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McKinney fire:

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    A massive debris flow triggered by flash floods that followed a wildfire in Northern California is believed to have killed scores of fish along a 50-mile stretch of the Klamath River last week. Intense storms sent flood waters coursing through an area recently burned by the McKinney fire, pushing charred soil, rocks and trees into the river near Humbug Creek, said Craig Tucker, natural resources policy consultant for the Karuk Tribe. At least four deaths have been linked to the 60,000-acre fire, which is the largest to burn in California so far this year. The debris flow was reported after up to three inches of rain fell on the east side of the fire Tuesday, Aug. 2, said Mike Lindbery, a public information officer on the fire. A remote gauging system managed by the Karuk about 20 miles downstream, at Seiad Creek, found that the dissolved oxygen in the river plummeted to zero for about four hours Wednesday night, then again the following night, Tucker said. Dead fish started washing up farther downstream in Happy Camp that Thursday. “It’s...
    Containment of the deadly McKinney Fire — which has killed four people while razing scores of houses in the Klamath National Forest — continued to grow Tuesday, even as firefighters worked through another round of dry and gusty weather. The McKinney Fire was 55% contained Tuesday morning after having stalled at 60,370 acres, Cal Fire and the U.S. Forest Service announced. The progress came as firefighters celebrated having cut line around the entire 80-mile perimeter of the fire — meaning they can focus on mopping up hot spots while working to keep its acreage unchanged, the Forest Service reported. More hot and dry weather was expected to hit the burn area Tuesday. The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning that will be in effect from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m., due to single-digit humidity levels and winds that could gust to 45 mph. “Large dust devils have been observed and are a hazard to look out for on the fireline from the unstable atmosphere,” the Forest Service wrote in an update Tuesday morning. Related Articles Crashes and...
    SMYRNA, Del. (CBS) — Twenty Delaware firefighters trained to tackle wildfires are flying out west Tuesday afternoon. The team is hoping to lend a helping hand as wildfires scorch California. They’re headed to battle the McKinney Fire in the Klamath National Forest, near the border of California and Oregon. This is the first assignment of the year for Delaware’s wildfire crew. Their last trip was to Montana last summer to help fight the Harris Mountain Fire. The team is expected to depart at 1 p.m.
    A longtime U.S. Forest Service wildfire lookout is among the four people confirmed to have died in the McKinney fire burning near the California-Oregon border. Kathy Shoopman, 73, died at her home in the community of Klamath River as a result of the fire, officials with Klamath National Forest said Monday. “Kathy started her career as a lookout at Baldy Mountain Lookout, west of Happy Camp, in 1974,” officials said. “Since then, she has staffed Lake Mountain Lookout, and most recently staffed Buckhorn Lookout, a post she has held since 1993.” A resident of Klamath River for nearly 50 years, she was remembered as a talented artist, gardener and an animal lover, officials said. As of Monday morning, the McKinney fire had charred 60,379 acres and was 40% contained, officials said. There were 3,266 personnel assigned to the blaze. Authorities were cautiously optimistic about the fire outlook, stating that the burn pattern in the blaze’s northwestern region was “creating less severity in that area.” Firefighters continued mop-up operations and were securing and evaluating their primary...
    A longtime U.S. Forest Service fire lookout who spent decades scanning the Klamath National Forest for puffs of smoke and the next threat to communities across Siskiyou County died at her home during the McKinney Fire, the federal agency announced Monday. Kathy Shoopman, 73, died at her home in Klamath River during the blaze, which exploded in late July into the state’s largest conflagration of 2022, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Three other people died in the fire, though their names have not been released, pending positive identification and notification of their next of kin by authorities. Shoopman lived in Klamath River for nearly 50 years; meaning that her home was among the many under her watch. She worked in mountaintop perches across the Klamath National Forest, spotting fires when they first ignited. She started her career in 1974 at the Baldy Mountain Lookout, which is west of the community of Happy Camp. About 20 years later, she transitioned to the Buckhorn Lookout, which is about four miles north of the Klamath River community. She worked there until her...
    Strong winds expected to sweep through the Shasta Valley could hinder the progress made in recent days by thousands of firefighters in containing the massive and deadly McKinney wildfire burning at the California-Oregon border. Since it began in the Klamath National Forest late last month, the blaze has killed four people, destroyed 87 homes and consumed 60,044 acres, but its spread has slowed over the past few days, with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection reporting 30% containment. It is the largest wildfire in the state so far this year. Forecasts of wind gusts of up to 30 mph pose significant new risks and prompted the National Weather Service in Medford, Ore., to prepare to issue a red flag warning for Yreka, Calif., and other parts of the valley along Interstate 5 starting Sunday afternoon. “When you put a lot of wind on a fire, a lot of bad things can happen,” said Ryan Sandler, one of the meteorologists monitoring the situation. Dangerous wind conditions are expected through at least Monday. Map shows the area where the...
