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    Editor’s note: This interview first appeared in This Land, David Corn’s new newsletter. This Land is written by David twice a week and provides behind-the-scenes stories about politics and media; his unvarnished take on the events of the day; film, books, television, and music recommendations; interactive audience features; and more. Subscribing costs just $5 a month—but right now you can sign up for a free 30-day trial of This Land here. On the last day of 2020, Tommy Raskin, the 25-year-old son of Rep. Jamie Raskin, ended his own life. Days later, Raskin was at the Capitol on January 6, with his daughter Hannah and the husband of his other daughter, Tabitha, for the certification of the electoral vote. The three lived through the harrowing hours, as Trump-inspired insurrectionists attacked Congress and tried to stop the transfer of power. These two traumas were distinct, one personal and intimate, the other with ramifications for an entire nation. Yet for Raskin, his wife, Sarah, and their daughters, these different nightmares were intertwined, each striking at and undermining core assumptions about life...
    DONALD Trump has branded the 2020 election as the "greatest fraud in US history". In a statement on his new website, the former US president, 74, slammed last year's "tainted and corrupt" election - saying it was worse than his impeachment or "any of the other many scams the Democrats pulled". 7Donald Trump slammed last year's 'tainted and corrupt' electionCredit: Reuters 7Trump said the 2020 election should be referred to as 'The Big Lie'Credit: Jack Hill/The Times 7Trump made the statement on his new website - From The Desk of Donald J. TrumpCredit: Donald Trump Trump tore into the so-called "Fake News Media" and said the 2020 election should be referred to as "The Big Lie". "The Fake News Media, working in close conjunction with Big Tech and the Radical Left Democrats, is doing everything they can to perpetuate the term 'The Big Lie' when speaking of 2020 Presidential Election Fraud," he said. "They are right in that the 2020 Presidential Election was a Big Lie, but not in the way they mean. "The 2020 Election, which didn’t even...
    Western Journal February 14, 2021 0 Comments Louisiana Republicans condemned the vote of Louisiana GOP Sen. Bill Cassidy, who joined Senate Democrats on Saturday in voting to convict former President Donald Trump of the article of impeachment against him. Saturday’s Senate vote fell well short of the 67-vote majority needed to convict the former president on the House-passed article of impeachment that accused Trump of inciting insurrection through his words and actions of the day of the Jan. 6 Capitol incursion. Six other Republicans joined Cassidy in voting to convict Trump in the 57-43 tally: Richard Burr of North Carolina, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Cassidy tweeted a terse comment about his vote. “Our Constitution and our country is more important than any one person. I voted to convict President Trump because he is guilty,” he tweeted. Our Constitution and our country is more important than any one person. I voted to convict President Trump because he is guilty. pic.twitter.com/ute0xPc4BH — U.S. Senator...
    SEVEN Republican Senators voted with the Democrats to impeach Donald Trump for inciting insurrection. Their backing was not enough to find the former President guilty and the historic second attempt at impeaching him fell short. 8Donald Trump was acquitted for a second timeCredit: AFP - Getty Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict the 45th president. The seven GOP senators joined 48 Democrats and two senators who are independents in voting to impeach Trump, who was accused of inciting supporters to lay siege to the Capitol. Most of them aren't up for re-election soon with Murkowski is the only one of the group facing voters in 2022. Burr and Toomey aren't running for another term. Romney is the only one to vote to convict the president during his two impeachment trials. His guilty vote at Trump’s initial impeachment trial last February made him the first senator to ever vote to convict a president of the...
    Republican Sen. Patrick Toomey (Pa.) on Saturday evening released a statement explaining his reason for voting to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE during the Senate impeachment trial, saying that Trump's actions betrayed the Constitution.  The Senate earlier in the day voted 57-43 on a single charge of incitement of insurrection, falling short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict the former president.  The statement, released after the trial concluded, explained Toomey's decision to break from his party. "His betrayal of the Constitution and his oath of office required conviction," he wrote.The Pennsylvania senator claimed that Trump's defense team was accurate in their observations that Democrats were doing everything in their power to get Trump impeached."Many elected Democrats did want to impeach President Trump from the moment he won the 2016 election." Toomey added, "The mainstream media was unrelentingly biased and hostile to the president. Both often overlooked violent...
