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    FOLLOWING an urgent Android warning, these are the apps you should delete NOW that could break your phone, say boffins. Worryingly, a new malware dubbed "Dracarys" can automatically click through and grant certain permissions - without the user realising. 1Android users need to avoid these apps, warn boffinsCredit: Getty Hackers have corrupted various apps to steal people's information warns Meta, which owns Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp. The Android malware known as "Dracarys" has been found in fake versions of Telegram, WhatsApp, YouTube, and recently Signal, a messaging app. Meta said in a report this month that the malware "uses accessibility services". This is "a feature in the Android operating system to assist users with disabilities, to automatically click through and grant the app certain permissions without the user having to do it". Read more on hackersWATCH OUT Google Chrome warning as 'North Korean hackers spotted stealing from emails'TURN IT ON Official Android warning for BILLIONS – important setting to turn on now The threat is introduced via non-official versions of YouTube, Signal, Telegram, WhatsApp, and custom chat applications. Once mistakenly downloaded,...
    Apple is urging iPhone users to download the latest version of its operation system, iOS 15.6, because it includes patches for 39 vulnerabilities that act like open windows for hackers to climb into your smartphone. The patches are for memory safety flaws, some that expose users to remote code execution attacks. While other vulnerabilities allow bad actors to track devices, terminate WiFi access and access sensitive data in the iCloud Photo Library. You can download iOS or iPadOS 15.6 by going to Settings > General > Software Update. Along with patching vulnerabilities, the new iOS 15.6 fixes flaws in the system like one that incorrectly shows users their storage was full or how a tab in Safari reverts to a previous page on its own. Scroll down for video  The new iOS 15.6 update fixes dozens of vulnerabilities, along with annoying flaws like one that incorrectly shows users their storage was full or how a tab in Safari reverts to a previous page on its own There is also an issue that causes braille devices to slow or stop responding when...
    INSTAGRAM users have been warned that hackers may have already accessed their accounts without them realizing it. It means that personal data - including your email address and phone number - as well as your photos could be at risk. 4A girl uses a mobile phoneCredit: Getty 4Hackers may have accessed billions of Instagram accounts unknowinglyCredit: Getty - Contributor Instagram's parent company Meta, which also owns Facebook, claims the image-sharing site has a billion active users. While some may think users with thousands of followers are more likely to get hit with an attack, all users of the social media platform are vulnerable. And account could be compromised, even if the hacker doesn’t get in contact with the user to let them know or demand a payment, according to Tom Gaffney, a security expert at F-Secure. The most obvious sign is if there has been a change to the user’s registered phone number or email, Gaffney told the Daily Record. Read more Instagram storiesAPPLE GRUMBLE Never click dangerous new iPhone pop-up – it will make hackers target youINSTA INFLUENCE One...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – A new online threat could make businesses, governments and consumers vulnerable to cyberattacks. Now security experts are racing to get ahead of criminals. It surrounds a utility called Log4j, which is used in a range of devices, including smart watches, TVs, gaming consoles, printers, smart thermostats and cloud services. READ MORE: COVID Pandemic Has Led Healthcare Providers To Rethink How They Deliver Care To Community“This particular issue is extremely widespread just because it’s so common and used in many, many applications,” said Mark Ostrowski. Ostrowski, who is with the cybersecurity firm Check Point, says hackers have already tried to use the flaw to gain access to around half of the corporate networks worldwide. Now businesses, tech companies and governments are implementing patches to block them. “Very quickly it’s been fixed across multiple, multiple platforms,” said Ostrowski, “as well as cybersecurity companies have created protections against these things.” READ MORE: Bridge Prep Academy Of Village Green In Kendall Placed On Precautionary Code Red LockdownBut it’s possible networks have already suffered a breach. “This is at a scale that...
