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    LOS ANGELES — The identification of a small molecule drug that can target the brain’s circadian clock proteins may prove effective for treating glioblastoma, the most common cancerous brain tumor in adults, researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC announced Monday. Glioblastoma is an aggressive disease. Patients survive an average of just 15 months once they are diagnosed. Despite more than two decades of research on the causes and treatments of glioblastoma, that prognosis has hardly improved. But recent work by a Keck School of Medicine team has demonstrated that circadian clock proteins, which help coordinate changes in the body’s functions over the course of a day, may play a key role in glioblastoma growth and proliferation after current standard treatments, according to research published in “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.” The discovery has led to a potential breakthrough: the identification of a small molecule drug, known as SHP656, that can target the clock proteins and may prove effective for treating the disease, according to USC.Biological Sciences at the Keck School of Medicine and director of...
    (CNN)Scientists have created mouse embryos in a dish, and it could one day help families hoping to get pregnant, according to a new study.After 10 years of research, scientists created a synthetic mouse embryo that began forming organs without a sperm or egg, according to the study published Thursday in the journal Nature. All it took was stem cells. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can be manipulated into becoming mature cells with special functions. "Our mouse embryo model not only develops a brain, but also a beating heart, all the components that go on to make up the body," said lead study author Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, professor of mammalian development and stem cell biology at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. "It's just unbelievable that we've got this far. This has been the dream of our community for years, and a major focus of our work for a decade, and finally we've done it."Lab-grown human milk may be just three years awayRead MoreThe paper is an exciting advance and tackles a challenge scientists face studying mammal embryos in...
    Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos from stem cells that mimic how natural embryos develop up to 8.5 days. The man-made embryos formed an early-stage brain, heart, and gut, introducing a powerful new model to study diseases and bringing researchers one step closer to understanding how life begins. “The big question that we are addressing in the lab is how do we start our lives?” Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a Caltech biological engineer who led the new research, said during a press briefing. Her team published their study on Thursday in Nature. How different cell types coordinate and signal to eventually grow into complex structures like organs remains a mystery, in part due to the limits of prior embryo models. These models rely on the use of stem cells, which can become a variety of specialized cell types from muscle cells to neurons. Scientists used one kind of stem cells to create synthetic embryos in the past, but the models were imperfect and did not accurately simulate the kinds of developmental changes that natural mouse embryos undergo. However, Zernicka-Goetz’ team combined the...
    Stem cells are pretty amazing. They can grow into and repair organs. They can turn into multiple different types of cells. They’re also very useful to create new blood cells for patients going through chemotherapy. While there’s still a lot we don’t know about them, scientists hope they can be used for some potentially groundbreaking treatments in the future—and maybe even cure brain injuries. A team of researchers discovered stem cells in the bodies of mice that helped repair injured spinal cords. In a new paper published on Monday in the journal Developmental Cell, the authors said that the cells responded to injuries in the mice’s central nervous system. They believe that the findings could potentially lead to a treatment for humans as well. “We hope that studying these cells will help build a more complete picture of the role different types of stem cells play in repairing damage, which could have important implications for regenerative medicine,” Caetano Reis e Sousa, an immunology researcher at the Francis Crick Institute and co-author of the paper, said in a press release. ...
    Science. A recent scientific breakthrough with artificial mouse embryos has finally made it possible to cure certain diseases in humans. But this raises some ethical questions. A historical discovery From time to time, we deal with certain scientific matters when the facts are so important as to be raised. Months ago, we told you The world’s largest bacteria Never analyzed, the “Theomargarita Magnifica“, a string-like uninucleate bacterium discovered in Guadeloupe. Today, for the first time, researchers have developed Mouse embryos without using eggs or sperm He watched them grow outside the womb. A real breakthrough in our understanding of how embryos develop. After eight days of cultivation Therefore, these embryos were created only from stem cells taken from the skin. This discovery was appreciated Weizmann Institute of ScienceIn Israel, notably Jacob Hanna, an embryonic stem cell biologist This achievement was published in the journal Go, In the center of a scientific paper explaining how the researchers achieved their achievement. For example we observe Embryos develop only after eight days of incubation Stem cells. To guarantee...
    Scientists have revealed plans to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger, almost 100 years after it went extinct.   The Tasmanian Tiger, also known as the tyhlacine, roamed the Earth for millions of years before being wiped out by human hunting in the 1930s.  Now, Colossal Biosciences, a startup based in Dallas, Texas, has announced plans to start the 'de-extinction' of the species, using stem cell technology.  'Bringing back the thylacine will not only return the iconic species to the world, but has the potential to re-balance the Tasmanian and broader Australian ecosystems, which have suffered biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation since the loss of the predator earlier this century,' Colossal Biosciences explained.  Colossal Biosciences, a startup based in Dallas, Texas, has announced plans to start the 'de-extinction' of the species, using stem cell technology The thylacine was once common in Australia thousands of years ago but went extinct a century ago (pictured)  How do scientists plan to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger? The scientists plan to take stem cells from the fat-tailed dunnart - a living species with similar DNA - and...
