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    Republican members of the United States House of Representatives are seldom reluctant to fire off bizarre claims about reproductive health. On Wednesday, Georgia Congressman Jody Hice took the GOP's rhetoric to a new level. During a hearing on "abortion access and the law," Hice, one of several outspoken characters in the Peach State's right-wing caucus, asked if pregnant people ever deliver "something" that is not a homosapien. "Is there any instance of a woman giving birth to something that is not a human being, a baby, like, a turtle, or as our First Lady suggested, a breakfast taco," Hice asked. "I mean, is there any instance where other than a human being has been born?" READ MORE: GOP senator ridiculed for comparing pregnant women to sea turtles Hice's female staffer, seated to his rear right, reacted viscerally. "Is that one of his aides behind him, on the left? Her face when he said that," one Twitter user noted. "The moment that staffer behind him realizes that she doesn't get paid enough to deal with this bullshit," Dr. Jorge...
    In a New Republic piece from last week, headlined “The Rise of the Hereditary Judiciary,” Matt Ford lays out the case that the federal judiciary up to and including the Supreme Court, which was always the least democratic branch, has over recent years become even less democratic. (I spelled “democratic,” with a small-d, although it could also refer to a judiciary that has become more Republican.) Ford starts out talking about a swap, agreed between President Joe Biden and Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, in which Biden made a rather bad deal. If McConnell would stop using his position to block two appointments to federal prosecutor positions, Biden would accept McConnell’s “suggestion” of an appointee to a federal judgeship in Kentucky, a candidate with Republican and anti-abortion track records. (It was a bad deal for Biden, Ford suggests, because the federal judgeship is a lifetime appointment, while U.S. attorney appointments are not.) But what caught Ford’s eye was that the judgeship to which McConnell’s ally would be appointed was not vacant at the time. In fact, the conservative and Republican...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell threatened to tank a bipartisan bill that puts $52 billion toward the semiconductor industry to compete with China if Democrats try to resurrect President Joe Biden's Build Back Better plan.  'Let me be perfectly clear: there will be no bipartisan USICA as long as Democrats are pursuing a partisan reconciliation bill,' McConnell tweeted late Thursday afternoon, using the acronym for the United States Innovation and Competition Act.  Press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre called McConnell's threat 'shocking' and 'outrageous,' in a statement issued as President Joe Biden was returning to the White House after his two-country trip to Europe.  Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell threatened to tank a bipartisan bill that puts $52 billion toward the semiconductor industry to compete with China if Democrats try to resurrect President Joe Biden's Build Back Better plan 'Let me be perfectly clear: there will be no bipartisan USICA as long as Democrats are pursuing a partisan reconciliation bill,' McConnell tweeted late Thursday afternoon, using the acronym for the United States Innovation and Competition Act President Joe Biden waves to reporters as...
    (CNN)Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell has issued a major warning to Democrats: Republicans won't agree to a bill to bolster US competitiveness with China if Democrats continue to pursue an economic agenda they are trying to pass along straight party lines this summer.The China competitiveness bill has been the subject of negotiations for months and is being closely watched by industry groups -- particularly automakers -- because it includes funding for the development of semiconducter chips that are in short supply. House and Senate Democrats have been at odds over the proposal, stalling its progress, but the Kentucky Republican's threat could sink the effort altogether. "Let me be perfectly clear: there will be no bipartisan USICA as long as Democrats are pursuing a partisan reconciliation bill," McConnell tweeted, referring to the China competes bill acronym that stands for the United States Innovation and Competition Act.McConnell's threat comes as Democrats are pursuing a bill that would include capping the price of prescription drugs -- as well as potentially energy and climate provisions -- through the budget process known as reconciliation, which...
    Lindsey Graham wants you to suffer. Sens. Bernie Sanders and Lindsey Graham held a debate about the economy Monday at the the Edward M. Kennedy Institute in Massachusetts, aired on Fox Nation. The event was supposed to be some kind of kumbaya bipartisan thing, bringing the two sides together for a discussion about the economy. Sanders, an independent from Vermont, gave a full-throated defense of the vision progressives have for America: a public health care system, a living wage, and tax fairness. Graham, a South Carolina Republican, reiterated his party’s dream of ending Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. “In the United States, Lindsey, we spend twice as much per capita on health care compared to the people of any other country, while major countries like Canada, the U.K., Germany manage to supply health care to all their people,” Sanders said. “Why is that?” he asked rhetorically. “Because they’re not having insurance companies ripping off the system.” That’s socialism, said Graham. “And it’s not going to fix America. We are not a socialist nation. There is a better way, I promise you this.” His better way happens...
