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    Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-AR) said “it’s not appropriate” for former President Donald Trump to have reportedly taken classified documents when he left office and added the Department of Justice case on the matter “needs to be wrapped up.” During Monday’s CNN Tonight, host Laura Coates asked Hutchinson what impact this month’s FBI raid of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort will have on a possible Trump or Hutchinson run for the White House in 2024. The governor didn’t answer if it’ll have an effect on whether he himself will run for president: Well, in the short term, you could almost give the attorney general the title of honorary campaign manager and fundraiser for Donald Trump. Clearly, that has resorted to his benefit in the short term. I think it’s important we keep the public interest in mind. The public interest is making sure that classified information, sensitive public documents, are returned to archives, to their protected environment. It’s not appropriate for these documents to be running loose at Mar-a-Lago. That’s not appropriate. That has to be returned and secure. And then this whole...
    John Bazemore-Pool/Getty Images Twitter’s latest high-profile battle in the content moderation wars centers on a tweet sent by Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) on Monday. Greene retweeted an MSNBC clip featuring U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Rachel Levine, an admiral and a doctor who is a transgender woman. Levine transitioned about a decade ago and changed her first name from Richard to Rachel. Greene alluded to this in a tweet on Monday in which she called her “Dr. Dick,” stating, “We must do everything we can to prevent Dr. Dick Levine’s pre-teen #WeenieChop.” We must do everything we can to prevent Dr. Dick Levine’s pre-teen #WeenieChop pic.twitter.com/EOYRpvaNoi — Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene???????? (@RepMTG) July 18, 2022 The tweet was apparently flagged to Twitter, which concluded it violated the platform’s rules. Eventually, the company placed a message on it declaring the tweet runs afoul of its “hateful conduct” policy. However, Twitter said, it’s staying on the platform because it “may be in the public’s interest.” “This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules about hateful conduct,” the message says. “However, Twitter has...
    Retired NASA astronaut Scott Kelly insists the public has not lost interest in space — despite a bombshell new report pointing to widespread apathy among young people. The 58-year-old American naval aviator, who spent a year on the International Space Station from 2015 to 2016, said the rise of space tourism fuelled by billionaires Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Sir Richard Branson was sparking public interest once again. He spoke out after a report found that a lack of awareness was driving fear among Generation Z, with those born between 1997 and 2012 more likely to associate space with aliens and Star Wars than exploration or satellite communications. Just one in three adults of all ages are 'excited' about space, the survey of 20,000 people across 11 countries worldwide found, while one in five are 'nervous' and one in nine 'terrified'. A total of 97 per cent of respondents said they saw the cosmos as a threat, citing space junk and climate change as their main concerns.  The report has been published by Inmarsat, Britain's largest satellite group, which said the...
    Former Attorney General Bill Barr said Donald Trump was 'detached from reality' and that his claims of voter fraud in the aftermath of the 2020 election were 'bulls***', in testimony shown Monday by the House committee investigating the January 6 violence. Trump's former top legal officer described how he repeatedly told the president his allegations were false. And at one point he laughed as he described how Trump supporters had tried to build a case of fraud.   'I was somewhat demoralised because I thought boy, if he really believes this stuff, he has, you know, lost contact with with these become detached from reality,' Barr told the committee in his videotaped testimony.' When Barr pushed back, he said, he was met with little interest  'My opinion then and my opinion now is that the election was not stolen by fraud. 'And I haven't seen anything since the election that changes my mind on that, including the "2000 Mules" movie,' he said before laughing at the film made by conservative activist Dinesh D'Souza, which claims that drop boxes were abused bu...
    Washington Post columnist Taylor Lorenz stood by her decision to reveal Chaya Raichik as the social media influencer behind the “Libs of TikTok” Twitter account. Lorenz spoke to CNN’s Brian Stelter for a Reliable Sources segment on her article, which explored how the account became prominent in conservative circles by generating right-wing outrage content. “Were you always determined to identify the person?” Stelter asked. “Was that the most important part of the story for you?” Lorenz defended her decision to  identify Raichik by citing the influence of her account, plus Raichik’s entry into the public square with her media engagements. I really wanted to make the case why this account mattered, and I think it’s incredibly important as someone who covers influence or industry to know who is encouraging influence in this way. For all we knew, this could have been a foreign actor. We just didn’t know. I thought ‘hey, look, this account has massive power, massive influence. This woman is basically on a right wing media source. She gave interviews to The New York Post, Tucker [Carlson], all...