    Researcher Dhruv Sareen’s own stem cells are now orbiting the Earth. The mission? To test whether they’ll grow better in zero gravity. Scientists at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles are trying to find new ways to produce huge batches of a type of stem cell that can generate nearly any other type of cell in the body — and potentially be used to make treatments for many diseases. The cells arrived over the weekend at the International Space Station on a supply ship. “I don’t think I would be able to pay whatever it costs now” to take a private ride to space, Sareen said. “At least a part of me in cells can go up!” The experiment is the latest research project that involves shooting stem cells into space. Some, like this one, aim to overcome the terrestrial difficulty of mass producing the cells. Others explore how space travel impacts the cells in the body. And some help better understand diseases such as cancer. “By pushing the boundaries like this, it’s knowledge and it’s science and it’s learning,”...
    (CNN)The first time molecular biologist Doris Taylor saw heart stem cells beat in unison in a petri dish, she was spellbound."It actually changed my life," said Taylor, who directed regenerative medicine research at Texas Heart Institute in Houston until 2020. "I said to myself, 'Oh my gosh, that's life.' I wanted to figure out the how and why, and re-create that to save lives."That goal has become reality. On Wednesday at the Life Itself conference, a health and wellness event presented in partnership with CNN, Taylor showed the audience the scaffolding of a pig's heart infused with human stem cells -- creating a viable, beating human heart the body will not reject. Why? Because it's made from that person's own tissues. "Now we can truly imagine building a personalized human heart, taking heart transplants from an emergency procedure where you're so sick, to a planned procedure," Taylor told the audience. "That reduces your risk by eliminating the need for (antirejection) drugs, by using your own cells to build that heart it reduces the cost ... and you aren't in the...
    MAGNETIC bandages may soon be used to repair worn joints and mend broken bones. Combining the dressings with an injection of stem cells helps cartilage and bone to regrow, researchers found. 1Magnetic bandages may soon be used to repair worn joints and mend broken bonesCredit: Alamy The method, in which patients would recover at home, could spell the end of hip and knee replacement ops. The NHS does about 100,000 of each every year, as well as spending £2billion on treating 850,000 broken bones. The technique sees tiny magnetic particles attached to stem cells — which are able to turn into bone and cartilage. They are injected before being guided to the damaged areas and activated by the magnetic bandage. Read More on HealthLOVE STRUCK What your relationship status says about your HEALTH & your risk of dyingSNAP HAPPY Urgent summer health warning as millions of Brits urged to take more selfies In tests on sheep, the treatment sped up bone repair. Human trials are planned. Prof Alicia El Haj, of Birmingham University, said the method worked better than...
    Three children with a rare genetic kidney disease have each successfully received a breakthrough transplant operation that did not require the use of immunosuppressant drugs afterwards. A team at Stanford University, in the Bay area, performed that operations three years ago on children who were suffering from Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD), a condition which inhibits a person's ability to fights infections. For this procedure, the children not only receive the organ but stem cell and bone marrow transplants from the same donor as well.  While these children are not yet cured from their condition, they are in a much healthier, safer, place now than they were before the operation, and they will not have to take the risks of using immunosuppressants. The team that worked on these cases is hopeful that their findings from these three cases can help the 90,000 Americans that are currently awaiting a kidney transplant.  Kruz, 8, and Paizlee Davenport (pictured), 7, of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, were both born with the rare kidney disease SIOD The pair of siblings received dual immune/solid organ transplants from their parents,...
    A high fat, low-carb, diet that has gained attention on social media in recent years may extend a person's lifespan, a new study finds. Researchers at Stanford University, in the Bay Area, found that the ketogenic diet, often referred to colloquially as the keto diet, can help muscle and stem cells survive stress and allow a person to live longer. Keto diets are extremely low-carb, but very high in fat. This trains the body to become efficient at burning fat and trains it to convert fat into energy. The rise of the diet in some communities has come with some controversy, with some warning that it could cause nutrient deficiencies and other long term problems - despite short term benefits. Researchers found that eating a high fat, low carb, keto diet can extend a person's life span in the same way that regular fasting dose (file photo) Researchers, who published their findings last week in Cell Metabolism, found that the keto diet provides many of the same positive effects to a person's cells that fasting does. In a test on...
    (CNN)Here is some background information about stem cells.Scientists believe that stem cell research can be used to treat medical conditions including Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. About Stem CellsSources: National Institutes of Health, Mayo ClinicStem cell research focuses on embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Read MoreStem cells have two characteristics that differentiate them from other types of cells:- They are unspecialized cells that can replicate themselves through cell division over long periods of time.- Stem cells can be manipulated, under certain conditions, to become mature cells with special functions, such as the beating cells of the heart muscle or insulin-producing cells of the pancreas.There are four classes of stem cells: totipotent, multipotent, pluripotent and unipotent.- Totipotent stem cells that develop into cells that make up all the cells in an embryo and fetus. (Ex: The zygote/fertilized egg and the cells at the very early stages following fertilization are considered totipotent.)- Multipotent stem cells can give rise to multiple types of cells, but all within a particular tissue, organ or...
