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    NASA is carrying out checks of its new massive moon rocket after the booster was battered on the launch pad by Hurricane Nicole. The $4.1 billion (£3.5 billion) Space Launch System rode out the storm but suffered 'minor damage' during 100mph winds, according to the US space agency. It is currently still scheduled to launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Wednesday, November 16, pending the safety of the area and post-storm inspections. But if more damage is identified and the rocket is delayed again, NASA faces another looming issue. Some of its hardware - including two solid rocket boosters - is set to expire in mid-December and the agency will have to determine if it is still safe to use beyond that date. Artemis I, which is due to blast an uncrewed Orion spacecraft into orbit for a trip around the moon, was first scheduled to launch at the end of August. But a series of problems have led to this date being repeatedly pushed back, with the hurricane just the latest issue.  NASA is carrying out checks of its...
    A HUGE slingshot has hurled its first Nasa payload on a test flight that could pave the way for a unique way to send satellites into orbit. Spaceflight technology firm SpinLaunch’s groundbreaking Orbital Accelerator launches objects using a rotating carbon-fibre arm housed within a 300ft-wide steel vacuum chamber. 4SpinLaunch's spacecraft-launching slingshot has completed its latest testCredit: YouTube/SpinLaunch 4The enormous structure is taller than the statue of libertyCredit: YouTube/SpinLaunch It's able to fling a launch vehicle containing a satellite at up to 5,000 miles per hour into the stratosphere. The technique is touted as a cheap alternative to rocket launches, which cost tens of millions of dollars per flight. The test, SpinLaunch’s 10th successful launch, was carried out from Spaceport America in New Mexico on September 27. It's part of a series of trials that will determine whether scientific payloads and satellites could survive the stress of the procedure. Read more about spaceFIRE AND FURY Nasa photo reveals 'strong solar flare' that sparked radio blackoutsSECRET WORLD Massive HIDDEN planet could be lurking inside this 'dusty disk' The test included payloads from...
    A Washington D.C. K9 has been found dead inside of a police car after he was left alone, authorities announce. K9 Rocket was found by his handler inside of the marked K9 vehicle the morning of Monday, Sept. 19, according to the Metropolitan Police Department. Temperatures exceeded 80 degrees the day of the dog's tragic death.  Police say that the vehicle Rocket was found in was idling and equipped with a temperature monitoring and alarm system that should activate when the vehicle exceeds a safe temperature. A full inspection of the vehicle is being done to determine if the system malfunctioned.
    Blue Origin/Twitter An unmanned Blue Origin rocket exploded shortly after takeoff over Texas Monday, which marked the first in-flight mishap for the Jeff Bezos-owned space travel company. During a live broadcast of the launch, the rocket exploded while going 693 mph at an altitude of just over 28,000 feet. BREAKING | Blue Origin suffers a launch failure during the launch of #NS23. The uncrewed mission used the launch-abort system to remove the capsule from the New Shepard Rocket. @CBS12 @blueorigin #abort #launch pic.twitter.com/lY59QGlmtv — Zach Covey (@ZachCoveyTV) September 12, 2022 The flight’s capsule parachuted back to earth intact. Main chutes out. Blue Origin gets an unplanned test of its escape system. pic.twitter.com/i9lE7Lg8ft — Christian Davenport (@wapodavenport) September 12, 2022 The Associated Press reported: The New Shepard rocket was barely a minute into its flight from West Texas when bright yellow flames shot out from around the single engine at the bottom. The capsule’s emergency launch abort system immediately kicked in, lifting the craft off the top. Several minutes later, the capsule parachuted onto the remote desert floor. The...
    A NERVE-WRACKING new video has revealed Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin mission experiencing "booster failure" during an uncrewed launch. Early Saturday morning, Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket launched from West Texas. 1Early Saturday morning, Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket launched from West Texas.Credit: Blue Origin Shortly after, the NS-23 flight had to utilize it abort system that allows the capsule to parachute to Earth. The missions was abruptly aborted due to an issue with the rocket's booster. Booster failure happened just as the rocket reached MaxQ, which refers to the moment a rocket reaches maximum dynamic pressure. "This was a payload mission with no astronauts on board. The capsule escape system functioned as designed," the company tweeted.  Read more on Jeff BezosROCKET RETREAT Inside Jeff Bezos' space station that could offer HOLIDAYS in 2027BEZOS BLAST Jeff Bezos slams Biden over soaring inflation after threat to tax Amazon more In a a second tweet on Monday, the company said that despite the booster failure, the escape system for the capsule "performed as designed." Most read in TechDANGER ZONE AI creator warns of 'apocalyptic' AI...
    Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket experienced its first failed launch Monday due to an 'anomaly' just about one-minute after liftoff that saw the capsule activate its escape system to pull away from the booster when its engine went out. The capsule quickly ignited its escape motor that generated at least 70,000 pounds of thrust in just a few seconds and then burned out to allow the craft to deploy its parachutes and coast back to Earth. This is the first time the escape system had been used in a real situation - previous scenarios were to test the technology. The capsule was uncrewed, it was only carrying scientific research equipment, but had humans been inside they would 'have felt a serious jolt, but would 'have been safe,' Eric Berger with Ars Technica reports. Blue Origin has yet to reveal what caused Monday's issue.  Read more: twitter.com/SciG...
