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    President Joe Biden's aides are getting frustrated with his indecisiveness on policies including student loan forgiveness and China tariffs.   Biden is 'driving officials across his administration a little nuts' wrote Politico's West Wing Playbook Wednesday, as discussions on some of these key issues have dragged on for a year.  'The bias in the Biden administration ... is for inaction,' said a former White House official who worked for both Biden and former President Donald Trump. 'The way you enable that is you say, "We should look into that further. We should get some more data. We should do more studies." So you get a lot of that.' President Joe Biden is 'driving officials across his administration a little nuts' wrote Politico's West Wing Playbook Wednesday, over perceived indecisiveness on policies including student loan forgiveness and China tariffs  The aides are getting frustrated because Biden hasn't made decisions on policies like student loans (left) and Chinese tariffs. Biden said Wednesday he planned to talk to Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) in the next 10 days but wouldn't reveal what he'd tell the leader on...
    On Monday’s broadcast of the Fox Business Network’s “Cavuto: Coast to Coast,” Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN) criticized the Biden administration for relaxing tariffs on Chinese solar panels and weighing lifting other tariffs on China while blocking mineral mining in Minnesota. Stauber said, “[T]his administration just will not allow the Minnesota miner to mine these critical minerals here in the United States using American labor, best environmental standards, and the best labor standards. Neil, what the president did a week and a half ago allowing the Chinese labor to enter our country, is unacceptable. When we talk about solar panels coming into this country,  Chinese Communist Party-made, child slave labor, zero environmental standards, and zero labor standards, it’s unacceptable when we’re ready, able, and willing to do it right here in our country, just simply unacceptable.” He added, “What I’m concerned about is the 232 tariffs lifting on steel and not allowing us to mine our critical minerals here. … We have to re-shore our manufacturing and our mining and have that tag say made in America. I’ve said that this...
    WASHINGTON – Here’s one thing Republican Rep. Peter Stauber and Democratic Sen. Tina Smith can agree on: President Joe Biden should not drop Trump administration-imposed tariffs on Chinese steel. To combat inflation Biden may drop some of the tariffs imposed on about $350 billion worth of goods the United States imports from China. The president is expected to make his decision on tariffs soon; in the coming days or weeks. But to the relief of Minnesota’s iron ore industry, its workers and state lawmakers, Biden is expected to keep Trump-era tariffs on imported steel, as well as aluminum. Keeping those tariffs in place will prevent the price of domestic steel – and its key component iron ore – from dropping because it keeps the price of Chinese-made steel from being competitive. The imposition of 25% tariffs on Chinese steel is one Trump policy Smith, supports. Article continues after advertisement “For too long, China has cheated on its international trade commitments on steel production, put Iron Rangers out of work, and threatened our national security,” Smith said. “Steel tariffs are a...
    Chet Strange/Getty Images Former President Donald Trump blasted President Joe Biden on Tuesday over the news that the Biden administration is looking to “reshape” the U.S. tariffs on China in an attempt to try and bring down inflation. In the statement, Trump also boasted of the $28 billion “gift” he gave U.S farmers – referring to his administration’s costly bailout of farmers as a result of the tariffs. Politico reported on Tuesday, “The administration is likely to announce action to lift a narrow set of tariffs on Chinese imports this month.” “Believe it or not, it is looking more and more like the United States is getting ready to remove the Tariffs on China. This would be a terrible mistake. These Tariffs have brought many Billions of Dollars to our Country, and made affected businesses, such as steel, viable again in the United States,” Trump said in a statement. “Doing this would be the greatest gift that China could ever receive. Our Farmers alone got $28 billion as a gift from me, that came directly out of the Tariffs because...
    China’s Global Times government propaganda newspaper illustrated an article on Monday about President Joe Biden considering lifting tariffs on Chinese products with a photo of Biden falling off of a bicycle this weekend — an embarrassing image that went unmentioned in the article and had nothing to do with its contents. Biden alarmed observers this weekend during a bicycle ride in Delaware on a family vacation when he stopped to speak to reporters and abruptly fell over. Nikki Schwab / Daily Mail Biden later claimed he was “feeling great” and that he had not suffered any health episode but had gotten his foot stuck in the pedal. The president did not appear to sustain any significant injury. “What happened was — any of you guys ride bikes?” he explained. “Well, some of them have this thing you put your toe in, constrains your foot so it doesn’t fall off the pedals. I was getting off the bike and it got stuck on the right side.” C-SPAN The Global Times, an official Chinese Communist Party outlet, did not address the situation in Delaware. In...
