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    (CNN)A conservative church is not where you might expect to see a showing of "Hamilton," the award-winning Lin-Manuel Miranda musical that tells the life story of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton through hip-hop, R&B and soul music. But this weekend, a church in McAllen, Texas, called The Door performed the show -- with some right-wing tinkering. The actors reportedly mentioned Jesus and Christianity throughout, and a video shows that the performance also featured a sermon comparing homosexuality to drug addiction and deeming it a sin. Jill Filipovic "He knows exactly what you've gone through," Pastor Victor Lopez told the audience. "You've gone through maybe broken marriages. Maybe you struggle with alcohol, with drugs -- with homosexuality -- maybe you struggle with other things in life, your finances, whatever, God can help you tonight. He wants to forgive you for your sins." Part of this is just cheesy. "Hamilton," delightful as it is, debuted in2015 and is not exactly on the cutting edge of pop culture trends in 2022. And the tried-and-true easiest way to make a piece of pop culture...
    A Virginia woman Gov. Glenn Youngkin appointed to the Virginia Board of Historic Resources has resigned after making widely criticized remarks about Confederate statues and the Civil War. A spokeswoman for Youngkin confirmed to Richmond TV station WRIC Tuesday that Ann McLean had resigned from the board effective Monday. McLean had criticized the push to remove Confederate monuments and in an interview after her appointment had defended secession by the Southern states. Those and other remarks drew widespread criticism from Democrats. Porter says the governor was in disagreement with McLean’s prior comments. McLean did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment Wednesday. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin's nominee to the state's board of historic resources resigned after making offensive and historically inaccurate statements about the Civil War and slavery. Ann McLean, a Richmond historian and founder of Hunter Classical Christian School, was tapped by the Republican governor last month to join the board, but comments she made in an interview last year showed her defending the continued display of Confederate monuments, reported WRIC-TV. “I think that the Southerners knew that their story of why they fought the Civil War was not being told correctly,” McLean told radio host John Reid in December on WRVA radio. “Fake news, or false narratives, are not new, and this whole tragedy is that these statues were built to tell the true story of the American South to people 500 years from now. But we have forces right here 150 years later that want to destroy the evidence of that story, and you know, the fight for sovereignty of each state.” McLean returned to Reid's program following her nomination to the state board and justified Southern secession --...
    A Maryland man who used a lacrosse stick attached to a Confederate battle flag to shove a police officer during the U.S. Capitol riot was sentenced on Wednesday to five months in prison, according to a Justice Department spokesman. U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper also sentenced David Alan Blair, to 18 months of supervised release after his prison term and ordered him to pay $2,000 in restitution, said William Miller, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s office for the District of Columbia. Federal prosecutors recommended sentencing Blair to eight months in prison followed by three years of supervised release. Blair’s attorney, Terrell Roberts III, asked for a sentence of probation. Blair, 27, left his home in Clarksburg, Maryland, and started driving to Washington, D.C., after the riot erupted at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Shortly before 6 p.m., Blair encountered a line of Metropolitan Police Department officers on the Capitol’s West Lawn and refused to heed their commands to leave the area, prosecutors said. A police officer’s body camera captured Blair walking in front of the police line and...
    The Fairfax City Council voted Tuesday to change 14 street names that have ties to slavery and the Confederacy. The vote comes after last month’s emotional public debate. More Fairfax County News More Virginia News More Local News The streets the council voted to rename are the following: Confederate Lane Lee Highway Lee Street Mosby Road Mosby Woods Drive Old Lee Highway Plantation Parkway Raider Road Ranger Road Reb Street Scarlet Circle Singleton Circle Traveler Street Stonewall Avenue The new names for those streets aren’t known yet, but the council directed staff to begin the public engagement and selection process for any streets that have been approved for renaming. Residents can leave comments online.
    SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Federal prosecutors have recommended an eight-month prison sentence for a Maryland man who pleaded guilty to shoving a police officer with a lacrosse stick attached to a Confederate battle flag during last year’s riot at the U.S. Capitol. Prosecutors also on Wednesday recommended sentencing David Alan Blair, 27, to three years of supervised release after any prison term and ordering him to pay $2,000 in restitution. READ MORE: 18-Year-Old Charged With Attempted Murder In Southern Baltimore ShootingU.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper is scheduled to sentence Blair next Wednesday. Blair left his home in Clarksburg, Maryland, and started driving to Washington, D.C., after the riot erupted at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Shortly before 6 p.m., Blair encountered a line of Metropolitan Police Department officers on the Capitol’s West Lawn and refused to heed their commands to leave the area, prosecutors said. A police officer’s body camera captured Blair walking in front of the police line and yelling, “Hell naw. Quit backing up. Don’t be scared. We’re Americans.” Blair was arrested after he pushed his lacrosse stick...