    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is seen atop the mobile launcher at Launch 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Aug. 26, 2022.Steve Seipel | NASA NASA is postponing its Artemis I moon mission again, after making a second attempt to get the launch off the ground on Saturday. The space agency is working toward the debut of its Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion capsule, for what would be a more than month-long journey around the moon. As NASA was filling the rocket on Saturday morning, the agency's team detected a hydrogen fuel leak from the engine section. NASA made several attempts to fix the leak, but time ticked away ahead of the launch window that was set to open at 2:17 p.m. ET. NASA called off a first launch attempt on Monday after it was unable to resolve a temperature problem identified with one of the rocket's four liquid-fueled engines, discovered with less than two hours to go in the countdown. This story is developing. Please check back for...
    NASA is preparing the launch of the unmanned Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule as part of the agency's Artemis I mission Today marks the start of humanity's return to the surface of the Moon for the first time since 1972, with the rocket set to land in three years' time. The mission will see an uncrewed Orion spacecraft circle the moon and return to Earth after a 42-day, 1.3 miIlion-mile voyage. If all goes to plan, another flight will follow in 2024 – this time with astronauts on board – before human boots once again grace the lunar surface a year later as part of NASA's ambitious $93 billion (£63 billion) Artemis programme. People in campervans have been arriving at Cape Canaveral over the weekend, all vying for the best view of the enormous rocket's lift-off. Over 200,000 people are expected to line the beaches and causeways around the Kennedy Space Center to watch the launch, while millions more around the world will tune in on television. MailOnline will be providing live updates of the launch in the...
    (CNN)Few things are more exciting than watching a spacecraft lift off the launchpad and set off on a cosmic quest, as NASA's Artemis I mission is poised to do Monday.But if you're a casual observer, it may be that few things are more confusing than hearing some of the jargon used by mission control.Celebrities and spectators from around the globe will gather at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to see the new Space Launch System rocket and uncrewed Orion spacecraft embark on their journey toward the moon. Why NASA is returning to the moon 50 years later with Artemis IAnd for those who can't make it in person, live feeds will be available on a number of platforms and watch parties have cropped up across the country. That's a lot of people trying to distinguish LH2 from LO2 and figure out what in the world L Minus is.For everyone who's not a NASA scientist or amateur astrophysicist, here are some of the terms you might hear during the historic launch -- and what they mean.Read MoreLiftoff lingoNASA is...
    In this article ASTRThe company's LV0010 rocket stands on the launchpad at Florida's Cape Canaveral ahead of the NASA TROPICS-1 mission.AstraSmall rocket-builder Astra said Thursday it would not have any additional flights this year after the company reported another quarterly loss. "Whether we'll be able to commence commercial launches in 2023 will depend on the success of our test flights" for a new rocket system, Astra CEO Chris Kemp added during the company's second-quarter conference call. Shares of Astra fell about 3% in after hours trading from its close of $1.58, with the stock down more than 80% in the past 12 months. Astra said it is moving away from its Rocket 3.3 system earlier than expected, and will now focus on the next version of its launch vehicle. The upgraded system, called Rocket 4.0, is more powerful and more expensive, with a price tag of up to $5 million per launch. The switch comes after the company launch in June, with a Rocket 3.3 carrying a pair of satellites for NASA's TROPICS-1 mission – the first of a set of...
    NASA announced Wednesday it selected three potential dates for its Artemis I mission – the first stage of its historic operation to send the first woman and person of color to the moon. The American space agency is targeting August 29 to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center. And September 2 and 5 are marked down as backup launch dates. James Free, associate administrator at NASA's Washington DC headquarters, said the exact date will be determined about a week before launch. Scroll down for video  The American space agency is targeting August 29 to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) (pictured)  rocket and Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center. And September 2 and 5 are marked down as backup launch dates Artemis I, which has experienced several delays over the past two and a half years, will finally launch an uncrewed Orion capsule that will soar around the moon and splash back down in the Atlantic Ocean. The news of the official launch comes weeks after NASA conducted a final 'wet dress...
    (CNN)A test rocket carrying a component for a future US nuclear armed intercontinental ballistic missile blew up 11 seconds after takeoff Wednesday night from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, according to a statement from the base. An investigation is underway and the debris only affected the immediate launch pad area.This was the first test of the Mk21A Reentry Vehicle (RV) the part of the weapon that would hold a nuclear warhead if the system was operational. There was no nuclear element or armed component to this test.The Mk21A is planned to be the reentry vehicle for the future LGM-35A Sentinel intercontinental ballistic missiles, a new ground-based nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile planned to replace the current Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile as a key element of the US nuclear deterrent capability.The explosion comes a week after the latest test of a US hypersonic weapon failed after an "anomaly" occurred during the first test of the full system.Read MoreThe test, carried out June 30 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii, was supposed to launch the Common Hypersonic Glide Body...
