Web Analytics Made Easy - Statcounter
Friday, Dec 09, 2022 - 01:26:17
44 results - (0.004 seconds)

said and done:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Donald Trump attempted to convince Ivanka and Jared Kushner to appear with him on stage on Tuesday for the launch of his campaign for the 2024 presidency, according to sources.  Trump plans to announce his run at the Palm Beach resort in Florida, sources told The New York Post.  The former president was overheard chatting with his daughter and Kushner at his daughter Tiffany's wedding over the weekend in Mar-a-Lago - but it's unclear if the couple will accept Trump's offer.  Ivanka and her husband are said to be 'done' with Washington DC, and have no intention of returning to the White House if Trump runs again and wins.  'Trump thought he could convince Ivanka this weekend to come back and campaign for him as she was the most requested speaker after the president himself last time around... but so far she's resisting his entreaties and holding firm, as is Jared,' the source said. 'They both feel they got burned in Washington and don’t want to go back and expose themselves and their children to another bitter campaign.'  Trump Jr...
    Celebrity journalist Chaunce Hayden sat down with Ivana Trump who shared insights into her life, including if she had any regrets marrying Donald Trump, living with and without wealth and what the public's biggest misconception is about herself. Hayden is the former publisher of Steppin' Out magazine who met Ivana several times over the past 20 years. He interviewed 'kind and friendly' Ivana in 2016 for New York-based Metropolis Nights magazine and described her as 'smart as a whip.' 'I see a lot of Ivana in Ivanka. Ivana was a lot of things, but most of all I think she would want to be remembered as a mom who adored her kids,' Hayden said. 'She faced hard times with elegance and most of all she was an awesome mom.' Ivana Trump died on Thursday of a suspected cardiac arrest after being found 'unconscious and unresponsive' in her New York City townhouse. She was 73. Here, DailyMail.com recaps that 2016 interview.  Ivana Trump died on Thursday of a suspected cardiac arrest after being found 'unconscious and unresponsive' in her New York...
    DEAR ABBY: I was recently in a restaurant with a friend who is deaf. (I can hear.) We were using American Sign Language to communicate. A group walked past us, saw we were using sign language and assumed neither of us could hear. One of them told her friends we were “deaf and dumb.” The woman’s back was toward my friend, so my friend was unaware of the comment. (Thank heavens, because my friend can read lips.) When the server came to my table to take our order and they realized I could hear, they were visibly surprised. Related Articles Dear Abby: They allowed my ex back in the family against my wishes Dear Abby: This is so awkward, but I don’t know my date’s name Dear Abby: She tried to set rules in my house, and it blew up into a huge thing Dear Abby: I keep replaying the thing that got me fired. How do I get past this? Dear Abby: Would it be weird for me...
    It was a clear, sunny, blue-sky day the day I learned I had breast cancer. The brutally unexpected so often seems to happen on such days. For a few months over the past summer, I had an intermittent sharp pain under my left breast, as if the wire from a bra was cutting in. Sometimes it woke me at night, sometimes it disappeared for days. But there was no lump or general tenderness.  When I mentioned the pain to anyone, they would say: ‘Well at least it’s not breast cancer because you don’t get a pain with breast cancer.’ But then I read about how Girls Aloud singer Sarah Harding, who sadly died of breast cancer in September, experienced a pain which she attributed to a guitar strap rubbing her breast. It made me think that I should get my pain investigated – but not right then. At some point. In the future. It was a clear, sunny, blue-sky day the day I learned I had breast cancer. The brutally unexpected so often seems to happen on such days I...
    (Left to Right) Kehlani shows picture of poorly done composite veneers and compares them to current professionally done veneers. @Kehlani/TikTok Kehlani said they regret the cheaply-done composite resin veneers they've had for three years. The singer said the veneers made them unable to floss and made their teeth too white and boxy. "If you travel to get them, you're going to have to be traveling a lot to get them fixed," they warned. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Kehlani warned their 2.2 million TikTok followers to "stop traveling and getting bad resin veneers" on June 28. The singer said getting cheap resin veneers left them with teeth that were too white, too square, and needed expensive dental work to fix. "It is cheap and fast but the amount of long, expensive dental work you are going to need after you go this route is five or six times the amount," Kehlani said in a TikTok video. According to Kehlani, this is excluding the additional cost of travel you will pay if you went abroad to get your...