    Microsoft has urged Windows users to install a security update immediately before their personal information is seriously compromised.  The tech giant found a serious vulnerability in its operating system that could let hackers install programs, view and delete data or even create new user accounts.  The vulnerability, known as PrintNightmare, is within Windows Print Spooler, a software programme that runs by default on Windows.   Windows Print Spooler helps your computer interact with the printer and manages all print jobs in your queue.    All versions of Windows are vulnerable, according to Microsoft, including its most recent major release, Windows 10.   Microsoft has offered patches for the flaw in its security update guide. The tech giant says all versions of Windows are vulnerable Microsoft detailed the flaw in its security update guide along with guidance on how Windows users can protect their system.  'A remote code execution vulnerability exists when the Windows Print Spooler service improperly performs privileged file operations,' the firm says.  'An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could run arbitrary code with system privileges.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    Colonial Pipeline is having network issues preventing shippers from planning upcoming shipments of fuel, just after the nation's biggest fuel pipeline reopened after a week-long ransomware attack. The disruption was caused by efforts by the company to harden its system as it restores service following the cyberattack, and was not the result of a reinfection of its network, Colonial said Tuesday.  The company did not say when the issue would be fixed, but said it was still delivering products that had already been scheduled by shippers. Colonial said in a statement that its network was experiencing 'intermittent disruptions' but that 'these issues were not related to the ransomware or any type of reinfection.' An Exxon station in DC is seen out of gas after a cyberattack crippled the biggest fuel pipeline in the country. On Tuesday, 70% of DC gas stations were still dry RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Moscow spy chief denies being behind Solar Winds hack of... Gas prices climb to seven-year high of $3.045 a gallon......
    President Joe Biden issued a strong and emphatic warning Thursday to gas stations dealing with panicked customers facing gas shortages following the cyberattack on the Colonial Pipeline: “Do not, I repeat, do not, try to take advantage of consumers during this time.” Biden said that he will work with governors of affected states, along with federal agencies, to stop price gouging. “Nobody should be using this situation for financial gain,” Biden said. “That’s what the hackers are trying to do. That’s what they’re about. Not us. That’s not who we are.” Biden also urged drivers not to panic. “I know seeing lines at the pumps or gas stations with no gas can be extremely stressful,” Biden said. “But this is a temporary situation. Do not get more gas than you need in the next few days. As I said, we expect the situation to begin to improve by the weekend and into early next week. Gasoline supply is coming back online, and panic-buying will only slow the process.” Watch above, via CNN. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    Microsoft warned this Tuesday that hackers “supported by the Government of China” managed to access to email accounts of your Exchange Server business service. In an entry on the company’s official blog, its corporate vice president for security and user trust, Tom Burt, indicated that the hackers they took advantage of four weaknesses of the system previously unknown. This group of hackers, with the support of the Chinese Government, were looking for steal information from US organizations in fields as diverse as infectious disease research, law firms, higher education, defense contractors, think tanks and NGOs. Through the failures in the system that hackers managed to identify, they accessed the server, from which they could steal information such as accounts and contacts e-mail and simultaneously install elements of software evil or malware. The FireEye precedent Last December, the company specialized in cybersecurity FireEye, one of the largest in the United States, reported that hackers linked to the government of a foreign country -the suspicions are centered in Russia- they managed to access their systems and steal material from them. On...
    Editorial: Gaming / Facebook / Twitter / YouTube / Instagram / News / Discord / Forums CD Projekt RED, the Polish development studio, was the victim of a cyber attack in which important information was stolen. Now, new information indicates that those responsible are auctioning the source code of some of their games. According to information from Tom’s Hardware, on the EXPLOIT forums there are individuals who claim to have the source code for Cyberpunk 2077 and an unreleased version of The Witcher: Wild Hunt. The starting bid is $ 1,000,000 USD, but they are also willing to sell it directly for $ 7,000,000 USD. In case you missed it: 20 Gamer Gifts in Claro Shop to succeed this Valentine’s Day This is the source code to ‘Gwent’ card game. Witcher 3, CyberPunk 2077, etc is being auctioned today on EXPLOIT forums at a starting bid of $ 1,000USD. The ransomware authors said they will not be auctioning data anywhere else – any other location other than EXPLOIT is fake. – vx-underground (@vxunderground) February 10, 2021 It is worth...