    Crews battling the massive McKinney Fire in Siskyou County are making steady progress in controlling the blaze but dangerous weather conditions over the next couple of days will pose a challenge, according to an incident update released on Saturday morning. While residents of Siskiyou County are learning the devastating toll of the state’s largest wildfire this year they are also seeing an encouraging boost to fire containment numbers, which have risen from 10% on Thursday to 30% on Saturday. As of Saturday morning, the fire had scorched 60,044 acres in the Klamath National Forest near the border of California and Oregon, and destroyed 87 homes and 45 other structures, according to Cal Fire. Authorities have previously reported four deaths from the fire, surpassing the total death toll of California’s 2021 fire season, which saw three deaths. Fire crews have also established control lines on much of the southeastern edge of the fire that was approaching the town of Yreka, said Dennis Burns, a fire behavior analyst. Still, Burns said the next couple of days are going to pose dangerous conditions...
    YREKA, Calif. —  In this conservative corner of California, a monster fire that killed four people and destroyed dozens of structures is being framed by many in political terms. Some residents acknowledge the role of climate change in California’s increasingly destructive firestorms, but their true ire is often focused on decades of government policies they believe have worsened the fire risk and made fighting the destructive McKinney fire inside the Klamath National Forest more difficult. Yreka, which sits in the shadow of that national forest, was once a “timber town” known for its logging industry. Some residents here this week said the slow death of that industry coincided with the increased frequency of wildfire in the area as vegetation became more and more overgrown. “As a kid we very seldom worried that fires would get out of control and take out whole towns,” said Bill Robberson, 60, a lifelong resident of Siskiyou County and fourth-generation Californian. Experts said there are many factors behind the blaze. Population growth has pushed more residents into the wildland-urban interface, leaving more homes and people in...
    (CNN)California's McKinney Fire has destroyed nearly 90 houses and is only 30% contained a week after breaking out in the Klamath National Forest, with hot and dry conditions expected to continue through the weekend.The blaze, the largest wildfire in California so far this year, erupted on July 29 in the forest near the California-Oregon border and grew rapidly, fueled by winds from thunderstorms. On Tuesday it had burned more than 56,000 acres and forced thousands to evacuate. As of Friday evening, the fire had reached 59,666 acres and the perimeter was 30% contained, according to InciWeb, a US clearinghouse for fire information. More than 2,400 fire personnel are involved in battling the fire.Sheriff's deputies leave a home where a body was found on Monday.Of 274 structures inspected so far, 87 homes and an additional 47 structures -- including garages and commercial buildings -- have been destroyed, according to an initial damage assessment released by the Siskiyou County Office of Emergency Services.The office said a further four structures had minor damage from the fire, with the damage assessment more than 50%...
    A former police officer in Fresno County faces federal charges after authorities say he sexually assaulted four women while on active duty as a law enforcement officer. A federal grand jury returned a 10-count indictment against J. DeShawn Torrence of Corcoran alleging deprivation of constitutional rights under the color of law, the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday. Torrence, 38, “engaged in various forms of nonconsensual sexual conduct, ranging from directing a victim to remove her clothing without a legitimate law enforcement purpose to forcing his victims to engage in sex acts, all while serving as a police officer,” federal officials said. The incidents occurred multiple times from August 2017 to June 2021 while he served as an officer with the Sanger Police Department, officials said. California Siskiyou sheriff accuses news crew of abusing press privileges at McKinney fire The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office is considering pressing charges against ABC News for its coverage of the McKinney fire. Torrence is no longer employed by the department. According to authorities, four of the...
    The McKinney fire that’s killed four people has destroyed 132 structures, including 87 homes as it scorched nearly 60,000 acres in the Klamath National Forest, officials said. Meanwhile firefighters have slowed down the fire’s pace one week after it was first sparked, but fire officials said Friday flames could still make a run. Firefighters were keeping an eye on the fire that’s burned near the California-Oregon border, which remains at 10% containment as of Friday afternoon. But in the last 24 hours, officials with the Klamath National Forest said the fire had burned about 300 acres, a significant slowdown after the fire had burned through 59,636 in the last seven days. “We did see some growth in the fire,” said Dennis Burns, fire behavior analyst for the U.S. Forest Service during a briefing Friday. “It was all within lines.” California Photos: The McKinney fire rages along the Northern California border The McKinney fire near the Oregon border has burned more than 51,000 acres in the Klamath National Forest. After battling through mudslides and thunderstorms Wednesday,...