    President Biden is eyeing up a lift on some Trump-era Chinese tariffs, in a move to tackle red-hot inflation that risks angering the labor movement and making him appear weak on China.  Desperate to demonstrate action to drive down 8.6 percent inflation, Biden and his top officials are considering shedding some of the up to 25 percent tariffs that now cover $350 million worth of goods imported from China.  Biden is expected to exempt some products covered by Trump's SDection 301 tariffs on consumer items like bicycles but is likely to leave in place the tax on commercial items like steel and aluminum, White House sources told Axios. The report comes after National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan held a 4.5 hour meeting with his Chinese counterpart Yang Jiechi where he reportedly brought up concerns about China's 'aggression' toward Taiwan.  Both Treasury Sec. Janet Yellen and Commerce Sec. Gina Raimondo confirmed last week that Biden may reconfigure the Trump-era tariffs.  While the White House has claimed it is largely up to the Federal Reserve and Congress to take action to tackle...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. solar manufacturers say they are considering legal challenges after President Joe Biden declared a two-year pause for tariffs on solar imports from Southeast Asia. Biden also invoked the Defense Production Act on Monday as the White House moved to jumpstart solar installations that have been slowed or abandoned amid a Commerce Department inquiry into possible trade violations involving Chinese products. The White House said Biden’s actions would boost an industry crucial to his climate change-fighting goals while not interfering with or shutting down the Commerce investigation. But some domestic producers, including a California company that filed a complaint with Commerce about unfair competition from Chinese imports, said Biden’s actions would help China’s state-subsidized solar companies at the expense of U.S. manufacturers. “President Biden is significantly interfering in Commerce’s quasi-judicial process,” said Mamun Rashid, CEO of Auxin Solar, which filed the complain with Commerce earlier this year. “By taking this unprecedented – and potentially illegal – action, (Biden) has opened the door wide for Chinese-funded special interests to defeat the fair application of U.S. trade law,” Rashid...
    President Joe Biden on Monday announced a 24-month exemption of tariffs on solar panels from four southeast Asian nations that the Commerce Department suspects are actually made in China. Solar panel imports from Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Malaysia were frozen after the Commerce Department opened an investigation in March on whether Chinese solar producers were illegally circumventing tariffs by routing their operations through those countries. Reuters first reported that Biden has decided to exempt those solar panel imports from tariffs in order to get stalled solar-power projects back on track. The move will benefit U.S. solar developers and utilities that rely on imported solar panels, but hurt American solar panel manufacturers. Auxin, a California-based solar panel manufacturer that prompted the Commerce Department’s probe through a complaint, slammed Biden’s decision. “President Biden is significantly interfering in Commerce’s quasi-judicial process,” Auxin Chief Executive Officer Mamun Rashid said in a statement, according to Bloomberg. “By taking this unprecedented — and potentially illegal — action, he has opened the door wide for Chinese-funded special interests to defeat the fair application of US trade law.” The White House...
    Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) said President Joe Biden is in a bit of a bind regarding his administration’s relations with China, noting that the idea of easing tariffs on the Asian country will miss the mark for any attempt to help rising inflation. Amid Biden’s trip to Asia, the Republican senator told Sunday Morning Futures host Maria Bartiromo that the White House is concerned Biden will consider removing tariffs so he can be seen as taking some kind of action. “There’s a lot of division inside the administration right now. On the one hand, they understandably don’t want to be seen as weak on China since Joe Biden has been weak on China going back decades,” Cotton said. “Just as recently as a couple years ago, he was still saying that China is not our main competitor and that China has no chance of beating us in that competition. Even if he, like an ostrich, sticks his head in the sand.” Cotton noted that the Biden administration is concerned about inflation under its watch...
    Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) is urging President Joe Biden’s administration not to follow through on suggestions that they will cut United States tariffs on Chinese products. In recent weeks, a number of Biden officials have suggested that the administration cut Section 301 U.S. tariffs on China-made products. Treasury Department Secretary Janet Yellen, for instance, said last month that cutting U.S. tariffs on China is “worth considering.” “There would be some desirable effects,” Yellen said. “It’s something we’re looking at.” Hawley, in a letter to U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Katherine Tai, urges the Biden administration to drop the “misguided policy proposal” noting that tariffs are intended to “level the playing field for American workers and communities which have long suffered from unfair practices perpetrated by China after its accession to the World Trade Organization in 2001.” Hawley writes: I write with concern about recent comments from Biden Administration officials that indicate a desire to cut tariffs on goods imported from China. I urge you to reject this misguided policy proposal. I further write to inquire about the status of a new...