    NBC / Contributor/Getty Images Kelly Clarkson said she's never getting Botox, partly because she's afraid of the toxic chemicals. Although Clarkson doesn't plan to get cosmetic procedures, she said she doesn't judge celebrities who do so. Clarkson is the latest celebrity to break out of Hollywood's standards of beauty.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Kelly Clarkson said she understands people in her industry get Botox, but she never plans to. During Mayim Bialik's podcast on Tuesday, singer and talk show host said she is forgoing all kinds of cosmetic procedures for two reasons. First. she's afraid of the toxic chemicals in Botox. Second, she wants her fans to see her age naturally. "I'm gonna look like a total Shar-Pei, like a dog. I'm gonna have every wrinkle in the world on my face," Clarkson said, according to Today.  But Clarkson, 39, said she doesn't feel above other celebrities who get work done. "It has nothing to do with me being better than somebody that gets (work done on) their face. I'm afraid of stuff called botulinum...
    Jerod Harris / Stringer/ Getty Images Shannen Doherty told her Instagram followers that she can't identify with any of the women she sees in movies because they appear to have fillers, Botox and facelifts. The actress said she's "done" trying to fit into Hollywood's version of beauty.  Doherty is a two-time breast cancer survivor.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. In an Instagram post on Sunday, actress Shannen Doherty told her followers that she can't identify with women on-screen because their perfectly smooth faces are unrelatable.  "Watching movies tonight and noticed there were few female characters I could relate to. You know, women without fillers, without Botox, without a facelift" Doherty said in a post.  The fomer 'Charmed' star added that she's done trying to fit into Hollywood's and magazines' definition of beauty.  A post shared by ShannenDoherty (@theshando)   Doherty's stance against cosmetic procedures comes just as Botox's popularity is taking off. It was ranked the most popular non-invasive cosmetic procedure in 2020 — 4.4 million procedures were done in 2020 alone, according...
    Derek Chauvin is placed in handcuffs after being found guilty of murdering George Floyd Court TV via AP, Pool Fall River Police apologized after sharing a response to Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict on Tuesday. "Chauvin immediately stood and calmly placed his hands behind his back," the post read in part. "Imagine if George Floyd had done the same," it continued. Police said that was shared erroneously. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A Massachusetts police department apologized after sharing a post on its Facebook page that read: "Derek Chauvin immediately stood and calmly placed his hands behind his back. Imagine where we'd be if George had done the same." The now-deleted Facebook post was shared by the Fall River Police Department in Massachusetts on Tuesday after Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. Facebook Icon The letter F. Follow Insider on Facebook The post reshared a screenshot of a tweet reading: "Chauvin immediately stood and calmly placed his hands behind his back. Imagine where we'd be if...
    GEMMA Collins is saying goodbye to pumped up lips and a line-free face now she's turned 40, after getting too carried away with having Botox and fillers. The reality star, 40, is embracing a new decade in her life and a new look after deciding to have all her cosmetic work dissolved in a bid to look like herself again. 7Gemma Collins confesses she got far too carried away with Botox and fillersCredit: Instagram She admits that she took her obsession with Botox and fillers way too far, to the point where her mum Joan didn't recognise her anymore. "Last year, I got a bit paranoid and started thinking, ‘I’m turning 40, I’ve got to get this and that done," Gemma revealed. "I had a little bit put in my lips, I had my cheeks done, I had Botox, filler. I done the lot. It looked nice but then I started to get carried away and wanted a bit more, as you do." She said: "But then my mum looked at me and went: ‘Gemma, I...
    Brady had a bit too much Tequila at the Bucs' boat parade. Getty/Vaughn Ridley/Reuters/Jonathan Dyer LeBron James shared his jealousy at Tom Brady's tequila-fueled Super Bowl parade. The LA Lakers couldn't have a parade after winning the NBA Finals in October thanks to COVID restrictions. "I would have been walking beautifully just like you!" James wrote to Brady on Twitter. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. LeBron James says he was really jealous of Tom Brady's boozy Super Bowl parade. Brady and the rest of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers celebrated Sunday's victory over the Kansas City Chiefs with a boat parade through Tampa on Wednesday, enjoying music, dancing, and a few beverages. The 43-year-old quarterback was caught on video stumbling away from the parade with the help of a friend and a huge smile on his face. He later put the incident down to having a few drinks of "avocado tequila." Unlike Brady, James was unable to celebrate the Los Angeles Lakers' NBA Finals victory in October with a parade due to the COVID-19 pandemic. "Man o...