    Ever since the demise of Roe v. Wade was telegraphed by a Supreme Court draft opinion, GOP Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has sought to downplay the substance of the ruling. McConnell immediately instructed his caucus to focus their outrage on the unprecedented leak, but the reality is that McConnell no longer leads his caucus—he follows it. And after feigning indignation for about a day, Senate Republicans started coming clean about their ultimate destination: a national abortion ban. Sen. Kevin Cramer of North Dakota explained that if someone crossed state lines to have an abortion in Moorhead, Minnesota, he wouldn't "find a lot of solace in that just because it didn’t happen in my state." “I think you could expect that pro-life activists would push for federal protections," Cramer added. "I mean, I wouldn’t take that off the table.” Christine Pelosi talks about the Supreme Court's leaked decision on Roe v. Wade, and what Democrats are doing now, on Daily Kos’ The Brief podcast x Embedded Content Toward the end of the last week, McConnell had clearly concluded he had no choice but to...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has signaled that the GOP could pursue a federal ban on abortion if the right-wing Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade and Republicans regain control of Congress in the fast-approaching midterm elections. "If the leaked opinion became the final opinion, legislative bodies—not only at the state level but at the federal level—certainly could legislate in that area," McConnell (R-Ky.) told USA Today in an interview late last week, days after the publication of Justice Samuel Alito's draft ruling in a Mississippi abortion-ban case sparked nationwide outrage. "If this were the final decision, that was the point that it should be resolved one way or another in the legislative process," McConnell said of a federal abortion ban, which polling suggests would be broadly unpopular with the U.S. electorate. "So yeah, it's possible." While the Republican leader claimed he would not be willing to weaken the legislative filibuster to push through a federal abortion ban, the GOP's 2017 decision to nuke the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees paved the way for the confirmation of Justices Neil Gorsuch,...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has signaled that the GOP could pursue a federal ban on abortion if the right-wing Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade and Republicans regain control of Congress in the fast-approaching midterm elections. "If the leaked opinion became the final opinion, legislative bodies—not only at the state level but at the federal level—certainly could legislate in that area," McConnell (R-Ky.) told USA Today in an interview late last week, days after the publication of Justice Samuel Alito's draft ruling in a Mississippi abortion-ban case sparked nationwide outrage. "No one should be surprised at what the leak of Alito's opinion taking away abortion rights revealed. There is a plan, and this is just one part of it." "If this were the final decision, that was the point that it should be resolved one way or another in the legislative process," McConnell said of a federal abortion ban, which polling suggests would be broadly unpopular with the U.S. electorate. "So yeah, it's possible." While the Republican leader claimed he would not be willing to weaken the legislative filibuster...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said a national abortion ban is "possible" if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade. McConnell talked about what may come next if the high court dismantles the landmark abortion decision, as is hinted in a leaked draft opinion, while expressing opposition to ending the filibuster to pass legislation on the issue. "If the leaked opinion became the final opinion, legislative bodies — not only at the state level but at the federal level — certainly could legislate in that area," McConnell told USA Today on Thursday. ROE LEAK: MCCONNELL AND SCHUMER SPAR OVER DRAFT SUPREME COURT OPINION McConnell has set his focus on how the draft opinion from the Supreme Court was leaked, saying that the "integrity and independence of the Supreme Court" were under attack. "All of this puts the cart before the horse,” McConnell commented. Still, the senator acknowledged that in the event Roe is overturned, the issue of abortion would need to be resolved through legislation in "one way or another." "So yeah,...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says a federal abortion ban is 'possible' if the Supreme Court rules to overturn Roe v. Wade. 'If the leaked opinion became the final opinion, legislative bodies - not only at the state level but at the federal level - certainly could legislate in that area,' McConnell, of Kentucky, told USA Today on Thursday.  'And if this were the final decision, that was the point that it should be resolved one way or another in the legislative process. So yeah, it's possible.'  However, McConnell remained cautious when addressing whether Republicans would pass abortion banning legislation if they were to win back the Senate in the upcoming midterm election. 'With regard to the abortion issue, I think it's pretty clear where Senate Republicans stand,' he added. 'And if and when the court makes a final decision, I expect everybody will be more definitive. But I don't think it's much secret where Senate Republicans stand on that issue.'  McConnell's remarks come in response to a Supreme Court draft opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito that revealed that the...
    The former president had two vastly different reactions to the GOP leaders' anger at him following the January 6 Capitol riot  Donald Trump said House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy had an 'inferiority complex' and that he didn't take the lawmaker's anger following the January 6 Capitol riot seriously, according to a new book excerpt released on Thursday. The criticism from McCarthy's fellow Republican leader Mitch McConnell, however, did not sit as easily with the former president.   Trump thinks he would still be in the White House had it not been for the Senate Minority Leader, he told New York Times journalists Jonathan Martin and Alex Burns for their book 'This Will Not Pass: Trump, Biden, and the Battle for America's Future.' The former president called the Kentucky legislator 'bad news' months after the January 6 Capitol riot, in the spring of 2021, in an excerpt obtained by Punchbowl News.  'Had Mitch stuck with many members of the party who knew the election was rigged, I think we wouldn’t be at Mar-a-Lago,' the ex-leader said. 'We would be at the White House...