    Survivors of heart attacks could have better life expectancy as scientists have developed a new treatment that can mend damaged heart tissue.  Human hearts are very poor at repairing themselves — after a heart attack, scar tissue is left which is less elastic. But now scientists from Germany, Sweden and the drug company AstraZeneca have created a new therapy using stem cells that could do this more efficiently. They were able to regenerate heart cells in pigs using human ventricular progenitor (HVPs) cells. These cells play a crucial role in the formation of the organ during development and can turn into specialised heart cells where required. Reported in the journal Nature Cell Biology, the scientists hope to start clinical studies in humans within the next two years. Human hearts are very poor at repairing themselves — after a heart attack, scar tissue is left which is less elastic. But now scientists have developed a new treatment using stem cells (stock) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Thirteen more children fall sick with mystery hepatitis... NHS's never-ending...
    Some time in the not-too-distant future, a patient who suffers a heart attack will spend time recovering in the hospital before a transplant. Oddly, though, their surgery date will be timed around a resupply mission to a space station. That’s because their new heart isn’t being driven or flown in from anywhere on Earth—rather, it’s been grown in space using stem cells. While other scientists are set on discovering extraterrestrial life, some regenerative medicine researchers—scientists who study how to regrow and repair human tissue—want to create it themselves by growing stem cells in outer space. Their dream of establishing a biomanufacturing pipeline in low-Earth orbit sounds outlandish, but the commercial space age is enabling researchers to start turning it into a reality. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are simple human cells that can grow into a number of complex organs. They’re derived from adult human skin or blood cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, which are found in an early stage of embryonic development. Due to limited space and personnel aboard the International Space Station, experiments that have grown...
    While the Fountain of Youth is the stuff of legend, the search for a way to stop humans from aging is happening as we speak—inside the laboratory. In a study published in the journal eLife on April 8, scientists at Babraham Institute in the U.K. managed to de-age the skin cells of a 53-year-old woman by 30 years in a petri dish. Looking at age-related biological changes in the DNA, these genetically-modified younger cells appeared and behaved as any 23-year-old skin cell should. Notably, the team was also able to de-age the cells in less than two weeks. The techniques used in this experiment have been around for the last few decades. However, with the woman's skin cells, the researchers managed to shave off time from the usually long process while also avoiding the problems reprogrammed cells can often run into, like inadvertently turning cancerous. “This kind of work is very important,” Dr. Ivona Percec, a plastic surgeon and stem cell researcher at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study, told The Daily...
    HIV-positive is a chronic condition that can be controlled with daily doses of medicines but there’s no known cure. However, there have now been three cases of HIV being put into remission that a D.C.-area researcher finds “exciting.” The research was conducted by the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trial Network that is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Each case, the most recent announced on Feb. 15, involved use of stem cells modified to prevent the ability of HIV to replicate and continue to infect the body. The use of those stem cells, however, happened under extreme circumstances. More Health & Fitness News More Local News “All had acute leukemia; all had to go through severe chemotherapy; and then had a stem cell transplant. Those are not simple, benign treatments that everyone could have,” said Dr. Michael Horberg, an infectious disease doctor at Kaiser Permanente, who is a leading HIV/AIDS researcher. Horberg was not affiliated with the published findings. Dr. Michael Horberg, an infectious disease doctor at Kaiser Permanente who is a leading HIV/AIDS researcher....
    The attack of the COVID-19 virus on the human heart is completely hidden from view, revealed only by the damage that’s left behind. But San Francisco scientists have designed a way to witness the assault. In lab-grown globules of throbbing heart cells, they can watch signs of distress, then death. By creating disease in a dish, the Gladstone Institutes team hopes to better understand the mysteries of Long COVID – not just in the heart, but also in other tissues. They’re part of a growing international effort to study how the virus infects cells and how cells can retaliate and recover. “Very rapidly, this is opening up avenues for us to look at many different organ systems,” said virologist Dr. Melanie Ott, director of the Gladstone Institute of Virology and professor of medicine at UC San Francisco. Melanie Ott, left, director of the Gladstone Institute of Virology and professor of medicine at UC San Francisco, and Mir Khalid talk in the Ott Lab at Gladstone Institutes on March 31st, 2021. (Photo by Michael Short/Gladstone Institutes)  “COVID is not just an infection...
    A research team reported Tuesday that a woman with leukemia has possibly been cured of HIV after receiving an umbilical cord blood transplant from a donor who is naturally resistant to the virus. The patient marks the third person and the first woman to likely be cured of HIV after receiving stem cell transplants, according to Reuters. The two men believed to have been cured received adult stem cell transplants. The outlet reports: The case of a middle-aged woman of mixed race, presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunisitic Infections in Denver, is also the first involving umbilical cord blood, a newer approach that may make the treatment available to more people. Since receiving the cord blood to treat her acute myeloid leukemia – a cancer that starts in blood-forming cells in the bone marrow – the woman has been in remission and free of the virus for 14 months, without the need for potent HIV treatments known as antiretroviral therapy. Timothy Ray Brown was the first man to be deemed successfully cured of HIV after receiving a stem...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — For only the third time ever, a person has been cured of their HIV infection. It took a variation on a bone marrow transplant using umbilical cord blood. As CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reports, this development may open up the possibility of a cure to more people of diverse racial backgrounds. READ MORE: More Than 1,400 NYC Employees Fired Over Vaccine MandateAmazingly, about 1% of people of European descent have a genetic mutation that prevents them from making a receptor that HIV needs to be ingested into immune cells to do its dirty work. Those people are effectively immune to HIV. So if a person were to get a bone marrow transplant from one of those genetically immune donors, they too would be resistant to HIV. That’s what has been done in two patients with leukemia, but… “The people who have been cured from HIV have been people who’ve had leukemia, who’ve required these dangerous types of procedures, high-intensity chemotherapy, to eliminate their own immune system so that they can accept a transplant that has the...
