneré and Samantha Cristoforetti — and is now trying to redress the imbalance. The agency also said the “time has come” to put disabled people into space as part of an initiative called the Parastronaut Feasibility Project. According to ESA, it’s the first time that a space agency anywhere has...
    Astronaut Tim Peake has revealed what steps to take if you're keen to embark on a career in space, including preparing for a 'gruelling' year and a half selection process.  For the first time in 11 years, the European Space Agency (ESA) has put the call out for new astronaut candidates, who will work alongside their existing astronauts as Europe enters a new era of space exploration.  The former Army Air Corps officer, 48, from Hampshire, appeared on Good Morning Britain today, where he explained the skills and qualifications the ESA are looking for in their new recruits.  He told that a history studying science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is essential, and that applicants are largely selected based on their 'personality and character', assessing skills such as 'team work and communication'.  British astronaut Tim Peake is involved in a recruitment drive for new astronauts to join the European Space Agency cohort and gave advice on what it takes to join the program  The European Space Agency is on the hunt for new astronauts to work alongside their existing astronauts...
    By The Associated Press PARIS (AP) — Are you calm under pressure and zero gravity, open to extra-terrestrial travel and female? If so, you could be a prime candidate for the European Space Agency's first astronaut recruitment drive in 11 years. The ESA, NASA’s European equivalent, is highlighting diversity this time to nudge the agency beyond its primarily white and male roots. This year, the ESA is looking not only to recruit more women astronauts, but also people with disabilities who have always dreamed of going into space. “We are looking towards the Moon... and Mars. We need very excellent astronauts for the future,” said the ESA’s Director General Jan Worner. “To go farther than we ever have before, we need to look wider than we ever have before.” Only 65 of the 560 people who have ever gone into space have been women. Of those 65 women, 51 were American. The ESA has sent only two women into space - Claudie Haigneré and Samantha Cristoforetti - and is now trying to redress the imbalance. The ESA says the “time...
    (CNN)The European Space Agency (ESA) is looking for new astronauts for the first time in 11 years.Applications open on March 31, and women are encouraged to apply as the agency seeks "to expand gender diversity in our ranks," according to a statement from the ESA published Monday."To go farther than we ever have before, we need to look wider than we ever have before," said ESA director general Jan Wörner in the statement. "This recruitment process is the first step and I look forward to watching the agency develop across all areas of space exploration and innovation, with our international partners, in the years to come."3 missions prepare to explore Mars and other space news to expect in 2021The agency is keen to receive applications from every part of society, according to David Parker, ESA director of human and robotic exploration.Read More"Diversity at ESA should not only address the origin, age, background or gender of our astronauts, but also perhaps physical disabilities," said Parker in the statement. "To make this dream a reality, alongside the astronaut recruitment I am launching...
    BERLIN (AP) — The European Space Agency said Thursday that Josef Aschbacher, an Austrian scientist who leads its Earth observation program, has been appointed as the organization's next head. The agency's 22 member states elected Aschbacher to be ESA's director general succeeding Jan Woerner, whose term ends on June 30. Aschbacher currently oversees the ESA’s center for Earth Observation, near Rome, and has been deeply involved in some of the agency's most high-profile missions including the Copernicus fleet of satellites collecting environmental data about the planet from space. The European Space Agency has lately begun discussing involvement in crewed missions beyond Earth's orbit, such as a possible return-to-the-Moon mission with NASA. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, business, science
    BERLIN (AP) — The European Space Agency said Thursday that Josef Aschbacher, an Austrian scientist who leads its Earth observation program, has been appointed as the organization’s next head. The agency’s 22 member states elected Aschbacher to be ESA’s director general succeeding Jan Woerner, whose term ends on June 30. Aschbacher currently oversees the ESA’s center for Earth Observation, near Rome, and has been deeply involved in some of the agency’s most high-profile missions including the Copernicus fleet of satellites collecting environmental data about the planet from space. The European Space Agency has lately begun discussing involvement in crewed missions beyond Earth’s orbit, such as a possible return-to-the-Moon mission with NASA. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Scientists have come up with an out-of-this-world idea to clean up nearly one million pieces of space junk orbiting Earth. The European Space Agency will send a suicide robot “space claw” to clear the atmosphere of cosmic waste by gripping defunct satellites and steer them back into Earth’s atmosphere, where they would both ignite and safely burn up, according to CNET. There are an estimated 3,000 dead satellites and 900,000 pieces of small debris orbiting the planet, which could cause a disaster if they collided with the thousands of live satellites circling the globe. The ESA will ink a contract with Swiss startup ClearSpace to launch its first removal mission called ClearSpace-1. The claw’s first target is a 250-pound Vega Secondary Payload Adapter — aka VESPA — that’s been orbiting Earth for seven years after helping launch a rocket. The one-time mission is scheduled to begin in 2025 and estimated to cost well over $100 million — making its long-term value questionable. ClearSpace is hoping that the expensive project will be the start of a sustainable space junk removal effort that...
    BERLIN — The European Space Agency says it is signing a 86 million-euro ($102 million) contract with a Swiss start-up company to bring a large piece of orbital trash back to Earth. The agency said Thursday that the deal with ClearSpace SA will lead to the “first active debris removal mission” in 2025, in which a custom-made spacecraft will capture and bring down part of a rocket once used to deliver a satellite into orbit. Experts have long warned that hundreds of thousands of pieces of space debris circling the planet — including an astronaut’s lost mirror — pose a threat to functioning satellites and even the International Space Station. Several teams are working on ways to tackle the problem. The object being removed from orbit is a so-called Vespa payload adapter that was used to hold and then release a satellite in 2013. It weighs about 247 pounds. Filed under european space agency ,  rockets ,  satellites ,  space ,  startups ,  technology ,  11/26/20
    Data from the European Space Agency's robotic Philae lander has revealed that Comet 67P's icy interior is 'fluffier than froth on a cappuccino'.    Analysis of a giant dent made by Philae on the comet's icy boulders during its 'second touchdown' in 2014 provides new insights into the softness of the exposed ice.  Philae bounced as it landed on the comet six years ago and European researchers have finally found its second touchdown site, which they've named ‘skull-top ridge’ for its apparent skull-like appearance.  Although the first and third landing points were identified previously, the location of the second site had remained unknown until now.   The 2.5 mile by 2.7 mile duck-shaped comet – which was first observed in 1969 – orbits Jupiter at a rate of once every six-and-a-half years and is around 377.4 million miles from Earth.  Scroll down for video  This graphic shows how Philae bounced twice after it failed to anchor itself to the surface of the comet during its landing in November 2014 RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Comets have...
    (CNN)It's another step in humankind's return to the moon, and eventually on to Mars. As NASA seeks to return humans to the lunar surface through its Artemis program, the space agency is adding international partnerships to facilitate sustainable exploration of the moon -- while demonstrating that a human mission to Mars is possible in the future. A collaborative agreement was finalized between NASA and the European Space Agency on Tuesday, and the two agencies will work together on the Artemis Gateway lunar outpost. This is also NASA's first formal agreement to launch international crew members to the moon during the Artemis missions, according to the agency. The Artemis Gateway will act as a way station serving astronauts traveling from Earth before they reach the surface of the moon. NASA mission finds water on the sunlit surface of the moon "This partnership leverages the outstanding cooperation established by the International Space Station as we push forward to the Moon," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine in a statement. Read More"Gateway will continue to expand NASA's cooperation with international partners like ESA, ensuring...
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