    EXCLUSIVE — Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) is calling on the Biden administration to keep tariffs on Chinese goods in place and demanding an investigation into China’s alleged unfair trade practices, according to a letter sent to U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai and obtained by the Washington Examiner. In the letter sent to Tai on Monday, Hawley argued that the tariffs level the playing field for American workers and are important tools for countering China economically. The senator also asked about the status of a long-awaited investigation into Beijing’s use of industrial subsidies that give Chinese companies a boost over their American rivals. “China repeatedly violates the rules of international trade and unapologetically steals and cheats in its economic relationship with the United States,” Hawley wrote. “To cut tariffs at this juncture would be a strategic blunder.” BIDEN FACES IMPATIENT LEFT AND HAS FEW OPTIONS AS ROE HANGS IN BALANCE The Biden administration last week began a legally required review of the tariffs that former President Donald Trump imposed on some $370 billion worth of Chinese goods under Section 301 of...
    President Joe Biden’s administration has eliminated United States tariffs on more than 350 products made in China, nearly all of which could be made in the U.S. or other countries. The Section 301 tariffs on billions of dollars worth of China-made products were first imposed by former President Trump after a decades-long free trade consensus in Washington, D.C., that has eliminated 3.7 million American jobs from the U.S. economy from 2001 to 2018. Late last week, Biden’s U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Katherine Tai announced that after an extensive review process on nearly 550 China-made products subject to U.S. tariffs, the administration would eliminate tariffs on 352 of those products. The China-made products that will escape U.S. tariffs thanks to Biden include breast pumps, solar water heaters, garage door openers, X-ray tables, and thermostats, as well as food products from China such as crab meat, Dungeness crab, and Alaskan sole. “Once again, multinational importers and their army of Washington lobbyists have protected their ability to import cheap Chinese goods over sourcing from American manufacturers,” Zach Mottl, chairman of the Coalition for a Prosperous...
    The United States has agreed to lift tariffs on British steel and aluminum, mending a rift between allies that dates back to the Trump administration. At a meeting Tuesday in Baltimore, the U.S. and the U.K. announced a deal that would remove taxes on British steel and aluminum that comes in below new quotas on the imports. The British agreed to lift retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, including whiskey. In 2018, President Donald Trump imposed tariffs of 25% on imported steel and 10% on aluminum, calling the foreign metals a threat to U.S. national security — a move that outraged the British, Europeans and other longstanding American allies. Although President Joe Biden had criticized Trump for alienating America’s friends, he was slow once taking office to undo the metals tariffs, popular in the politically important steel-producing states. Last year, the Biden administration reached a deal with the European Union, agreeing to drop the tariffs on EU metals that come in below new import quotas and continuing to tax imports that exceed them. Critics said all along that Trump’s steel and...
    BEIJING (AP) — China and the U.S. held a virtual meeting regarding the two countries’ fraught trade relationship Saturday after a lengthy break in negotiations. China’s top trade negotiator Liu He called U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai to discuss the “Phase 1” trade deal, negotiated under the Trump administration, along with the sides’ other major economic concerns, according to a statement from China’s Commerce Ministry. Both sides “conducted pragmatic, candid and constructive exchanges” according to the statement. Tai had said this week that she plans frank conversations with officials in Beijing about an interim trade deal aimed at resolving a tariff war. Liu, a vice premier and member of the ruling Communist Party’s Politburo, also pushed for the cancelation of additional tariffs and sanctions levied by the U.S. on Chinese goods. The “Phase 1” trade deal put on pause a trade war enacted by former president Donald Trump, who raised tariffs on Chinese imports over complaints about Beijing’s industrial policy and trade surplus. China retaliated by suspending purchases of U.S. soybeans and raising tariffs on other goods....