    The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office claims that a TV news crew abused its media privileges during its coverage of the deadly McKinney fire burning in the Klamath National Forest at the California-Oregon border. The fire, which grew rapidly in hilly, challenging terrain, has consumed 56,668 acres and was 10% contained as of Friday, according to U.S. Forest Service spokesperson Aaron Johnson. At least four people have died in the blaze, but there is no official count on the number of structures damaged or destroyed. The Sheriff’s Office has declined to officially name the news station cited in its complaint and told SF Gate that the investigation is ongoing. However, the incident has been linked to a TV crew reporting for ABC News. During its reporting, the ABC News crew was filming on private property destroyed by the fire that had not yet been cleared by police in “an unlawful abuse of press privileges,” the Sheriff’s Office said Tuesday. The broadcast showed Matt Gutman, ABC News chief national correspondent, with a Siskiyou resident, who showed the crew what...
    More than half of the country is now experiencing some form of drought for the fourth week in a row with no region of the country free from the harsh conditions. A combination of extreme heat coupled with low amounts of rainfall is also pulling moisture from plants and soil resulting in tinder dry conditions, ripe for wildfires.  Wildfire season has become longer and blazes more intense, scorching temperatures have broken records and lakes are shriveling.  While it may come as no surprise that the western portion of the country including California is enveloped in a drought which has lasted for several years, even the northeast of the country is now experiencing a 'flash drought'. More than half  the country is in some level of drought for the fourth week in a row, the US Drought Monitor reported on Thursday Ventusky Privacy Policy Wildfire season has also become longer and blazes more intense, scorching temperatures have broken records and lakes are shriveling. A Billings 4AJ helicopter makes a water drop at the Oak Fire near Mariposa, California last month The...
    Thunderstorms and mudslides have hampered firefighters’ battle this week against the deadly McKinney fire in Klamath National Forest at the California-Oregon border, authorities said. Three inches of rain on the fire’s east flank caused mudslides and wreaked havoc for firefighters struggling to stop the steady advance of the blaze that has killed four people. The fire had grown to 58,668 acres as of Thursday morning, with 10% containment, officials said. “When the water comes down that fast it doesn’t penetrate, it just runs off which actually causes some problems,” said Dennis Burns, fire behavior analyst for the U.S. Forest Service. “We had a lot of mudslides, washed out some roads, some vehicles were stuck, things like that, but it had very little effect on the fire.” One video circulating on Twitter on Wednesday showed a semi-truck and at least three pickups stopped on a road as a river of muddy water rushed down steep terrain. One man climbed into his truck through the window as water seeped under the door. “It’s gonna get worse!” one firefighter can be...
    While the McKinney Fire continues to grow slowly in Siskiyou County, firefighters are reporting “excellent progress” as they begin to rack up some containment on the state’s largest wildfire, according to authorities. As of Thursday morning, the McKinney Fire — which is 10% contained — has scorched more than 58,600 acres near the border of California and Oregon, according to Cal Fire. Authorities have reported that four people have been found dead in the burn zone, surpassing the total death toll of California’s 2021 fire season, which saw three deaths. Heavy rainfall earlier this week gave crews battling the massive blaze the breathing room they needed to establish some containment lines, which led law enforcement in the area to even allow some residents to return home. Thanks to containment lines put in just north of the cities of Yreka and Hawkinsville, authorities on Wednesday reduced evacuation orders within parts of those cities to warnings. Still, residents in those warning zones were instructed to remain alert. Related Articles Crashes and Disasters | Climate Migration: Wildfire pushes Northern California family to...
    Rain allowed firefighters to ramp up their efforts on the massive McKinney fire, which is now 10% contained, officials said during a community meeting Wednesday in Fort Jones, Calif. The blaze, which has charred 57,519 acres, continued to burn slowly in Siskiyou County as authorities lifted some evacuation orders. Four bodies have been found in its path. The Yeti Complex and Alex fires burning nearby were listed at 2,986 acres and 151 acres, respectively, according to the Klamath National Forest. Both were 0% contained. Ten evacuation zones — seven in Yreka and three in the county — have been downgraded to warnings, officials said Wednesday night. The affected areas are primarily in Yreka from Fairchild Street and Shasta Avenue west to the edge of the residential district. Residents in those zones can return to their homes, but authorities stressed caution and warned that anyone in the area should still be prepared to leave if warnings change to orders. Officials referred residents to community.zonehaven.com for up-to-date information on evacuation orders and warnings. Phil Anzo, a unit...
    Strong thunderstorms that dropped rain over the McKinney Fire have provided firefighters in far Northern California with some breathing room. But that relief is coupled with concerns that additional blazes could pop up in the coming days, according to authorities. The McKinney Fire grew 1,210 acres in the past 24 hours and now stands at 57,519 acres. The eastern flank of the fire received 1-3 inches of rain on Tuesday while the western flank received less than a half-inch. “The rain was beneficial, but there’s still lots of work to be done,” said Charles Smith, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Medford, Oregon. “Even with all that rain, there’s still smoke coming from the center and western edges of the fire.” Due to all the lightning-charged thunderstorms that hit the area in recent days, Smith said there was also a chance for “holdover fires” that may not become apparent for several days. It could take up to a week for the ground to dry out from the rain and for firefighters to know the extent to which the...