    For the first time ever, it appears scientists have cured a woman of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. In a clinical trial, scientists used a new stem cell transplant method that left the woman, who has not been publicly identified, without the virus in her system. She is the third person to achieve HIV remission and was treated with cord blood stem cells, which are more widely available than the adult stem cells used in the other two people, who were both men. VIROLOGIST WHO CO-DISCOVERED HIV DIES AT 89 "This third case of HIV remission suggests that CCRΔ5/Δ32 cord stem cell transplantation should be considered to achieve HIV remission and cure for people living with HIV who require such a transplant for other diseases, according to the study team," the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said in a press release. The “New York patient” was diagnosed with HIV in 2013 and had been on antiretroviral therapy, a treatment for the disease. The NIAID said the HIV in her system was "well-controlled...
    (CNN)A US woman has become the third known person who's gone into HIV remission, and the first mixed-race woman, thanks to a transplant of stem cells from umbilical cord blood, according to research presented at a conference Tuesday. The woman, whom the researchers described as middle-aged and of mixed race, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia four years after an HIV diagnosis, according to an abstract from the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.After the leukemia diagnosis, she received high-dose chemotherapy that destroyed her blood cells. Later, she got a transplant of stem cells from an adult family member to replenish her own blood cell levels. This served as a bridge to maintain her blood cells while she received stem cells through umbilical cord blood from an unrelated newborn, which can take up to a month to start producing cells. The cord blood had a mutation that makes cells resistant to HIV infection. The first known person to be cured of HIV has died of cancerJust over three years after her 2017 transplant, she stopped taking HIV meds, known as...
    For the first time ever, a woman has been cured of HIV. A woman dubbed the 'New York patient' by scientists at New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City has defeated the virus after receiving a rare, but dangerous, stem-cell treatment. She is the fourth person to ever be cured of HIV - the previous three are all men - and experts have found two cases of women somehow beating the virus naturally. The woman was also a cancer patient, and received a treatment meant to combat both diseases at once - but is also so risky that it has been deemed 'unethical' to use it on people who do not have a late-stage cancer diagnosis. In order to perform this treatment, doctors must first find a donor who has a rare mutation that makes them resistant to the virus. A woman dubbed the 'New York patient' has become the first woman to be functionally cured of HIV after receiving a rare. but dangerous, stem cell treatment four year ago (file photo) Experts tell NBC that people...
    A living 'robofish' that's built from human cardiac cells and swims just like a fish could pave the way for artificial hearts, a new study reveals. Created by researchers at Harvard University, the 'biohybrid' recreates muscle contractions of a pumping human heart to push its tail fin side to side. Under half an inch long, it's made of plastic fins and a paper spine, but on either side are two strips of living heart cardiac muscle cells that perform these contractions.  The device, which could be mistaken for a real fish on casual viewing, was inspired by the shape and swimming motion of a zebrafish.  Aside from its applications in the field of robotics, the scientists believe their creation marks a step toward building an artificial heart.  Schematics of the autonomously swimming biohybrid fish, which swims by recreating the muscle contractions of a pumping heart HOW DOES THE 'ROBOFISH' SWIM? Unlike previous devices, the biohybrid fish has two layers of muscle cells, one on each side of the tail fin. When one side of muscle cells contract, it causes those on the...
    People with debilitating foot pain could be treated with injections of their own belly fat, a study suggests.    Chronic plantar fasciitis — inflammation around the heel and arch of the foot — can leave patients in agony.  But a trial of 14 patients diagnosed with the condition, which can force people to cut back on physically active, has uncovered another potential remedy.  All of the participants given the treatment reported that they were more active after six months, and could play sports again. Benefits were even greater after a whole year, according to academics at Pittsburgh University. Fat in the lower abdomen and thighs is known to be rich in stem cells — the human body's raw material for repairing itself.  Stem cells can mimic any other cell in the body, such as blood or muscle cells, and are used to treat a range of conditions — from worn-out knees to damaged hearts.   As part of the latest study, researchers injected patients' stomach fat back into the balls of their feet.  Plantar fasciitis is estimated to affect up to...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — When you think of hip replacement, you probably picture an elderly person having surgery after taking a nasty fall. But young people can also need hip replacement because of a condition that kills the hip bone. CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez has more on a procedure using stem cells that can avoid hip replacement. FLASHBACK: New Techniques Improve Hip & Knee Replacement Surgeries Like most tissues in the human body, bones are formed by living cells, and like all cells, they need blood vessels to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Sometimes that delivery system fails due to a rare condition called avascular necrosis or AVN. “Avascular necrosis means bone death. That happens due to lack of blood supply to the bone … Patients who are in their 20s, 30s, and in their 40s. And that leads to deterioration of the hip that can need a hip replacement,” said Dr. Nakul Karkare of Lenox Hill Hospital. That’s what happened to Tania Rodriguez. The 45-year-old was a physically active woman who suddenly developed searing hip pain. “I didn’t even realize...