    Russia held fresh nuclear drills today as Germany joined America in pledging to send some of its most advanced weapons systems to Ukraine.  Video showed Yars launchers - capable of carrying nuclear missiles that can hit almost any country on earth - taking part in exercises in the Ivanovo region, just to the west of Moscow.  The drills involved 1,000 troops 'dispersing' the launchers - the first move on the outbreak of a nuclear war - and came just hours after Joe Biden said he will send advanced rocket artillery to Ukraine. Meanwhile Olaf Scholz, the German chancellor who has been criticised for his lackluster support of Kyiv, then pledged to send its most up-to-date IRIS-T anti-aircraft missile systems to help thwart Russia jet and cruise missile attacks. Russia held nuclear drills today (pictured), just hours after Biden announced he is sending advanced rocket artillery to Ukraine  Moscow said Yars launchers - capable of firing nuclear missile at virtually any country - practiced 'dispersing', which would be the first move at the outbreak of nuclear war The Russian defence ministry said 1,000...
    Israel's new laser-based air defense system will cost just $2 per interception, the country's leader announced Wednesday. The country's new air defense system, known as Iron Beam, will only cost the country $2 per interception, a significant cost reduction compared to existing shoot-down systems, which cost tens of thousands to millions to track and eliminate missiles aimed at the country, Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett estimated. ISRAEL SIGNS FIRST FREE TRADE DEAL WITH AN ARAB STATE "Until today, it cost us a lot of money to intercept each rocket. Today they [the enemy] can invest tens of thousands of dollars in a rocket, and we will invest $2 on the electricity for intercepting that rocket," Bennett said in a video issued by his office, according to Reuters. "This is a game changer, not just because we are striking at the enemy military, but also because we are bankrupting it," Bennett added during a visit to Israeli manufacturer Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. Israel has been a frequent target of rocket and bomb attacks from the Palestinian...
    The United States will provide Ukraine with more advanced rocket systems and munitions, President Joe Biden announced on Tuesday. The commander in chief wrote in a New York Times op-ed that his administration would provide the weapons that “will enable them to more precisely strike key targets on the battlefield in Ukraine.” INVADING FORCES DEPORT OVER 230,000 UKRAINIAN CHILDREN TO RUSSIA, KYIV SAYS The package will likely include the weapons that Ukrainian leaders, including President Volodymyr Zelensky, have requested, including the Multiple Launch Rocket System, MLRS, the U.S.-made weapons system that fires a barrage of rockets hundreds of miles, farther than the weapons the U.S. has provided to them so far. Ukrainian officials have also asked for the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System, HIMARS, which are similar but lighter wheeled systems capable of firing the same ammunition. The president said on Monday that the U.S. would not send rockets that could potentially provide Ukraine with the capability to strike Russian territory. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER The U.S. has provided Ukraine with nearly $4 billion worth...
    The Department of Defense and Ukrainian defense leaders are in "constant communication," spokesman John Kirby said on Friday while declining to provide details ahead of the drawdown package. The United States has provided Ukraine with nearly $4 billion worth of military aid since Russia invaded roughly three months ago, though there are reports that it could step up the weapons it's providing in the tranche. INVADING FORCES DEPORT OVER 230,000 UKRAINIAN CHILDREN TO RUSSIA, KYIV SAYS Ukrainian leaders, including President Volodymyr Zelensky, have urged the U.S. to provide them with the multiple launch rocket system. That's a U.S.-made weapons system that fires a barrage of rockets hundreds of miles, farther than the weapons the U.S. has provided so far. Ukraine has also asked for the high mobility artillery rocket system, which is a similar but lighter-wheeled system capable of firing the same ammunition. The department is “preparing to” provide the Ukrainians with the weapons, CNN reported on Thursday, while Politico came out with a similar report a day later adding that neither President Joe Biden nor Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin...
    Washington (CNN)The Biden administration is preparing to step up the kind of weaponry it is offering Ukraine by sending advanced, long-range rocket systems that are now the top request from Ukrainian officials, multiple officials say. The administration is leaning toward sending the systems as part of a larger package of military and security assistance to Ukraine, which could be announced as soon as next week. Senior Ukrainian officials, including President Volodymyr Zelensky, have pleaded in recent weeks for the US and its allies to provide the Multiple Launch Rocket System, or MLRS. The US-made weapon systems can fire a barrage of rockets hundreds of kilometers — much farther than any of the systems Ukraine already has — which the Ukrainians argue could be a gamechanger in their war against Russia.Another system Ukraine has asked for is the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System, known as HIMARS, a lighter wheeled system capable of firing many of the same types of ammunition as MLRS.Read MoreRussia has in recent weeks pummeled Ukraine in the east, where Ukraine is outmanned and outgunned, Ukrainian officials have...