    CNN Senior Political Correspondent Abby Phillip excoriated Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) for his vote to acquit former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, only to then deliver a speech condemning Trump’s conduct, calling McConnell out for essentially trying to have his cake and eat it too. Anchor Dana Bash began the segment talking about Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-CA) infuriated tone at a press conference earlier Saturday, reacting to McConnell’s actions. Pelosi “was so incensed, so angry, understandably so,” said Bash, “given the fact that she really would have given the Impeachment Article to the Senate had she not heard pretty clearly, like we all heard, from Mitch McConnell when he was still in charge of the schedule of the Senate, that he wasn’t going to bring them back from recess.” Phillip agreed, saying that “[i]t was sort of like a last dagger at the Democrats from McConnell to basically make the House Impeachment Managers’ case for them and then vote to acquit.” She then noted that House Lead Impeachment Manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) had made the point that the Senate had already determined the constitutionality issue, but she “cannot imagine...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Senate acquitted Donald Trump on Saturday in his second impeachment trial in a year, with fellow Republicans blocking conviction over the former president's role in the deadly assault by his supporters on the U.S. Capitol. The Senate vote of 57-43 fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection after a five-day trial in the same building ransacked by his followers on January 6, shortly after they heard him deliver a fiery speech. In the vote, seven of the 50 Senate Republicans joined the chamber's unified Democrats in favoring conviction. Trump left office on January 20, so impeachment could not be used to remove him from power. But Democrats had hoped to secure a conviction to hold him responsible for a siege that left a police officer and four other people dead and to set the stage for a vote to bar him from ever serving in public office again. Given the chance to hold office in the future, they argued, Trump would not hesitate to encourage political violence...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:05 p.m. Former President Donald Trump is welcoming his second impeachment acquittal and says his movement “has only just begun.” Trump in a lengthy statement is thanking his attorneys and his defenders in the House and Senate, who he said “stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.” He is slamming the trial as “yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country.” And he is telling his supporters that, “Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun” and that he will have more to share with them in the months ahead. While Trump was acquitted by the Senate, seven Republicans voted to convict him, making it the most bipartisan vote in the history of presidential impeachments. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S SECOND SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: The Senate met in a rare...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told fellow Republicans that he plans to vote to acquit Donald Trump on charges incitement of insurrection – a signal that the House-led effort to convict the former president will fail. McConnell made his position known on what could be the last day of the former president's impeachment trial. 'While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,' McConnell said in the letter.   Although he had denounced Trump's actions in an emotional Senate floor speech immediately after the Jan. 6 MAGA riot in the Capitol, McConnell also did not act to hasten the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office. Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (middle - on the Senate floor today) has told colleagues he will vote to acquit Trump He voted along with 44 other Republicans that the post-presidency impeachment was unconstitutional – a position that did not prevail. Word of McConnell's decision came minutes before the beginning of Saturday's session of the Senate trial. After a delay...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told fellow Republicans that he plans to vote to acquit Donald Trump on charges incitement of insurrection – a signal that the House-led effort to convict the former president will fail. McConnell made his position known on what could be the last day of the trial, as closing arguments were set to begin.  Although he had denounced Trump's actions in an emotional Senate floor speech immediately after the Jan. 6 MAGA riot in the Capitol, McConnell also did not act to hasten the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office. He voted along with 44 other Republicans that the post-presidency impeachment was unconstitutional – a position that did not prevail. Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell arrives at the US Capitol for the fifth day of the second impeachment trial of former US President Donald Trump, on February 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. He told colleagues he will vote to acquit Trump House Democratic managers brought up numerous Trump administration officials who quit following the riot – among them McConnell's wife, former...
    Hillary Clinton weighed in on former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial this week, suggesting in a tweet that if the Senate ultimately votes to acquit him, it will only be because "the jury includes his co-conspirators."  "If Senate Republicans fail to convict Donald Trump, it won't be because the facts were with him or his lawyers mounted a competent defense," Clinton, the former secretary of state, tweeted Wednesday morning. "It will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators." THE 5 BIGGEST MOMENTS FROM THE SECOND DAY OF TRUMP'S IMPEACHMENT TRIAL Her tweet came before the second day of Trump's impeachment trial, during which Democratic impeachment managers played never-before-seen footage showing how close rioters came to lawmakers during the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol attack.  The impeachment managers are trying to tie Trump's actions, including his refusal to accept the results of the November election, directly to the actions by a mob of his supporters who ransacked the Capitol at the beginning of January. Five people, including a U.S. Capitol Police officer, died during the attack. When the trial concludes, the Senate will have to decide whether to convict...