    Worn-out knees and ankle joints could soon be treated with an injection of a patient’s own belly fat. A trial involving 120 patients is looking at whether a single jab of cells extracted from abdominal fat can ease the pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis. While it might seem an unlikely option, body fat (known as adipose tissue) is rich in stem cells, ‘master cells’ capable of turning into different types of tissue. The hope is that they will turn into the cells that make up cartilage and repair damaged joints. A trial involving 120 patients is looking at whether a single jab of cells extracted from abdominal fat can ease the pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis This approach has been subject to previous research but is controversial, with some private clinics already offering the therapy, despite little evidence it is effective.  Doctors say more clinical studies, such as this new trial, are needed to show it works before it is more widely used. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage, the tough, elastic material that helps our joints take the strain of movement,...
    THIS year has been full of scientific discoveries but some were far weirder than others. From a part-human, part-monkey embryo to a brain blow that grew eyes, we've rounded up some of the weirdest science moments of 2021. First part-human, part-monkey embryo 4The macaque embryo was injected with human stem cells Back in April it was announced that the first part-human, part-monkey embryo had been created by scientists in California despite ethical concerns. Researchers grew human stem cells in monkey embryos to try and better understand how the cells communicate. The controversial embryos were made at the Salk Institute in California. They're scientifically known as monkey-human chimeras. Human stem cells, known for the ability to become different types of cells, were injected into macaque embryos in a petri dish. The scientists hope their work could be used to create organs for transplants and teach us more about human development and disease progression. Most read in NewsDELIBERATIONS CONTINUE Ex-Theranos chief’s fate hangs in balance as jurors delay verdictTRAGIC DEATH Victim's family issue statement after Deshazor Everett car crashHOSPITAL HORROR Covid patients...
    AN injection made using stem cells from ground-up milk teeth is being touted as a cure for impotence. A jab each side of the todger helped 37 out of 38 men rediscover their mojo. 1An injection made using stem cells from ground-up milk teeth is being touted as a cure for impotenceCredit: iStockphoto - Getty Researchers said the stem cells — which can grow into healthy tissue almost anywhere in the body — repaired damaged arteries in their manhoods. Erectile function improved by an average of 64 per cent during the four-year study at ­Edogawa Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Researcher Dr Shoji Koga said: “The treatment repairs blood vessel damage. It could become a widespread therapy.” Experts say drugs such as Viagra do not work for about one in three men. Dr Geoff Hackett, former chairman of the British Society for Sexual Medicine, said: “Stem cells from milk teeth are a very promising treatment. They can regenerate blood flow.” Most read in Men’s HealthKNOW THE SIGNS Prostate cancer warning: The 7 toilet habits to look out forDOC’S ORDERS I’m a...
    Israeli-based MeaTech unveiled the world's largest lab-grown steak on Wednesday. Weighing 3.67 ounces, the steak is made from real fat and muscle cells taken from tissue samples of a living cow and produces astatically pleasing grill marks when cooked. Living bovine stem cells were added to the 'bio-inks,' along with stem cells, which were then placed in a 3D printer to produce the steak. The printed slab of 'meat' was then matured in an incubator, allowing the stems cells were differentiated into fat and muscle cells that develop into fat and muscle tissues. Scroll down for video  Weighing 3.67 ounces, the steak is made from real fat and muscle cells taken from tissue samples of a living cow and produces astatically pleasing grill marks when cooked 'MeaTech's goal is developing a true replacement for conventional steak that maximizes cell-based content rather than non-meat ingredients,' the company shared in a press release. 'MeaTech intends to continue improving upon its bioprinting and cultivation technologies to produce cultivated meat that better mirrors the key characteristics of farm-raised, premium steak.' RELATED ARTICLES Previous...
    Researchers have developed robots out of frogs’ stem cells, which are capable of stacking new stem cells to reproduce. And for many generations. A wonderful experience that can tell about the origin of life. You will be interested too [EN VIDÉO] The amazing power of stem cells Eternal youth seems to be an old quest just like humanity. This desirable fountain of youth is located in the heart of our body, within the stem cells. Discovery takes us to discover these amazing cells in the science video. For years, researchers have been trying to create genotypes made of cells. By 2020, a team from the University of Vermont and the University of Tufts had successfully formed Robots From Stem cells Frogs can move around individually and organize themselves to perform different tasks (read below). Today, a new step has been taken with genobots that can create new generation robots that can reproduce like a creature. Layers of stem cells that turn into robots Initially, as before, we had genotypes made up of clusters of frog stem cells Xenobus...