    Former President Donald Trump told Republican Leader Mitch McConnell that if he could get Georgia's Gov. Brian Kemp to overturn now President Joe Biden's 2020 win in his state officials in Michigan and Pennsylvania would follow.  CNN obtained an excerpt Wednesday of the forthcoming book This Will Not Pass: Trump, Biden, and the Battle for America's Future by New York Times reporters Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns - which details some of the conversations the ex-president had following his November 2020 election loss.   'I've been calling folks in those states and they're with us,' Trump reportedly told McConnell and other Senate GOP leaders during a phone call in December 2020 about Pennsylvania and Michigan.   After the call, McConnell told his colleagues, 'We've got to stay focused on Georgia,' the book said.  McConnell was referencing the two run-off Senate races slated for January 5 that would determine which party held the majority - races the Democrats won.  Former President Donald Trump (pictured) told Republican Leader Mitch McConnell that if he could get Georgia's Gov. Brian Kemp to overturn now President Joe Biden's...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said on this week’s broadcast of “Fox News Sunday” that Republicans would “make sure Joe Biden is a moderate” if they retake Congress in the midterm elections. Anchor Dana Perino said, “I want to ask about the midterms next anyway. You have a great way of transitioning, sir. Inflation, gas, and groceries. this is on everybody’s mind. What would be different for Americans if Republicans win back the majorities in the House and Senate this year?” McConnell said, “Well, our agenda next year, if we are fortunate enough to be in the majority, will be focused on exactly what you and I have been talking about. Crime, education, beefing up the defense of our country. The president’s request for the Defense Department, this year’s request, doesn’t even keep up with inflation. We’ve got a war going on in Ukraine. We’ve got big power competition with the Russians and the Chinese. We need to meet the demands of the international situation. So all of those will be on our agenda.” He added, “We will not...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is apparently unfazed about his low approval numbers among Republican voters in national polls, the GOP lawmaker indicated on Thursday.  The Kentucky Republican sat for nearly an hour-long live interview with Axios in the morning, where he also dismissed journalist Jonathan Swan's attempt to confront him on his about-face over supporting Donald Trump in 2024. 'There's no obvious challenge to your leadership. People like to gin it up, but there isn't. And yet recent polls show your approval rating is in the 30s among Republicans,' Swan said. 'Why do they hate you?' McConnell, the most powerful elected Republican in Washington, chuckled before beginning his response.  'Look -- there are two constituents that are important to doing this job. The people of Kentucky, who have sent me here seven times, and the Republican members of the Senate, who elected me eight times without opposition,' the lawmaker said.   'My job is not to run up political popularity nationally. I'm not running for anything nationally.' However he admitted that any official leading a political party often 'irritated' people...
    Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP sounds alarm bells over Greitens allegations Brooks vows to not back McConnell as leader amid Trump criticism Republicans are attacking Judge Jackson for defending poor people's rights MORE (R-Ky.) on Tuesday sidestepped saying if former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, who is running for Senate, should drop out in the wake of allegations of abuse by his former wife. "Well look I think all of the developments of the last 24 hours are things the people of Missouri are going to take into account both the primary and I would assume would take into account in the general," McConnell said during a weekly press conference. McConnell taking a stance on Greitens could risk injecting the GOP leader into the Missouri primary, and would likely prompt a response from Greitens, who has said that he would not support the Kentucky Republican as GOP leader.  But McConnell's comments come after an affidavit by Sheena Greitens, the former governor's ex-wife, that contained several disturbing details, including that Eric Greitens bought a gun, hid it from his family...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell warned of an 'utter meltdown' at the border if the Biden administration moves away from using Title 42 authority to reject immigration claims based on health grounds tied to the pandemic.  He blasted the idea of a sudden change in policy – after the White House signaled the policy could end as soon as next month under its periodic reconsideration. 'This move would take our border from its current state of chaos into a whole new level of utter, utter meltdown,' said McConnell said on the Senate floor Tuesday. The administration is under pressure to roll back its use of the authority, now that covid cases are dropping and vaccines continue to proliferate. 'It would be wildly reckless for Democrats to simply stand down and let the floodgates open,' McConnell warned. 
    Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R), who is running for U.S. Senate to replace retiring Sen. Roy Blount (R) in November’s upcoming election, has twice refused to answer if he would back GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell in a bid to remain the party’s leader. At CPAC, Amanda Head of Real America’s Voice asked Schmitt if he would support McConnell as Senate Majority Leader, should Schmitt win the seat and Republicans take back the Senate. “Oh look, I don’t even think anybody is running against him. I’m going to take my cues from people like Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley and Mike Lee and talk to them about that for sure,” Schmitt responded.  This weekend at CPAC, Trump doubled down on his criticism of McConnell but Missouri Senate Candidate @Eric_Schmitt refused to pledge to vote against Mitch McConnell as GOP Leader if elected. I gave him two chances. pic.twitter.com/fJzIgUqhva — Amanda Head (@AmandaHead) February 27, 2022 Schmitt also dodged the question in a Fox News interview published Sunday: Asked if he’d back McConnell if he wins election, Schmitt said, “I’m...
    Representative Mo Brooks (R-AL), a candidate for Alabama’s U.S. Senate seat up for grabs later this year, is not bullish on the prospects of current Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) resuming the role of Majority Leader should the Republicans take the Senate in November. Brooks told Mobile, AL radio’s FM Talk 106.5 on Friday that he would be reluctant to support McConnell if he won Alabama’s Senate seat. However, he added a caveat that there was a “slim” possibility he could support McConnell if his opponent for the leadership role were one of the “open-border, left-wing types.” “There’s going to be significant resistance to Mitch McConnell being the Republican leader of the United States Senate,” he said. “Even Lindsey Graham has suggested Mitch McConnell should not be the leader if he is not going to be able to work things out with Donald Trump. And I have seen nothing to suggest that he is going to be able to work things out with Donald Trump. But we’ll see how it plays out in that regard.” “But, I’m going to...