    LeBron James continues to impress, even in the latter stages of his career. The four-time MVP put on an impressive performance against the Detroit Pistons to get the Lakers the win. The game went into double-overtime, and James made two clutch threes to ice the game and get the Lakers back to winning ways. LeBron continues to impress NBA legend Isiah Thomas spoke after the game on LeBron’s performance. Thomas was very happy with the way James played, especially at his age. He noted that it isn’t very often that players of his age play every game, including overtimes and long minutes. Thomas added that James continues to break records set by the very best in the NBA on a nightly basis. “I’m definitely impressed watching him because he’s doing it at age 36. And he’s playing back-to-back night, he’s playing overtimes, and then he’s taking and making all the big shots every single night. When I say every single night that LeBron James steps out, he’s breaking a record and passing some of the most historical figures that we...
    TOWIE star Yazmin Oukhellou has opened up about her “traumatic” secret Brazilian bum lift surgery. The reality TV personality, 26, has revealed that online comments from trolls – including jibes about her looking pregnant – convinced her to fly to Turkey for the risky £3,000 procedure. 8The Only Way Is Essex star Yazmin, 26, recently underwent a "traumatic" bum lift Credit: Instagram “I'll be honest, it's quite traumatic," she told new! magazine. "I'm still sore to touch. I hadn't really seen how dangerous the procedure was until after I had it done..." But she also admitted that she feels better in a bikini because of the procedures that she kept a secret from everyone except her mum. "It's not something I'm encouraging people to go out and get,” she added. “But it's made me feel a lot better in a swimsuit.” Candidly, Yazmin confessed that the pressure of the limelight influenced her decision to go under the knife. 8The stunning reality star initially kept the procedure a secret, only now opening up about the experienceCredit: Instagram 8Yazmin confessed it was...
    The Marine Corps has launched an investigation into a Marine who shared a video online in which he threatened to shoot Chinese people while deployed with the fleet.  According to Stars and Stripes, Marine Corps spokesman, Capt Joseph Butterfield, identified the Marine as Pfc Jarrett Morford. In the video, Morford is heard saying: 'As the honorable Trump said today on Twitter, it was China's fault. China is going to pay for what they have done to this country and the world.' The Marine Corps has launched an investigation into Pfc Jarrett Morford (left and right) who shared a video online in which he threatened to shoot Chinese people while deployed with the fleet Morford was referring to the spread of the coronavirus in the US, which has reported more than 7.5 million cases of COVID-19 and more than 211,000 deaths since the pandemic broke out earlier this year.  President Donald Trump has continued to place blame on China for the virus spreading to the US. He has also called coronavirus, the 'China virus' on several occasions.  But it's unclear...
    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday the city skipped over the permitting process used by people who wish to create street art when it painted Black Lives Matter outside Trump Tower on 5th Avenue last month. “That is something that again transcends all normal realities because we are at a moment of history when that had to be said and done. That’s a decision I made,” de Blasio said at a news conference. “We haven’t said ‘no’ to people. We’ve said, ‘If you want to apply, you can apply, but there’s a process.'" The mayor was asked about the process the city went through before it painted the artwork after a women's group supporting President Trump sued the city for blocking its permit to paint the phrase “Engaging, Inspiring, and Empowering Women to Make a Difference!”on a city street. "The normal process continues for anyone who wants to apply,” de Blasio said. Since being painted last month, the Black Lives Matter artwork in Manhattan has been vandalized multiple times. A spokesperson for the...
    Dear Moneyist, I have rented a house behind my own home to someone in the service industry who is out of a job because of COVID-19, and now he can’t pay the full rent. I am fortunate enough to still have a job, but I am heavily in debt with student loans, my mortgage, and other bills. I work very hard, including early and late hours and weekends. I have referred my tenant to companies hiring during COVID-19, but he isn’t interested or says it pays too low. Instead, he is hanging out with friends or his girlfriend, and always smoking weed. He tells me I should forgive or discount the rent. It should be noted that he is already getting a discount since the rent is well below market price. Part of me doesn’t want to give him a discount since I work so hard and long hours, and he just hangs around being picky about work. Is that wrong of me? What should I do? Impatient Landlord The Moneyist: ‘I’m having a hard time...
    LONDON (Reuters) - British opposition Labour Party leader Keir Starmer said on Monday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been asleep at the wheel during the coronavirus crisis and had been far too slow to make major decisions. "I think the prime minister has been asleep at the wheel, he has been slow, the comms, the communications has been terrible," Starmer told ITV. "It began to break down frankly when Dominic Cummings put forward a ridiculous defence of what he had done in the north east." "They haven't done the groundwork on test, trace and isolate," Starmer said. (Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge; editing by Kate Holton) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    Washington Redskins Redskins wide receiver Emanuel Hall tore his Achilles and is likely done for the season. Hall suffered the injury about a month ago but recently announced it on his Instagram page. View this post on Instagram So for those that don’t know, about a month ago while running routes and getting ready for training camp, I tore my Achilles. I have never second guessed what I want for my life. I fell in love with this game at 7 years old and have been obsessed every since. One thing I have learned in the past 2 years is that perception is everything. If you have your mind right, it will always take your life from point A to point B. Even though this is a major setback I’m going to bounce back. I’m determined. I want to thank all the people who have supported my career ever since I stepped on the field. Just know I’m working. #HTTR A post shared by Emanuel Hall (@e_hall84) on Jun 26, 2020 at 5:58pm PDT Hall...