    The rain that has helped crews fighting the McKinney Fire has caused flash flooding and mudflows in an older burn area nearby. Evacuation warnings were issued Tuesday night north of Mount Shasta as Whitney Creek rose quickly. The warning area, indicated in yellow on the Zonehaven map below, includes rural neighborhoods in the area of last summer’s Lava Fire. “Please be ready to evacuate,” said a Facebook post from the Siskiyou County sheriff’s office. Video shared by the county’s emergency services office showed the creek sweeping entire trees down a muddy wash. The area is 25 miles southeast of the McKinney Fire, which has burned more than 55,000 acres in the Siskiyou Mountains since Friday. Thousands of people are under an evacuation order north and west of Yreka. Click ‘accept’ or ‘decline’ to see the full evacuation map, with an address search field. Related Articles Crashes and Disasters | Los Altos Hills: Arson suspect detained after 10 fires in one day Crashes and Disasters | San Mateo man dies in San Leandro traffic collision ...
    A fire big enough to make its own lightning used to be as rare as it sounds. But the McKinney fire, which erupted Friday, generated four separate thunder and lightning storms within its first 24 hours alone. A deadly combination of intense heat, parched vegetation and dry conditions has turned the 55,000-acre blaze in the Klamath National Forest into its own force of nature. Four separate times, columns of smoke rose from the flames beyond the altitude at which a typical jet flies, penetrating the stratosphere and injecting a plume of soot and ash miles above the Earth’s surface. It’s a phenomenon known as a pyrocumulonimbus cloud, a byproduct of fire that NASA once memorably described as “the fire-breathing dragon of clouds.” In Siskiyou County, the water in these clouds returned to Earth as rain, accompanied by thunder, wind and lightning, in “a classic example of a wildfire producing its own weather,” said David Peterson, a meteorologist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, which has developed an algorithm to distinguish fire-induced thunderstorms from traditional ones. Investigators have yet to...
    (CNN)As firefighters battle the raging wildfire scorching a Northern California forest and swallowing homes in its path, some residents forced to flee are left to grapple with the losses and an uncertain future.Klamath River resident Kayla Dailey, pregnant with her third child, spent her due date not prepping for the imminent delivery of her daughter, but fleeing the McKinney Fire, which she says ultimately engulfed her home.Massive McKinney Fire in Northern California leaves trail of destructionDailey, her husband Levi, their two young sons, and the family's roommate Dalton Shute relocated to Northern California from Indiana just 4 months ago. Wildfires were not something the family had encountered before.The blaze, the largest wildfire in California so far this year, broke out Friday afternoon in the Klamath National Forest near the California-Oregon border and grew rapidly over the weekend, fueled by explosive fire weather. The fire sprinted through dry brush and grass, scorching more than 56,000 acres and forcing thousands to evacuate as the flames advanced on rural Klamath River communities. The fire had zero containment as of Tuesday.Read MoreHowever, in a...
    Raging forest fires in Northern California claimed two more lives as the death toll rose to four from what has become the state's largest blaze brought on by blistering heat and bone-dry conditions, authorities said Tuesday. The Siskiyou County Sheriff said two bodies were found in separate residences on Monday along Route 96, one of the only roads in and out of the area. On Sunday, first responders found the first two bodies inside a burned-out vehicle inside a gated driveway of a home near the Klamath River. Flames overtook the vehicle before they could escape. 'It's really tragic when a fire gets up and moves this fast and basically takes out a community. And that's what happened in the Klamath River area,' Mike Lindbery, a spokesman with the fire's incident management team, said Tuesday. The McKinney Fire in Northern California has claimed four lives over five days as firefighter struggle to contain it Officers with the Siskiyou County Sheriff's office carry away the remains of one of two people found burned to death in separate residences in the Klamath...
    Firefighters battling the deadly McKinney Fire near the California-Oregon line are girding for potentially strong thunderstorms over the Klamath National Forest on Tuesday, which could either help quell California’s largest fire of 2022 and harden fire lines, or fan it further out of control. The forecast for monsoonal thunderstorms is expected to complicate firefighters’ path to containing the McKinney Fire and several other blazes burning in the Klamath National Forest that have forced thousands of people from their homes. It comes after firefighters reported strong progress Monday night in building dozer lines and protecting the remote city of Yreka — work that could be tested under more intense fire conditions. “It looks very good right now,” said Mike Lindbery, a U.S. Forest Service spokesman. “Now, that could change, as you see things come into alignment. If we begin to see clear skies over the fire, expect it to get up and run.” “This is a fuels-driven fire,” he added. “And as soon as those big logs sitting there smoldering get some heat on them, they’re going to ignite. And if...