    The study showed that xenobos organisms can locate nearby other single cells and assemble new xenobots, which will then in turn mature and begin the process of reproduction with other single cells once more. The organisms — which are said to be less than a millimeter wide — are designed on an AI mainframe and assembled by hand. Study researcher Douglas Blackiston added, “People have thought for quite a long time that we’ve worked out all the ways that life can reproduce or replicate. But this is something that’s never been observed before." What else? Josh Bongard, a computer science professor and robotics expert at the University of Vermont as well as lead author of the study, added that robots aren't simply metal and wires — and that an engineered combination of molecular biology and artificial intelligence meets the definition of what a robot is. "Most people think of robots as made of metals and ceramics but it's not so much what a robot is made from but what it does, which is act on its...
    Brian Shelton’s life was ruled by Type 1 diabetes. When his blood sugar plummeted, he would lose consciousness without warning. He crashed his motorcycle into a wall. He passed out in a customer’s yard while delivering mail. Following that episode, his supervisor told him to retire, after a quarter-century in the Postal Service. He was 57. His ex-wife, Cindy Shelton, took him into her home in Elyria, Ohio. “I was afraid to leave him alone all day,” she said. Early this year, she spotted a call for people with Type 1 diabetes to participate in a clinical trial by Vertex Pharmaceuticals. The company was testing a treatment developed over decades by a scientist who vowed to find a cure after his baby son and then his teenage daughter got the devastating disease. Brian Shelton was the first patient. On June 29, he got an infusion of cells, grown from stem cells but just like the insulin-producing pancreas cells his body lacked. Now his body automatically controls its insulin and blood sugar levels. Shelton, now 64, may be the first person...
    (CNN)The US scientists who created the first living robots say the life forms, known as xenobots, can now reproduce -- and in a way not seen in plants and animals.Formed from the stem cells of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) from which it takes its name, xenobots are less than a millimeter (0.04 inches) wide. The tiny blobs were first unveiled in 2020 after experiments showed that they could move, work together in groups and self-heal. Now the scientists that developed them at the University of Vermont, Tufts University and Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering said they have discovered an entirely new form of biological reproduction different from any animal or plant known to science."I was astounded by it," said Michael Levin, a professor of biology and director of the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University who was co-lead author of the new research."Frogs have a way of reproducing that they normally use but when you ... liberate (the cells) from the rest of the embryo and you give them a chance to figure out how...
    In a potential breakthrough for regenerative medicine, scientists have created the first-ever living robots that can reproduce.  The millimetre-sized living machines, called Xenobots 3.0, are neither traditional robots nor a species of animal, but living, programmable organisms. Made from frog cells, the computer-designed organisms, created by a US team, gather single cells inside a Pac-Man-shaped 'mouth' and release 'babies' that look and move like their parents.   Self-replicating living bio-robots could enable more direct, personalised drug treatment for traumatic injury, birth defects, cancer, ageing and more.  Xenobots 3.0 can gather hundreds of single cells, compress them and assemble them into 'babies' released from their Pac-Man-shaped mouths WHAT ARE XENOBOTS?Xenobots are neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal, but a living, programmable organism. They are made out of adapted stem cells from Xenopus laevis, an African species of frog.  Their shape has been designed by a computer to be able to replicate over multiple generations.   No animal or plant known to science replicates in this way. Xenobots will help developed computer-designed organisms for intelligent drug delivery.   Xenobots are the work...
    Sperm have been made from monkey stem cells and used to fertilise a macaque egg in a scientific breakthrough that could lead to human infertility treatments.  Researchers took some stem cells, converted them into primitive sperm and showed this was capable of fertlising an egg from a rhesus macaque. The monkeys share similar reproductive mechanisms to humans, making them an 'ideal and necessary model for exploring stem cell-based therapies for male infertility,' experts at the University of Georgia (UGA) said. It comes fives years after scientists were able to create sperm in a laboratory and use it to father healthy baby mice in another pioneering move. The hope is that the research could one day pave the way to help men with defects that leave them unable to produce sperm, as well as those whose fertility has been damaged by cancer treatment or infections such as mumps.   Breakthrough: Sperm have been made from monkey stem cells and used to fertilise a macaque egg in a scientific breakthrough that could lead to human infertility treatments (stock image) HOW ARE STEM CELLS MADE...
    Jonathan Amos Science Reporter 17 October 2021, 13:13 IST Photo source, Reuters Photo caption, Lucy Ning collided with the Atlas rocket A spacecraft was sent from Cape Canaveral to explore the fossil record in the solar system. Lucy is a spacecraft orbiting Jupiter (Jupiter-Jupiter) to study clusters of two asteroids. One of them is in front of Jupiter in the orbit of the campus. The other is in the back. NASA scientists say the study of these asteroids could help understand the effects of the first phase of solar system formation. The Lucy spacecraft was launched from the Cape Canaveral in Florida at 9.45am on Saturday on an Atlas-5 rocket. NASA initially decided to spend $ 98.1 billion (approximately Rs. 7,360 crore) on the mission over a twelve-year period. Photo source, Jason Kaffer CC Photo caption, Lucy is a human skeleton fossil in Africa There is a human fossil in Africa called Lucy. It was this fossil that helped us learn more about the existence of the human race. Due to its inspiration, NASA carries out this...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of clinics pushing unproven stem cell procedures caught a big break from the U.S. government in 2017: They would have three years to show that their questionable treatments were safe and worked before regulators started cracking down. But when the Food and Drug Administration’s grace period expired in late May — extended six months due to the pandemic — the consequences became clear: Hundreds more clinics were selling the unapproved treatments for arthritis, Alzheimer’s, COVID-19 and many other conditions. “It backfired,” says Leigh Turner, a bioethicist at the University of California, Irvine. “The scale of the problem is vastly larger for FDA today than it was at the start.” The continuing spread of for-profit clinics promoting stem cells and other so-called “regenerative” therapies — including concentrated blood products — illustrates how quickly experimental medicine can outpace government oversight. No clinic has yet won FDA approval for any stem cell offering and regulators now confront an enormous, uncooperative industry that contends it shouldn’t be subject to regulation. Although emerging research suggests stem cells could someday have...
