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    Warner Bros. Discovery HGTV Urban Oasis 2022. Fans dreaming of living in an HGTV-designed house now have their chance. The sweepstakes is now open for the HGTV Urban Oasis 2022, located near downtown Nashville, Tennessee. The grand prize package includes the new, fully-furnished home, Mercedes-Benz C-Class and $50,000, with a total value of more than $1.3 million. The network tapped Brian Patrick Flynn as the interior designer. He has also previously worked on the HGTV Dream Home and is the star of Magnolia Network’s “Mind For Design.” “Nashville is synonymous with country music, and for this year’s HGTV Urban Oasis, we wanted to embody the history of musical legends as well as showcase the modern representation and diversity that the city is known for,” Flynn said in a press release. “From the local artistry to the instruments seen throughout the design, this home is filled with the spirit of Nashville, offering a beautiful, livable space inside a bustling city.” Architect Turner Binkley, builder Mitchell Builders Group, muralist Kelsey Montague and Organizer Brittani Allen round out the team. “HGTV...
    The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk The Well at Oxon Run officially opened to the public on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks at the opening of The Well at Oxon Run on Saturday. (WTOP/Valerie Bonk) WTOP/Valerie Bonk (1/8) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. After more than four years of planning, The Well at Oxon Run, a new urban garden and wellness space in Ward 8, has opened its gates. The...
    OVERTOWN (CBSMiami) – Design renderings are giving Overtown residents a peek into the future. “I love living here,” exclaimed Overtown resident Electa Edwards.  READ MORE: Miami PD needs help finding 4-year-old Isiah Williams & his mom Tramika Williams“From all the pictures I have seen, they’re going to make it a pedestrian park that have water parks,” said lifelong Overtown resident Jackie Bell, 84. Bell says she’s excited about the “Underdeck” renderings illustrating the 33-acre public space, that will be developed by Florida Department of Transportation and the City of Miami, running below 395, from Overtown to Biscayne Bay. ”They had to do something for the community because they keep destroying it,” Bell said. READ MORE: Plantation renter who's a single dad scrambling after being told lease won’t be renewedLike back in the 1960s when 395 was constructed, resulting in this for Overtown, ”Slum and blight because Black businesses that were here they had to move,” said Bell.  ”This 395 project disrupted Overtown. It was dubbed “urban renewal” but truth be told it ended up being urban removal,” said Dr. Nelson...
    Urban Capital: “A complete street with spacious sidewalks, central travel and dedicated transit lanes, and a two-way cycle track on the south side of the street.” Courtesy NCPC Linear Green: “A curbless car-free urban linear park with a dedicated central transit way flanked by dedicated cycle tracks.” Courtesy NCPC Civic Stage: “A gracious central pedestrian promenade flanked by a dedicated cycle track and shared travel lanes for cars and transit.” Courtesy NCPC (1/3) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. One of America’s most famous roadways could be in for a makeover: Urban planners want to re-imagine downtown D.C.’s Pennsylvania Avenue as a signature outdoor venue, emphasizing people over cars and expanding park space between the White House and the U.S. Capitol. “What if the avenue was elevated to a signature venue for spectacular events, a place where all are welcome, uplifted and inspired?” the Pennsylvania Avenue Initiative posits. The project puts forward three concepts of what the 1.2-mile thoroughfare’s future could look like, and is seeking public input on...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A new public art project in Chicago, just around the corner from the ABC7 Studio, honors Earth Day.National Geographic and ABC7 are teaming up to celebrate natural beauty in an urban space.Over the course of the last three days, Chicago muralist Sentrock has turned the side of our ABC7 studios in the Loop into a beautiful work of art."Like Chicago, there's so much going on and we gotta remember the next generation," Sentrock said. "So that's where the little small plant and my signature character to kind of embrace it.It's all to honor Earth Day, and April as Earth Month, in partnership with National Geographic.RELATED: Our America: Climate of Hope"We've teamed up with ABC stations to bring nature to urban spaces through the work of local artists, said Ashley Thomas, NatGeo digital archive director.If you live in an urban area, you may not have easy access to nature. This mural is working to bring that restorative, inspirational essence to you based on an iconic photo from the National Geographic archive."It was a giant forest, giant trees, and...