    YREKA, Calif. —  Officials are searching for more potential victims of the McKinney fire as improving weather conditions allowed firefighters to gain some ground on California’s largest blaze of the year. About 1,700 firefighters battling the 55,493-acre blaze were contending with triple-digit heat and possible thunderstorms that could set off dangerous conditions. There were about 10 other smaller fires burning in Klamath National Forest. The fire, which was 0% contained, ignited Friday afternoon near Highway 96 and McKinney Creed Road, southwest of the Klamath River near the California-Oregon border. The main fire’s growth has stalled over the last two days, as more firefighters have arrived at the scene. Fire crews took advantage of more favorable weather conditions on Monday, including rain, and worked to establish containment lines to prevent the blaze from spreading. The cause of the fire is under investigation. California 2 found dead in car as raging McKinney fire grows to become California’s largest of year The McKinney fire has ripped through 52,498 acres in Klamath National Forest. A red flag warning is in effect, and...
    (CNN)As a massive wildfire continues to cut a path of destruction through a Northern California forest, residents are left to contend with lost homes and treasured family items.The McKinney Fire, the largest in California so far this year, broke out Friday afternoon in the Klamath National Forest near the California-Oregon border and exploded in size, quickly scorching more than 55,000 acres and forcing thousands to flee, not knowing if their homes will still be there when they return. The fire had zero containment as of Monday.2 dead in the McKinney Fire in Northern California, the states largest blaze this yearOn Sunday, two people were found dead inside a vehicle that burned in a driveway in the fire's path near Highway 96, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office. Video from Highway 96, along the Klamath River, shows trees burned black, charred vehicles on the side of the road with wheels melted off and destroyed structures, including the Klamath River Community Hall.Resident Mike Nowdesha surveyed the rubble Monday where his home once stood, a house he and his wife recently renovated.Read...
    TWO people have died in their car after attempting to out run the McKinney wildfire, which blazed through 80 square miles. The two unidentified bodies were found around 10am on Sunday in a driveway, north of Highway 96 in California, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office. 3Two people have died as a result of the blazing McKinney FireCredit: AP 3The California wildfire has burned through 80 square miles of the Klamath National ForestCredit: AP The two deaths were the first connected to California's wildfires this year, the Mercury News reported. The McKinney Fire burned through more than 55,493 acres in the Klamath National Forest, known for its hunting, fishing, and whitewater kayaking and rafting. That's almost 42 football fields worth of destroyed land and is considered California's largest fire of the year. It only took about 18 hours on Friday to plow through, forcing thousands of people to leave their homes near the California-Oregon line, according to the outlet. Read more in wildfiresBATTLE LINES Incredible moment farmer tries to slow down wildfire to save neighbour's homeWALL OF FLAMES Wildfire...
    WEED, Calif. —  A hot drizzle fell over the Weed Community Center on Monday, where nearly all of the 157 cots assembled by the American Red Cross had been occupied by evacuees from the McKinney fire the night before. Dozens of people milled about, some anxious and others bored, as the blaze raged in the nearby Klamath National Forest. Many feared the worst, but for Harlene Schwander, 81, it had already happened: Her house, located along Highway 96, has been leveled by the fire. Harlene Schwander shows some of the family photos she was able to grab before the McKinney fire destroyed her home on Monday, Aug. 1, 2022 in Weed, California. Schwander and BJ Janowicz, left, were staying at the Red Cross evacuation shelter. (Haley Smith/Los Angeles Times) “If I had known, I would have gotten more,” Schwander said. “I would have taken my sunglasses! I wasn’t thinking.” Schwander, an artist, said she had almost nothing left save for the clothes on her back and the handful of family photos she grabbed before she fled Saturday with her...
    Rainfall slowed the now fatal McKinney Fire’s growth overnight as the conflagration scorched 55,493 acres — approximately 86 square miles — and remained 0% contained by Monday morning, according to U.S. Forest Service officials.Related Articles California News | McKinney Fire: Two found dead in burned car as thousands flee California News | ‘It’s just decimated’: McKinney Fire explodes California News | Man found dead inside burning vehicle in San Jose; police say death is ‘suspicious’ California News | Oak Fire near Yosemite reaches 67% containment, Cal Fire says California News | Man suspected of starting fires in remote Oregon woods detained by 3 residents who tied him to a tree Weather on Sunday also favored the firefighters working to contain two other blazes in the area, the China 2 Fire and the Alex Fire. And the Forest Service said Monday that firefighters would continue taking advantage of the helpful conditions to build containment lines with awareness of the extremely dry vegetation surrounding them: “The continued threat of thunderstorms and...
