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    Henry Fuhrmann, editor and mentor to generations of journalists at the Los Angeles Times, died earlier this month at the age of 65. Henry was a brilliant editor passionate about language, whose work was instrumental in changing newspaper standards for describing immigrants and people from minority communities, and in guiding this paper’s transition online. Here I want to highlight an aspect of his work that was equally heroic: his care for the next generation. I first met Henry at a journalism seminar organized by the Los Angeles chapter of the Asian American Journalists Assn. As a prize for correctly answering a question that I’m sure was quite trivial, he gave me a plain cream diner mug with black text: “Los Angeles Times Copy Desk.” That mug meant so much to me. At the time I was fresh out of college, without steady work, connections or promising prospects in journalism. I took it as evidence that Henry thought I was good enough to work for the L.A. Times. I’ve kept the mug at every desk through every job I’ve had....
    Vice President Kamala Harris said that Democrats didn’t push to codify abortion rights because they “certainly believed” that Roe v. Wade was among those issues considered “settled.” In an exclusive interview with the vice president, CBS News’ Robert Costa asked about the 5-4 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that effectively overturned Roe v. Wade  mere weeks ago. The interview will air on Sunday’s edition of Face the Nation, but a pair of preview clips show the VP speaking out about the issue. In one, the VP expressed outrage at the decision, and pushed for Congress to pass legislation, and reiterated that she “never believed” the now-justices who claimed in their confirmations that they would respect settled precedent: VICE PRESIDENT HARRIS: I think all of us share a deep sense of outrage that the United States Supreme Court took a constitutional right that was recognized, took it from the women of America. We are now looking at a case where the government can interfere in what is one of the most intimate and private decisions that someone can make. ROBERT COSTA:...
    As locals celebrated the Fourth of July at Highland Park on Monday morning, a gunman believed to have been perched on a nearby rooftop opened fire, killing at least six people and wounding dozens more. Robert Crimo, 22, was taken into custody as a person of interest following an extensive manhunt, and it was later revealed that he had posted videos appearing to muse about committing violent acts, including one video from 2021 that appeared to show him driving down a street that appears to be part of the parade route. TWO HIGHLAND PARK SHOOTING VICTIMS IDENTIFIED "This morning at 10:10 a.m. our community was terrorized by an act of violence that has shaken us to our core," Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering said after the shooting. "Our hearts go out to the families of the victims during this devastating time. On a day that we came together to celebrate community and freedom — we are instead mourning the tragic loss of life and struggling with the terror that was brought upon us." Police arrested...
    THREE men have told how they encountered an apparent Bigfoot-like "Yowie" as they travelled home from work - leaving them terrified. The men, from remote Queensland, Australia, have claimed they came across the beast while driving home earlier this month. 4Seamus Fitzgerald described the mysterious figure as having “very long arms” and an “apelike” faceCredit: AYR / Buck Buckingham The Courier Mail reported the three plantation workers were driving on Saturday, December 4 to the Jimna Base Camp in Australia when they spotted the animal. They said they spotted the “slouched over figure” under a street light and when the figure noticed them, it turned in their direction. Seamus Fitzgerald told The Courier Mail described the mysterious figure as having “very long arms” and an “apelike” face. He said: “We initially thought it was a boar or a really big animal until we got closer and saw it runoff in a very apelike way. “I’ve never really had a paranormal or strange experience like that before. "I hardly slept that night and the feeling was overwhelming that I had seen...
    ON October 31, revellers enjoy all the spine-tingling festivities that Halloween brings the world every year. The haunting event usually consists of fun activities and events, but why do we celebrate it and where did the tradition originate? Here’s everything you know about the much-loved celebration… 2 Halloween is celebrated globallyCredit: Getty Images Where did Halloween come from? It’s a common misconception that Halloween originated in America, but the tradition was actually started up a bit closer to home. Experts believe that the spooky festival started in Ireland, where the Celtics celebrated Samhain. This Gaelic festival was held after harvest and honoured the souls of the dead to prevent bad luck. It was one of four Gaelic seasonal festivals, commonly observed across Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Other theories suggest that pagans have been celebrating Halloween for thousands of years, where people dressed up in costumes and built bonfires to scare evil spirits away. Remarkably, evidence of these early Halloween events can be traced back to over 6,000 years ago. Why do we go trick or treating? It’s believed...