    SAN JOSE — Whole Foods, a high-profile grocery store, has leased space as an anchor for the revamped El Paseo de Saratoga mixed complex that could become a new urban village in southwest San Jose. The deal for Whole Foods was disclosed in a presentation at a community meeting on Jan. 20 by the project’s principal developer, Sand Hill Property Co. “A major grocery will anchor the site and set the tone,” Sand Hill Property and its primary architects for the development, Kenneth Rodrigues & Partners and KTGY Architecture, stated in final presentation for the community meeting. The transaction to land Whole Foods is a major win for Sand Hill property. “Whole Foods is a fantastic anchor for the project that will immediately solidify this project as a dynamic, urban community gathering place for the entire neighborhood,” said Erik Schoennauer, a San Jose-based land-use and property consultant. The wide-ranging revamp of El Paseo de Saratoga could transform the existing big-box mall in San Jose into what could become a smaller version of the iconic Santana Row to the north. The...
    Photo by Colin WolfHall on Franklin in Tampa Heights has been closed since last December, but the space may have a new occupant by the end of this year. Asian food hall Urban Hawkers plans to open in the space in the coming months. CEO and founding partner Victoria Vo told Creative Loafing Tampa Bay that it’s too early to commit to a date, but the company is eyeing a late 2021 or early 2022 opening. The concept, located at 1701 N Franklin St., will feature multiple booths, and all of them will focus on various Asian-inspired menus. Vo said patrons will walk up and order food then eat it at communal tables—meaning the model is more similar to Armature Works than it is to the former Hall on Franklin. “We are in an underserved community when it comes to Asian cuisine,” Vo added. “There’s a lot of Americanized Asian cuisine, but we’re going to have a heavy focus on bringing back a certain side of the culture to Urban Hawkers.” New “Coming soon” signage featuring giant images of Pepsi went up...
    Contra Costa County was hit by two lawsuits Thursday, a month after the Board of Supervisors approved a boundary change to allow construction of 125 homes in protected open space near Danville. In a controversial decision on July 13, the supervisors voted 4-1 to stretch the urban limit line east of Blackhawk so developers could build the homes on 30 acres in the Tassajara Valley. In exchange, the developers promised to dedicate 700 acres of land elsewhere to be preserved as open space. County voters had set the boundary in 1990 to protect the open space beyond it and discourage urban sprawl. One of the suits was filed by a collective of two environmental groups and a pair of Contra Costa County residents, and the other by the Easy Bay Municipal Utility District. The district has maintained for years that it doesn’t have enough water to supply the homes, and alleges it was illegal for the county to approve the project knowing the district had no water to give. In an interview, EBMUD spokeswoman Andrea Polk said the district has...
    To allow a 125-home development on 30 acres in Tassajara Valley, the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted 4-1 to stretch the urban limit line east of Danville and San Ramon that voters set in 1990. Developers have long sought to build homes there, and the latest proposal — by FT Land, LLC — swayed the supervisors to go along largely because the landowner promised to dedicate 727 acres there for open space. At least four of the supervisors had to approve the move because subdivisions aren’t otherwise allowed beyond cities’ urban boundaries. Supervisor Candace Andersen dissented. Supervisors agreed that although their decision will allow development to stretch farther out, it ensures that a much larger swath of open space will remain, staving off the specter of a far more expansive housing project years down the road. “One of the things we wanted to do with the urban limit line is end sprawl development,” Supervisor Federal Glover said at Tuesday’s meeting. “Certainly the gifting of 700-and-some-odd acres would actually serve that purpose.” Joe Calabrigo (bottom right), the...