    Dozens of hikers were rescued from the Pacific Crest Trail over the weekend as the McKinney fire continues to ravage Northern California’s Klamath National Forest. Sixty people were rescued Saturday afternoon on the California side of the trail at Red Buttes Wilderness, officials with the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon said. The evacuation was an assist with the Siskiyou County sheriff’s search and rescue team. “The difference with the hikers on the trail is they’re not as mobile,” Jackson County sheriff’s public information officer Aaron Lewis said. “[We] went to trailheads near roads and started gathering hikers. They weren’t necessarily in immediate danger.” The hikers were transported from Road Junction 1055 to Seattle Bar at Applegate Lake before being taken to Medford or Ashland, Oregon authorities said. California 2 found dead in car as raging McKinney fire grows to become California’s largest of year The McKinney fire has ripped through 52,498 acres in Klamath National Forest. A red flag warning is in effect, and storms are expected. As of Monday morning, the McKinney fire —...
    Two people were found dead in a vehicle in the area of the McKinney Fire, California's largest forest fire this year so far, according to authorities. The two people were found on Sunday morning at 9:57 a.m. in a residential driveway off of Highway 96, west of the community of the Klamath River, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office. Additional information on the deaths is pending based on positive identification of the victims and notification of their next of kin, the office stated on social media. No other deaths caused by the fire have been found yet, a spokesperson for the office told the Washington Examiner. OREGON RESIDENTS DETAIN ARSON SUSPECT BY TYING HIM TO TREE A firetruck drives along California Highway 96 as the McKinney Fire burns in Klamath National Forest, Calif., Saturday, July 30, 2022. (AP Photo/Noah Berger) Noah Berger/AP A scorched vehicle rests sits next to a driveway as the McKinney Fire burns in Klamath National Forest, Calif., on Sunday, July 31, 2022. (AP Photo/Noah Berger) Noah...
    Two people were found dead in a vehicle that was burned in the path of the McKinney Fire, the Siskiyou County sheriff’s office has announced. The bodies were discovered just before 10 a.m. Sunday in a residential driveway along Doggett Creek Road, north of Highway 96 and west of the community of Klamath River. The sheriff’s office said no more information on the deaths would be released until the victims are identified and their family notified. The McKinney Fire, which started Friday, has burned more than 50,000 acres (80 square miles) in the mountains west of Yreka. Doggett Creek Road has been under evacuation order since the early hours of the wildfire, which started Friday around 2 p.m. The deaths are the first this year associated with a California wildfire. Related Articles Crashes and Disasters | “It’s just decimated”: McKinney Fire explodes along California-Oregon border into state’s largest fire of 2022 Crashes and Disasters | Wildfires in West explode in size amid hot, windy conditions Crashes and Disasters | Oak Fire near Yosemite reaches 67%...
    The largest wildland fire recorded this year in California has turned fatal as the inferno exploded in size and emblazed its way through Klamath National Forest. Two people have been found dead in their car in the town of Klamath River, California, amid the apocalyptic scenes as thousands of homes were evacuated, Siskiyou County Sheriff Jeremiah LaRue confirmed.  It's believed that the two people who tragically died were attempting to flee the fast-moving flames ripping through the state's dry terrain. The threatening McKinney blaze - which is now engulfing 80 squared miles of dry tinderbox wildland in the area - has been spurred on by gusty winds and lightening strikes.  Firefighters are working tirelessly to put out the unpredictable blaze, which began on Friday afternoon - but it is currently zero per cent contained.  The roaring inferno threatening wildlife and homes in California has now become fatal - after two people were found dead in a car in their driveway The threatening blaze is now engulfing 80 squared miles of dry tinderbox wildland in the area as firefighters work tirelessly to...
    (CNN)A wildfire in Northern California exploded in size over the weekend, triggering evacuations and becoming the state's largest wildfire so far this year, according to CAL FIRE. The blaze, dubbed the McKinney Fire, broke out Friday afternoon in the Klamath National Forest near the California-Oregon border and has since ripped through more than 52,000 acres, advancing on homes and forcing nearly 2,000 residents to evacuate Saturday, authorities said.Heavy smoke over the fire helped slow its growth Sunday, but also kept firefighting aircraft grounded, the US Forest Service said in a Sunday night update.As the weekend ended, the blaze was 0% contained and firefighters face a long battle ahead as lightning and thunderstorms complicated efforts while the flames raced through dry vegetation. Northern California wildfire exacerbated by weather, causing significant growthOregon state Rep. Dacia Grayber was camping with her husband, both firefighters, near the California state line when they woke up to orange skies, hot wind gusts, lightning and blowing ash, she said on Twitter. They evacuated from the campground knowing one of them may return on deployment if the fire...