    HILLARY Clinton took to Twitter to slam Republican Senators who don't vote to convict Donald Trump as "his co-conspirators." Clinton's commentary comes as former president Donald Trump’s impeachment trial is underway. * Read our Donald Trump impeachment live blog for the very latest news and updates on the former president... 4The former US Secretary of State revealed her thoughts in a Wednesday morning tweetCredit: Getty Images - Getty 4President Trump's second impeachment trial is underwayCredit: AFP or licensors 4undefinedCredit: Twitter The former US Secretary of State tweeted on Wednesday morning: "If Senate Republicans fail to convict Donald Trump, it won't be because the facts were with him or his lawyers mounted a competent defense. "It will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators." The ex first lady isn't new to condemning members of the GOP - as just just last month she insisted "QAnon Rep" Marjorie Taylor Greene should be "on a watch list" after posts backing Democrat executions resurfaced online. Clinton's tweet followed just minutes after Nancy Pelosi insisted the "evidence of President Trump’s guilt is overwhelming." The 80-year-old...
    (CNN)Anyone who watched the back-to-back presentations of the House impeachment managers and former President Donald Trump's legal team on the first day of the Senate impeachment trial could see that this was a massive mismatch.On the one hand, you had the impeachment managers making a compelling -- and moving -- case about the riot at the US Capitol on January 6 and the fact that, but for a few lucky breaks and brave people, it could have been much, much worse. On the other, you had Trump lawyer Bruce Castor telling stories about hearing Everett Dirksen's "phenomenal" voice on an old record his parents played for him. (Yes, that actually happened.)It was like watching an NBA team play my junior high school basketball squad. It's awkward, uncomfortable and you have no doubt about the superior team. And yet, when it came time for the senators to vote on whether it was constitutional to impeach a former president, it was clear that almost nothing had changed from the previous test vote on the constitutional question last month. Note that I said...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has once again signaled to fellow Senate Republicans that Donald Trump’s impeachment trial is a 'vote of conscience.' McConnell has reportedly indicated that senators who disputed the constitutionality of the trial could still vote to convict the former president, three sources told Bloomberg News.  Despite having voted on Tuesday to declare it unconstitutional for the Senate to hear the case, McConnell also suggested that he has not yet determined how he will vote regarding finding Trump guilty, the outlet reported. Only six Republicans voted against party lines, in favor of the constitutionality of the trial in the Senate, on Tuesday. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, center, has once again indicated that Republicans can vote to convict Trump McConnell indicated senators who disputed the constitutionality of the impeachment trial could still vote to convict Trump, pictured On January 11, the House introduced just one article of impeachment against Trump for his role in allegedly inciting the violent mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on January 6. The article of impeachment passed in the lower chamber on January 13....
    Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseHouse Republicans urge Senate to block vote on Commerce secretary over Huawei Juan Williams: GOP cowers from QAnon McCaul urges senators to block vote on Commerce secretary over Huawei concerns MORE (R-Neb.), who's said he may vote this month to convict former President TrumpDonald Trump Pelosi pushing Newsom to pick Schiff for next California AG: report Palm Beach town attorney says Trump should be able to live at Mar-a-Lago Trump helipad at Mar-a-Lago to soon be demolished MORE on an article of impeachment, is pushing back against possible retaliation from the Nebraska Republican State Central Committee by warning that his party must choose between “conservatism and madness.” Sasse on Thursday released a five-minute video responding to Republican officials back home who want to censure him at a Republican State Central Committee meeting on Feb. 13 because of his criticism of Trump. He warned that purging Trump skeptics from the GOP is “not only civic cancer for the nation [but] just terrible for our party.”  Sasse, who didn’t support Trump’s candidacy in 2016 or 2020, dismissed his critics...