    NASA has signed a joint venture agreement with Spinlanch, which is developing a revolutionary accelerator based on centrifugal force. Last November, we told you SpinLaunch, A company that wants to use centrifugal force to make it easier to put small payloads into orbit. Apparently, this concept really impressed NASA; So is the American Space Agency Made a joint venture agreement with the company. Together they will now test the reliability of an organization in the context of some routine operations, especially those targeting low orbit. Theoretically, the idea of ​​SpinLaunch is surprisingly simple. Controlling the payload into orbit is the first step in the Suborbital Accelerator Launch System (SALS). It is a large circular vacuum chamber that acts as an accelerator enclave. A real space slingshot Once inside, the assembly rotates on an axis. Thanks to the vacuum that rules the room, the engine can accelerate to individual speeds with complete silence without having to resist the friction created by gaseous molecules in the atmosphere. Once it has finally reached sufficient speed, the load is disconnected from the...
    NASA could be flinging its satellites into space using extraordinary 'whirl 'n' hurl' launch technology later this decade.  The US space agency has signed an agreement with California startup SpinLaunch to test the latter's bizarre 'kinetic' launch system, seen as a green alternative to fuel-based launches.   It works by attaching a reusable rocket to a giant rotating arm in an electric vacuum-sealed centrifuge and spinning it at several times the speed of sound.  The rocket is then released and shoots to space to release payloads such as satellites into low-Earth orbit. It can then return to Earth to be reused for further launches. The whopping launch machine, which is located in Spaceport America in New Mexico, measures 165 feet (50.4 metres) – slightly taller than the Statue of Liberty (150 feet, or 46 metres).  Scroll down for video  California-based start-up SpinLaunch has built an alternative rocket launch system (pictured) designed to catapult spacecraft into orbit. The system works by attaching a rocket to a giant rotating arm in a vacuum-sealed centrifuge and spinning it at several times the speed of sound. It...
    President Joe Biden will on Monday ask for $813.3 billion in national security spending in his proposed budget, including money for a space-based missile warning system and almost $2 billion for an interceptor to protect against ballistic missile threats from states such as North Korea and Iran. Senior U.S. generals have warned that Iran's growing arsenal poses the greatest risks to American interests in the Middle East, and North Korea's threat was apparently on display last week when it claimed to have tested its new Hwasong-17 intercontinental ballistic missile. Analysts said the new missile could reach anywhere in the U.S.  Against that backdrop, Biden will send his budget to Congress on Monday, according to officials familiar with the proposals, with hikes in defense spending.  'I'm calling for one of the largest investments in our national security in history, with the funds needed to ensure that our military remains the best-prepared, best-trained, best-equipped military in the world,' said Biden in a statement ahead of scheduled remarks. 'In addition, I'm calling for continued investment to forcefully respond to Putin’s aggression against Ukraine...
    Vladimir Putin has deployed a multiple rocket launcher system which 'sucks the air out of its victims' into Ukraine as his war of occupation intensifies. The TOS-1 Buratino fires fuel-air 'thermobaric' rockets which, when they explode, consume all oxygen in the blast zone, killing everyone in the area. Victims can appear to have no visible external injuries but will have suffered massive internal damage.   The weapon is based on the Soviet-era T-72 main battle tank with the main turret removed and replaces with a rocket launcher system holding 30, 8.5-inch rockets.  The TOS-1 Buratino multiple rocket launcher, pictured here in June 2020 during Moscow's Victory Day military parade, is believed to have been deployed in Ukraine The weapon system can fire 30-8.5inch rockets within 15 seconds. The thermobaric rockets have a range of approximately two miles with each warhead causing a 1,000-ft diameter blast zone The TOS-1A Buratino multiple rocket launcher system can fire 30 thermobaric projectiles in 15 seconds devastating a 1,000ft-wide blast zone  The system was developed in the mid-1980s and the unguided rockets have a two-mile range. ...
    TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Israel’s prime minister on Tuesday acknowledged that its Iron Dome defense system is too expensive and the country is speeding the rollout of laser technology to protect it from rocket attacks. Naftali Bennett told a security conference that the new generation of technology — a “laser wall” — will be unveiled within a year in southern Israel. Little is known about the system’s effectiveness, but the system eventually is expected to be deployed on land, in the air and at sea and send a deterrent message to archenemy Iran and its proxies. “If we can intercept a missile or rocket with an electrical pulse that costs a few dollars, we will essentially neutralize the ring of fire that Iran has set up,” Bennett told the Institute for National Security Studies at Tel Aviv University. “This new generation of air defense can also serve our friends in the region.” Israel unveiled the Iron Dome a decade ago, and the military says it has been a great success, with a 90% interception rate against incoming rocket...
    Processing unwanted Christmas returns has become so expensive for online retailers they're increasingly likely to let customers keep the item and offer a refund too.    According to returns processor Optoro, returning a $50 item costs an average of $33, up 59 percent from 2020, when it cost around $13.53 to do so.  That has led to an increase in the number of retailers telling shoppers' to keep an unwanted gift, rather than return it, because the processing cost wipes out any profit they'll have made.   Optoro's CEO Tobin Moore claims supply chain issues and worker shortages are to blame for the rocketing prices of handling returns.  According to CBRE supply chain, about three in 10 online purchases get returned.    Many big retailers already analyze shoppers they suspect of gaming the system by making too many returns, or buying goods in the hopes of getting to keep them and receive a refund. And attempting to exploit the strained system could result in people being banned from certain sites altogether, experts have warned.   The cost of returning a $50 item to a...