    Mitch McConnell has slammed Joe Biden for 'adopting the Bernie Sanders prescription for America' after the president accused him of trying to stop the administration from being a success. The war of words between the veteran Republican and Democrat showed no sign of slowing down, as the Senate Minority Leader said Biden had 'got it wrong again'. In his Wednesday press conference, Biden repeatedly asked: 'The fundamental question is, what's Mitch for?' He then accused McConnell of doing 'anything to prevent Biden from being a success', and saying the Republicans do not know 'what they are for'. McConnell hit back on Thursday, telling Fox News: 'My good friend the president got it wrong again.  Fox News Privacy Policy Mitch McConnell has slammed Joe Biden for 'adopting the Bernie Sanders prescription for America' In his Wednesday press conference, Biden repeatedly asked: 'The fundamental question is, what's Mitch for?' 'I helped him pass a bipartisan infrastructure bill, I supported in the Senate a bill to deal with China and the computer chip shortage. 'If the president starts acting like a moderate...
    Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina is very nearly in a league of his own when it comes to obsequious wet-noodle survival maneuvers, with House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy running a close second. So when it came time this week to pick sides in the dustup between the Mitch McConnell wing of the party and Donald Trump's wing, Graham quickly betrayed his Senate colleagues, some of whom he's served with for decades. On Fox News Wednesday night, Graham told host Sean Hannity that he couldn't support McConnell for GOP leader if he didn't have a “working relationship” with the de facto leader of their party. “If you want to be a Republican leader in the House or the Senate, you have to have a working relationship with President Donald Trump,” Graham said. "Here’s the question: Can Senator McConnell effectively work with the leader of the Republican Party, Donald Trump? I’m not going to vote for anybody that can’t have a working relationship with President Trump." Graham's swipe at McConnell came after several Senate Republicans dared to admit this...
    Republican Senator Lindsey Graham suggested he would oppose Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's virtually unchallenged hold on Senate GOP leadership if he can't have a 'working relationship' with Donald Trump on Wednesday night. 'I'm not going to vote for anybody for leader of the Senate as a Republican unless they can prove to me that they can advocate an American (sic) First agenda and have a working relationship with President Trump,' the South Carolina lawmaker told Fox News. He followed the staggering admission by predicting a Trump victory in the next White House race. 'It's his nomination if he wants it, and I think he'll get reelected in 2024' Graham said of the GOP presidential ticket.  One of Trump's most vocal allies in Congress, Graham was asked by host Sean Hannity about the prospect of McConnell securing another term as Senate GOP Leader. 'Well, elections are about the future. If you want to be a Republican leader in the House or the Senate, you have to have a working relationship with President Donald Trump,' Graham said. He called Trump 'the most...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell blocks simple majority votes on Dems' voting rights bills Republicans threaten floor takeover if Democrats weaken filibuster  Biden to 'forcefully advocate' for voting rights in Tuesday speech MORE (R-Ky.) vowed on Tuesday that Republicans would retaliate if Democrats change the legislative filibuster, threatening to gum up the chamber and cause major headaches. McConnell, speaking from the Senate floor, argued that changing the requirement that most legislation needs 60 votes to advance would "silence the voices of millions and millions of Americans" represented by GOP senators. "We will make their voices heard in this chamber in ways that are more inconvenient for the majority and this White House than what anybody has seen in living memory," McConnell said. "What would a post-nuclear Senate look like? I assure you it would not be more efficient or more productive. I personally guarantee it," he added. The Senate operates throughout the day on unanimous consent — meaning deals that have buy-in from the entire chamber. But McConnell warned that Republicans would be willing to block those...
    Senate Republicans are threatening to force votes on a slew of bills designed to split the Democratic caucus and take over the floor agenda should Majority Leader Charles Schumer carry out his threat to push through a change in Senate filibuster rules for voting rights. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has been leading a Republican filibuster against the bills, threatened to use Senate rules to call up a raft of legislation in response – including bills that might peel off a vote a or two from vulnerable Democrats.   'Since Sen. Schumer is hellbent on trying to break the Senate, Republicans will show how this reckless action would have immediate consequences,' McConnell vowed.  McConnell's planned virtual takeover of the floor agenda would not result in new laws – Democrats could block them and President Biden could veto them anyway. But it could put pressure on Democrats while also tying up the floor with procedural votes.   On tap would be legislation including a bill on the Keystone XL pipeline, a project President Joe Biden blocked at the start of his term....
    Press Secretary Jen Psaki brushed off concerns that Senator Joe Manchin felt 'bullied' by White House staff and fellow Democrats on Wednesday as inter-party divisions have left the West Virginia moderate increasingly isolated. During her daily news briefing Psaki also brushed off questions over whether the divide would force Manchin to switch parties.  She told reporters that the West Virginia centrist isn't exactly a 'withering flower on the side of the road' after Manchin revealed his frustration with Biden's staff is the main reason he's forcing Democrats to kill their goal of passing their Build Back Better package by the end of this year.  'Senator Manchin is somebody who has won many tough-fought fights in West Virginia,' Psaki said when asked if the White House would take a 'softer approach' over reports that Manchin felt 'bullied.'  'He comes proudly from a coal mining family, he's a pretty outspoken advocate for the things he believes in and the things he doesn't, and I would doubt he's a withering flower on the side of the road.' Manchin stunned Democrats all the way...