    Video shows the terrifying moment armed US Marshals entered a young Florida mother's apartment without a warrant Friday morning in pursuit of a fugitive who had nothing to do with her.  The Marshals were searching for a homicide suspect wanted by the Manatee County Sheriff's Office when they approached Kada Staples' unit, thinking the fugitive may be inside. 'U.S. Marshals. Come to the door!' an officer is heard yelling in the video, which was captured on Staples' doorbell camera. 'Tell him to come out with his hands up,' another officer yelled to the camera. 'We know he's in there. The place is surrounded.' Kada Staples (pictured) claims armed US Marshals entered her Florida apartment without a warrant after believing homicide suspect Shamar Johnson was inside 'U.S. Marshals. Come to the door!' an officer is heard yelling in the video, which was captured on Staples' doorbell camera
    This is the moment an aggressive bear got into a tense stand-off with a leopard, before backing down when the big cat stood its ground. Footage shows the sloth bear skulk away with a growl after failing to take on its rival. The footage was captured in the Kumana National Park on Sri Lanka's east coast. In the video, taken from a distance, the black sloth bear appears out of the woods and walks towards where the leopard is resting on the ground.  As soon as the bear comes into the vicinity of its rival, it quickly stands up on its hind legs in an attempt to scare the animal. Unmoved by the bear's threats, the leopard stands up and squares off with the bear. After some tense growling and hissing however, the bear appears to back down and drifts off towards the forest cover, leaving the carnivore behind. This is the moment an aggressive bear got into a tense stand-off with a leopard, before backing down when the big cat stood its ground in the Kumana National Park on Sri Lanka's...
    Share this: To Charlotte Bennett, the new book that arrived at her Manhattan apartment this week — Anita Hill’s “Believing” — was more than just a look at gender violence. It was a dispatch from a fellow member of a very specific sisterhood — women who have come forward to describe misconduct they suffered at the hands of powerful men. Bennett’s story of harassment by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo helped lead to his resignation after an investigation found he’d harassed at least 11 women. And 30 years ago this month, Hill testified before a skeptical Senate Judiciary Committee that Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her.
    NEW YORK -- To Charlotte Bennett, the new book that arrived at her Manhattan apartment this week - Anita Hill's "Believing" - was more than just a look at gender violence.It was a dispatch from a fellow member of a very specific sisterhood - women who have come forward to describe misconduct they suffered at the hands of powerful men.Bennett's story of harassment by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo helped lead to his resignation after an investigation found he'd harassed at least 11 women. And 30 years ago this month, Hill testified before a skeptical Senate Judiciary Committee that Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her."I can't imagine what it was like doing that in 1991," said Bennett, 26. "I've thought about that a lot."Hill's history obviously predates the #MeToo movement, the broad social reckoning against sexual misconduct that reaches its four-year mark this week. But Bennett's moment is very much a part of it, and she believes #MeToo is largely responsible for a fundamental change in the landscape since 1991, when Hill came forward."I'd like to think that now, we...
    NEW YORK (AP) — To Charlotte Bennett, the new book that arrived at her Manhattan apartment this week — Anita Hill’s “Believing” — was more than just a look at gender violence. It was a dispatch from a fellow member of a very specific sisterhood — women who have come forward to describe misconduct they suffered at the hands of powerful men. Bennett’s story of harassment by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo helped lead to his resignation after an investigation found he’d harassed at least 11 women. And 30 years ago this month, Hill testified before a skeptical Senate Judiciary Committee that Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. “I can’t imagine what it was like doing that in 1991,” said Bennett, 26. “I’ve thought about that a lot.” Hill’s history obviously predates the #MeToo movement, the broad social reckoning against sexual misconduct that reaches its four-year mark this week. But Bennett’s moment is very much a part of it, and she believes #MeToo is largely responsible for a fundamental change in the landscape since 1991, when Hill came forward. “I’d...
    Madi Prewett Revisits Tense ‘AFR’ in Book: When Did She Last Speak to Peter? Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Cl B stock falls Tuesday, underperforms market The best team in the American League is going home before the AL Championship Series. Hey, it happens, particularly against a red-hot, punishing opponent in a best-of-five AL Division Series.  Can Astros cheaters redeem legacy this postseason? USA TODAY SPORTS See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Daily Cover: Kris Bryants Giant Relief Sports Illustrated Derek Jeter pens letter to 12-year-old self TODAY NWSL faces reckoning amid claims of abuse, sexual misconduct among coaches CBS News For Pete’s Sake, Yankees Aren’t Good Enough: Unchecked Sports Illustrated Minor league pitcher says he mows lawns to make ends meet CBS News Daily Cover: And Were Off! Sports Illustrated Click to expand Replay Video Daily Cover: Kris Bryants Giant Relief The public sees him as a cerulean-eyed Express model and perennial All-Star who led the Cubs to...