    Here’s a story that encompasses the total, flaming, corrupt disaster of U.S. politics and media all at once. In late 2020, Donald Trump told then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell about his plans to overturn his election loss—and McConnell remained silent because saying publicly that Trump should stop trying to overturn the election would have jeopardized Republican chances in January 2021’s Georgia Senate runoffs. That’s the flaming corrupt disaster of U.S. politics part. The flaming corrupt disaster of U.S. media part is that we are learning this now, in 2022, because some New York Times reporters saved it for a book. Yes, once again we are learning information that it would have been good to learn at the time it was happening, or at least as soon as reporters became aware of it, more than a year later so that people with regular salaried jobs as reporters can juice their book sales. RELATED STORY: The way The New York Times reported the story of missing documents says more about them than Trump The reporters this time are Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns. Back in February, it was fellow New...
    Amanda Knox has said massive public interest in Ghislaine Maxwell is partly because of an 'opportunity to vilify a woman for sex crimes'. Maxwell, 60, was convicted of facilitating the sexual abuse of minors by her former partner, Jeffrey Epstein, on December 29 , 2021. She faces 65 years in prison, meaning she could spend the rest of her life behind bars.  Ms Knox, 34, was wrongly convicted of the 2007 murder of British university student Meredith Kercher, who was 21. She said Maxwell was the 'next best thing' to holding Jeffrey Epstein accountable.  Amanda Knox, 34, (pictured) has said massive public interest in Ghislaine Maxwell is partly because of an 'opportunity to vilify a woman for sex crimes' 'Maxwell was obviously guilty of these terrible crimes and should be held accountable for her crimes. But also, we should be careful and mindful as a society when we have such raging interest in some cases over others,' she told Times Radio. 'The reason why we really, really cared about this case was because it was the opportunity to vilify a...
    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials moved Tuesday to open public lands in portions of three western states to potential solar energy development, as part of the Biden administration’s effort to counter climate change by shifting from fossil fuels. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management issued a call to nominate land for development within “solar energy zones” in Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico that combined cover about 140 square miles (360 square kilometers). The solicitation of interest comes as officials under Democratic President Joe Biden promote renewable wind and solar power on public lands and offshore to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that are warming the planet. BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning said in a statement that government support for renewable energy was a top priority for the agency, which oversees almost a quarter-billion acres of land primarily in western states. The land bureau in early December issued a draft plan to reduce rents and other fees paid by companies authorized to build wind and solar projects on public lands. The recent actions mark a pronounced shift from Republican President Donald Trump’s...
    Republicans are using the old tweets of two Biden nominees to try and stymie the president's tech and telecom agenda. Sen. Ted Cruz and other Republicans have dug into the backgrounds - and Twitter feeds - of two nominees who would serve at the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission. And they're pushing back against FCC nominee Gigi Sohn, who called Fox News 'dangerous to our democracy,' and FTC pick Alvaro Bedoya, who said the  Immigration and Customs Enforcement is an 'out-of-control domestic surveillance agency.' The pushback comes as Democrats are trying to regain voting majorities at the two agencies, which decide issues of net neutrality, competition and data privacy.  Republicans have successfully used tweets against Biden's nominees before. In March, they sank Neera Tanden's nomination to lead the Office of Management and Budget because of her old tweets.  Democrats could ram the nominations through but in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate, they would need every member of their party on board and Vice President Kamala Harris to cast the tie breaking vote.   Republicans are pushing back on old tweets...
    Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) has accused public health officials of looking after the interests of public health. The shocking allegation was made on Friday’s edition of America Reports with John Roberts, who somehow did not immediately fall out of his chair at Cotton’s claim. (In fairness to the senator, he said it should be up to elected officials, not bureaucrats to make decisions about public health.) Roberts played a clip of Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) spoke out against compulsory mask mandates for schoolchildren, saying “We’re not doing that in Florida.” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki called the decision “greatly concerning.” Roberts turned to Cotton and said, “So you’ve got the governor of Florida saying, ‘I don’t think this is the right thing to do,’ and the White House coming down on him for that. Is that the White House’s role?” Not surprisingly Cotton replied, “No,” adding, Let me say, nobody elected the CDC. Nobody elected Tony Fauci to make these decisions. Advisers advise, elected officials decide. And the American people elected Joe Biden and the members of Congress and...