    GULF SHORES, Ala. (AP) — A more than $2 million renovation of the fishing pier at Gulf State Park should be finished in July, according to the Alabama Department of Conversation and Natural Resources. A statement from the agency said decking, handrails and lights are being replaced as part of the work on the pier, which extends more than 1,500 feet (457 meters) into the Gulf of Mexico. A new system to dispose of fish-cleaning waste and an observation deck also are being added, and the concessions area and restrooms are being improved. The work, which totaled $2.4 million, took months longer than anticipated, dragging into the summer season, but the agency said the delay couldn't be avoided. “This is going to be what sets the example for any pier that is built on the Gulf of Mexico,” Lamar Pendergrass, a state parks supervisor, said in a statement. “If people want to see something that is state-of-the-art and done the right way, this is where they need to be.” Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not...
    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The rebuilding process has been complete at Avera Behavioral Health Center in Sioux Falls where a tornado struck the hospital complex last September. Avera said all services at the center have now reopened. One of three EF-2 tornadoes pummeled the hospital campus Sept. 10. Nurse manager Natasha Sundet arrived at the center after the patients had been moved and said she hardly recognized the hospital and grounds. “There are big chunks of metal hanging from the building; broken glass everywhere; tree limbs and trash; cars that have been picked up and moved with their windows blown out,” Sundet said in the aftermath. “When I walked into the building there was water pouring in through the ceiling. I have never seen anything like it.” Dr. Matt Stanley remembers driving to Avera Behavioral Health the right after the tornado hit. “You see, building material, you know, several blocks away,” said Stanley. “Surprising that no one was hurt. And as we walked through the facility and look at that destruction, realize how many patients we had to move...
    (CNN)Attorney General William Barr dismissed the possibility of a predominantly mail-in election being secure, echoing a stance promoted by President Donald Trump and dismissed by nonpartisan election experts.When asked during an interview with NPR if he thought an election conducted mainly by mail could be secure, Barr said, "Personally, no." "We just mailed out checks under this program. And what is it? I heard something like 20% or something were misdirected," Barr said, referring to a Government Accountability Office report released Thursday that stated more than $1 billion in stimulus funding was sent to people who are deceased.The process for mailing absentee ballots and stimulus checks differs in key ways. The stimulus checks were sent automatically to people who had direct deposit information on file with the US Treasury and those who didn't have that information on file were sent their checks in the mail. Absentee ballots are not simply sent to individual voters; most people who vote by mail have to apply to vote absentee before receiving a ballot."I know things can happen like that," Barr added when asked...
    Dr. Mehmet Oz says that Americans aren't through dealing with COVID-19 — and have become complacent in their battle in remaining healthy amid the pandemic. What are the details? Oz, who appeared Thursday on "Fox & Friends," said that Americans have "gotten sloppy" and have relaxed their precautions too much following the lifting of many lockdown restrictions across the country. "We got a bunch of folks who are rebellious, frustrated, they've been locked up for a long time, especially young people, and we've gotten sloppy as you see," he explained. Oz said he realizes people want to get back to a "new normal," but proper precautions need to remain in place, and people need to seriously heed health officials' warnings. "The virus is not done with us yet, so we got to keep battling it," he said. He pointed out that the average age of infection in June is "about 35," which, he says, is "half the age of what it was early in the pandemic." What does this mean? Well, Oz...
    Dr. Mehmet Oz said on Thursday that people have “gotten sloppy” with some of their precautions against COVID-19 and warned that “the virus is not done with us yet.” “We got a bunch of folks who are rebellious, frustrated, they’ve been locked up for a long time, especially young people, and we’ve gotten sloppy as you see,” Oz told “Fox & Friends” on Thursday. He went on to say that “we want to go back to a new normal,” but “he virus is not done with us yet so we got to keep battling it.” He explained that “this is especially a problem among our young folks.” Oz said the average age of infection is “about 35, half the age of what it was early in the pandemic,” which he said shows that “the vulnerable people, the people who are overweight, hypertensive, diabetic or older are staying away from the opening process.” “But the younger people, because they’re frustrated, they’re hanging out with each other, they’re going out to meet new people and we cannot afford to let our guard down right now because reversing the trend gets a lot tougher...