    SpaceX has finally received NASA’s first representatives of the US space agency’s Artemis project to bring humans back to the moon by 2025. Tour For a more assembled structure – earlier this week. After two failed legal proceedings by Jeff Bezos’s rival Blue Origin, the first demands of the project will finally be implemented by Elon Musk’s company, which has bid $ 1 billion for a project with NASA. In April 2021. Read more Tender call provides for construction Human landing system (HLS), a SLS rocket crew transport platform (Space launch system) And its Orion capsule, in a very short time, have the role of expelling astronauts from the spacecraft and carrying them to lunar soil. The visit focused Star base, A structure that includes launch pads for the Starship Orbit spacecraft and the transport vehicle factory. The idea was to measure the subcontractor’s progress in the development of the structure – which, from a technical point of view, should not be overlooked. This is because, in January of this year, there was not even asphalt in the designated...
    A prototype vehicle launches out of the company's suborbital accelerator during its first test flight on October 22, 2021 at Spaceport America in New Mexico.SpinLaunch SpinLaunch, a start-up that is building an alternative method of launching spacecraft to orbit, last month conducted the successful first test flight of a prototype in New Mexico. The Long Beach, California-based company is developing a launch system that uses kinetic energy as its primary method to get off the ground – with a vacuum-sealed centrifuge spinning the rocket at several times the speed of sound before releasing. "It's a radically different way to accelerate projectiles and launch vehicles to hypersonic speeds using a ground-based system," SpinLaunch CEO Jonathan Yaney told CNBC. "This is about building a company and a space launch system that is going to enter into the commercial markets with a very high cadence and launch at the lowest cost in the industry." Founded in 2014 by Yaney, Spinlaunch's successful test on Oct. 22 at Spaceport America in New Mexico marks a major milestone in the company's progress. SpinLaunch has largely stayed...
    Orion capsule is mated to Space Launch System for Artemis I mission. This week, NASA completed “stacking” the components of the Artemis 1 mission. That mission will fly using the Saturn-V-sized Space Launch System (SLS) and send an uncrewed version of the new Orion crew capsule on a trip around the moon. On a Friday conference call with journalists, NASA put a date on that flight: February 2022. The 322-foot rocket is now standing—fully assembled, but empty of fuel—inside the huge Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy Space Center, the same building that formerly hosted Apollo-era rockets as well as space shuttle missions. In the next two months, NASA plans to roll the rocket out to the launch pad to conduct initial tests. Early in 2022, it will get a full “wet dress rehearsal” in which the systems are fully fueled and the countdown proceeds to almost time for launch, but the engines are not ignited. Following that test, Artemis I will be moved back to the VAB for a final check and, assuming all is well, will quickly return to...
    The Pentagon on Monday said an ISIS-K rocket made it through U.S. missile defense systems and landed inside Kabul airport at a time when American forces remain on high alert for more attacks. Officials said it was one of five launched by terrorists but it landed without causing harm. During a briefing, the Department of Defense spokesman John Kirby said there remained an 'active' threat to U.S. personnel and that officials were investigating reports that children were killed in a drone strike on Sunday. Army Maj. Gen. Hank Taylor told reporters that C-RAM defense systems took down one of the rockets fired on Monday morning.  'We assessed that five rockets were in the air and went,' he told reporters.  'Three landed off the airfield ... were no effect. 'C-RAM was able to affect and thwart the attack. The one or the other rocket landed with no effect to the mission or any danger to our personnel.' He later clarified that one rocket landed inside the airport perimeter   'The force protection C-RAM did work, it did engage and had effect on...
    A missile defense system in Kabul on Monday intercepted five rockets fired at the international airport. No casualties were reported. A U.S. defense official speaking on the condition of anonymity confirmed the rockets were intercepted via a C-RAM missile defense system. The official did not confirm if all five rockets were brought down short of Hamid Karzai International Airport. The attack comes shortly after a U.S. airstrike on ISIS-K in response to the terrorist attack last Thursday that killed 13 U.S. servicemembers. Earlier on Sunday, a suicide bomber aiming to attack the airport was killed in a U.S. drone strike while driving in his vehicle. Taliban fighters investigate a damaged car after multiple rockets were fired in Kabul on August 30, 2021. (WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP via Getty Images) General Frank McKenzie, head of U.S. Central Command, told reporters last week that Kabul airport would be adequately protected from rocket fire. “We know they (ISIS-K) would like to lob a rocket in there, if they could,” said McKenzie. “Now we actually have pretty good protection against that. We have our anti-rocket and...