    An embattled proposal to develop new housing in the Tassajara Valley — a vast swath of privately owned land in unincorporated Danville — will raise an important question for Contra Costa County officials: Should development be allowed in areas currently designated as open space? If approved, the development plan would see the construction of 125 houses on 30 acres in the valley, but the owners would also dedicate 700 undeveloped acres to the East Bay Regional Park District for preservation as open space. Project officials would also build a community park and a sewer pump station. But the project would require the county to move the “urban limit line,” which marks the boundary between areas that can be developed for residents and businesses and those that can’t. Populating otherwise unfettered land outside that boundary with buildings and people is a major red flag for conservationists who want to ensure the county’s natural land is preserved. The county Board of Supervisors will review the proposal at a meeting in the near future — an exact date has not been set —...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Gov. Andrew Cuomo joined community leaders Thursday in Harlem for the construction kick-off of the National Urban League headquarters. The Urban League Empowerment Center will be located on 125th Street between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and Lenox Avenue. READ MORE: Police: Couple Asks Woman For Help Feeding Kids, Then Steals $16,000 “This project is going to revitalize Harlem. It is smart, it is right, it is mixed use. It brings a museum, it brings affordable housing, it brings retail. It brings commercial space. In and of itself, it is going to revitalize Harlem,” Cuomo said Thursday. READ MORE: FBI: Suspect Killed During Kidnapping Investigation At Leonia Apartment Complex The $242 million project will house New York’s first museum dedicated to Civil Rights. MORE NEWS: After More Than A Year, The Show Must Go On: More Broadway Shows Announce Plans To Resume Performances It will also provide 170 units of affordable housing, below-market office space and retail space anchored by Target and Trader Joe’s.
    More On: google Pro-Palestine activists sink Facebook app store ratings Google to open first physical store in Chelsea this summer Google wants to use AI to diagnose your skin condition Google wins cloud deal from SpaceX for Starlink internet service Officials in San Jose, California, have approved Google’s plans to build a massive, multi-billion dollar campus in the heart of the city. The tech giant will develop 80 acres of land on the western edge of downtown San Jose, which will undergo an estimated $1 billion in infrastructure improvements. Google will own all of the land, but most of the project will be allocated for residential and public space. That includes 15 acres of parks, plazas, and green spaces, new walking and biking paths, storefronts and more, city council staff said. The development, which will house Google’s first mixed-use campus, will also include up to 7.3 million square feet of office space for 20,000 workers and the construction of 1,000 affordable housing units, at least a quarter of all residential space in the development, according to the plan. A...
    (CNN)One of the prevailing narratives of the Covid-19 pandemic is that it has caused travel to grind to a halt. But that statement is overly simple. Because while international travel may have dropped off, most of us are still on the move -- just not in the same ways we previously were. Cities have experienced the biggest change, with more people working from home. The beating hearts of many cities are struggling in the short term, but the pandemic has also accelerated transport trends that were already breaking through. In the long term, cities -- and people -- could be in better shape for it.As part of the CNN series Road to the Future, anchor and correspondent Bianca Nobilo sat down with key figures to ask what's next for urban transport. Here are some takeaways, edited for length and clarity. JUST WATCHEDThis tech could help clean the air for commutersReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHThis tech could help clean the air for commuters 02:15The pandemic has allowed cities to tick off their transport wish lists Asutosh Padhi, senior partner at consulting firm...
    By JOCELYN NOVECK, AP National Writer The Pritzker Architecture Prize, the field's highest honor, has been awarded to the Paris-based duo of Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal for “prioritizing the enrichment of human life," especially in the context of public housing. The selection of the French laureates, who have long focused on creating more liveable structures that connect to nature in even the densest of urban settings, was announced Tuesday by Tom Pritzker, chairman of The Hyatt Foundation, which sponsors the award. “Through their design of private and social housing, cultural and academic institutions, public spaces, and urban developments, Lacaton and Vassal re-examine sustainability in their reverence for pre-existing structures, conceiving projects by first taking inventory of what already exists,” organizers said in a statement. “By prioritizing the enrichment of human life ... they are able to benefit the individual socially, ecologically and economically, aiding the evolution of a city." In her own remarks, Lacaton noted that “good architecture is open — open to life .... It should not be demonstrative or imposing, but it must be something familiar, useful...