    The majority of Britons are 'not interested at all' in reading Prince Harry's tell-all memoir about Megxit, a survey has found. Just 14 per cent of people surveyed said they were 'very interested' or 'fairly interested' in the bombshell book, while 80 per cent were 'not very interested' or 'not interested at all'. The Duke of Sussex, 36, on Monday confirmed the forthcoming release of his autobiography, which he has collaborated on with a ghostwriter and is due out late next year. It is believed Harry did not warn The Queen, Prince Charles or Prince William about the tell-all book until 'moments before it became public' in a press release by publisher Penguin Random House. Two-thirds of Britons are 'not interested at all' in reading Prince Harry's tell-all memoir about Megxit, a YouGov survey found. The Duke, 36, on Monday confirmed the forthcoming release of his autobiography, which he has collaborated on with a ghostwriter and is due out late next year Just 14 per cent of people surveyed said they were 'very interested' or 'fairly interested' in the bombshell book, while 80...
    BORIS Johnson says The Sun’s exposé of Matt Hancock’s lockdown breaking affair was in the public interest — and a free Press must be defended. Amid outcry over the data watchdog raiding two homes and seizing computer gear in its hunt for our whistle-blowers, the PM said we were in the right to run the story. 3Boris Johnson says The Sun’s exposé of Matt Hancock’s lockdown breaking affair was in the public interestCredit: AFP 3Matt Hancock lost his job as Health Secretary after his affair was revealedCredit: THE SUN Cops joined the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in the swoop to seek evidence of who leaked footage of former Health Secretary Mr Hancock, 42, canoodling with taxpayer-funded aide and lover Gina Coladangelo. Campaigners and politicians of all stripes likened the busts in the south of England to Stasi-like behaviour and warned it was a threat to Press freedom. Critics asked what message it sent to the world to see Britain operating like a totalitarian state. Quizzed over the row, Mr Johnson’s official spokesman said: “The Prime Minister believes in the freedom...
    Rudy Giuliani can no longer practice law in New York, a state appellate court ruled Thursday. The court suspended Giuliani's law license after a panel concluded he made 'demonstrably false' statements regarding the 2020 election. '[W]e conclude that there is uncontroverted evidence that respondent communicated demonstrably false and misleading statements to courts, lawmakers and the public at large in his capacity as lawyer for former President Donald J. Trump and the Trump campaign in connection with Trump's failed effort at reelection in 2020,' the 33-page decision read. Rudy Giuliani's law license was suspended by a New York appellate court on Thursday. The former personal attorney to Trump is seen June 22 voting in the New York mayoral primary It claimed that the former New York mayor threatened 'public interest' in his capacity as Trump's personal attorney and insisted his actions 'warrant interim suspension from the practice of law.' Giuliani was one of the figures in Trump's inner circle who led the former president's legal challenge to the 2020 presidential election results. He argued the vote was riddled with fraud...
    John Solomon, founder of Just the News and host of John Solomon Reports, praised Alex Marlow’s Breaking the News: Exposing the Establishment Media’s Hidden Deals and Secret Corruption as a “must-read” book exposing previously unreported corruption and conflicts of interest across the news media industry. “[Breaking the News] is literally an explosive bombshell,” Solomon stated on Thursday’s edition of his podcast. “[Alex Marlow] has done enormous research into the corporate corrupting ties [and] political corrupting ties of mainstream news media.” News media corruption goes far beyond left-wing and partisan Democrat biases, Solomon observed. He noted that Breaking the News provides readers with information on widespread conflicts of interest across news media necessary for a comprehensive understanding of what drives much of the industry’s deception. LISTEN (interview begins at 15:45): Identifying political biases is only part of a complete understanding of news media corruption, Solomon held. He celebrated Breaking the News for revealing financial and personal ties between news media figures and issues they report on. While introducing Marlow, Solomon remarked: A lot of times we talk about bias in the news media, and there’s...