    Former President Obama urged supporters to do more to back the White House campaign of former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump seeks to rally base with immigration full-court press Trump says Obama may have committed treason Poll: Biden leads Trump by more than 20 points on race and policing MORE as he hurdles toward the general election against President TrumpDonald John TrumpSouth Korea slams Bolton book as 'distorting the reality' of nuclear talks Democrats face tough questions with Bolton Protesters try to bring down statue of Andrew Jackson near White House MORE. Obama said during a joint-fundraiser with Biden, his first such appearance with his former No. 2, that the situation Biden may inherit if he wins this November may be tougher than that in early 2009, but that the former vice president is the right candidate to meet the moment. “I am here to say the help is on the way if we do the work because there’s nobody I trust more to be able to heal this country and get [it] back on track than my dear friend...
    (CNN)One of the Atlanta police officers charged in the death of Rayshard Brooks would not have done anything differently that night, he said in an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.Atlanta police officer Devin Brosnan also called Brooks' death a "tragedy," according to his interview published by the newspaper Tuesday, just hours before the 27-year-old father was to be laid to rest. "At the end of the day, someone lost their life. To me, it's heartbreaking no matter the circumstances, no matter what," Brosnan, 26, said. "When anybody dies truly is something you never want to see happen, to have happen. I can't imagine what a family would go through." Atlanta is once again at the center of the nations struggle with race and civil rightsBrooks' death, coming two weeks after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, sparked more protests and demonstrations across Atlanta, and the city's police chief stepped down less than a day later.Brosnan was surprised and disappointed by Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard's decision to charge him with aggravated assault -- in part because...
    GARY, Ind. (CBS) — Loved ones were fit to be tied as graves were left underwater for weeks – you saw the story about a Gary cemetery dealing with some extreme flooding first on 2. By Monday night, the water was gone. But CBS 2’s Tara Molina was asking Monday what was being done to make sure such a thing does not happen again. Parts of Ridgelawn Cemetery looked like a lake not too long ago. It was tough for anyone to see, but especially for families with loved ones buried there. And of course, people want to know the area won’t look that way again. “It is an improvement!” said Freda Black. Black is happy she can finally visit her parents’ gravesites again. “I could see (my mother’s) stone now,” she said. Black reached out to let us know the water, covering the area for weeks, finally cleared. “I couldn’t even pull up this far before,” Black said. “It looks 100 times different,” added Black’s daughter, Prudence Shutters. “I’m so grateful.” So what changed since...
    CHICAGO (CBS)– Now that elective surgeries are being preformed in Illinois, the University of Chicago is leading the way for how those procedures are being scheduled. Doctors there came up with a formula that’s now being used at hospitals all over the world. Dr. Vivek Prachand said 21 different factors are taken into consideration to decide which surgeries should be done and which should be done first. “The surgeon, to really think about would two weeks, would a two-week delay period impact how the disease would progress, would it make the disease worse or would it make the surgery more difficult to perform,” he said. While some patients are eager to get their medical treatment started, others are a little hesitant to go into a hospital. Especially during a time when people are being told to stay home whenever possible. Communication with patients becomes even more important. “We have this scoring system that really does take their safety and their risk into account,” Prachand said. “They’re not just being called in because we want to get their procedure done, but...
    (CNN)Marisa Bello always dreamed of getting married under the stars, and she wasn't about to let a global pandemic stop her.So back in March, when her home state of Nevada started shutting down to minimize the effects of the coronavirus outbreak, she and her fiance, Luis, made plans to drive across the state line into Utah and elope. They got married on April 3, and the Bellos set up a laptop camera to stream the wedding online so friends and family could follow along.There were vows. There was dancing. There were tears. And, yes, it all unfolded under the stars."It wasn't exactly how we imagined it, but it was intimate and wonderful anyway," said Marisa Bello, a Catholic school principal who lives in Las Vegas. "Since we couldn't celebrate with everyone in real life, we just wanted to do something that would bring love into everybody's living room."Read MoreMarisa and Luis Bello of Las Vegas set up a laptop to livestream their wedding, held April 3 in Utah, so friends and family could vitrually join the celebration.The Bellos aren't the...