    Federal prosecutors have recommended an eight-month prison sentence for a Maryland man who pleaded guilty to shoving a police officer with a lacrosse stick attached to a Confederate battle flag during last year’s riot at the U.S. Capitol. Prosecutors also on Wednesday recommended sentencing David Alan Blair, 27, to three years of supervised release after any prison term and ordering him to pay $2,000 in restitution. U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper is scheduled to sentence Blair next Wednesday. Blair left his home in Clarksburg, Maryland, and started driving to Washington, D.C., after the riot erupted at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Shortly before 6 p.m., Blair encountered a line of Metropolitan Police Department officers on the Capitol’s West Lawn and refused to heed their commands to leave the area, prosecutors said. A police officer’s body camera captured Blair walking in front of the police line and yelling, “Hell naw. Quit backing up. Don’t be scared. We’re Americans.” Blair was arrested after he pushed his lacrosse stick against an officer’s chest. The officer responded to the push by striking Blair...
    CANTON, South Dakota—South Dakota wasn’t a state during the Civil War. Founded in 1889, it didn’t send troops into battle. But an event this summer in Canton, a small town southeast of Sioux Falls, will feature a pair of skirmishes between the Blue and the Gray. A logo for Canton Civil War Days, set for Aug. 12-14, shows both the American flag and a Confederate banner. Selwyn Jones of Gettysburg—who is the uncle of George Floyd, the Black man killed by a Minneapolis police officer in 2020—said he could fathom a Civil War event in his home state of North Carolina. But in South Dakota, with the Canton Chamber of Commerce sponsoring it? “The Confederate flag should literally be like the swastika is,” Jones told The Daily Beast. “If you display a swastika in Germany, you are automatically arrested. If you mention Hitler’s name, your ass is obviously arrested.” Jones isn’t alone in his opposition to the weekend gathering in Canton, a town of 3,500 in a state with a Black population of just over 2 percent. Other South Dakotans...
    Madison County Commission Chairman Dale Strong won the Republican nomination Tuesday in a House runoff election for Alabama’s 5th Congressional District, a vacancy created when its current representative, Mo Brooks (R), decided to run for Senate. FIVE JAN. 6 HEARING TAKEAWAYS ON PENCE BUCKING TRUMP OVER THE 2020 ELECTION COUNT Strong defeated former Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Casey Wardynski in the runoff, which was prompted when neither secured 50% of the vote in the state’s primary election last month. In that race, Strong won about 45% of the vote, while Wardynski won about 23%. Strong is likely to be elected to Congress in November in the deep-red district. Polling conducted after the primary showed comparable margins in the runoff election even after the primary field was narrowed to its top two vote-getters. A poll conducted by Cygnal earlier this month found Strong leading Wardynski 45.7% to 30.6%, with another 23.7% undecided. The race was often contentious and centered on scandals facing each candidate. As the Madison County Commission chairman,...
    KENNESAW, Ga. (AP) — A city councilman in Georgia has resigned to protest the reopening of a Confederate souvenir shop that sells images with racial slurs and dolls and statues that caricature Black people, news outlets reported. Kennesaw Councilman James “Doc” Eaton said he wanted no part of the city’s decision to issue a business license to the downtown store. His resignation is effective on June 21. “It breaks my heart to have to do it,” Eaton told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Eaton’s daughter, Cris Eaton Welsh, owns a chiropractic business across the street from the souvenir shop and said she plans to relocate. “There’s a difference between selling merchandise and propagating hate,” Eaton Welsh said. Wildman’s Civil War Surplus reopened Tuesday after closing earlier this year following the death of its founder, Dent “Wildman” Myers, and the expiration of its business license, the AJC reported. Marjorie Lyon, who worked with Myers for years, said reopening Wildman’s “wasn’t a decision.” “It’s an honor,” she told the AJC. Lyon identified herself as the store’s manager. “I don’t have any control over...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday convicted a Confederate flag-toting man and his son of charges that they stormed the U.S. Capitol together during the riot on Jan. 6, 2021, to obstruct Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s presidential victory. U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden delivered the verdict from the bench after hearing two days of testimony without a jury for the trial of Kevin Seefried and his adult son, Hunter. READ MORE: Young Boy From Los Angeles Reaches Remission Stage Of Cancer Battle: 'No Retreat, No Surrender'McFadden convicted both Delaware men of a felony count: obstruction of an official proceeding, the joint session of Congress for certifying the Electoral College that day. The judge also convicted the Seefrieds of misdemeanor charges that they engaged in disorderly conduct and illegally demonstrated inside the building. But he acquitted Hunter Seefried of other misdemeanor charges for clearing a shard of glass from a broken window at the Capitol. They will remain free pending separate sentencing hearings in September. McFadden, whom President Donald Trump nominated for the court in 2017, presided over...