    A central Arkansas hospital system is requiring staff members who receive a religious exemption from getting the COVID-19 vaccine to also give up other popular medications. Conway Regional Medical Center has joined the growing number of hospitals mandate Covid shots for workers. Employees of the hospital system will have until October 8 to be fully vaccinated, but there is an option for some to get a religious exemption from the requirement. Hospital leadership noticed that many were applying for religious exemptions based on the potential use of fetal cell lines in the development of the vaccine.  To make sure that employees applying for waivers to dodge vaccine requirements are doing so because of their truly-held beliefs, the hospital is making them attest that they will stop using 30 other common drugs that also used fetal cell lines for development, including Tylenol and Tums.  Conway Regional Health System is requiring all employees to get vaccinated by October 8 to keep their jobs. Those who apply for a religious exemption on the basis of vaccines using fetal cell links in development...
    With the aim of expanding the possibility of living for people suffering from leukemias, TecSalud and Be the match they formalized an alliance to promote stem cell donation. Stem cell donation is part of the ttreatments to fight more than 70 types of cancer, including leukemias suffered by hundreds of people in Mexico. Stem cell donation, an unknown culture At least 70% of patients who need a donor do not find a profile genetically compatible in his family, so they have to look for him, in most cases, in long waiting lists. The success in this search is very low, since only 10% of those who look for a donor find it on time. “Transplants are performed when there are no other treatment alternatives, whoever receives the transplant also receives a therapy that will allow them to have a new and better life,” he said. Guillermo Torre, Rector of TecSalud and Vice President of Research of the Tecnológico de Monterrey. An alliance for life Leukemias, a group of malignant (cancerous) diseases of the blood, account for 50% of new cases...
    08/18/2021 at 6:17 PM CEST A new study carried out by researchers at the University Hospital of Düsseldorf, in Germany, has shown that brain organoids have the intrinsic ability to self-organize primitive sensory structures that respond to light: they are optic vesicles, which progressively grow as structures similar to “eyes” and that include a large part of the cells and other characteristic components of the visual system. These organoids or laboratory mini-brains can help study brain-eye interactions during embryo development, model congenital retinal disorders and generate specific retinal cell types, according to a press release. The research was recently published in the journal Cell Stem Cell. Integration with the brain The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS, according to its acronym in English) are a type of stem cells with pluripotential conditions, that is, capable of producing most of the tissues present in the human body, which are artificially derived from a cell that was not pluripotential in principle. This is achieved through genetic reprogramming processes in adult cells, in which the transfer of exogenous genes is...
    Scientists have enabled tiny lab-grown brains to develop rudimentary eye structures that can sense light and communicate with the rest of the brain. The spherical masses, known as 'brain organoids,' are cultivated in a petri dish from stem cells, which can duplicate the function of any other bodily cell.  Researchers at Heinrich-Heine-University's Institute for Human Genetics in Düsseldorf, Germany used stem cells to grow organoids pairs of 'optic cups,' an early stage of eye formation that develops when a fetus is about five weeks old.  The lab-grown brains grew eye-like structures called optic cups that have retinas, corneas and lenses and can 'see' light How were they made?  Until now, optic cups and other 3D retinal structures had not been integrated into brain organoids. To achieve this, the team modified a protocol they developed for turning induced pluripotent stem cells into neural tissue.  The human brain organoids formed optic cups, which appeared as early as 30 days and matured as visible structures within 50 days.  The organoids are only about three millimeters (0.1 inch) wide, and the cups are miniscule,...
    The world's first lab-grown foie gras has been created using duck stem cells — and one Michelin-star chef said he can't tell the difference. It is made by extracting cells from a single, fertilised egg and feeding them the same nutrients a duck would be given, including proteins, amino acids and lipids. Scientists say the result is similar to traditional foie gras, offering a buttery and delicate taste without the ethical concerns. Scroll down for video  Lab-grown: The world's first lab-grown foie gras (pictured) has been created using duck stem cells. It has been developed by the French startup Gourmey, which is based in ParisFoie gras: Culinary delight or just plain cruel? Foie gras is made of duck or goose liver. By French law, it is defined as the liver of a duck fattened by force feeding corn. Outside France it is sometimes produced using natural feeding. The technique, known as gavage, dates back as far as 2500 BC when the ancient Egyptians kept birds for food and deliberately fattened them through force feeding. By French law, foie gras...