    The Pritzker Architecture Prize, the field’s highest honor, has been awarded to the Paris-based duo of Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal for “prioritizing the enrichment of human life,” especially in the context of public housing. The selection of the French laureates, who have long focused on creating more liveable structures that connect to nature in even the densest of urban settings, was announced Tuesday by Tom Pritzker, chairman of The Hyatt Foundation, which sponsors the award. “Through their design of private and social housing, cultural and academic institutions, public spaces, and urban developments, Lacaton and Vassal re-examine sustainability in their reverence for pre-existing structures, conceiving projects by first taking inventory of what already exists,” organizers said in a statement. “By prioritizing the enrichment of human life … they are able to benefit the individual socially, ecologically and economically, aiding the evolution of a city.” In her own remarks, Lacaton noted that “good architecture is open — open to life …. It should not be demonstrative or imposing, but it must be something familiar, useful and beautiful, with the ability to...
    PHILADELPHIA -- Mural City Cellars opened its doors to a line of people snaking through the parking lot eager to explore the space.Nicholas Ducos and Francesca Galarus are the owners, building their first business while also planning their wedding.They make five varieties of wine and source all of their grapes from small growers in a 300-mile radius. This brewer is the 1st Black woman to have a signature beer after launching French Toast Ale They then help the farmers pick the grapes, hand crush them, hand bottle, hand cork and hand label. They opened as a retail-only operation but plan to add small group tours and tastings starting in March and eventually have an outdoor space where people can sit and enjoy the wine.You can buy a membership, much like a farm CSA. Pre-pay and you get $2 a month and the couple is donating 15% of membership fees to neighborhood improvement projects.Watch more Philadelphia Localish videos anytime at https://6abc.com/localish or on our family of streaming apps (Apple TV, Android TV, Amazon Fire TV, Roku).
    By Anne-Marie Broudehoux Will the COVID-19 pandemic prompt a shift to healthier cities that focus on wellness rather than functional and economic concerns?[ READ: Americans Aren’t Getting Enough To Eat During the Coronavirus Pandemic ]This is a hypothesis that seems to be supported by several researchers around the world. In many ways, containment and physical distancing measures have contributed to an increased recognition of the importance of public space as a gathering place and key tools for meeting people's basic needs. Urban residents are more aware of the important role of this space as a living environment essential to their physical and psychological well-being. I am the director of graduate programs at the Université du Québec à Montréal's school of design, where I have been teaching environmental design for 19 years. I also hold a doctorate in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley.Global Cities Taking Unique Steps to Tackle COVID-19View All 8 SlidesParks Have Become Essential Forced isolation and social distancing during the pandemic have exacerbated solitude and anxiety for part of our population. Numerous studies show that loneliness is linked...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Something’s sizzling at Hotel Revival in Baltimore. Bay burgers topped with caramelized onions and seafood stacks made up of crab cakes, grilled shrimp and bacon on toasted bread. The Urban Oyster is now open at a pop-up space inside the hotel. “We wanted to give them a space for free to operate their business,” Jason Bass, Director of Culture and Impact at Hotel Revival, said. It’s part of the hotel’s pop-up and pick-up effort to help restaurants struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines “We have the space and we have a team that would be willing to support you as you’re going through that tough time,” Bass said. Tough times have fallen on businesses like The Urban Oyster, who used to have a restaurant in Locust Point. “Unfortunately, due to COVID, we had to shut it down this past summer in July,” Jasmine Norton, of The Urban Oyster, said. Then, Hotel Revival invited them to use their space, rent-free....