    The Jacksonville, Florida, City Council voted 13-6 Tuesday to defeat a resolution that would have seen the city remove all of its Confederate monuments. At least $500,000 would have been allocated to remove such controversial statues as the Daughters of the Confederacy monument and a pillar commemorating Confederate soldiers. Roughly 88 residents signed up to make public comments during the council meeting, according to a report. CALIFORNIA ANIMAL SHELTER BANS PET ADOPTIONS FOR GUN RIGHTS SUPPORTERS While proponents of the measure argued the monuments are representative of racism, opponents argued they are part of the city's history and should be preserved. The latter won out, and no discussion of the measure took place before it was voted down, according to a report. "I stand for the preservation of Jacksonville’s history in all its totality without the slightest omission," one speaker said. "Please let us find another way to promote and foster unity and healing without taking away the statues." Another speaker argued that removing the statues would be an endeavor of little worth....
    A man who stormed the US Capital waving a giant confederate flag with his son has been found guilty for his role in the January 6 riot.  Kevin Seefried, 52, and his son Hunter Seefried, 24, were both convicted of trespassing on restricted grounds, obstruction of an official proceeding, and disorderly conduct by a judge on Wednesday afternoon after waiving their right to a trial by jury.  The father and son duo from Delaware could face up to 20 years in prison for their obstruction charges alone, though it is speculated they will not receive that maximum sentence. Hunter was let off the hook for a destruction of property charge. The verdict was handed down by Judge Trevor McFadden - an appointee of President Trump - who previously acquitted a New Mexico government official of January 6 destruction charges. The trial featured testimony from Capitol Police Eugene Goodman, who successfully diverted the Seefrieds and a mob of rioters away from the Senate chambers during the riot.  Kevin Seefried carrying a large Confederate flag through the US Capital building on January 6,...
    A federal judge on Wednesday convicted a Confederate flag-toting man and his son of charges that they stormed the U.S. Capitol together to obstruct Congress from certifying President Joe Biden’s 2020 electoral victory. U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden delivered the verdict from the bench after hearing two days of testimony without a jury for the trial of Delaware residents Kevin Seefried and his adult son, Hunter. McFadden convicted both Kevin and Hunter Seefried of a felony count: obstruction of an official proceeding, the joint session of Congress for certifying the Electoral College vote on Jan. 6, 2021. The judge also convicted both men of misdemeanor charges that they engaged in disorderly conduct and illegally demonstrated inside the building. But he acquitted Hunter Seefried of other misdemeanor charges for clearing a shard of glass from a broken window at the Capitol. Both men will remain free pending separate sentencing hearings in September. McFadden, whom President Donald Trump nominated in 2017, presided over two previous bench trials for Capitol riot defendants. He acquitted one of all charges and partially acquitted another. Widely...
    (CNN)The man who was captured parading through the US Capitol with a large Confederate flag during the January 6, 2021 riot, was -- along with his son -- found guilty by a federal judge on Wednesday of obstructing an official proceeding, a felony.Kevin Seefried, with his wife, son Hunter and son's girlfriend, drove from Delaware to attend the "Stop the Steal" rally that day. Kevin and Hunter Seefried followed the crowd to the Capitol and helped storm the building, climbing in through a broken window and coming close to the Senate chambers while inside.January 6 committee division on criminal referrals surfaces long-simmering debate behind the scenesThe two men were found guilty by Judge Trevor McFadden on four misdemeanor charges as well, including entering and remaining in a restricted building and disorderly conduct in a restricted area. Hunter Seefried was acquitted on several charges related to a window prosecutors said he helped break. McFadden found that two other men had broken the window and Hunter only removed a shard that had fallen before climbing through.Kevin Seefried was part of the mob...
    A man carrying a Confederate battle flag stormed the U.S. Capitol with his son because they intended to stop Congress from certifying President Joe Biden’s 2020 electoral victory, prosecutors argued Tuesday at the close of the men’s trial. A federal judge, not a jury, will decide if Delaware residents Kevin Seefried and his adult son, Hunter, are guilty of a felony obstruction charge and several misdemeanor offenses stemming from the Capitol riot on Jan. 6, 2021. U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden didn’t immediately issue a verdict from the bench after hearing attorneys’ closing arguments. He told them to return to court on Wednesday afternoon. Defense attorneys argued that the Seefrieds had no intention of disrupting the joint session for Congress to certify the Electoral College vote when they entered the Capitol. Widely published photographs showed Kevin Seefried carrying a Confederate battle flag inside the Capitol after he and Hunter Seefried, then 22, entered the building through a broken window. Eugene Ohm, one of Kevin Seefried’s lawyers, drew a distinction between rioters who merely trespassed and those who went inside the...
    (CNN)Officer Eugene Goodman, the US Capitol Police officer who led the mob of protesters away from the Senate chamber on January 6, 2021, as senators and then-Vice President Mike Pence were evacuating, testified on Monday that the mob breaching the Capitol and breaking into the lower levels of the building "looked like something out of medieval times."Goodman described in court the scene at the western front of the Capitol, where rioters first breached the Capitol and "where you see one huge force clashing with the other." Goodman said police officers were trying to keep rioters at bay, while the massive mob stormed the building from the National Mall.Kevin Seefried carries a Confederate battle flag on the second floor of the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Goodman is testifying in the trial of Kevin Seefried and his son, Hunter Seefried, who are charged in connection with Capitol attack. Both men are charged with five counts, including obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting, entering or remaining in a restricted building, disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building,...