    (CNN)Several weeks after world health officials declared the coronavirus a pandemic, 40-year-old Sheri McCaskill decided to apply to a master's program in public health. The decision, McCaskill said, stemmed partly from the sudden heightened awareness about the importance of public health as the virus spread in the US. "I started to see a lot more happening in the public health realm through news, media and it was everywhere, everything we were hearing," McCaskill told CNN. "I think that kind of helped me to make my decision." Sheri McCaskillFields focusing on health sciences have all seen a jump in interest since the pandemic's start. Medical schools reported historic high application numbers late last year. Nursing school applications also saw increases, a spokesman for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing told CNN. But it's been the soaring interest in public health programs -- which before the pandemic saw a dip in applications -- that is particularly encouraging to some officials, who say the field, long underfunded and understaffed, is critical in helping tackle not just this virus, but other emergencies plaguing...
    Mukesh Bhardwaj cries as he sits next to his wife, who receives oxygen support for free for people suffering from breathing problems, outside a Gurudwara (Sikh temple), amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ghaziabad, India, May 3, 2021.Adnan Abidi | Reuters The World Health Organization is closely following ten coronavirus variants "of interest" or "concern" across the world, including two that were first detected in the U.S. and a triple-mutant variant that's wreaking havoc in India, as potential global public health threats. New Covid-19 strains pop up every day as the virus continues to mutate, but only a handful make WHO's official watchlist as "variants of interest" or the more serious designation, "variant of concern," which is generally defined as a mutated strain that's more contagious, deadly and that's more resistant to current vaccines and treatments. The organization has classified three strains as variants of concern: the B.1.1.7 from the U.K. and the most prevalent strain currently circulating throughout the U.S., B.1.351 detected in South Africa and the P.1 variant from Brazil. The other...
    Former Rep. Katie Hill, D-Calif., had her case dismissed against the Daily Mail for publishing nude photos of her in 2019. A few of the controversial photos depicted her in an intimate relationship with one of her campaign staffers, leading to rumors she was in a "throuple" with the staffer and her then-husband Kenny Heslep. Dismissing the case on Wednesday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Yolanda Orozco cited the First Amendment and ruled the Daily Mail photos were in the "public interest." "Here, the intimate images published by (the Daily Mail) spoke to (Hill’s) character and qualifications for her position, as they allegedly depicted (Hill) with a campaign staffer whom she was alleged to have had a sexual affair with and appeared to show (Hill) using a then-illegal drug and displaying a tattoo that was controversial because it resembled a white supremacy symbol that had become an issue during her congressional campaign," Orozco wrote. Her lawsuit, filed on Dec. 22, alleged the Daily Mail, RedState.com, who published text messages between Hill and the staffer, and Heslep, who took the photos, were guilty of violating the Civil Code and intentionally inflciting "emotional...
    Disgraced former congresswoman Katie Hill has lost a lawsuit against DailyMail.com over revealing details of her three-way affair with a campaign staffer. In a judgement handed down on Wednesday, Los Angeles judge Yolanda Orozco threw out Hill's case, finding that the stories about her were of 'compelling public interest' and protected by the First Amendment. In her ruling, the judge said arguments by Hill's lawyers were 'unpersuasive', and that DailyMail.com's stories about the former congresswoman were in the 'public interest' because they detailed her alleged affair with a campaign staffer, pictured her using drugs that were illegal at the time, and exposed her iron cross crotch tattoo which 'resembled a white supremacy symbol that had become an issue during her congressional campaign.' A Los Angeles judge on Wednesday ruled against former Rep. Katie Hill (pictured arriving at the Capitol in 2019) in her lawsuit against DailyMail.com  Hill, 33, resigned from Congress in 2019 after shocking nude photos emerged of the politician cavorting with Morgan Desjardins, who was then a 22-year-old junior staffer, (pictured all together) and an ethics...