    When it comes to making a rocket (and in fact whenever you want to put something in space) size and weight are two of the most important factors. In order to alleviate the burden as much as possible, new methods and technologies are always being sought to help do so. One of the main components that has the most weight? The fuel. Hence in Japan are experimenting with new thrusters that consume less. As reported by the Japanese space agency JAXA, hhave successfully tested a new rocket powered by a rotary detonation engine. It is a special propellant that uses shock waves to propel itself, produced by burning methane and oxygen. By detonating explosions in a controlled manner in a circular pattern, a boost is produced that is much more efficient by using less fuel. We have previously seen the odd laboratory experiment. However, now Japan has gone one step further, testing the technology from miles high. The engine was mounted on the S-520-31 rocket, released on July 27, 2021 from JAXA’s Uchinoura Space Center in Japan. Once the rocket...
    The Kabul airport was targeted in a rocket attack on Monday that was intercepted by the U.S.’s C-RAM missile defense system, a U.S. defense official told Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin. MARINES POST PHOTO OF DIGNIFIED TRANSFER OF SERVICE MEMBERS KILLED IN KABUL ATTACK  The official said there were no reported casualties. U.S. Central Command did not immediately respond to an after-hours email from Fox News. Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, said top aides have briefed President Biden on the development, including Jake Sullivan, his national security adviser.  VideoShe said in the statement that in light of the attack, the president "has reconfirmed his order that commanders redouble their efforts to prioritize doing whatever is necessary to protect our forces on the ground." The U.S. is set to conclude a massive two-week-long airlift of more than 114,000 Afghans and foreigners and withdraw the last of its troops, ending America’s longest war with the Taliban back in power. GET THE FOX NEWS APP The U.S. State Department released a statement signed by around 100 countries, as well as NATO...
    A New Shepard rocket launches on a test flight.Blue Origin Jeff Bezos' space venture Blue Origin auctioned off a seat on its upcoming first crewed spaceflight on Saturday for $28 million. The winning bidder, whose name wasn't released, will fly to the edge of space with the Amazon founder and his brother Mark on Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket scheduled to launch on July 20. The company will reveal the name of the auction winner "in the weeks following." New Shepard, a rocket that carries a capsule to an altitude of over 340,000 feet, has flown more than a dozen successful test flights without passengers, including one in April at the company's facility in the Texas desert. The autonomous system is designed to carry up to six people. The capsule has massive windows to give passengers a view of the earth below during about three minutes in zero gravity, before returning to Earth.VIDEO4:1404:14Jeff Bezos plans to go to space. Here are the safety factors involvedSquawk BoxBlue Origin's system launches vertically, and both New Shepard's rocket and capsule are reusable. The boosters...
    More On: israel World leaders react to escalating Hamas-Israeli bloodshed: ‘Needs to stop’ Fighting between Israel and Palestinians is worst since 2014 war Israeli soldier killed in anti-tank missile attack by Hamas Hamas official reportedly urges people to ‘cut off the heads of Jews’ The Israeli military’s ace in the hole against the ongoing rocket attacks by Palestinian militants in Gaza is its vaunted Iron Dome air-defense system. “More than 1,050 rockets have been fired towards Israel and the Iron Dome has had an 85 percent to 90 percent interception rate despite the Hamas terrorist organization attempting to overwhelm the system,” Israel Defense Forces spokesman Capt. Ben Rosner told The Post on Wednesday. Many of the rockets also have failed to reach the Jewish state, crashing instead inside Gaza, the army said. The defense system was developed by the Israeli Rafael Advanced Defense Systems and Israel Aerospace Industries, with US financial and technical support, to protect populated areas and critical assets from short-range aerial threats, the Washington Post reported. An Iron Dome aerial defense system battery is seen in...
    THE Iron Dome in Israel is the first missile interceptor of its kind in the world, and is said to have a 90 per cent success rate at bringing down targets. Thousands of rockets have been intercepted by the mobile air defence system, including during violent clashes with Gaza in May 2021. Here's the lowdown on the high tech system. 4 The Iron Dome is part of Israel's defence system and can intercept rockets launched from GazaCredit: AFP What is the Iron Dome? The Iron Dome is a mobile, all-weather air defence system in Israel designed to intercept and destroy short-range rockets and 155mm artillery shells fired from a distance of 4km to 70km. It intercepts rockets that are travelling in the direction of a urban areas and brings them down - it is the first system of its kind in the world. Developed by Rafael Advanced Defence Systems, if can be operated in all weather conditions including fog, dust storm, low clouds and rain. Israel hopes to increase the range of the dome's interceptions to 250km and make it...
    Onlookers watch as a Long March 5B carries the first segment of the Tianhe space station to orbit. On April 29, China’s National Space Administration launched a new heavy lift vehicle capable of taking over 27 tons of payload to Earth orbit. Although, as it turns out, the rocket is capable of more than that. While previous versions of the Long March 5 rocket included a booster that arced into the sea, the new 5b variant has four additional solid boosters. Those delivered enough power to send the entire first stage—91’ tall and weighing 46,000 pounds even after all the fuel was expended—right on into orbit. In a way, it’s quite an accomplishment.  However, while the payload (the first segment of China’s new space station) was delivered to a stable orbit several hundred miles higher, the booster entered an elliptical orbit so low that it’s still brushing against the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Sometime within the next few days, and likely within the next 24 hours, that orbit will decay.  Then the booster, the size of three school buses laid end to end, will come...