    A Delaware man and his son charged in the January 6 riot in the Capitol Building are hoping that a federal judge appointed by Trump lets them off with a slap on the wrist, claiming they were waved inside by cops.  U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden acquitted a New Mexico man in April on similar charges, a rare blemish on the Justice Department's record of securing convictions in Capitol riot cases.  Kevin Seefried, who carried a Confederate battle flag inside the Capitol after he entered the building with his son, Hunter, were 'early, aggressive and active participants' in the Capitol breach and among the first rioters to enter the bulling on Jan. 6, 2021, prosecutors have said. They will go on trial Monday in front of McFadden, who will hear testimony without a jury for the Seefrieds' bench trial, which means the judge will decide their cases. Kevin Seefried, left carrying flag, and his son, Hunter, right, inside the Capitol building during January 6. Kevin Seefried, seen here, carries a Confederate flag inside the U.S. Capitol Building on January...
    Donald Trump's recent endorsement struggles (most notably in Georgia) in the weeks leading up to House Jan. 6 hearings have led to renewed speculation that the former president is losing his grip on the Republican Party. In fact, recent reporting suggests that several prominent Republicans are likely to run for president in 2024, whether or not Trump himself launches a third campaign. But let's put that in the proper context: Trump's oft-repeated Big Lie about the stolen 2020 election has been called the new "Lost Cause" (in literally hundreds of articles) but it's only one facet of a broader mindset that has moved to the center of GOP politics — and none of that is going away, regardless of what happens to Trump as a person or a political figure. That mindset is rooted in Trump's claim that the system is specifically and maliciously rigged against his base — meaning white Christian conservatives, especially men, who are wholesome, innocent victims of malevolent outside forces, sinister elites and dangerous minorities. This echoes the Lost Cause reframing of the Civil War to...
    A federal judge’s acquittal of a New Mexico man in April was a rare blemish on the Justice Department’s record of securing convictions in U.S. Capitol riot cases. More than two months later, a Delaware father and son hope the same judge will clear them, too. Widely published photographs showed Kevin Seefried carrying a Confederate battle flag inside the Capitol after he entered the building with his son, Hunter. The Seefrieds were “early, aggressive and active participants” in the Capitol breach and among the first rioters to enter the bulling on Jan. 6, 2021, prosecutors have said. U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden will hear testimony without a jury for the Seefrieds’ bench trial, which is scheduled to start Monday. They waived their right to a jury trial, which means McFadden will decide their cases. McFadden, whom President Donald Trump nominated in 2017, has criticized prosecutors’ handling of Capitol riot cases. He suggested that the Justice Department has been unjustly tougher on Capitol riot defendants compared to people arrested at protests against police brutality and racial injustice after George Floyd’s 2020...
    Win McNamee/Getty Images A whopping 64 percent of Republicans say there should be public statues and memorials to Confederate General Robert E. Lee, more than double everyone else. Respondents to a new YouGov poll were asked “Do you believe that each of the following historical figures should or should not have statues or memorials of them in public places?” When asked about the disgraced general, only 13 percent of Republicans said he “should not” have statues or memorials in public places, versus an overwhelming 64 percent who said there should be memorials to Lee — more than double the 30 percent of the other respondents (Democrats: 22% Independents: 36%) who said so. A slightly smaller but still large majority of Republicans favored memorializing Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederate States of America. Only 14 percent of Republicans said Davis “should not” have statues or memorials in public places, versus 57 percent who said there should be memorials to Davis — again about double the percentage of other respondents (Democrats: 19% Independents: 31%) who said so. Defending Confederate statues and...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Four Confederate monuments owned by Baltimore are heading to a Los Angeles museum exhibit, Mayor Brandon Scott’s office confirmed Thursday. The statues are going across the country to “MONUMENTS,” an exhibit by art nonprofit LAXART set to open Fall 2023. The show is curated by LAXART Director Hamza Walker and artist Kara Walker, no relation, and the Museum of Contemporary Art’s Senior Curator, Bennett Simpson. READ MORE: Man In Critical Condition, Two Women Injured In Prince George's County Mall Shooting; Suspects At LargeThe exhibit will display decommissioned Confederate monuments alongside contemporary art created in response to the statues, according to art news outlet Artnet. The Baltimore monuments are the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument of Mount Royal Avenue, the Confederate Women’s Monument from West University Parkway, the Roger B. Taney Monument from Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and Thomas. J. “Stonewall” Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell. RELATED: The History Of The Now-Removed Confederate Statues Of Baltimore READ MORE: Man Charged In Smithsburg Mass Shooting Worked Shift Before Getting Gun From His Car,...