    Thousands of acres of precious urban space remain unused or misused, when they could be enlisted in the struggle for climate health and biodiversity. It took a pandemic, but many Americans planting their first garden this year discovered a valuable resource sitting in their backyards: unused land. But old-fashioned lawns are not the only thing preventing productive land use. Look at satellite imagery of your city and you might see buildings with concrete roofs, parking lots, shingled houses, and wide roads covering most of the land. This land was once covered by trees, prairies, and wetlands. The displacement of nature without efficiently using the land has resulted in an unnecessary loss of habitat, more severe flooding, polluted waters, and the Urban Heat Island Effect. We can do better. Jack StinogelMinnesota is expected to have wetter weather as the climate changes. In natural settings, rainwater goes right into the ground, filtering its way into bodies of water above or below ground. In cities, the ground is often shielded by impermeable surfaces like concrete. This leads to flooding and a strain on municipal...
    Sometimes greenhouses aren’t as efficient as you would think, says Brian Smith. And after five years of working in one, Smith thought he could do better. So he started looking up. Smith Family Greens is a vertical farm that specializes in soon-to-be certified organic microgreens for sale to restaurant distributors. The space, which holds 8,000 square feet of growing surfaces, a fully sealed environment made specifically for micro-greens, arugula and kale. Smith believes that the sustainable model is not only better for the environment, but it also helps cut costs and keeps their product safe from contamination. It’s a farm without a horizon, a small world of its own reaching towards the ceiling. The room hums with lights, fans and water purifiers. There’s a slight humidity from the hundreds of leafy vegetables that grow row after row in a highrise made for plants. The greens, nestled in organic soil, are held within styrofoam seed trays that float in nutrient infused water bays.Related Stories Incredible Edibles: The Small Farm Stand With Big Community Fermented Food Producer Invites You to Join Fermentation...
    Growing up in an area with more green space is beneficial to a child's intelligence, according to a new study that found those in greener urban areas had a higher IQ. A team from Hasselt University, Belgium, analysed IQs of over 600 children and then used satellite images to examine the green coverage of their neighbourhoods. The children in the study were all aged between 10 and 15, according to the team, who say a 3 per cent increase in greenery led to an IQ increase of about 2.6 points.  Researchers also found that children in the study had lower levels of behavioural problems if they lived in an area that more green coverage.   IQ point increases as a result of living in a green environment had the biggest impact on those at the lower end of the spectrum as small changes made a big difference.  A team from Hasselt University, Belgium, analysed IQs of over 600 children and then used satellite images to examine the green coverage of their neighbourhoods. Stock image This is the first time IQ...
    Cleveland Browns RB Nick Chubb in concussion protocol after big hit in training camp 5 Items That Are Making Your Grocery Bill Skyrocket How the Pandemic Is Persuading Millennials to Leave the City and Make Living in the Suburbs … Cool? City living treated Dylan Gray well. For two years, Gray, 26, rented an apartment in downtown Indianapolis with bars, restaurants, and his office all in walking distance. But when the coronavirus pandemic required him to start working remotely, Gray set his sights on buying a home in Broad Ripple, a neighborhood with a suburban feel located six miles north of downtown. © Money; Getty Images Buy-a-Home-Suburbs “Once my ability to walk to work was no longer a factor, it made sense for me to buy a house, especially given how low rates are right now,” says Gray, a business analyst at Salesforce. He purchased a 3-bedroom detached house for $230,000 last month, using a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with a 3.3% interest rate. Before the pandemic, many Americans relished the perks of living in a big city....
    José Manuel González Torres The 2017 Geneva Motor Show had an unexpected protagonist, the Honda Urban EV prototype. That concept car left the vast majority of attendees without hiccups, with almost unanimous approval of its aesthetics. It was a flirty compact vehicle with a vintage essence, with very square shapes and simply round headlights. Finally, reality overcomes fiction. The firm will market the Honda e with a 100 kW (136 hp) electric motor for the access version and 113 kW (156 CV) if we choose the Advance level. The autonomy reaches 222 kilometers (WLTP) in the first and 210 km for the most powerful model. If we remember the concept car, the front featured a screen that displayed interactive messages, a leap to digitization that also moved to the minimalist interior. That model won the 2018 Car Design Award and the firm has not missed the opportunity to make it a reality. In March 2019 it was still on display as a prototype until its final production version was presented during the Frankfurt Motor Show that same year....
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