    The Government has been condemned after refusing to release details of key email conversations involving leading scientists over the origins of Covid-19. This newspaper used Freedom of Information rules to obtain a cache of 32 emails about a secretive teleconference between British and American health officials held early in the pandemic. But officials blacked out almost every word before releasing the crucial documents. Before this discussion, several of the world’s most influential experts believed the new virus most likely came from a laboratory – but days later, the scientists began dismissing such scenarios as ‘implausible’ and branding them conspiracy theories. This newspaper used Freedom of Information rules to obtain a cache of 32 emails about a secretive teleconference between British and American health officials held early in the pandemic The critical call is at the centre of concerns that the scientific establishment tried to stifle debate on the pandemic’s origins, as damning new evidence emerges of US ties to high-risk research on bat viruses in Wuhan, where the first cases emerged in late 2019. The Mail on Sunday requested emails,...
    The protagonist in the triumph of Seville it was again Erik lamela, author in injury time of the goal that places Lopetegui’s men with six points. His so much before him Getafe joins the two that he converted against Rayo Vallecano on the first match, so the joy of the former Tottenham striker was immense. “The game did not make us feel comfortable in general, so I say we have to improve a lot. In the last play we believed until the endWe thought we could win it and luckily that ball was left there and we were able to do it ”, explained the Argentine after the game. Lamella is happy for his numbers on his arrival at Seville. “It makes me very happy that he is giving me this way in the first games, but hey, we have to improve a lot, we can play much betterWe have the players to be able to do it, but luckily we started by winning the first two games, which was the priority ”. The extreme goes step by step...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — 7-year-old Serenity Broughton is dead and her 6-year-old sister, Aubrey, wounded in a shooting Sunday afternoon in the Belmont Central community. Serenity (left) and Aubrey Broughton. (Supplied by Regina Broughton) Here is what we know about the shooting so far: The sisters were shot as their mother was getting them into a car at 2:50 p.m.; police were called to the 6200 block of West Grand Avenue, at Merrimac Avenue, for a ShotSpotter alert. Serenity was shot in the chest and torso, and was pronounced dead at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood. Aubrey was shot in the chest and right armpit, and was being treated at Loyola. Witnesses said they heard rapid gunfire at the time of the shooting. A man who lives across the street said he heard at least a dozen shots. Police said the girls were not believed to be the intended targets. There may have been more than one shooter, but there was not believed to be crossfire. Police asked anyone who saw something to say something. Witnesses can go anonymously...
    Wednesday, Fox News Channel’s Tucker Carlson opened his program by paying tribute to conservative talker Rush Limbaugh, who passed away earlier in the day due to lung cancer. The “Tucker Carlson Tonight” host credited Limbaugh for taking on censorship, which Carlson said long predated the wave of corporate censorship currently threatening the culture. Transcript as follows: CARLSON: Rush Limbaugh passed away today as you’ve doubtless heard. He had just turned 70 last month. There are people, literally millions of people who listen to Rush Limbaugh faithfully every day for 30 years. Some of them cried when they heard the news. Others on the internet gloated, revealing the depth of their cruelty and soullessness. We’re going to ignore them tonight. They have too much influence over our culture already. Instead, we’re going to tell you about Rush Limbaugh, what he did and why he mattered. Limbaugh was a profoundly talented broadcaster, but that’s not why he endured for generations and singlehandedly reshaped the media business, which he did. Rush Limbaugh actually believed things and he believed them with sincerity, that was...
    “We did not choose the countryside to settle in a telecommunications station”. Anne-Laure would never have thought, when she lived in the small village of Saint-Senior-de-Beauvoir fifteen years ago, to get acquainted with the rich of this planet. American Elon Musk’s SpaceX plans to put an end to the world’s white zones, especially by fitting relay antennas in this region south of the channel. The village was not randomly selected: optical fiber is already installed there, and it would be the best place to use the high-speed satellite internet network throughout the country’s northwest quarter. The U.S. agent had asked a French company to buy three hectares of land from a village of 350 people. It was countless of the latter who began to worry about the project. Among them is Kristelle, the breeder.“We believe in a great joke first and then we realize it’s solid, She says. We are on a farm, there are some farms locally, and we are well aware that the waves can have a very negative effect on milk production. “, She insists....