    The upcoming Country Music Association (CMA) Festival will prohibit attendees from flying or displaying any paraphernalia depicting the Confederate flag. The festival is set to take place in Nashville, Tennessee, next week from June 9-12, returning after a two-year hiatus due to the Coronavirus pandemic, according to the Huffington Post. In a section of its website titled “Prohibited Items & Activities,” the CMA stated that “Confederate flag imagery of any kind” is among the “items [that] will NOT be permitted at any CMA Fest location.”  In a statement provided to the Tennessean on Wednesday, the CMA explained its reasoning for the decision to ban the flag: This year’s CMA Fest is our first major fan-facing event in nearly three years. We have always had policies in place that protect the safety of our fans and ban discrimination, but we felt it was important to further refine our language to explicitly outline what will and will not be tolerated[.] In line with our first CMA Fest lineup announcement in early April, our event policy was published on our website, which states any behavior that...
    ABINGDON, Va. (AP) — A southwest Virginia county recently rededicated two Confederate monuments after relocating them from a downtown courthouse lawn to make way for construction. A ceremony was held Friday at a new park in Abingdon that was paid for by community donations, the Bristol Herald-Courier reported. One marker honors local Civil War generals. The other is a statue of a soldier holding a rifle. TV station WCYB reports the dedication included an honor guard and a gun salute. Many communities across Virginia have been removing Confederate monuments since the General Assembly gave them the ability to do so in 2020. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — House-passed legislation to erase Robert E. Lee Day and Confederate Memorial Day from a list of Louisiana holidays was approved 28-4 on Friday by the state Senate. The measure by state Rep. Matthew Willard, a New Orleans Democrat, awaited a final House vote on non-controversial language changes before going to Gov. John Bel Edwards for his signature. The legislative session is set to end Monday. Neither of the holidays has been officially observed by state government in years. Backers of the bill said the holidays should be wiped from state law because they commemorated slavery and white supremacy. Handling the bill on the Senate floor, Sen. Jay Luneau, an Alexandria Democrat, disputed arguments that have come from opponents of the bill that the holidays are part of state history. “It is important for us to realize that there is a way to commemorate history without glorifying the atrocities,” Luneau said. The two holidays are among those on a list of holidays a governor can proclaim in addition to other, permanent holidays that include Christmas and...
    Confederate flags will not be welcomed at the June CMA Fest in Nashville, Country Music Association officials announced. "Confederate flag imagery of any kind" will be banned at the festival, according to the CMA Fest website. The festival is returning after a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19 and will take place from June 9 to June 12. RINGO STARR RECEIVES AN HONORARY DEGREE FROM BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC The prohibition of imagery pertaining to the Confederate flag is intended to protect fan safety, according to a report citing CMA officials. "This year's CMA Fest is our first major fan-facing event in nearly three years. We have always had policies in place that protect the safety of our fans and ban discrimination, but we felt it was important to further refine our language to explicitly outline what will and will not be tolerated," a CMA statement read. "In line with our first CMA Fest lineup announcement in early April, our event policy was published on our website, which states any behavior that causes one of...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The CMA Fest is prohibiting any Confederate flag imagery at its four-day festival, following similar bans at other country music festivals. In a statement provided to The Tennessean, the Country Music Association said the decision to enact the policy this year was based on the personal safety of fans and to prevent discrimination. “This year’s CMA Fest is our first major fan-facing event in nearly three years. We have always had policies in place that protect the safety of our fans and ban discrimination, but we felt it was important to further refine our language to explicitly outline what will and will not be tolerated,” the statement said. After a two-year hiatus because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the annual festival that began in 1972 returns to Nashville, Tennessee, starting June 9. The festival regularly attracts about 50,000 country music fans. Stagecoach Festival in Indio, California, this year banned Confederate flag imagery and any other “divisive symbols” and “racially disparaging” displays. Country star Maren Morris has urged other country singers to call on festivals...
    Photos of Ku Klux Klan gatherings and a confederate flag tagged to the maps app of a Maryland high school are raising concern among community members, reports WTOP. The photos were tagged onto Apple Maps search results for Damascus High School School, the outlet said. The photos were removed Tuesday after school staff reported the incident. Any student found to be involved will be disciplined, district officials said.  To read the full story from WTOP, click here. 
    OWENSBORO, Ky. (AP) — A Confederate statue that stood outside a western Kentucky courthouse for more than a century was removed by county workers with little fanfare. The “Soldiers Monument” at the Daviess County Courthouse was taken down Tuesday morning and moved to the road department, the county’s top official, Judge-Executive Al Mattingly, told the Messenger-Inquirer. He said it will be kept there while officials decide what to do with it. Mattingly said the statue of a soldier with a gun could be placed elsewhere in the county or sold. The base, reading “To Our Confederate Heroes,” remains in place for now. Daviess County officials voted to remove the statue in 2020, but a lawsuit over its ownership delayed any action. Daviess Circuit Judge Lisa Payne Jones ruled last month that the statue belonged to the county, the newspaper reported. The Rev. Rhondalyn Randolph, president of the Owensboro NAACP, led the charge for removal, and said she’s thankful the statue that stood on the courthouse lawn since 1900 is gone. Randolph said her aim was never to erase history,...