    The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's tell-all book has been denied.  Judge Royce Lamberth denied the request to block the sale of the former national security adviser's memoir, 'The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir' in a ruling Saturday.   Lamberth, a Reagan appointee, heard arguments Friday over Zoom from Bolton's lawyer Charles Cooper and Deputy Assistant Attorney General David Morrell, representing the government.  This came after the Trump administration sued Bolton on Tuesday in order to postpone the release of his book because of concerns that classified information could be exposed The book was leaked to the media the next day.  It contains a number of explosive claims about President Trump, including that he asked China for help with his re-election bid - a move similar to how Trump interacted with Ukraine, which led to him being impeached.   The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's (left) tell-all book has been denied. The book makes some explosive claims about President Trump (right) The federal judge ruled in favor of...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo was reflective during his final daily novel coronavirus (COVID-19) briefing, claiming that the state has “done the impossible” by controlling the virus amid "111 days of hell." Rather than holding a standard news COVID-19 conference in which he was joined by staffers and took questions from reporters, Cuomo delivered a pre-recorded speech of just under 15 minutes that had the look and feel of traditional presidential addresses from the Oval Office. Cuomo wrapped up his daily briefings on the virus on  Friday, June 19 in Albany, citing continued good news as the state curbed the spread of the virus. “If you care for me and I care for you, we showed that in the end love does win,” Cuomo said during the briefing. “Love does conquer all. That no matter how dark the day, love brings the light. “That is what I will take from the past 111 days,” he added. “It inspires me and energizes me and excites me. If we could accomplish together what we did here, this impossible task, of beating...
    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo held his final daily coronavirus briefing on Friday, capping more than three months of press conferences in which he gave updates 7 days a week on COVID-19's spread in the state, measures to fight it, and its subsequent decline. Cuomo appeared by himself on Friday, telling viewers that he gave his staff their first day off in 111 days. "I can handle this last daily COVID briefing alone. After 111 days of hell, they all deserve a break," he said.  The governor, who appeared without his usual PowerPoint slide presentation, shared more positive coronavirus data. Statewide, 1,284 people are hospitalized from the virus, and 79,000 tests were conducted on Wednesday alone. The state also hit two weekly lows this week: less than 1% of New York residents are infected with the virus, and an average of 25 people died from the virus every day this week. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "When this started we had more cases per capita than any state in the country, or any nation on the globe. But today...
    CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Five years ago after eight black church members and their pastor were shot and killed in a racist attack, South Carolina came together and took down the Confederate flag from the Capitol lawn.Today, as yet another shocking killing of an African American roils the country, bringing a wave of pulled down statues and the removal of names of historical figures who repressed or oppressed other people, South Carolina leaders appears to be sitting out this movement so far.Wednesday marks five years since Dylann Roof sat through nearly an hour of Bible study at the Mother Emanuel AME church and then started shooting as the group prayed. Nine black worshipers were killed. Roof spared one woman's life so she could tell everyone he wanted to start a race war. He was sentenced to death and remains in federal prison.The attack left the community devastated, but Rep. JA Moore, who lost his sister in the shooting, believes it didn't inspire enough action. "We have done nothing," he said.Charleston Church Shooting: A timeline of eventsRoof didn't hesitate to explain his...
    President Trump is preparing to sign an executive order Tuesday that will create a system for tracking police misconduct, incentivize officer training and send social workers on some nonviolent police calls. Trump said Monday afternoon that the order would be a “very comprehensive” response to unrest over the killing of George Floyd by Minnesota police. Its details were spelled out to reporters on an evening call. A senior Trump administration official said the reforms could be “revolutionary” and that the White House expects broad support, including from police representatives who will attend the order’s signing ceremony. “You’ll never solve this problem by demonizing the police,” the official said. The tracking of officer misconduct will be broadly supported, he said, because “nobody hates bad cops more than good cops.” Many details would be implemented by the Justice Department and Trump will also call on Congress to pass additional legislation, officials said. Incentives for training officers would require that police departments meet certification standards to get federal funds. Those certifications would teach de-escalation techniques and ban chokeholds except in situations where deadly...
    BEIRUT (AP) — A drone strike in northwestern Syria on Sunday killed two senior commanders with an al-Qaida-linked group, opposition activists said. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an opposition war monitor, said the strike was believed to have been carried out by the U.S.-led coalition, which has been targeting extremists in Syria for years. The drone strike hit a vehicle carrying the two commanders — a Jordanian and a Yemeni — in the northwestern province of Idlib, the last remaining rebel stronghold in war-torn Syria. Idlib is dominated by al-Qaida-linked militants, and is also home to 3 million civilians. The Observatory said the men killed were with the al-Qaida-linked Horas al-Din group, Arabic for “Guardians of Religion.” Horas al-Din are hardcore al-Qaida elements who broke away from Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, the strongest insurgent group in the Idlib enclave. Al-Mohrar Media, an activist collective in northern Syria, said the dead were Horas al-Din’s general military commander, known as Qassam al-Urduni, or “Qassam the Jordanian.” It said the second man was a Yemeni citizen known as Bilal al-Sanaani, the...