    Gum lines the pockets of most Americans and has been a staple in American culture for centuries. For some, gum is all about flavor, and for others, it's about fear of bad breath, curbing hunger, or alleviating anxiety. For nearly 130 years, the brand Wrigley's has become synonymous with chewing gum. Since its start, the gum maker has dominated the chewing gum market, spawning brands from Juicy Fruit to Orbit to 5 Gum. But it hasn't always been smooth sailing for the William Wriglely Jr. Co.; over its storied past, the brand has faced turbulent years. Since the early 2000s, the chewing gum market has seen a decline in public sentiment, which hurt significant players. In 2006, the company ended its long-standing tradition of being a family run business with William Wrigley Jr. stepping down as CEO. By 2008, Wrigley's faced increasing global competition and was acquired by Mars along with Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway. According to Euromonitor International, the gum industry's market value hit $18.6 billion in 2020. Since 2015, Mars Wrigley has held 25% of the global brand...
    From the start of the Covid crisis, the President of the Republic, and more generally, public decision-makers, have guided their decisions based on the advice of scientific experts. However, in recent months they seem to emancipate themselves from it while new measures appear – such as weekend confinement in Nice or Dunkirk – only partially responding to the advice of scientists or those of elected officials. To understand this phenomenon, we propose to study the situation through the prism of the general interest. Indeed, it seems that as the health crisis has evolved, the appreciation of this notion by public decision-makers has greatly evolved. Scientists less listened to In September 2020, while many scientists called for containment, President Emmanuel Macron indicated that “the life of the country cannot be reduced to the advice of the Scientific Council”. More recently, at the start of 2021, the public agenda was marked by the hypothesis of containment in order to deal with variants of SARS-CoV-2. In its briefing note of January 29, the Scientific Council recommends the establishment of confinement for a period...
    Last month, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency issued our state’s climate report card. It showed that we’re not on track to meet our state’s goal of reducing our economy-wide greenhouse gas pollution 80% by 2050. The lone bright spot was our electricity sector, where emissions have declined by 29% since 2005. People react to these findings in a variety of ways. Some folks get frustrated. Others despondent. But a few try to change the story, using the success of our electricity sector to “what about … ?” the report: Why should electric utilities have to cut their emissions more when other polluters are the problem? What about the other parts of our economy? It’s a reasonable question. We should reduce our emissions economy-wide, but our electric sector is unique. Why? Because, for the most part, our electric utilities are monopolies. They control how they generate energy and how it gets to their customers. Their customers, that is, all of us, live in defined service areas where only one utility is allowed to sell. None of us have multiple-choice light switches...
    Europe Maria udrescu Subscribers Published on 01-20-21 at 6:40 am – Updated 01-20-21 at 6:42 am © AP It is an embarrassing affair that Portugal would have done well after taking the six-monthly presidency of the Council of the EU. At the end of December, the newspaper Espresso revealed that the Portuguese government had advanced false arguments to justify the choice of its prosecutor, who joined the team of 22 members (one per participating country) of the college of the future European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO)
    The social network Snapchat announced that it decided suspend “permanently” the account of the President of the United States, Donald Trump, days after he announced the indefinite suspension of the profile of the Republican leader after the assault on the Capitol by his followers. “For the sake of public safety, and based on his attempts to spread misinformation, hate speech and incite violence, which are clear violations of our guidelines, we have made the decision to permanently cancel his account, “said a spokesman for the social network quoted by the chain CNN. The spokesperson for Snap, owner of the social network of images that disappear after a few hours, said that after last week’s measure they were “evaluating what action in the long term” it was “the best for our community”. Trump, who on Wednesday became the first US president to be politically prosecuted twice, this time accused of “incitement to insurrection”, has faced different measures adopted by the main social networks in response to the violent assault on the Capitol in Washington, in which five people died. Barrage...
    Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) asked Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Friday to suspend President Trump’s account “in the interest of our national security and public safety.” “The next 12 days are critical for the preservation of our democracy. @jack, once again I urge you to suspend the @realDonaldTrump @twitter account in the interest of our national security and public safety,” he said Friday, also tagging Twitter Support: The next 12 days are critical for the preservation of our democracy. @jack, once again I urge you to suspend the @realDonaldTrump @twitter account in the interest of our national security and public safety. @TwitterSupport — Senator Joe Manchin (@Sen_JoeManchin) January 8, 2021 Twitter suspended President Trump’s account for 12 hours this week following his remarks about the Capitol riots, which delayed the joint session of Congress and certification of votes: As a result of the unprecedented and ongoing violent situation in Washington, D.C., we have required the removal of three @realDonaldTrump Tweets that were posted earlier today for repeated and severe violations of our Civic Integrity policy. https://t.co/k6OkjNG3bM — Twitter Safety (@TwitterSafety)...