    In an absurd announcement, the Black mayor of Livingston, Tennessee, who appears to be non-partisan and has served for more than 15 years, has declared April to be “Confederate History Month.” Claiming that this month will be centered around “heritage, not hate,” Confederacy is rooted in evil and racism, and the group has been publically criticized for allegedly trying to push the narrative that slavery wasn’t at the forefront of the Civil War, says dailymail. Source: Roland S. Martin/Youtube We need to let this mayor know that the country is watching closely and are greatly opposed to promoting the beliefs of the Confederacy. Sign this petition to demand Mayor Curtis Hayes repeal the order declaring April “Confederate History Month!” Repeal the Order Declaring April Confederate History MonthClick Here to Sign Petition To continue speaking up, sign these other petitions as well: Turtles Are Getting Mysteriously Ill in Central Florida, and Scientists Need Help Stop People From Shooting Pets with Guns and Arrows in Louisiana Horse Owners Were Charged With Roughly 300 Counts of Animal Abuse Emily Was...
    (CNN)One led the South in a war against the United States. Another objected to welcoming African Americans into White society. All fought on behalf of the cause of enslaving Black people.The proposal announced on Tuesday by a congressionally appointed commission that would replace the names of Confederate commanders from nine US Army installations is the latest step toward stripping a badge of honor from men who ultimately dedicated their lives to subjugating Black people. These are the Army bases that could have their Confederate names replacedThis is a look at the men whose names will be stricken.Fort Benning, GeorgiaRead MoreIts mission: This major Army installation near the Alabama border is the "Home of the Infantry" and features airborne, infantry and ranger training, among other functions.Who it is named for: Brig. Gen. Henry Benning (1814-1875) Benning's legacy: Back in 1968, an article in Infantry Magazine called the Confederate an "outstanding" lawyer-turned-soldier. The Georgian strongly defended slavery and was a leader in the South's secession movement. In a speech making the case for the region to leave the Union, Benning said abolition...
    The new Fort Liberty? Future American presidents may no longer have to visit major military bases named after murderous seditionists. After being blocked by Donald Trump and his white nationalist sedition-supporting advisers (who would go on to mount an attempted coup), moves to end the practice of naming military bases after traitorous Confederate generals are finally making progress. A federal commission has now released its recommendations for renaming nine U.S. Army bases named after Confederate traitors, replacing them with names of American heroes who didn't support a horrifically bloody rebellion against the United States so that Southern elites could continue to own slaves. The Washington Post brings us the new proposed names. Texas' Fort Hood would be renamed Fort Cavazos, honoring the first Hispanic brigadier general. Fort Benning would become Fort Moore. Fort Bragg would become Fort Liberty. Fort Hill becomes Fort Walker, honoring Civil War surgeon Mary Edwards Walker. The commission has leaned into honoring women and non-white Army leaders, which will no doubt enrage Trump-supporting seditionists already reeling from the thought that murderous traitors of a past age—and losers,...
    FORT BRAGG, N.C. -- A blue-ribbon Army commission has recommended new names for nine Army bases named after Confederate leaders, including Fort Bragg, which will be recommended as being renamed Fort Liberty, according to a U.S. official Tuesday.Later Tuesday, the Army Naming Commission is expected to formally disclose its recommended names for the bases named after Confederate generals.Last year, Congress passed legislation that required the renaming of U.S. military installations named after Confederate leaders by 2023.SEE ALSO: The history behind the naming of Fort Bragg as Pentagon considers renaming baseEMBED More News Videos Fort Bragg is named after Warrenton native, Braxton Bragg, who was a general in the Confederate Army. Fort Bragg in North Carolina is currently named after Gen. Braxton Bragg, a senior Confederate Army general. It would be renamed as Fort Liberty, the only one of the bases named after a concept, with eight others being renamed mostly after individuals with ties to Army history.The other bases to be renamed are Fort Hood in Texas, Fort Rucker in Alabama, Fort Polk in Louisiana, Fort Benning and Fort Gordon...