    Former President Donald Trump is the latest national Republican figure to heap praise on Senator Joe Manchin on Wednesday, crediting the West Virginia Democrat for 'saving' President Joe Biden from 'himself.' The key centrist single-handedly killed Democrats' goal of passing Biden's Build Back Better bill this year when he told Fox News Sunday he would vote 'no' on the $1.75 trillion social reform and climate change plan after months of negotiations. Trump told Fox Manchin saved the president because he claimed the package would 'blow the country up' if passed, citing soaring inflation. Inflation was also among Manchin's main concerns throughout months of back-and-forth with the White House and Capitol Hill.  'I think he’s saving Biden, because if they ever got that passed, this country would be a total disaster,' Trump said. 'Already, inflation is so bad, it’s at a level that nobody’s really seen - nobody remembers for so long - Jimmy Carter was there, but I think this will end up being far worse than Jimmy Carter.  Under the Carter administration the economy saw a devastating near-14 percent spike...
    Yet another Republican lawmaker is extending an invitation for Senator Joe Manchin to cross the aisle after the West Virginia Democrat upended President Joe Biden's plan to pass his sweeping $1.75 trillion social reform and climate change agenda this year. Texas Senator John Cornyn told Nexstar he texted Manchin on Tuesday to tell him, 'Joe, if they don’t want you we do.' He said Manchin switching party affiliations to Republican would be 'the greatest Christmas gift I can think of.'  And on Wednesday, Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell reiterated his invitation for Manchin to join his party. 'Obviously we would love to have him on our team,' McConnell told the New York Times. 'I think he’d be more comfortable.'  Manchin has been under fire from members of his own party ever since he told Fox News Sunday that he would vote no on Biden's Build Back Better bill (BBB), effectively killing the legislation in its current form. McConnell accused the West Virginian's fellow party members of calling him a 'liar' and trying to 'embarrass' him. Progressive Democrats are furious because...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell revealed that he’d be open to West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin joining the Republican Party after several conflicts with his fellow Democrats. On Monday, McConnell appeared on "The Guy Benson Show" podcast to discuss Manchin’s recent announcement that he would vote "no" on President Biden’s Build Back Better plan in the Senate, effectively ending its chances of being passed. MANCHIN CONFIDANT: BIDEN WHITE HOUSE’S INCIVILITY WAS LAST STRAW ON BUILD BACK BETTER  WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 06: Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) speaks at a press conference outside his office on Capitol Hill on October 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Manchin spoke on the debt limit and the infrastructure bill. () (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)  "I would imagine that your Christmas got a little bit merrier yesterday around 9:30, 9 AM Eastern time when your Democratic colleague Joe Manchin of West Virginia appeared on Fox News Sunday with Bret Baier and announced that he’s a no on Build Back Better," Benson opened. Benson asked whether McConnell had an "inkling" of Manchin’s vote prior to...
    Sen. Lindsey Graham warned his Senate Republican colleagues in a private lunch Wednesday that they would face the wrath of President Donald Trump if they voted in favor of the debt ceiling deal. The Hill newspaper reported Thursday that Graham said the deal Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell made with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer would get GOP lawmakers 'shot in the back.'  Graham also warned them that 'the president,' meaning Trump, 'is going to be engaged on this issue.  Still, 14 Republicans, including McConnell and other thorns-in-Trump's-side, like Sens. Mitt Romney, Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski, voted with all 50 Democrats on cloture for a bill that will allow lawmakers to lift the debt ceiling before the December 15 deadline using only Democratic votes.        Sen. Lindsey Graham (right) reportedly told his GOP colleagues at a private luncheon Wednesday that if they voted for the debt ceiling deal Thursday they would face the wrath of former President Donald Trump  In a vote of 64 to 36, the Senate cleared a procedural hurdle on a bill that delays Medicare sequestration cuts for...
    CNN host Jim Acosta on Saturday encouraged Democrats to abolish the filibuster, arguing that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell would do the same if he was in the Democrats' shoes – despite McConnell notably electing not to strike the legislative procedure when he had the opportunity to do so last year. Acosta waded into the critical Mississippi abortion case under the consideration of the Supreme Court on CNN's "Newsroom," telling viewers that due to the conservative structure of the High Court, Democrats should nuke the filibuster in order to pass sweeping far-left policies down party lines. McConnell, Acosta claimed, would likely choose to do the same if the circumstances were reversed.  SUPREME COURT HEARING ORAL ARGUMENTS IN CASE THAT COULD OVERTURN ROE V. WADE CNN took Jim Acosta of the White House beat on Monday to coincide with the Biden administration. (NGAN/AFP via Getty Images) "Democrats could think about it this way. If Mitch McConnell were in their shoes, what would he do?" Acosta said. "Given what we know, would we see him letting the filibuster stand? Is...
    Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned lawmakers Tuesday that the U.S. could suffer a 'deep recession' if they don't raise the debt ceiling by December 15.   'I cannot overstate how critical it is that Congress address this issue,' she urged the Senate Banking Committee. 'America must pay its bills on time and in full. If we do not, we will eviscerate our current recovery.'  Yellen said that in a 'matter of days' the majority of Americans would suffer financially if Congress didn't lift or suspend the debt ceiling.  Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned lawmakers Tuesday that the U.S. could suffer a 'deep recession' if they don't raise the debt ceiling by December 15 'As critical payments like social security checks and military paychecks would not reach their bank accounts and that would likely be followed by a deep recession,' Yellen predicted.    Earlier this month, Yellen told Congressional leaders that the federal government had more time than her initial estimate on when it would default on its debt.  Yellen had originally estimated the country wouldn't be able to pay its bills after December...