    Coronavirus updates: William Shakespeare gets vaccinated; police raid home of Florida virus dashboard creator The Washington Post names Siobhán O’Grady its Cairo bureau chief Forget the deficit for now. We have to spend our way out of this pandemic America's national debt load is now more than $27 trillion -- an exorbitantly high level. © Angus Mordant/Bloomberg/Getty Images A pedestrian wearing a protective mask stands in front of closed stores in Newark, New Jersey, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020. Newark, New Jerseys largest city, issued a stay-at-home advisory from November 25 to December 4, shutting down all non essential businesses to curb the rising Covid-19 cases. Photographer: Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images But there's a growing sense that the incoming Joe Biden administration and Congress will need to continue to kick the debt can down the road and focus on spending more on stimulus in the midst of the coronavirus crisis. Load Error The good news: borrowing money remains cheap. The yield on the US 10-year Treasury bond is currently just 0.94%. While that's up significantly...
    New York (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.Two years ago James Patterson and President Bill Clinton paired up to write a political thriller novel. Now the title could apply to our present situation: "The President Is Missing." As the week has dragged on, reporters and anchors have been raising questions and raising their voices. "He hasn't taken questions from reporters in over a week," CNN's Kaitlan Collins noted on Thursday. Much to my surprise, he hasn't even called into "Fox & Friends" or other friendly right-wing outlets. A seven-minute appearance at a Veterans Day ceremony was Trump's sole public appearance this workweek. It's not just journalists who are curious about this. The most-read story on the Washington Post website on Thursday night was David Nakamura's story titled "As Trump stews over election, he mostly ignores the public duties of the presidency."Read MoreNakamura described the president as "sequestered from public view, tweeting grievances, falsehoods and misinformation about the election results and about Fox News's coverage of...
    The Justice Department announced that a Statement of Interest (SOI) was filed today in a case pending in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania that challenges the City of Philadelphia’s “Event Moratorium” that prohibits issuing permits for gatherings of 150 or more people on public property. The lawsuit claims that the Moratorium violates the rights of freedom of speech and freedom of assembly guaranteed by the First Amendment. The City of Philadelphia imposed a ban on permits for public gatherings, which led to the cancellation of its Veterans Day parade while at the same time allowing groups of any size to take to the streets without a permit to protest. “The First Amendment to U.S. Constitution makes illegal any attempt by government to abridge the rights of the people to speak and assemble peacefully,” said Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband for the Civil Rights Division. “Our Founders established these rights to enshrine in our law a very simple ideal:  tyranny has no place in this free country. At a small town...
    Barbie has become the latest presidential challenger to Donald Trump, as toy giant Mattel launches a 2020 campaign range ahead of the election.  In a Tuesday press release, Mattel announced that they were launching the Barbie 2020 Campaign Team to 'expose girls to public leadership roles and pique their interest in shaping the future.'  The set will include four dolls of different ethnicities 'including a Black candidate, to remind all girls they can lead from the polls to the podium.' They are currently on sale for $39.99. Mattel, Inc. announced on Tuesday that they were launching the Barbie 2020 Campaign Team, consisting of four diverse dolls The set includes dolls that can be a candidate, campaign manager, fundraiser or a voter There are several 'roles that make a winning campaign' in the set, including a candidate, campaign manager, fundraiser and a voter. All the career jobs are aimed to 'show girls the importance of a political team working together to win.'  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Bodycam footage shows the moment quick-thinking officers......
    Rocket Companies RKT, , the parent company of mortgage lending giant Quicken Loans, has set the terms of its initial public offering. The company announced earlier in July that it plans to trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker “RKT.”  The company plans to offer 150 million shares priced at $20 to $22 each. Twenty banks are set to underwrite the IPO, led by Goldman Sachs GS, -0.86%. Proceeds from the IPO will be used to purchase businesses and Class D stock from Rocket Cos.’ existing holding company, Rock Holdings Inc., which is owned by the company’s founder and chairman Dan Gilbert. Rocket’s IPO comes as the broader IPO market has kicked into high gear after a long dry spell as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Recent offerings include Warner Music Group Corp. WMG, +1.08%, which returned to public markets in June after nine years of being private, and online insurer Lemonade LMND, -1.68%, which debuted last week. Rocket is also going public as the mortgage industry has seen millions of homeowners request forbearance...