    Ben Carson declined to back President Donald Trump's claim that he has done more for the African American community since Abraham Lincoln.The Housing and Urban Development Secretary said he "did not want to get into an argument about who's done the most" during his appearance on ABC's "This Week" with George Stephanopoulos.Carson, the only African American cabinet secretary in the Trump administration, instead listed the president's successes in supporting the black community, such as pushing for prison reform and restoring funding for the nation's historically black colleges and universities.Stephanopoulos continued to press Carson, asking if the president should stop making the comparison."It's hard to compare that with Lyndon Johnson passing the Civil Rights Act, the Voting [Rights] Act, Ulysses S. Grant sending in troops to take on the Klu Klux Klan, President Eisenhower sending in troops to enforce Brown v. Board of Education," Stephanopoulos said.Carson said it's an "important thing for us to acknowledge what has happened in the past.""We should be willing to look at what we've done together, collectively, to make progress," he said.The president's claim during a...
    In a new interview with Fox News’ Harris Faulkner, President Donald Trump repeatedly shoved his foot in his mouth and stumbled as he tried and failed to cogently address the issue of racism in the United States. At one point during the discussion, Trump returned to a claim he has made many times, that his time in office has been especially beneficial for black Americans. To justify this dubious claim, he tends to rely on the continuing economic trends that began before he was elected. And he conveniently ignores the fact that the current pandemic and recession have fallen especially hard on black Americans, a fact he takes no responsibility for. He’ll often include the caveat in his boast that President Abraham Lincoln is the only president who has done more on this front than he. But this time, Trump added a second caveat, saying that Lincoln’s accomplishments were “questionable.” Faulkner had to remind Trump that Lincoln freed the slaves: Trump: So I think I’ve done more for the black community than any other president. And let’s take a pass...
    JOHANNESBURG — Queen Victoria, Cecil Rhodes, King Leopold. Statues honoring these leaders of colonial rule have been pulled down over the years in Africa after countries won independence or newer generations said racist relics had to go. New campaigns in the US and Europe are now following Africa’s lead. Monuments to slave traders and colonial rulers have become the focus of protests around the world, driven by a reexamination of historical injustice after the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in the US. No protests have been spotted this week around the remaining statues in Africa, but several have faced furious demonstrations in the past. A boisterous student-led campaign pressed the University of Cape Town to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes from the school’s entrance in April 2015. The statue had been defaced and covered in excrement by students protesting against the colonial leader who supported white minority rule in South Africa and the colonization of the southern African territories named for him, Northern and Southern Rhodesia, which later became independent Zambia and Zimbabwe. Students celebrated...
    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Queen Victoria, Cecil Rhodes, King Leopold. Statues honoring these leaders of colonial rule have been pulled down over the years in Africa after countries won independence or newer generations said racist relics had to go. New campaigns in the U.S. and Europe are now following Africa’s lead. Monuments to slave traders and colonial rulers have become the focus of protests around the world, driven by a reexamination of historical injustice after the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in the U.S. No protests have been spotted this week around the remaining statues in Africa, but several have faced furious demonstrations in the past. A boisterous student-led campaign pressed the University of Cape Town to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes from the school’s entrance in April 2015. The statue had been defaced and covered in excrement by students protesting against the colonial leader who supported white minority rule in South Africa and the colonization of the southern African territories named for him, Northern and Southern Rhodesia, which later became independent Zambia and Zimbabwe. Students...
    New York (CNN Business)As protests against racism and police brutality sweep across the United States, companies built on utopian ideals of inclusion and sharing are being challenged to confront their own shortcomings. To that end, Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky acknowledged his company must do better on diversity.In an interview with CNN's Poppy Harlow, Chesky said he wants more diverse people on Airbnb's board, which is currently comprised of four white men, three white women, one black man and one Asian man. Meanwhile, Airbnb's leadership team is primarily white. Last week, Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian resigned from his company's board and urged the social platform to replace him with a black candidate. On Wednesday, Reddit named Michael Seibel, the CEO of Silicon Valley startup accelerator Y Combinator, as the first black board member in the company's history.Chesky said Seibel has been an important personal mentor to him, and that there is room to add more board seats at Airbnb. "I would love to add more board members of color to Airbnb. Absolutely," Chesky said, adding that the same goes for the...