    Republican lawmakers are plotting what they'll do if they win back the House and the Senate next year. The 2022 midterm elections are nearly a year away, but GOP leaders are already talking up what they plan to do should they win back majorities in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. The Republicans' plan, should they win, seems to consist of three things: obstructing President Joe Biden's agenda, punishing their enemies, and consolidating power. Since Biden was sworn into office in January, Republicans have done everything possible to block Democrats from enacting the agenda Americans voted for in Nov. 2020. In the House, the GOP has wasted hours by forcing lengthy roll-call votes on procedural motions to adjourn in the middle of the day. In the Senate, Republicans have filibustered many of the Biden's top legislative priorities, stalled nominees, and even forced staffers to read an entire bill aloud for hours on end just to delay its enactment. But should Republicans gain five seats in the House or...
    President Joe Biden is meeting Wednesday with some of the nation's top CEOs to put more pressure on Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to cave in the current debt ceiling stand-off.  Biden has invited bank leaders including JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon, Citi's Jane Fraser and Bank of America's Brian Moynihan to the afternoon meeting with Treasury Secretray Janet Yellen, adviser Cedric Richmond and Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo.  Biden and Senate Democrats are trying to get around a Republican filibuster threat and pass the same bill that got through the House last week, which suspends the debt ceiling until December 2022, after the midterm elections.  President Joe Biden wil meet with bank executives on Wednesday to pressure Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to cave in the current debt ceiling stand-off. On Tuesday night he said it was a 'real possibility' that Democrats scrapped the filibuster on debt ceiling bills  MEETING PARTICIPANTS • Jane Fraser, CEO, Citi • Greg Hayes, CEO, Raytheon • Charlie Oppler, President, National Association of REALTORS • Jo Ann Jenkins, CEO, AARP • Adena Friedman, President and CEO, Nasdaq...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki fussed at Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Ted Cruz at Wednesday's press briefing for their resistance to help Democrats raise the debt ceiling.  'We're being blocked on that effort currently by Congr... Sen. McConnell - I almost demoted him by accident - by Sen. McConnell, by Sen. Cruz and others. And what's so absurd about this is that these are individuals, especially Sen. McConnell, who have made very clear in the past about their concerns and the risks of the U.S. government defaulting,' Psaki said. 'This is why it's never happened in the past.'   The House is voting on a bill Wednesday night that would raise the debt ceiling. If it passes, it will go to the Senate, where it's expected to collapse.   White House press secretary Jen Psaki fussed at Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Ted Cruz at Wednesday's press briefing for their resistance to help Democrats raise the debt ceiling Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen testified the government will run out of cash on October 18.     'It would have...
    Senate Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is refusing to say he will not "mount a blockade" against a possible Supreme Court nominee put forth by President Joe Biden, should the opportunity arise, if Republicans take back the Senate after the 2022 elections. McConnell, as Majority Leader, infamously refused to even allow then-President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominee to have any confirmation hearings, keeping the seat open if a Republican won the White House in 2016, which Donald Trump did. In an interview with Politico's Burgess Everett, the Kentucky Republican who has been in the U.S. Senate since 1984 was asked if he would again "mount a blockade." “Cross those bridges when I get there, we are focusing on '22," McConnell said, Everett reports. “I don't rule anything in or out about how to handle nominations if I'm in the majority position." Politico's Anthony Adragna opines that "progressives will freak"over McConnell's remarks. "Liberal groups have ratcheted up the pressure on Justice Stephen Breyer to consider retirement, fearing McConnell would simply keep the seat open if he regains power in the midterms.......