    Kenneth P. Ruscio July 12, 2020 1:29PM (UTC) This article was originally published on The Conversation. During a recent Senate committee hearing on the COVID-19 crisis, Dr. Anthony Fauci told lawmakers he was concerned about "a lack of trust of authority, a lack of trust in government." He had reason to be worried. The Pew Center reported that July 7 only 17% of people in the U.S. have confidence in government to do the right thing. Never in the history of their surveys, which began in 1958, has that confidence been so low. : Why is trust so low and why does that matter, especially during a crisis – and especially during this crisis? No playbook The dilemma of leadership in modern democracy has long been the focus of my scholarship and teaching. I have asked what qualities and virtues leaders need to preside over a government of, by and for the people. If it's a challenging topic, it is also one never lacking for material. The current era points especially to the importance of trust for effective and...
    Donald Trump's CIA intelligence briefer, Beth Sanner (pictured), made rare public comments on Monday as she spoke about the challenges she faces while delivering intelligence to the president Donald Trump's CIA intelligence briefer made rare public comments on Monday as she spoke about the challenges she faces while delivering intelligence to the president.  According to Politico, Beth Sanner, who is a senior official at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, spoke during an event hosted by the Intelligence & National Security Alliance.  Sanner said it's important to understand if this 'is someone who reads? Someone who likes a story? Operates on visuals?' 'You figure out before you go in what that person needs from you.' She then said: 'Be calm in your confidence, do your homework, and have that first briefing be where you hit the things they need from you.' 'Watch your audience and pivot—when they’re done, you’re done. Ultimately, it’s about listening to be heard. You have to really hear people and then adjust yourself,' she added.  Sanner's mention of being able to 'pivot' during...
    Adam Smith had an elegant idea when addressing the notorious difficulty that humans face in trying to be smart, efficient and moral. In The Wealth of Nations (1776), he maintained that the baker bakes bread not out of benevolence, but out of self-interest. No doubt, public benefits can result when people pursue what comes easiest: self-interest. And yet: the logic of private interest – the notion that we should just ‘let the market handle it’ – has serious limitations. Particularly in the United States, the lack of an effective health and social policy in response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak has brought the contradictions into high relief. Around the world, the free market rewards competing, positioning and elbowing, so these have become the most desirable qualifications people can have. Empathy, solidarity or concern for the public good are relegated to the family, houses of worship or activism. Meanwhile, the market and private gain don’t account for social stability, health or happiness. As a result, from Cape Town to Washington, the market system has depleted and ravaged the public sphere...
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that candidates for political office in Rhode Island can collect signatures electronically during the coronavirus pandemic to reduce the risk of exposure. U.S. District Court Judge Mary McElroy wrote in her decision Thursday that electronic signature gathering was in the public interest. “In-person signatures amid a pandemic, one comprised of a highly contagious virus transmitted through close human contact, actually would undermine the public interest,” she wrote. The decision only applies to candidates running for office this year. Under the decision, candidates can email nomination papers to voters and have them returned the same way. The nomination papers can also be returned to the appropriate board of canvassers either in person, via drop box, mailed, or faxed. The lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island on behalf of six Senate candidates said in-person signature gathering “needlessly exposes candidates, their supporters, and the general public to risks associated with the COVID-19 pandemic with no justifiable countervailing government interest.” The state argued that electronic signature gathering opened the state...
    Much insistence has been made among the political and health authorities about the use of the mask to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. However, the WHO itself, while recommending it one hundred percent, has also emphasized that this does not make people immune to the disease. COVID-19 lighter.“data-reactid =” 13 “> Still, a recent study that was shared in a letter to the editor published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, regions with an early interest in facial masks had COVID epidemics- 19 milder. COVID-19 and the public interest in the use of masks“Researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong shared the results of their analysis of how public interest in face masks may have affected the severity of the pandemic and potentially contain the outbreak in 42 countries on 6 continents.“data-reactid =” 14 “> In“ COVID-19 and the public interest in the use of masks “, researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong shared the results of their analysis of how the public interest in masks may have affected the severity of...
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