    President Trump said Monday during a roundtable with law enforcement he’s going to discuss ideas to see how policing can be done in “a much more gentle fashion.” “We’re going to work and we’re going to talk about ideas, how we can do it better and how we can do it, if possible, in a much more gentle fashion,” the president said. “A thing like what happened should never have happened, and plenty of things shouldn’t have happened.” Trump said that the country could not give up the “finest law enforcement anywhere in the world.” “We won’t be defunding our police,” he added. “I guess you might have some cities who want to try.” TRUMP RAILS AGAINST BIDEN, 'RADICAL LEFT DEMOCRATS' OVER MOVEMENT TO DEFUND POLICE On Monday, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said the president believed there were “instances of racism” within the police force but that most cops have been “good people.” When asked what the president thought of the “Justice in Policing” Act unveiled by Democrats, McEnany said Trump hadn’t reviewed it but was looking into...
    A grand deal on gambling is possible in Alabama, but there’s still a long way to go.  That was essentially the message that representatives from the Poarch Creek Indians and owners of non-Indian casinos around the state gave Friday to Gov. Kay Ivey’s Study Group on Gambling Policy. The 12-member group heard presentations, via Zoom, from representatives from all the tracks and casinos in the state, as it continues in its quest to put together a proposal that Ivey and state lawmakers can use to hopefully craft future gambling legislation.  To move forward with almost any legislation will require an agreement of some sort between PCI, Lewis Benefield, who operates VictoryLand and the Birmingham Race Course, and Nat Winn, the CEO of GreeneTrack. The owners of smaller electronic bingo halls in Greene and Lowndes Counties will also have some input.  The tug of war between these various entities has, over the last several years, prevented an expansion of gambling. It also has left the state in a weird situation in which casinos are operating on a daily basis but there...
    Like a lot of people these days, Coralie Adam has been working from home. On an April morning in the Chicago suburbs where she was quarantining with her in-laws, Adam climbed out of bed, carried her laptop into a small home office, streamed a barre class, then sat down to watch her spacecraft approach a rocky asteroid 140 million miles from Earth. Everything You Need to Know About the CoronavirusHeres all the WIRED coverage in one place, from how to keep your children entertained to how this outbreak is affecting the economy. By Eve Sneider Adam is the lead optical navigation engineer on NASA’s first asteroid-sampling spacecraft, OSIRIS-REx. In 2016, it blasted off to the near-Earth asteroid Bennu, scheduled to return in 2023 laden with asteroid pebbles and dust. Scientists want to study the material to understand how, when, and why the solar system formed. A first “touch-and-go” (TAG) rehearsal of the ship’s asteroid-sampling procedure (approach the asteroid, get within 65 meters, back away to safety) would normally warrant a gathering of its team at Lockheed Martin mission support...
    Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has a "terrible" record on issues important to African-Americans -- and his attendance at a memorial service for George Floyd continues his history of pandering, Lara Trump said Saturday. The president's daughter-in-law, who is a senior adviser to the Trump 2020 Campaign, shared her views during an appearance on Fox News' "Justice with Judge Jeanine." "I think it was probably a pandering move to go to the funeral," Trump said of Biden, who clinched the Democratic Party's nomination Friday night. "He's hoping, Jeanine, that all Americans forgot about his incredibly racist remark you just referred to -- if you don't vote for him, then you aren't black." BIDEN CONDEMNS RIOTS OVER GEORGE FLOYD DEATH, CALLS FOR AN END TO 'NEEDLESS DESTRUCTION' Biden was criticized last month for suggesting during a contentious radio interview with host Charlamagne tha God that those having a hard time "figuring out" whether to support him or President Trump "ain't black. The remark drew immediate backlash. "If you look at the track record that Joe Biden has had, he has been in politics...
    NAACP President Derrick Johnson says African Americans are "done dying" from the effects of institutional racism in everything from policing to health care. The civil rights group launched a hashtag campaign, #WeAreDoneDying, and has called for sweeping reforms to policing around the country after the horrific death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. "You know, this is about Mr. Floyd's case, but it's much bigger than that. It is about the state of relationships between the African American community and law enforcement in this country," Johnson told CBSN anchors Vladimir Duthiers and Anne-Marie Green. He also stressed, "This is a national problem that will require a federal response."  Floyd's death sparked national outrage after a video showing white police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes as bystanders cried out and Floyd repeatedly said, "I can't breathe." "For African Americans, we have known this to be a problem for many, many years. What we're seeing now is the cellphone cameras are actually capturing what people have talked about for generations," Johnson said.  He also...
1