    Chris Wallace asked Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer Sunday about how partisanship in Congress has impacted confirmation battles. Breyer was nominated by Bill Clinton in 1994 and was confirmed 87 to 9. Considering that Breyer was a staffer for the late Senator Ted Kennedy many years ago, Wallace asked if he thinks he would’ve gotten that kind of overwhelming Senate support today “I know what you’re saying, and the answer is of course no,” Breyer said. Wallace then brought up how Mitch McConnell didn’t give Merrick Garland a hearing when appointed by Barack Obama in 2016, but in 2020 he pushed Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination through weeks before the election. “Doesn’t that undercut the authority of the court?” Wallace asked. “I was confirmed and I was nominated,” Breyer remarked. “It’s like asking for the recipe for chicken a la king from the point of view of the chicken.” He laughed a bit, but then added, “That’s the political environment. Now, you may disapprove of it, I may disapprove of it, and if enough people in the public want it to...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday told Democrats they could expect no help from Republicans if they tried to raise the debt limit as part of their 'reckless plans' for a $3.5 trillion 'spending spree.'  It sets up a fall battle between Republicans and Democrats over the nation's borrowing limit and President Biden's domestic agenda. McConnell delivered his promise just before the Congressional Budget Office revealed that the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan currently before Congress will not pay for itself, instead adding $256 billion to deficits over the next 10 years. That could provide a wrinkle in Democrats' plans as they battle demands that the measures be fully paid for.  And it is only the first package proposed by Democrats, who next want to pursue a $3.5 trillion, 10-year plan to strengthen social and environment programs. 'If our colleagues want to ram through yet another reckless taxing and spending spree without our input, if they want all this spending and debt to be their signature legacy, they should leap at the chance to own every bit of it,' said...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Trump asks court to block release of tax returns to Congress | Private sector adds 330K jobs in July, well short of expectations Senate panel advances first three spending bills McConnell lays out GOP demands for government-funding deal MORE (R-Ky.) on Thursday said Senate Republicans will not vote for legislation to raise the debt limit if President BidenJoe BidenBiden nominates Mark Brzezinski to be U.S. ambassador to Poland 10 dead after overloaded van crashes in south Texas Majority of New York state Assembly support beginning process to impeach Cuomo: AP MORE and Democrats stick to their plan to push through a $3.5 trillion spending and tax reform proposal this fall. Democrats are aiming to use the budget reconciliation process to advance the sweeping spending bill without GOP votes. McConnell said if Democrats “ram” the bill through the Senate, Republicans won’t provide any votes to raise the debt limit. “Let me make something perfectly clear: If they don’t need or want our input, they won’t get our help. They won’t get our help with...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is sending a grim message to unvaccinated Americans that the entire country could be locked down again as early as this fall if they don't get their COVID shots. 'These shots need to get in everybody's arm as rapidly as possible, or we're going to be back in a situation in the fall that we don't yearn for that we went through last year,' the Kentucky Republican said on Tuesday. McConnell, who at age 79 is squarely in the 'high-risk' category for the virus, has been urging Americans to get vaccinated for months.  His latest warning comes as the U.S. recorded 42,706 new cases on Tuesday with a seven-day rolling average of 37,056, which is a 244 percent increase from the 10,771 average recorded three weeks ago.
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that more people need to get vaccinated against coronavirus or new lockdowns could come in the fall. McConnell pointed out that 97% of COVID-related hospitalizations are from unvaccinated people, and said that he never expected there to be an issue convincing people to take the vaccine once it was developed. The Senate minority leader cited his battle with polio and the lengthy amount of time it took to develop a polio vaccine. (RELATED: Hillary Adviser Brags After Poking Fun At McConnell Disability) Get vaccinated! These shots need to get into arms as rapidly as possible, or else we’re gonna be back in a situation this fall like what we went through last year. pic.twitter.com/J4o6yL5cn4 — Leader McConnell (@LeaderMcConnell) July 20, 2021 “I want to underscore in the strongest possible manner I can, and I say this with some authority as you all know, as a result of being a polio victim myself, and being very aware that it took seven decades to come up with two effective polio vaccines,” he said. “This...
    More On: mitch mcconnell Schumer forges forward with infrastructure vote despite GOP resistance Schumer sets crucial test vote on $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill McConnell on $1.2T plan: ‘Need to see the bill before we decide to vote for it’ McConnell calls on Biden to drop nominee over alleged ties to eco-terrorists A fresh wave of pandemic lockdowns like the ones that crippled the country last year loom on the horizon if people don’t wise up and get vaccinated against COVID-19, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell warned. “These shots need to get in everybody’s arms as rapidly as possible or we´re going to be back in a situation in the fall that we don’t yearn for – that we went through last year,” McConnell said at a news conference Tuesday, adding, “This is not complicated.” Asked about comments from Utah Governor Spencer Cox alleging that conservative pundits are killing people with their rhetoric, McConnell stated that he encourages everybody to “ignore all of these other voices that are giving demonstrably bad advice.” McConnell’s call to seek trusted and verified information...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell seized on a report Tuesday showing inflation surged last month, blasting Democratic plans for a large-scale budge package that is ballooning in size. 'What Democrats say they want to force through this summer through reconciliation would make our current inflationary mess look like small potatoes,' the Kentucky Republican said in remarks on the Senate floor Tuesday. 'Nobody serious thinks our country needs another gigantic overdose of over-borrowing, overspending, and over-taxing,' said McConnell.  He pointed to his 'distinguished colleague,' Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is helping to craft the budget plan for the Democratic majority, and who McConnell pointed out has been 'very transparent about his socialist ideology for decades.' Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) pointed to new data showing a jump in inflation Tuesday and blasted Democratic budget plans 'But the country did not elect a 50-50 Senate and a president who claimed to be a moderate so that Chairman Sanders could turn America into a socialist country,' said McConnell. Sanders calls himself a Democratic Socialist, and caucuses with Democrats.  McConnell is...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Thursday that if he were to become majority leader again it would not be to hold up all legislation under President Joe Biden’s administration, but to stop the worst of it from going through. McConnell was speaking at the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce in his home state and mentioned winning back a majority in the Senate. McConnell said if he were reelected as majority leader he could make sure Biden would keep his promise to be a moderate president. “Do they really want a moderate administration or not? If the House and Senate were to return to Republican hands that doesn’t mean nothing happens,” McConnell said. “What I want you to know is if I become the majority leader again it’s not for stopping everything. It’s for stopping the worst. It’s for stopping things that fundamentally push the country into a direction that at least my party feels is not a good idea for the country,” McConnell continued. “And I could make sure Biden makes his promise … to be a moderate.” WATCH: ...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell pushed back on vaccine skepticism during remarks in Kentucky Tuesday. The top Republican senator has encouraged vaccinations multiple times in the past few months, specifically addressing the level of vaccine hesitancy among Republican men. In April the Biden administration commended McConnell for his leadership on the issue. On Tuesday McConnell again emphasized that the three vaccines are a medical miracle and said, “We’re in the red zone on vaccines, but we’re not quite in the end zone yet.” “There’s no good reason not to get vaccinated. We need to finish the job,” he continued. “And I know there is some skepticism out there, but let me put it his way. It may not guarantee you don’t get it, but it almost guarantees you don’t die from it if you get it.” Other Republicans have come under criticism for their comments about vaccines, including Senator Ron Johnson. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel called out Johnson for his recent news conference with individuals who said they got serious effects from the vaccines. “Instead of encouraging more people to...