    Liz Cheney will find out Wednesday if she will keep her GOP Conference Chairwoman position after she voted to impeach Donald Trump in the House last month – to the ire of many Republican colleagues. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy will have to decide whether to launch a vote on Cheney's future in the Party immediately, or he could delay the issue and send it to an internal committee. 'It's going to be close,' one Republican said, according to Politico, if there is an immediate vote on the matter. Republican representatives are meeting on Wednesday afternoon – some in person and some on Zoom – on the fate of Cheney. Those looking to oust the Wyoming Republican from her leadership position have been pushing other members to show up at the meeting in person so Cheney will have to face her critics head-on. GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney could find out Wednesday if she will stay on in her leadership position after voting to impeach Donald Trump last month The conference will hold a meeting, both in-person and...
    By Maeve Reston | CNN Former President Donald Trump’s lies and his insistence that the November election was rigged against him may have turned out to be a bridge too far for the attorneys who were slated to defend him in his upcoming Senate impeachment trial in a little more than a week. But his party has largely stuck with him. After a brief flirtation with reason and sound judgment in the weeks following the January 6 siege at the Capitol, the Republican Party has decided to honor their deep and often blind allegiance to Trump, choosing to overlook his role in inciting the deadly insurrection rather than pay the price of crossing him and his base next year at the ballot box. The collapse of Trump’s legal team amid a disagreement over legal strategy, which CNN first reported Saturday night, stood in stark contrast to the slow crawl of Republican elected leaders back into the former President’s corner as the anger lawmakers feel about the insurrection fades and his potential power to help or destroy them in the 2022...
    As a practical political matter, it’s now obvious that Donald Trump will NOT be convicted in a Senate impeachment trial. That being the case, I don’t have strong personal feelings about whether the Democrats should insist on going all the way through a trial. Although it would be just to do so, and give every senator a chance (and an obligation) to go on record, most Republican senators do not view such a vote as an opportunity to take a stand on whether Trump’s incitement of the attack on the Capitol is a high enough crime or misdemeanor. They find it inconvenient, at the moment, to either endorse or condemn Trump’s last few disgraceful crimes. And, as you probably know, conviction of Trump would then lead to a second vote, awkward for many Republicans, on whether to disqualify Trump from running for president in 2024 (or ever again). Avoiding an impeachment trial is a stance of political cowardice, and should be understood and condemned as such. Every other argument those Republican senators make should be viewed as pettifoggery in a...
    Donald Trump directed one of his former political aides on a mission to reassure GOP senators that he doesn't have any plans to form a third party that could siphon off Republican voters. Brian Jack, who served as Trump's political director during his time in the White House, portrayed his message to Republican lawmakers as they prepare for an impeachment trial against the former president next month. 'The president wanted me to know, as well as a handful of others, that the president is a Republican, he is not starting a third party and that anything he would do politically in the future would be as a Republican,' North Dakota Senator Kevin Cramer told Politico of Trump. 'The Republican Party is still overwhelmingly supportive of this president.' The report indicated that Jack did not specifically mention impeachment during his calls, but wanted to make sure it was known that Trump is still a Republican. The reassurance comes as reports revealed earlier this month that Trump planned to start and lead a third party – the Patriot Party – which would...
    In an interview on Thursday, Republican Rep. Peter Meijer of Michigan shared disturbing details about the dynamics in the U.S. Congress in the aftermath of violent attacks on the Capitol buiding. Per Newsweek, speaking with MSNBC host Hallie Jackson, Meijer said that many of his colleagues are concerned for their safety. Some, he explained, travel with security while others are looking to buy body armor in order to protect themselves from potential attacks from angry supporters of President Donald Trump. “I have colleagues who are now traveling with armed escorts out of fear for their safety,” Meijer stated, noting that lawmakers are now operating under the assumption that their lives are in danger. “Many of us are altering our routines, working to get body armor, which a reimbursable purchase that we can make. It’s sad that we have to get to that point, but our expectation is that someone may try to kill us.” “We have to account for every scenario,” the congressman added, noting that there is “an unprecedented degree of fear, of divisiveness, of hatred” in the nation’s...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – The United States House of Representatives made history Wednesday by impeaching the President of the United States for the second time. The House accuses President Donald Trump of incitement of insurrection, with the charge stating, “Willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.” The impeachment comes one week after chaos erupted at the U.S. Capitol. A crowd smashed inside to try to stop Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. Five people died and dozens more were hurt. To some, it might appear as though impeachment isn’t necessary given that President Trump won’t be in office later next week. But it could impact his future aspirations to hold office again. A little more than 12 months after the House of Representatives voted to impeach Mr. Trump, the lawmakers did so again Wednesday. But unlike the first time, 10 Republicans joined the Democratic majority’s vote to remove him. (credit: CBS) WCCO spoke with David Schultz about this unusual situation. Schultz is a political science professor at Hamline University. “We are looking at something incredibly historic,”...