    Solar firms are warning that petitions for new tariffs on imports of solar cells and modules from Asia have hurt business and threaten to upend the industry at a time when it needs all hands on deck to meet demand for renewable energy. The Solar Energy Industries Association is leading a blitz against the petitions, which were filed in August by an anonymous group of companies identified as American Solar Manufacturers Against Chinese Circumvention, ahead of a decision by the Commerce Department about whether to consider the inquiries that could come as soon as Thursday. "If allowed to proceed, these anonymous petitions would cripple the U.S. solar industry and ruin America’s plans to tackle climate change," the solar group said in a fact sheet released Monday. The petitions in question allege circumvention of standing anti-dumping and countervailing duties, or AD/CVD, on China by vendors in Malaysia, Vietnam, and Thailand — an allegation that SEIA disputes. BIDEN'S BUY AMERICAN GOALS CONFLICT WITH EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS TARGETS The petitioners argue that Chinese companies are supplying the capital...
    VIDEO3:0603:06It would be wise to remove U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods, says former ambassadorStreet Signs Asia Higher U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods hurt American businesses and consumers, and it would be "wise" to cut those levies, a former American diplomat and trade negotiator said Thursday. If both countries were to reduce tariffs on each other, their relationship could improve, said Frank Lavin, a former U.S. ambassador to Singapore and undersecretary of Commerce for international trade. He told CNBC that a "mutual reduction" in tariffs would also allow the U.S. to address longstanding concerns about China's trade practices. Lavin was asked what advice he would give to the Biden administration on its policy toward China. "I would say don't step away from the issue, there's some serious trade issues there and I think a lot of President Trump's criticisms were valid so don't drop that agenda," Lavin, now chief executive and founder of consultancy Export Now, told CNBC's "Street Signs Asia."Flags of the U.S. and China displayed on a table ahead of a meeting.Jason Lee | AFP | Getty Images"But...
    A coalition of more than 30 key business and industry groups urged the Biden administration to reverse tariffs placed on Chinese imports by former President Donald Trump. The groups led by the Chamber of Commerce and Business Roundtable argued that the tariffs are an impediment to U.S. economic growth and hurt American consumers, according to the letter obtained by The Wall Street Journal on Thursday. They asked the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) to begin negotiations with the Chinese government to resolve any difference between the two sides. “A worker-centered trade agenda should account for the costs that U.S. and Chinese tariffs impose on Americans here and at home and remove tariffs that harm U.S. interests,” the groups wrote in the letter addressed to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and USTR head Katherine Tai, the WSJ reported. The tariffs on a variety of Chinese goods were applied by the former administration in an effort to boost American manufacturing. The tariffs were kept after Trump signed the Phase One trade deal with China in January 2020 to ensure the conditions were met. (RELATED: US Tariffs...
    Donald Trump returned to the GOP political scene Saturday with a speech at the North Carolina Republican Convention, where he called on China to pay "reparations" to the U.S. for coronavirus-related damages. "All nations should work together to present China a bill for a minimum of $10 trillion to compensate for the damage," Trump said, adding that the figure was lower than it should be. "As a first step, all countries should collectively cancel any debt they owe to China as a down payment on reparations," he said. Trump said he also thought the U.S. should put a 100% tariff on any goods imported from China.  In a lengthy speech Saturday night, the former president echoed sentiments from Republicans on the Hill and went after infectious disease specialist Anthony Fauci for reversing his stance on the importance of wearing masks early in the pandemic. DONALD TRUMP ENDORSES NC REP. TED BUDD FOR SENATE AS LARA TRUMP STANDS DOWN "Fauci said powerfully at the beginning, no masks," Trump chided Saturday. "Then he became a radical masker," he said.  "Get a pair...
    More On: china WHO slammed as China’s ‘useful idiots’ after probe into COVID origins Ex-CDC boss floats ‘cover-up’ in China’s COVID-19 response Joint report from China, WHO says animals were likely source of COVID-19 Democrats targeting red states and other commentary The US is not ready to lift tariffs on China any time soon, President Biden’s newly-confirmed trade representative has announced. Speaking to the Wall Street Journal Sunday in her first interview since being confirmed earlier this month, US Trade Representative Katherine Tai expressed some willingness to engaging in trade negotiations with Beijing, noting the damage tariffs can cause domestically, but also cautioned against lifting them abruptly. “I have heard people say, ‘Please just take these tariffs off,’” she told the paper, warning that “yanking off tariffs” could harm the economy unless the change is “communicated in a way so that the actors in the economy can make adjustments.” “Whether they are companies, traders, manufacturers or their workers,” Tai continued, having “the ability to plan” for changes that affect their future is paramount to consider. Tai also recognized the...