    A nursing home worker has melted the hearts of millions on social media after sharing a video of one of her patients receiving a Christmas gift. In a recent video posted on TikTok by @bekarir, an elderly woman, believed to have dementia, is seen cuddling a large cuddly tiger toy, given to her by a carer. The video begins with the woman, named Freda, who is believed to live in America, already wrapping her arms around the plush tiger toy. However, it's the final comment made by Freda which has left many on social media heartbroken. as she says: 'You see how much we miss loving somebody?'  It's not clear from the video if Freda has family, or whether she's been kept apart from loved ones due to the pandemic.   Freda, believed to be from America, melted the hearts of millions on social media recently after they saw her reaction to receiving a soft tiger toy for Christmas Since September, nursing homes where there's no active outbreak of Covid-19 have been encouraged to welcome visitors, but policies vary widely from...
    For Elizabeth Tobin Kurtz, Leanza Cornett was more than just a beauty queen. The pageant star, who won the title of Miss America in 1993, passed away at age 49. Her death was confirmed by the Miss America Organization in a statement on Wednesday. "It is with great sadness the Miss America Organization relays the news our beloved Miss America and friend, Leanza Cornett, has passed away," the organization wrote on Facebook. "Leanza had a bright and beautiful spirit and her laugh was infectious. We know she meant so much to so many, including all of you." The statement continued: "We are devastated by this sudden loss in our Miss America family and we are deeply sorry for her family and close friends for their loss." FORMER MISS AMERICA LEANZA CORNETT DEAD AT 49 On Friday, Kurtz described Cornett to People magazine as “smart, talented and driven.” The pageant star, who won the title of Miss America in 1993, passed away at age 49. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Dick Clark Productions) “You think ‘beauty queen,’ but that’s...
    It can be difficult to give a subtle hint when you're feeling frustrated, as proven by these hilarious viral photos.  Diply rounded up a selection of photographs from around the world that show people being brutally blunt in a series of scenarios.   Among the amusing snaps was a single mother who advertised for a new partner via a sign on the back window of her car. Elsewhere, an angry customer blasted a restaurant employee for getting their order wrong by writing a message on their plate using onions.   Diply picked out a selection of hilarious scenarios where people around the world have given not so subtle hints, including a panhandler believed to be in the US who promised to use any money donated for taking revenge  That told them! A diner who requested no onion in their dish made their annoyance known by spelling out a message using the unwanted ingredient   RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Schoolboy, 11, is dubbed a 'hero' after jumping behind the... Youthful 51-year-old who says she is...
    Tamar Braxton is seen as We TV celebrates the premiere of “Braxton Family Values” at Doheny Room on April 02, 2019 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images for WE tv ) WE tv has honored Tamar Braxton’s request to be released from her contract but still intend to move forward with airing her reality television show Get Ya Life! despite her objections. Braxton and the network have severed ties after the R&B singer accused them of being “excessive and unfair” over their work demands, Variety reported. The outlet obtained an exclusive statement on Friday confirming the split. (Photo: Getty Images) “Tamar Braxton has been an important part of our network family for more than a decade. As she focuses on her health and recovery at what is clearly a difficult and personal time, we will work with her representatives to honor her request to end all future work for the network. We wish her nothing but the best,” the WE tv statement read. Read More: Tamar Braxton says she is ‘healing’ after a suicide...
    Matthew Rozsa July 6, 2020 8:47PM (UTC) A group of 239 scientists from 32 different countries plan on publishing a letter in a scientific journal next week contending that the coronavirus is far more predisposed to airborne transmission than previously believed. If true, it would have major implications for public safety and hospital measures designed to limit spread of the virus. The letter will go against the conclusion of the World Health Organization (WHO) and therefore calls on the agency to revise its current position on the pandemic. The scientists' conclusion would mean that masks could be needed even outdoors and in socially distant settings; that indoor ultraviolet lights could be required to kill particles floating in tiny droplets; that health care workers may need to use N95 masks while caring for coronavirus patients; and that ventilation systems may be required to include new filters and to reduce air recirculation. : The WHO, by contrast, argues that N95 masks and proper ventilation are only of concern amid medical procedures that create aerosols, or droplets smaller than 5 microns. The agency...
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