    (CNN)The congressional naming commission which was set up to remove Confederate names from military bases has unveiled proposals to rename nine bases.The proposed names include women, African-American and Latino service members.The Naming Commission suggested changing the name of Fort A.P. Hill, named after a Confederate general, to Fort Walker. Dr. Mary Walker was the Army's first female surgeon and was ultimately awarded the Medal of Honor for her service during the Civil War. Fort Polk in Louisiana, also named after a Confederate general, could become Fort Johnson in honor of Sgt. William Henry Johnson. The African-American soldier is considered one of the first heroes of World War I after he fought off about two dozen Germans alone, killing at least four. Fort Bragg, one of the largest military installations in the world, could be named Fort Liberty, according to the commission's recommendations, the only one of the facilities named after an American value instead of an individual or group of people.Read MoreThe naming commission solicited suggestions for possible new names to the US Army bases through a public website. They...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Fort Bragg would become Fort Liberty as panel recommends new names for Army bases that commemorate Confederate officers. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    FORT HAMILTON, Brooklyn (WABC) -- After years of controversy, Fort Hamilton has removed the name of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from an avenue on the Brooklyn Army base, replacing it with that of a Black Vietnam War hero from Crown Heights.General Lee Avenue, located in the city's only Army base, was rechristened John Warren Avenue Friday morning.Warren was a 22-year-old lieutenant in the Army who was killed in the Vietnam War in January 1969.The change is the culmination of a long-standing push by local officials, accelerated by the recent removal of at least 230 Confederate symbols across the country, to get rid of Robert E. Lee's name.The base will also rename Stonewall Jackson Drive in coming weeks, which is named after another Confederate military figure, Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.Lee was stationed at Fort Hamilton from 1841 to 1846, serving as an Army engineer.There has been a push for years to strip the base of these Confederate names, an effort that accelerated after the killing of George Floyd in 2020. Mayor Bill de Blasio said at the time that Lee's...
    After the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis in 2020 set off massive protests in the United States and many other countries, the Shenandoah County School Board in Virginia voted to change the names of two public schools that were named after Confederate officers. But now, according to NBC News, that board is considering going back to the old names. In 2020, Stonewall Jackson High School became Mountain View High School, and Ashby-Lee Elementary School became Honey Run Elementary School. Gen. Robert E. Lee, Gen. Stonewall Jackson and Col. Turner Ashby, Jr. were high-ranking officers in the Confederate Army during the 1860s. At a meeting in mid-May, according to NBC News reporters Elisha Fieldstadt and Maya Brown, Shenandoah County School Board Vice Chair Dennis Barlow announced that 4000 people had signed a petition calling for the schools’ old names to be resorted. Barlow was highly critical of those who pushed for the name changes in 2020, slamming them as “creepy” and “elitist” as well as from “the dark side.” Moreover, Barlow described Jackson (who died of pneumonia in 1863) as...
    Charles County Public Schools is investigating how a Confederate flag was hung from the flagpole of one of the Maryland county’s high schools. On Thursday, cadets from La Plata High School’s JROTC found it on the school’s main flagpole. School staff removed the flag after it was reported. More Maryland News More Charles County News More Education News Principal Douglass Dolan said in a letter to the school community that school administrators have learned that students are sharing images on social media after the flag was hung. “We are investigating the incident, including reviewing school camera footage and talking with students who may have information about the incident,” Dolan said. The school resource officer is helping with the investigation, he said. Charles County schools said in a statement that it is working with the Charles County Sheriff’s Office to investigate. In a statement, Schools Superintendent Maria Navarro called what happened “disturbing,” adding that it’s a teachable moment for “children and ourselves that we as a school system and as a community will not tolerate symbols of hate, and...
    Two Virginia schools which had been named after Confederate generals and soldiers and which changed their names in the wake of the 2020 murder of George Floyd, are to revert back to their earlier names. The Shenandoah County School Board changed Stonewall Jackson High School to Mountain View High School and Ashby-Lee Elementary School to Honey Run Elementary School in Quicksburg, following a board vote in July 2020 and final approval in January 2021. But less than two years later, a petition was launched to gauge the strength of feeling on reverting the schools back to their original names.  In 2020, a vote was held to switch the name of Stonewall Jackson High School to Mountain View, but it is likely the old name could be brought back within months General Stonewall Jackson served as a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and became one of the best-known Confederate commanders Vocal opposition came from community members and alumni with more than 4,000 people signing the petition to switch the names back. The topic was discussed at length by the six...
    A construction worker has been barred from a Capital District school after twice showing up to campus in a vehicle donning a Confederate flag. Students and staff first noticed the vehicle parked at Albany High School Monday, May 16, and alerted administrators, according to the Albany City School District. It was determined that the vehicle in question belonged to an employee of a contractor working on the school’s expansion project. The district said it notified the construction company of the offensive display and the company said it had addressed the issue with the employee. “The individual was asked to move his car off campus and not to return to campus with it,” Albany Schools Superintendent Kaweeda Adams said.  “The individual immediately complied with the request to remove the vehicle from campus.” Adams said managers also distributed materials to workers reminding them of the company’s policies surrounding “bias-motivated events,” including bullying and displaying hate symbols. But the employee returned in the same car the following day. “On Tuesday afternoon, the same vehicle was found to be parked on Washington Avenue directly...