    Liberals are renewing their calls for 82-year-old Justice Stephen Breyer to resign so they can get some new blood in the Senate before the Republicans regain the majority after Minority Leader Mitch McConnell threatened to block every Biden nominee during the 2024 election year. McConnell said on Hugh Hewitt's radio show Monday that he thought it was 'highly unlikely' that whichever party had the majority, 'would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election.' His comment sparked panic among many Democrats who fear they could lose control of the Senate during next year's election. Many have turned on Breyer who, at 82, they believe should retire to allow someone with more energy to take his place. The Justice had already found himself unpopular with liberals after previous remarks he gave suggesting court packing may be a bad idea. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said she is 'inclined to say yes' when asked on Sunday whether she thought Breyer could retire so that Biden could appoint a younger liberal to the Supreme Court. 'You know, it's something I thin about, but I...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday if he has the Senate majority he'll block President Joe Biden's Supreme Court nominees in 2024, the year of the next presidential election.  'I think it's highly unlikely - in fact, no, I don't think either party, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election,' McConnell said on Hugh Hewitt's radio show.  McConnell was asked if he'd repeat what he did in 2016 to then President Barack Obama by refusing to give his Supreme Court pick, now Attorney General Merrick Garland, a vote, because it was during a presidential election year.  Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he would block President Joe Biden's Supreme Court nominee if the person was nominated in 2024, the next presidential election year  McConnell famously blocked President Barack Obama's (left) pick to replace Justice Antonin Scalia, Judge Merrick Garland (right), who now serves as President Joe Biden's Attorney General  McConnell, however, had no problem pushing through the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett (right),...
    More On: mitch mcconnell McConnell blasts AOC over push for far-left infrastructure bill McConnell comes out against Capitol riot commission ahead of House vote Trump implores GOP to vote against proposed Jan. 6 riot commission McConnell urges Biden to ‘remain strong’ on Israel as Schumer backs ceasefire Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell ​says he won’t allow a vote on a Supreme Court nominee from President Biden in 2024 if Republicans win back the chamber — adding that he would “wait and see” about confirming a justice in 2023, should there be a vacancy. McConnell was asked, if the GOP regains control of the Senate in 2022, if he would follow the same rule they used in 2016 to deny a hearing for former President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, to fill the vacancy left by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. “So I think it’s highly unlikely. In fact, no, I don’t think either party if it controlled, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election. What was...
    (CNN)Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Monday that if his party regains the majority in 2022 it's "highly unlikely" he would let President Joe Biden confirm a Supreme Court vacancy if one opened up in 2024, and was non-committal when asked about an opening at the end of 2023."I think in the middle of a presidential election, if you have a Senate of the opposite party of the president, you have to go back to the 1880s to find the last time a vacancy was filled. So I think it's highly unlikely. In fact, no, I don't think either party if it controlled, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election. What was different in 2020 was we were of the same party as the president," McConnell said on the Hugh Hewitt radio program Monday. When asked what he would do if his party controlled the Senate and a seat opened up at the end of 2023, McConnell said: "Well, we'd have to wait and see what happens."The...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that he would block a Supreme Court nominee from President Biden in 2024 if Republicans are in the Senate majority – just as he did in 2016 after the death of late Justice Antonin Scalia.  McConnell, R-Ky., made the comment in an interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt. The commitment follows a controversial decision McConnell made last year to plow ahead in confirming Justice Amy Coney Barrett less than two weeks before Election Day.  "I think in the middle of a presidential election, if you have a Senate of the opposite party of the president, you have to go back to the 1880s to find the last time a vacancy was filled," McConnell told Hewitt.  "So I think it’s highly unlikely. In fact, no, I don’t think either party if it controlled, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election," McConnell added. "What was different in 2020 was we were of the same party as the president." Senate Minority Leader...
    Senate Minority Leader McConnell suggested Monday it was “highly unlikely” that the Senate, if controlled by the GOP, would confirm a Supreme Court nomination from President Joe Biden in 2024. “Well, I think in the middle of a presidential election if you have a Senate of the opposite party of the president, you have to go back to the 1880s to find the last time a vacancy was filled,” McConnell said during an interview with radio host Hugh Hewitt. “I think it’s highly unlikely – in fact, no, I don’t think either party, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election.” “What was different in 2020 was we were of the same party of the president and that’s why we went ahead with it,” he added. McConnell rejected former President Barack Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland to fill the Supreme Court vacancy in 2016, months before the election took place. (RELATED: Democrats Introduce Bill That Would Add Four Justices To The Supreme Court: REPORT) WASHINGTON, DC – OCT. 22: Senate...