    Bradley Cortright March 4, 2021 0 Comments Officials in the Biden administration are moving to reverse many of former President Donald Trump‘s policies. However, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo told MSNBC that Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imports were effective. Host Stephanie Ruhle asked Raimondo if the Biden administration plans to keep Trump’s tariffs in place.  She responded, “Those tariffs have been effective. The data show that those tariffs have been effective.” “And I think what President Biden has said is we’re going to have a whole-of-government review of all of these policies and decide what makes sense to maintain,” she added. Watch the video below: .@MSNBC Exclusive: "Chinese telecommunication companies, their behavior is a threat to American economic and national security. We are going to use the entities list to its full effect." –@GinaRaimondo pic.twitter.com/WkVjt8ztcw— MSNBC Live with Stephanie Ruhle (@RuhleOnMSNBC) March 4, 2021 In 2018, Trump imposed tariffs on aluminum imports from every country except for Canada and Mexico, a move he cast as a national security decision.  “A strong steel and aluminum industry are vital to our national security,...
    President-elect Joe Biden might keep President Trump's tariffs imposed on Chinese exports for the first few months of his administration. Biden said he planned to review the deal signed between Trump and China almost one year ago that requires it to buy an additional $200 billion of U.S. goods over two years. China has failed to uphold its end of the bargain. “I’m not going to make any immediate moves, and the same applies to the tariffs,” Biden told the New York Times. “I’m not going to prejudice my options.” While running for president in 2016, Trump frequently spoke on forging "fair" trade deals between the United States and other countries, which included China. In January, China agreed to a partial trade deal in which the U.S. would place a 25% tariff on approximately half of Chinese products. Biden said that he planned to review that deal with allies in Asia and Europe “so we can develop a coherent strategy.” “The best China strategy, I think, is one which gets every one of our, or at least what...
    Janet Yellen, former chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve.Getty Images Former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen has been nominated by President-elect Joe Biden as his Treasury secretary — a position that would make her, if confirmed by the Senate, a critical figure in U.S. trade negotiations with China. U.S.-China tensions have escalated since President Donald Trump took office in 2017. Actions Trump has taken against China include slapping elevated tariffs on Chinese goods and restricting access to the American market for some Chinese companies. He argued these measures would address what he said were risks to U.S. national security and unfair trade practices by Beijing. Yellen has in the past acknowledged concerns about Chinese industrial practices. Her policy stance on China is less known, but she has supported open trade and the international trading system — an indication that she, like many on Biden's team, would be a moderate voice.VIDEO15:2715:27President-elect Biden announces his economic team, including former Fed chair Janet YellenThe Exchange"If you look at her history, she has been more moderate on China issues than most folks in the...
    The United States has learned from the coronavirus pandemic that it is "dangerously dependent" on the supply chain coming out of China, but President Donald Trump will defend the nations blue-collar workers from the threat posed overseas, White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said Monday.  "If we learned anything from the China virus, the Communist China virus experience here, it is that we are dangerously dependent on China for essential medicines, N95 masks, all manner of things," said Navarro on Fox Business Maria Bartiromo. "Of course, we [have] already begun to do it with the tariffs President Trump put on China. They have been very successful." The trade deficit with China peaked in 2018 but has been coming down as the U.S. sees manufacturing come back to the states, he added.  "Nobody wants to invest in China anymore," he said. "The whole world knows that that is a risky proposition, but this is going to be a battle. The Trump trade policy and tariff policy will be central to bringing things onshore here ... dont forget, [Joe] Biden let China in World Health Organization and...
    NEW YORK - Automakers Tesla, Volvo, Ford and Mercedes-Benz have sued the U.S. government over tariffs on Chinese goods, demanding customs duties paid on imports be returned, with interest. The lawsuits were filed over the past days in the New York-based Court of International Trade and concern tariffs imposed by the U.S. Trade Representative on imports from China, which Tesla in its filing called "arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion." The duties came amid a wider trade dispute between Washington and Beijing, and the automakers are asking for the tariffs to be revoked and any money paid to import parts returned. Mercedes in its filing accused Washington of "prosecution of an unprecedented, unbounded and unlimited trade war impacting over $500 billion in imports from the People's Republic of China," and argued U.S. law "did not confer authority on defendants to litigate a vast trade war for however long, and by whatever means, they choose." U.S. President Donald Trump's administration engaged in months of trade conflicts with China and imposed the levies as part of an effort to wean...