    A mouse embryo developed from stems cells has a beating heart and is starting to develop muscles, a gut and nervous system while it grows inside a lab at the University of Virginia.    Scientists sparked development of the cells by weaving the different types together, allowing it to become 'the first in vitro model of a mammalian embryo with so many tissues to be built from stem cells,' the team shared in a press release.   This is also the first version complete with a notochord, which is a cartilaginous skeletal rod supporting the body in all embryos and 'is a definite trait of vertebrate animals,' according to the researchers. The team hopes the breakthrough will assist researchers with understanding mammalian development, battle diseases, create new drugs and grow tissues and organs for human transplants.  Scroll down for video  A mouse embryo with a beating heart is starting to develop muscles, a gut and nervous system while it grows inside a lab at the University of Virginia Christine Thisse, Ph.D., of UVA's Department of Cell Biology, said in a...
    (CNN)When SpaceX's 20th resupply mission lifted off to the International Space Station in March 2020, beating heart cells were along for the ride. After 22 days, the heart cells were returned to Earth -- and they were still beating. The implications of this experiment mark a significant step toward helping heart patients on Earth in the future.The results of this experiment were the subject of a virtual panel discussion Tuesday that CNN obtained exclusive access to -- panel members included NASA astronaut Jessica Meir and researchers from Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. They were joined by Brody Parker, a former heart patient who will soon celebrate his 11th birthday and his two-year heart transplant anniversary. Spaceflight alters human heart cells but they return to (mostly) normal on EarthTwo years ago, Parker said he was "an average 8-year-old boy" who enjoyed playing soccer and spending time with his friends. In May 2019, he started feeling tired all of the time and stopped wanting to do the things he enjoyed. On June 1, 2019, Parker said he didn't feel well....
    TINY beads which can mend a broken heart have been developed in a British lab. The revolutionary microspheres are injected into the heart and release stem cells which then repair damaged tissue. 2Tiny beads which can mend a broken heart have been developed in a British lab It is the first time stem cells have been delivered effectively to the heart which would otherwise reject them. Experts hope the treatment will one day cure heart failure, which affects 920,000 people in the UK. Researcher Daniel Stuckey, of University College London, said: “Our technology provides a new way of ensuring that the cells injected into the heart are working as they should. “We hope this research will give us the information essential for making stem cell therapy a realistic treatment for people with heart disease.” Doctors have tried to use stem cells to repair hearts for years but have struggled to get them to the organ before the body flushes them out. The revolutionary microspheres are injected into the heart and release stem cells which then repair damaged tissue Most read...
    The human heart is a complex organ comprising of several chambers, valves and tissue, all of which makes it one of the most difficult organs to model – until now. Scientists used stems cells to grown the first human 'mini-hearts' with a beating chamber that mimics the organ of a 25-day-old embryo. Dubbed 'cardioid,' the miniature heart is the size of a sesame-seed and has a hollow chamber that beats 60 to 100 times per minute - the same rate as an embryo at this stage of development. The team hopes to analyze the cardioids to uncover how the heart develops in the womb and other scientific mysterious like why babies' hearts do not scar following a heart attack. Scroll down for videos  Scientists used stems cells to grown the first human 'mini-hearts' with a beating chamber that mimics the organ of a 25-day-old embryo The latest breakthrough stems from previous work in 2020, which developed a functioning mini human hear in a lab using mice cardiac cells. This model, however, looked like a lump of cells in a...
    BIG-HEARTED Borussia Dortmund star Marwin Hitz has taken time off between matches to donate stem cells to a stranger battling leukaemia. DKMS Germany uploaded a photograph to Instagram at the weekend showing Dortmund’s Swiss goalkeeper in a hospital bed preparing to donate. 2Borussia Dortmund star Marwin Hitz has donated stem cells to a stranger battling leukaemiaCredit: Instagram @dkms_de Hitz, 33, has been at Dortmund since 2018, playing 26 times in all competitions this term. And Hitz penned a new two-year contract last month after ousting Roman Burki as the club’s No1. But he made his biggest contribution this season donating stem cells in the fight against leukaemia. Hitz registered as a donor while playing for old club Wolfsburg. And after being told he was a match for a stranger battling leukaemia, Hitz jumped at the chance to help out. He declared: “I have a family of my own, I have children. “If I imagined that one of them would develop blood cancer, I would be incredibly grateful for any suitable donor. “Against this background, it was a matter to help when...
    THE TRAGIC death of Ashley Cain's little girl Azaylia has inspired thousands of people to sign up to the stem cell register, a charity has revealed. Little Azaylia was diagnosed with a rare form of leukaemia just two months after she was born. 2Little Azaylia has inspired thousands of people to join the stem cell registerCredit: Instagram Ex footballer Ashley and his girlfriend Safiyya Vorajee announced Azaylia died from the disease on Sunday, April 25, 2021. Azaylia had Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), which is a rapidly progressive form of the illness. Chemotherapy is one of the treatments for the disease and if this doesn't work a possible alternative treatment option is a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. The donated stem cells are given through a tube into a blood vessel (a drip) in a similar way to chemotherapy medication. Charity Anthony Nolan today revealed that Azaylia's heartbreaking story has led to 56,000 people joining the charity's stem cell register. Posting on Instagram the charity said: "Azaylia’s legacy will live on in each of those potential lifesavers, any one of whom may one day be...
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