    Five brave Black students, along with their mothers, have filed a federal lawsuit against both the Floyd County School district and Coosa High School on grounds of alleged racial discrimination, as reported by the Associated Press. The students allege that the school, located in Rome, Georgia, is violating their First Amendment rights, as well as their equal protection rights, including by acting with “deliberate indifference” to “acts of racial animosity” toward Black students by white students and teachers, as well as the school’s dress code and disciplinary policies. Before we get into the details, it’s important to remember that according to 2018-2019 data, the school district is more than three-quarters white and 7 percent Black, as highlighted by CNN. It’s also located in the part of Georgia that elected the QAnon Congresswoman, Marjorie Taylor Greene, to represent the state. With that in mind, let’s get into the details of the suit (which are deeply disturbing), and what students are doing to speak out in defense of their basic rights and humanity now. RELATED: Judge strikes down hateful anti-trans bathroom law...
    May 21st and 22nd will mark the 158th Anniversary of the Battle of Resaca and our 38th annual Civil War Reenactment of the famous battle. The reenactment is Georgia’s oldest and largest premier event held in the state. The Reenactment The Battle of Resaca Reenactment is hosted each year by the many volunteers of the Georgia Division Reenactors Association, one of the nation’s oldest and most respected Civil War reenacting organizations. A portion of the proceeds will go towards the Resaca Battlefield area preservation efforts, while the balance will go towards funding next year’s event. Please see our Sponsors page for a list of the organizations and businesses that have helped make this event possible. Confederate BatteryThe reenactment will again be held on the historic Chitwood Farm, a 650 acre section of the original battlefield, which in itself is a rare privilege. This farm hosted some of the heaviest fighting during the conflict. Two Federal soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for the capture of the Van den Corput’s...
    Share this:1st Lieutenant John E. Warren, Jr.Photo courtesy of Gloria-Baskin-Warren The main street inside the Fort Hamilton Army Base, General Lee Avenue will no longer carry the name of the famous or some now refer to the notorious Civil War General who resigned from the United States Army to join arms with the Army of the Confederate States or America. Back in the years from 1841 to 1846, then Captain Robert E. Lee was the Post Engineer at Fort Hamilton.  In 1852, he returned to West Point where he became the Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy to 1855. In 1861 he resigned his commission from the Union Army and joined the Virginia state militia forces.  On April 17, 1861, Virginia seceded from the United States. On Friday, May 20, at 10:30 a.m., the post’s main transportation artery will be formally renamed in honor of 1st Lieutenant John E. Warren, Jr., a Brooklyn native, VietNam Veteran and Medal of Honor Recipient. The ceremony will take place at the corner of White Avenue and Warren Avenue, in front of the New York Military Entrance...
    Confederate protest in South Carolina. I never quite understood civil war reenactors. I knew people who enjoyed it, but as a hobby, the best comparison I could ever make was shitty cosplay. Cosplay focused on fictional characters, the ability to laugh at ourselves, our own imagination, and the weirdness of designs. Civil War celebrators seemed like grown men playing dress-up dolls with their friends because they couldn’t let go of romanticized ideas of a war that divided the nation where one side fought on behalf of slavery. The confederate lies from over 150 years ago live on because we live in a fantasy land that doesn’t reflect reality, but rather the reality that some would like to believe. Every year on May 10, South Carolina celebrates confederate memorial day, a time for those who have ancestry that links to confederate soldiers to mourn, well, something. This isn’t to say that there aren’t people who don’t have genetic connections to soldiers of the past; I’m sure numerous Americans do have that connection. I’d bet many Americans also share connections to soldiers who fought for...
    Richmond officials are seeking a court order to move the only remaining Confederate monument owned by the city. The Richmond City Council voted unanimously Monday to direct the city administration to grant the statue of Confederate Gen. A.P. Hill to the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. The city took down its other Confederate monuments nearly two years ago and conveyed them to the museum earlier this year. But officials haven’t been able to move forward with removing the Hill monument because the general is buried beneath it. The city has been negotiating with descendants of Hill’s family to decide what should be done with his remains, which were moved to the monument in 1891, about 25 years after his death at the end of the Civil War. The ordinance approved Monday specifies only that the remains will be removed and “reinterred respectfully” in accordance with a Circuit Court of Richmond order. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    South Carolina Democratic gubernatorial candidate Joe Cunningham announced Tuesday he plans to end Confederate Memorial Day if elected. The former congressman called the holiday "embarrassing" in a tweet. "Today, state offices are closed to observe Confederate Memorial Day. This is another example of how our state continues to live in the past," Cunningham wrote. "Honestly, it’s embarrassing. When I’m governor, we’re going to end Confederate Memorial Day and make Election Day a state holiday instead." MILITARY ITEMS MAY BE RENAMED DUE TO CONFEDERACY REFERENCES Today, state offices are closed to observe Confederate Memorial Day. This is another example of how our state continues to live in the past. Honestly, it’s embarrassing.When I’m governor, we’re going to end Confederate Memorial Day and make Election Day a state holiday instead.— Joe Cunningham (@JoeCunninghamSC) May 10, 2022 "The state of South Carolina has officially observed Confederate Memorial Day since 2000, when the legislature added it to the state calendar as a compromise after we became the last state in the country to observe Martin Luther King, Jr....