    Supercharged by gusty thunderstorms and drought-ravaged trees, the McKinney Fire exploded over the weekend into California’s largest fire of 2022 — wiping out houses, sending 1,300 people fleeing for safety and forcing dozens of hikers to be rescued from the Pacific Crest Trail near the California-Oregon border. The blaze charred more than 51,000 acres as of Sunday morning and remained just 1% contained as it barreled out of control through the Klamath National Forest — a remote enclave northwest of Mt. Shasta that’s renowned for its fishing, white-water kayaking and rafting. And with scores of lightning strikes — some originating from its own billowing smoke plume — hitting around the central conflagration this weekend, firefighters warned thousands more to be ready to flee at a moment’s notice. At least 400 structures remained threatened by the blaze Sunday, which needed less than 48 hours to swell to twice the size of any other fire so far this year in California. But while temperatures eased slightly on Sunday and thunderstorms eased somewhat early Sunday afternoon, firefighters girded for another round of potentially...
    (CNN)A wildfire raging in Northern California has been exacerbated by winds from thunderstorms on Friday evening, causing significant growth on Saturday, according to InciWeb. The fire has already burned 30,000-40,000 acres with potentially dangerous storms possible Saturday, according to an update from Klamath National Forest."Cumulus clouds are developing in the fire area, which have potential to exacerbate fire behavior," Klamath National Forest said in a Facebook post.The fire, known as the McKinney fire, started on Friday in Siskiyou County near the California-Oregon border, about four hours north of Sacramento. The county has a population of just about 44,000, according to the US Census Bureau.A mandatory evacuation order was announced for parts of Siskiyou County on Saturday, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office. Residents within the evacuation zone are being asked to "please leave immediately."Read MoreA red flag warning, which indicates dangerous fire conditions, is in effect. Lightning is expected in the area, and fire managers were "expecting a very dynamic day [Saturday] on the fire as predicted weather is expected to be problematic for the firefighters," according to InciWeb's...
    A wildfire that started Friday afternoon has grown to 18,000 acres, and fire managers say another day of “very active fire behavior” is expected. Evacuations have been ordered along the Klamath River in Siskiyou County. The McKinney Fire started around 2:15 p.m. Friday on the south side of Highway 96 about 5 miles east of the community of Horse Creek. The map above shows mandatory evacuation areas in red and warning areas in yellow. The report Saturday morning from Forest Service fire managers said winds from late evening thunderstorms kept the fire active through the night. A red-flag warning, indicating heightened fire danger, remains in effect because of lightning. Barely 18 hours after it started, McKinney was already the second-largest California wildfire of the season, slightly smaller than the Oak Fire, west of Yosemite. Because of the expectation of hot, windy weather, more crews are being called to the scene. Related Articles Crashes and Disasters | PG&E profits and revenue drop, wildfire efforts widen Crashes and Disasters | Water woes are biggest worry for Californians...
    MCKINNEY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – McKinney Fire Department officials announced on November 10 that they would be partnering with Integrative Emergency Services to implement an emergency response telemedicine program for 911 calls. The Fire Department hopes that the new program, which is among the first in the country to involve fire-based EMS departments, will help save some patients a trip to the hospital by connecting paramedics and other first responders to ER physicians. READ MORE: DFW Airport Stops Prepaid Parking For Thanksgiving WeekThe physician will then be able to work with paramedics to assist in providing the right diagnosis, treatment, and referral options without the expense or long waiting times of an ER visit. READ MORE: Chance For Strong Storms Moving Through North Texas This Evening“The healthcare world is evolving, and technology is in the forefront, partly out of necessity due to the pandemic,” said McKinney Fire Chief Danny Kistner. “Telemedicine on 911 calls will allow our highly-trained paramedics to treat the right patient at the right time in the right location.” MORE NEWS: Fundraiser Held To Benefit Dallas Firefighters Injured...
    McKINNEY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Before the sun came up this morning, the McKinney Fire Department (MFD) responded to four structure fire calls. Each one was reported as a possible lightning strike. READ MORE: DFW Weather: More Strong Storms Forecasted In North Texas This Weekend “This is why it is so important to have working smoke alarms in your home,” said McKinney Fire Department Public Information Officer Merit Ossian. “When a fire breaks out, you have only a few minutes to get your family out. You want to be able to use every second of that time.” All the reports came from the southwest side of McKinney. No injuries were reported in any of the fires. Each fire is under investigation to determine the exact cause. READ MORE: Motorcycle Deputies Arrest Man Caught Dumping 5 Tons Of Slate Shingles On County Road Here’s a look at how the fires were reported: At 9:48 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 25, MFD responded to the report of a structure fire in the 7000 block of Collin McKinney Pkwy. Fire crews investigated and found the...