    After contending with technical challenges and then the coronavirus pandemic, NASA is finally ready to launch its $2.4 billion nuclear-powered Perseverance Mars rover Thursday morning. The high-stakes mission will look for signs of past microbial life and to collect rock and soil samples for eventual return to Earth. The rover also will carry a small $80 million experimental helicopter that will attempt the first "Wright brothers' moment" on Mars, and another experiment to test technology that one day could help astronauts by extracting oxygen from the mostly carbon dioxide atmosphere. But finding and collecting scientifically valuable rock and soil samples, autonomously packaging them in slender, germ-free tubes and caching them on the surface for later retrieval is the primary goal of NASA's eighth Mars lander, the most complex spacecraft ever built to explore the red planet. An artist's impression of the Perseverance Mars rover on the surface of the red planet. NASA/JPL-Caltech "It is definitely the most mechanically complicated thing that's ever been in deep space," said Adam Steltzner, chief engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said of the sample...
    Software in place to monitor hydraulic systems during a test firing of NASA's Space Launch System moon rocket was to blame for an early engine shutdown Saturday, not an actual problem with the booster's shuttle-heritage engines or its complex propulsion system, NASA said Tuesday. All four of the Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-25 engines operated normally throughout the test and while an instrumentation glitch with engine No. 4 was called out near the end of the run, it was unrelated to the shutdown. NASA said the huge rocket was not damaged and otherwise performed normally. Generating a combined 1.6 million pounds of thrust, four hydrogen-fueled RS-25 engines fire during a ground test Saturday of the Space Launch System rocket's first stage. The planned eight-minute test firing ended 67.2 seconds after ignition due to software monitoring a hydraulic power system. NASA Engineers are still assessing the test results to determine if another hot-fire test is needed at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi where the rocket remains in place atop a massive test stand. It may even be possible to forego another test...
    Aerospace firms on Thursday credited NASA with a successful test of engines on a Boeing-built rocket for Artemis missions that aim to return U.S. astronauts to the moon by 2024, more than half a century since the last lunar walk. NASA simulated a launch by firing the engines of the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket while it was anchored to a tower at its Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The four RS-25 engines roared to life for the full eight minutes of the test and filled the surrounding area and sky with clouds of white smoke. After the engines cut off, NASA employees could be heard applauding on the space agency’s live-streaming video, and many aerospace firms publicly congratulated NASA on a successful test. A previous test in January ended after about a minute – well short of the roughly four minutes engineers needed to gather enough data. The Space Launch System is now expected to go to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for integration with Lockheed Martin Corp’s Orion spacecraft. Acting NASA Administrator Steve...
    Israel announces upgrade of Iron Dome rocket defense system
    The Space Launch System (SLS) 'megarocket' that will one day take astronauts to the moon and Mars has passed a major assembly milestone, according to NASA.  The US space agency said the ten segments that make up the two booster rockets were vertically stacked over several weeks at the Kennedy Space Center.  When launched, the $18.6 billion SLS will be the most powerful rocket ever made and capable of taking cargo and astronauts to the moon in a single trip.  Passing this milestone brings NASA a step closer to the first uncrewed Artemis mission to the moon and back - due to launch on 312ft SLS by the end of this year. Getting the rocket off the ground for Artemis I in 2021 is critical to meet the 2024 target of landing the first woman and next man on the moon with Artemis III.  The Space Launch System twin solid rocket boosters are fully assembled and stacked on the mobile launcher at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida The Space Launch System (SLS) 'megarocket' that will one day...
    Virgin Orbit — the sister company of billionaire Richard Branson’s space tourism outfit Virgin Galactic — will try a second test of its small satellite-launching rocket later today, months after it failed to reach orbit during a first attempt. It will also be the first time that the company tries to launch working satellites into space on behalf of NASA. Sometime after 1PM ET, Virgin Orbit’s customized Boeing 747 will take off from Virgin Galactic’s spaceport in the Mojave desert and ascend to 35,000 feet with the satellite-launching rocket attached to its wing. Once it reaches a predetermined location, the rocket is supposed to drop and ignite, taking the small satellites on board the rest of the way into orbit around the Earth. Virgin Orbit says the window for launch will last until 5PM ET. There is no live stream of the test, though the company plans to tweet updates throughout the flight. It will make photos and video available sometime after the test is completed. Virgin Orbit has been working on its airborne rocket-launching system for years Virgin...
    A scheduled test of NASA's Space Launch System rocket on Saturday quickly went off the rails, casting doubt on the next steps of sending Americans to space and the moon. The Space Launch System is designed to be the most powerful rocket ever, with four RS-25 rocket engines and two external boosters built by Northrop Grumman. On Saturday, it was scheduled to undergo a hot fire test at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. It was set to be the last test as part of a 'Green Run' of eight tests. The test was originally supposed to take place in November, but was delayed by a fueling issue discovered during a previous test.  Investor's Business Daily reports Saturday's test ran for just over a minute before ending, though, when it was supposed to go for eight minutes. Scroll down for video  A scheduled test of the Space Launch System at NASA's Stennis Space Center went awry The Saturday test was scheduled to be the last of eight 'Green Run' tests for the rocket A 'major component failure' occurred in one...