    (CNN) — Rep. Peter Meijer, one of just 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach President Donald Trump, explained his vote Wednesday evening as a step toward “accountability” following the President’s response to last week’s US Capitol insurrection. “I was in the House chamber when it was being attacked a week ago today. That was a moment that called for leadership. I was hoping to see the President rapidly try to de-escalate, try to denounce, try to stop the violence from occurring, and he abandoned his post,” Meijer, a Michigan freshman lawmaker told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer. “To me that was disqualifying. My heart broke in that time, seeing folks ransacking the Capitol. And since then, the President has not accepted responsibility. I hold the seat that was held by Gerald Ford for 25 years before he was elevated to the White House. He pardoned Richard Nixon, but that was after Richard Nixon resigned and was held accountable for his actions. And here, there must be accountability.” The House voted 232 to 197 to impeach Trump exactly one week after rioters forced lawmakers to...
    Washington (CNN)Rep. Peter Meijer, one of just 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach President Donald Trump, explained his vote Wednesday evening as a step toward "accountability" following the President's response to last week's US Capitol insurrection. "I was in the House chamber when it was being attacked a week ago today. That was a moment that called for leadership. I was hoping to see the President rapidly try to de-escalate, try to denounce, try to stop the violence from occurring, and he abandoned his post," Meijer, a Michigan freshman lawmaker told CNN's Wolf Blitzer. "To me that was disqualifying. My heart broke in that time, seeing folks ransacking the Capitol. And since then, the President has not accepted responsibility. I hold the seat that was held by Gerald Ford for 25 years before he was elevated to the White House. He pardoned Richard Nixon, but that was after Richard Nixon resigned and was held accountable for his actions. And here, there must be accountability."The House voted 232 to 197 to impeach Trump exactly one week after rioters forced lawmakers...
    More On: impeachment The new impeachment question and other commentary GOP rep’s Capitol siege question stumps House during Trump impeachment vote McConnell hasn’t decided how he will vote on Trump impeachment Movers seen at White House week ahead of Biden arrival President Trump plans to respond to his second impeachment in a video message Wednesday night. The tone and length of the planned response to the 232-197 vote was not immediately clear. House Democrats joined by 10 Republicans impeached Trump for allegedly inciting last week’s Capitol riot, which disrupted certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. The Senate won’t begin his trial until after Trump leaves office on Jan. 20. The impeachment briskly passed the House after over two hours of afternoon debate. Those voting to impeach said Trump organized a mob when he spoke to thousands of supporters and urged them to march on the Capitol to overturn Biden’s win. Four Trump supporters and one police officer died during clashes at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Wednesday he’s undecided on whether to convict Trump —...
    In an interview on Wednesday, Democratic Rep. Jason Crow of Colorado said that some Republicans wont support the impeachment of President Donald Trump because they fear for their lives, The Hill reported. Most Democrats in the House of Representatives have strongly supported the push for a second impeachment of Trump, accusing him of inciting an insurrection against the United States government, but GOP lawmakers have been reluctant to endorse the effort. “The majority of them are paralyzed with fear,” Crow told MSNBC. “I had a lot of conversations with my Republican colleagues last night. A couple of them actually broke down in tears talking to me, and saying that they are afraid for their lives if they vote for this impeachment.” Crow did not name the lawmakers, but said that he told them “welcome to the club” after they expressed concerns over their safety. “That’s leadership. Our country is in a very challenging time,” the Democrat added, suggesting that Republicans should stop looking for excuses and put the country first. “Many of us have felt that way for a long...