    McKINNEY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Two children in McKinney are ok after falling through ice near Lake Forest and Highland, the McKinney Fire Department said Friday, Feb. 19. They were out when first responders arrived. Ice kids fell into in McKinney (McKinney Fire Dept.) “Please talk to your kids about the dangers of walking on icy lakes,” the McKinney Fire Department said. Bystanders said some other kids were playing hockey on this same area earlier.
    McKINNEY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – McKinney fire investigators say a fire sprinkler did its job on New Year’s Eve, when fire broke out at the Hutchins BBQ restaurant at 1301 N. Tennessee St. Units arrived just before 10 p.m. to find fire coming from the roof at the rear of the restaurant. The call was upgraded to a structure fire. McKinney firefighters were able to put it out quickly. That effort was helped by a sprinkler head installed in the older part of the building. The sprinkler kept the fire from spreading until firefighters arrived. The investigation continues and the fire is still listed as accidental/undetermined at this time. “This shows the effectiveness of fire sprinklers and why building owners should strongly consider retrofitting their properties with fire sprinklers,” said McKinney Fire Marshal Mike Smith. “Fire sprinklers can also be added to homes – lowering the home fire death rate by up to 90%.” MORE FROM CBSDFW Driver Killed In High-Speed Crash Into Tree In Plano McKinney Mayor George Fuller Critical Of COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout, Only...
    McKINNEY, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Firefighters rescued a woman stranded on the roof of her burning McKinney home after she ran back inside for her cell phone. It happened in the 6300 block of Avalon Woods Dr. on December 14. The woman had helped her mother escape the burning home, before running back inside and getting trapped. “If a fire breaks out in your home, you have just a few minutes to get out safely,” said McKinney Fire Marshal Mike Smith. “Close doors as you leave and don’t go back inside for any reason.” Firefighters used ladders to bring the woman down to safety. Two people were treated and transported to a local hospital for burns and smoke inhalation. The cause of the fire is under investigation. MORE FROM CBSDFW Country Music Legend Charley Pride Dies Of COVID-19 Complications In Dallas Texas GOP Chair Allen West Suggests ‘Law-Abiding States’ Should ‘Form A Union’ After Supreme Court Rejects Lawsuit On Election Results Texas Parks And Wildlife Confirms Another Mountain Lion Sighting In North Texas
    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) — Nearly 170 firefighters from across Texas flew out Tuesday morning, headed to California to help battle the historic wildfires sweeping across that state. The emergency crews include 80 firefighters from North Texas. It was just two weeks ago when a heartfelt reunion between McKinney firefighter Quincy Blunt and his daughter captivated thousands on social media. The special welcome home came after he spent 25 days in California. Now, Blunt is one of several McKinney firefighters volunteering to go back. With hundreds of wildfires burning in the state — about 30 of them major — the group doesn’t know exactly where they’ll be sent. Blunt says he’s keeping an eye on conditions in California and that he’s eager to help out again, even though it may mean missing his daughter’s 8th birthday. “There’s no doubt those guys they’re needing help,” he said. “They’re just as tired as they was when I went out there the first time, and they’re not getting any relief whatsoever.” Southwest Airlines is chartering two roundtrip flights to get the firefighters to and from...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4) – Even though its been snowing ash and wildfire smoke is worsening air quality across the front range, many people are still setting off illegal fireworks and starting illegal campfires, according to Boulder County Sheriff’s Office Fire Management Officer Seth McKinney. (credit: CBS) Sunday night in Boulder, McKinney said someone threw a bottle rocket out of their car window, as they were driving along North Foothills Highway, causing a brush fire. “We need people to use good judgement, be a little smarter than that, because that could have some really bad consequences,” McKinney said. Fortunately, some Good Samaritans saw the brush fire as they were driving by, and stopped to call 911 and help put the fire out before it got out of hand. (credit: CBS) “If you come across one, you do what you can to keep it small, call 911, get the troops coming, and then see what you can do, because the last thing we want is another large fire,” McKinney said. McKinney also explained that even though some snow and rain is expected Monday...
    All it would take is one phone call from a fire department. Any fire department. Joshua McKinney assured me of this one recent morning, standing in the shade in his grandmother’s driveway in South Los Angeles as an LAPD helicopter circled overhead. For weeks now, ever since the 26-year-old got out of prison in June, he has been trying to earn a paycheck in an economy that’s in shambles and dreaming of returning to the fire lines, where he worked to get months off his sentence, earning a pittance. “I went in mainly to get out early, but as I was there, I actually fell in love with it,” McKinney explained. “I was like, ‘Dang, I never knew how much I loved hard work.’” He and thousands of other Californians are barred from suiting up again because of their criminal records, and that is just stupid for a state that is woefully short on resources to fight fires. In recent weeks, firefighters have been overrun in Northern California, slammed from all sides by wildfires that have killed...
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