    NASA's massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket that will one day take astronauts to the Moon and Mars is to undergo its final 'hot fire' engine test later this month. The space agency confirmed the four massive engines will be bolted to the ground during the firing - the final test before an uncrewed test flight later this year.  The rocket has already undergone a number of static engine tests and the next trial - the hot fire test - will happen at some point from January 17.  SLS is designed to be the backbone of the Artemis programme - which will see the first woman land on the Moon in 2024 and humans land on Mars in the 2030s.  The space agency confirmed the four massive engines will be bolted to the ground during the firing - the final test before an uncrewed test flight later this year The hot fire test on January 17 marks the culmination of the year-long Green Run - a series of checks on the flight-readiness of the massive SLS ahead of...
    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan’s military said Thursday it successfully conducted a successful test flight of a rocket system capable of carrying a conventional warhead up to a range of 140 kilometers (about 90 miles). In a statement, miliary leaders said the weapon system, called Fatah-1, will give Pakistan’s army “capability of precision target engagement deep in enemy territory.” It said President Arif Alvi, Prime Minister Imran Khan and the military leaders congratulated scientists and troops on the “successful” flight test. The statement provided no further details. Pakistan became a declared nuclear power in 1998, when it conducted underground nuclear tests in response to those carried out by its rival and neighbor India. The nations have fought three wars since gaining independence from Britain in 1947. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The company also improved its launch vehicle recovery methods over the course of the year. In July, SpaceX crews managed to snag both halves of the nose cone fairing out of mid air using a large net set atop a recovery ship — a technique similar to what Rocket Lab recently demonstrated with its Electron recovery system. Those nose cone fairings are worth $6 million combined so retrieving them unharmed, before they hit the ocean’s surface with any appreciable speed, is of paramount importance.  Of course, before SpaceX could officially switch over from its older cargo capsules, the company had to prove that the Dragon 2 crew capsule variants were safe and sturdy enough to shuttle people to the ISS and back. As such, SpaceX successfully demonstrated its Dragon crew capsule launch escape system in mid-January. Taking off from launch complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center, the uncrewed Falcon 9 rocket flew for just 90 seconds before the abort signal was activated, causing the crew capsule to forcefully separate from the rest of the rocket. The capsule blasted away at...
    NASA has started assembling the Artemis Space Launch System, marking an important milestone ahead of future missions to the moon. “At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers lowered the first of 10 segments into place Nov. 21 for the twin solid rocket boosters that will power the first flight of the agency’s new deep space rocket,” NASA said in a statement. “Artemis I will be an uncrewed flight to test the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft as an integrated system ahead of crewed flights to the Moon with the Artemis program.” The space agency said the booster segments arrived by train in June from Northrop Grumman’s manufacturing facility in Utah. “Stacking operations began Nov. 19 with engineers transporting a booster segment from the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility to the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building,” it said. NASA TESTS BOOSTER ROCKET FOR FUTURE ARTEMIS MISSIONS TO THE MOON The Artemis I mission is scheduled to take place in 2021. “Stacking the first piece of the SLS rocket on the mobile launcher marks a major milestone for the Artemis Program,” said Andrew Shroble, an integrated operations...
    “We basically simulated the highest load case, where we drop a fully weighted dummy stage out of the sky and accelerate it to the highest load point and then pop the canopy,” Rocket Lab CEO, Peter Beck, said during a company webcast in August. This week was a big one for the recovery team. We conducted the final drop test and passed with flying colors. Next step is the real thing – bringing Electron’s 1st stage back under a chute on Flight 17! pic.twitter.com/KFUrvBm6S1 — Rocket Lab (@RocketLab) August 6, 2020 Two and a half minutes and 80 vertical kilometers after Thursday’s launch, the Electron’s two stages were scheduled to separate with the cargo-laden second stage continuing its journey into orbit while the first stage shuts down and coasts into a fall back down the gravity well. To ensure the safety of the cargo in the second stage, the two rocket portions operate independently, Beck explained, including the guidance and reaction control systems. However, though the first stage gently splashed down back on Earth, the second stage will be...
    Rocket Laboratory It is set to complete an important test for its rocket reusability program during its next voyage, which is currently scheduled to take place in mid-November, with a missile widow opening on November 16th. This is a bit surprising because the launch company said it was going to do this on its 17th aircraft, the next launch was actually its 16th aircraft, but the company had a brief answer as to why it moved the timetable. This is not the first test performed by Rocket Laboratory in pursuit of reuse – after Rocket Lab founder and CEO Peter Beck first announced in August 2019 its mission to retrieve and update the electron booster, the rocket laboratory’s guided control and control system on the booster’s control and control system It has also tested the parachute to be used for slowing down. In a video released today, he also explained the reason behind trying to retrieve the busters (basically increasing the company’s production rate by eliminating the need to create a new booster for each aircraft) and the reasons why...
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