    Reuters January 13, 2021 0 Comments A week after President Donald Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, the U.S. House of Representatives will vote on Wednesday to impeach the president for his role in an assault on American democracy that stunned the nation and left five dead. At least five Republicans have said they would join Democrats to impeach Trump for the second time, just seven days before he is due to leave office and President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in on Jan. 20. A vote of the House majority to impeach would trigger a trial in the still Republican-controlled Senate, although it was unclear whether such a trial would take place in time to expel Trump from the White House. Democrats moved forward on an impeachment vote after Vice President Mike Pence rejected an effort to persuade him to invoke the 25th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to remove Trump. “I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our Nation or consistent with our Constitution,” Pence said in a letter...
    Bradley Cortright January 12, 2021 0 Comments Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) is adding his name to the growing list of House Republicans who say they will vote to impeach President Donald Trump for allegedly inciting a mob to storm the U.S. Capitol.  In a statement on Tuesday, Kinzinger said, “Throughout my time in Congress, I’ve sought to do the right thing for the good of the people I represent and for the country as a whole. We are in unchartered waters here, and in a moment in history, we have not experienced in modern times.” “The President of the United States encouraged an angry mob to storm the United States Capitol to stop the counting of the electoral votes. This angry mob turn violent and caused destruction to our nation’s symbol of democracy. This insurrection led to countless injuries and the death of several people, including to of our U.S. Capitol Police Officers,” he continued. “There is no doubt in my mind that the President of the United States broke his oath of office and incited this insurrection. He used his position in...
    President Donald Trump is less than two weeks away from his term ending. Yet some are pushing to impeach him for what would be the second time during his presidency. With just 9 days left until Trump leaves office, the bottom line is that will be nearly impossible to successfully impeach and convict the president in that time-frame. Calls for a second impeachment raise a unique scenario in which a president could theoretically be impeached twice within one term, especially in his waning days in office. Impeachment is a fairly simple process, with the Constitution allowing Congress to remove a president for “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” This round of impeachment proceedings, led by Democratic Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Jamie Raskin of Maryland and Ted Lieu of California, charges that Trump incited an insurrection. (RELATED: Marco Rubio: The Left Is Using The Capitol Riot As ‘An Opportunity To Destroy The Right’) WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 09: A campaign sign for U.S. President Donald Trump lies beneath water in the Capitol Reflecting Pool, on Capitol Hill...
    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., conducts a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on Friday, June 26, 2020.Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images The House will move closer Monday to impeaching President Donald Trump an unprecedented second time over his role in sparking an invasion of the Capitol during Congress' electoral vote count last week. Democrats plan to introduce an article of impeachment Monday that charges Trump with high crimes and misdemeanors for inciting an insurrection and disrupting the peaceful transfer of power. The three representatives leading the effort — Reps. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., David Cicilline, D-R.I., and Ted Lieu, D-Calif. — say 210 House members have cosponsored the measure. It puts them just shy of the 218-vote majority needed to impeach Trump in the House, though the number could end up lower due to vacancies and absences. Democrats hold 222 seats. In a letter to Democrats on Sunday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also said her party would attempt to pass Raskin's resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence and the Cabinet...
    John Bolton slammed Democrats for conducting a partisan impeachment, saying they were 'almost as bad and somewhat equivalent to' President Trump. In an interview with ABC News, Bolton defended his decision not to testify before Congress during the impeachment proceedings.  He writes in his new book that the Democratic-led House of Representatives committed malpractice by tailoring impeachment exclusively to Ukraine. The House impeached the president after it was alleged that Trump sought to withhold aid from Ukraine unless the government in Kyiv investigated Joe Biden and his son, Hunter. As Barack Obama's vice president, Biden was in charge of US policy toward Ukraine. The president and his supporters allege that Hunter Biden obtained a position on the board of a Ukrainian energy firm because of his father's standing.  Former National Security Adviser John Bolton (left) defended his decision not to testify before Congress during impeachment proceedings, saying that the Democrats were 'almost as bad as and somewhat equivalent to' President Trump (right) Bolton writes in his new book that the Democratic-led House of Representatives committed malpractice by...
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