    WASHINGTON - The World Trade Organization ruled Tuesday that some U.S. tariffs against China broke international trading rules, a conclusion that exacerbates U.S.-WTO tensions and drew immediate backlash from Washington.     A WTO panel said that “China has demonstrated that the additional duties apply only to products from China and thus fail to accord to products originating in China an advantage granted to the like product originating in all other WTO Members.”   The Chinese Ministry of Commerce said the ruling was “fair and objective,” and hoped the U.S. would comply.     U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer criticized the ruling, saying the WTO panel report “confirms what the Trump administration has been saying for four years: the WTO is completely inadequate to stop China’s harmful technology practices.”     He also said its decision shows that the WTO provides no remedy for such misconduct, adding that the ruling would not have any effect on the U.S. China Phase I trade deal that was reached earlier this year.     The Trump administration has accused China of intellectual...
    GENEVA - A World Trade Organization panel ruled Tuesday that Trump administration tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods are illegal, vindicating Beijing even if the United States has all but incapacitated the WTO's ability to hand down a final, binding verdict. The decision marks the first time that the Geneva-based trade body has ruled against a series of high-profile tariffs that President Donald Trump's government has imposed on a number of countries _ allies and rivals alike. Trump has repeatedly claimed that the WTO treats the U.S. unfairly. In its decision, the WTO's dispute settlement body ruled against the U.S. government's argument that China has wrongly engaged in practices harmful to U.S. interests on issues including intellectual property theft and technology transfer. The ruling, in theory, would allow China to impose retaliatory tariffs on billions' worth of U.S. goods. But it is unlikely to have much practical impact, at least in the short term, because the U.S. can appeal the decision and the WTO's appeals court is currently no longer functioning _ largely because of Washington's single-handed...
    US President Donald Trump and Chinas Vice Premier Liu He, the country's top trade negotiator, hold a press conference before they sign a trade agreement with the US and China during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC on January 15, 2020.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images NEW YORK — The World Trade Organization ruled on Tuesday that additional tariffs imposed in 2018 by the United States on Chinese goods violated international trading rules, a blow to the Trump administration's trade war against the world's second largest economy. A three-person panel of WTO trade experts said Washington broke with global regulations in 2018 when it slapped more than $200 billion in levies on a slew of Chinese goods. Since March 2018, the United States has imposed tariffs on $400 billion in Chinese exports. "The United States has not met its burden of demonstrating that the measures are provisionally justified," the panel said in a report. The panel offered an additional observation, saying the group was "very much aware of the wider context...
    GENEVA (AP) — World Trade Organization rules that Trump administration tariffs on Chinese goods worth over $200 billion are illegal. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    By ROD McGUIRK, Associated Press CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — China on Tuesday began investigating whether Australia is dumping wine in a trade dispute that further strains relations between the countries and could shut the biggest export market for Australian wine. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce said the anti-dumping investigation involved wine in containers of 2 liters (68 fluid ounces) or smaller imported from Australia from Tuesday. The Australian government denied subsidizing exporters. “We do find this deeply troubling, concerning and perplexing given Australia’s wine industry is not subsidized to export and it’s certainly not dumping product on the world market,” Trade Minister Simon Birmingham said. “Now it’s for China and Beijing to explain the rationale behind these actions and why they have moved to that stage of an investigation.” China’s only other anti-dumping investigation of Australian products effectively closed the China market to Australian barley in May through crippling tariffs. Australia is appealing that decision. The investigation of Australian wine exports, which made 1.1 billion Australian dollars ($795 million) from the Chinese market last year, could take between a year...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — China on Tuesday began investigating whether Australia was dumping wine in the latest trade dispute to strain relations between the free-trading partners and could shut down the world’s biggest export market for Australian wine. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce said the anti-dumping investigation involved wine in containers of 2 liters (68 fluid ounces) or smaller imported from Australia from Tuesday. The Australian government denied subsidizing exporters. “We do find this deeply troubling, concerning and perplexing given Australia’s wine industry is not subsidized to export and it’s certainly not dumping product on the world market,” Trade Minister Simon Birmingham said. “Now it’s for China and Beijing to explain the rationale behind these actions and why they have moved to that stage of an investigation.” China’s only other anti-dumping investigation of Australia effectively closed the China market to Australian barley in May through crippling tariffs. Australia is appealing that decision. The Beijing investigation of Australian wine exports, which made 1.1 billion Australian dollars ($795 million) from the Chinese market last year, could take between a year and 18...
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