    By now, you’ve probably heard the theoretically scary story of how hackers managed to infiltrate the computer systems at a water treatment plant in Oldsmar, Florida and remotely control the chemical levels — but it turns out that description gives the hackers far, far too much credit. The reality? The water treatment plant itself left off-the-shelf remote control software on these critical computers — and apparently never, ever bothered to change the password. An official cybersecurity advisory about the incident from the state of Massachusetts (via Ars Technica) explains that the SCADA control system was accessed via TeamViewer, the kind of remote desktop application an IT administrator might roll out to remotely troubleshoot computers — not something you’d generally want hooked up to a critical system. More importantly, and here I will just quote the Massachusetts report verbatim: Further, all computers shared the same password for remote access and appeared to be connected directly to the Internet without any type of firewall protection installed. No, we’re not sure why this report is coming from MA instead of FL...
    SECRETARY of State Mike Pompeo was the first Trump administration official to blame Russia for the US government data breach described as the "cyber Pearl Harbor." On Friday, Pompeo confirmed reports that the Kremlin was behind the major hacking spree in the United States, which infiltrated federal departments and private sector businesses. 13US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo blamed Russia for the breachCredit: AFP or licensors 13The US Secretary of State said 'we can say pretty clearly that it was the Russians that engaged in this activity' after Moscow denied itCredit: AFP These spies hacked Microsoft and infiltrated a US nuclear weapons stockpile as part of a nine-month "virtual invasion" by Moscow, inserting code into network management software from SolarWinds Corp app. During an an interview with The Mark Levin Show, Pompeo said: “This was a very significant effort, and I think it’s the case that now we can say pretty clearly that it was the Russians that engaged in this activity. “There was a significant effort to use a piece of third-party software to essentially embed code inside of...
    The list of victims from the devastating and long-undetected hack on US government agencies and companies continues to grow ever since the sprawling cyber-espionage campaign was disclosed earlier this week. Federal authorities are expressing increased alarm over the suspected Russian hack that breached, among others, US nuclear agencies - with the nation's cybersecurity agency already warning of a 'grave threat' to government and private networks as a result.  It is one of the biggest hacks ever uncovered and has sent security teams around the world scrambling to investigate the scope and contain the damage.  As the investigation continues a week after the hack was first publicly revealed, a timeline is beginning to emerge regarding how it was first discovered and exactly who has been affected.  The hack involved a common software product made by Texas-based SolarWinds Corp, which is used by hundreds of thousands of organizations, ranging from government agencies to Microsoft and Fortune 500 companies.  Before this week, few people were aware that SolarWinds provided vital computer network monitoring services to the major corporations and government agencies worldwide. Now, the revelation that...
    Microsoft has revealed that is 'working to notify' 40 of its customers specifically targeted in global hacking campaign launched from Russia. The software titan confirmed that the breach - the biggest in US history intelligence history - was not limited to Washington but spread across seven countries. The United Kingdom, Israel, Canada and the United Arab Emirates were also in the cross hairs and the list 'will keep growing.'    The targets were not limited to government agencies - predominantly defence organisations - but included IT firms, NGOs and think-tanks. Microsoft President Brad Smith said: 'This is not ''espionage as usual," even in the digital age. Instead, it represents an act of recklessness that created a serious technological vulnerability for the United States and the world.'  Microsoft said this map illustrates data sent back from its Defender Anti-Virus software and identifies customers who installed versions of SolarWinds' Orion software containing the attackers' malware which breached US government at the highest level Microsoft was breached in the massive suspected Russian campaign that has hit multiple U.S. government agencies Microsoft President...
    By Matt O’Brien and Frank Bajak | Associated Press Governments and major corporations worldwide are scrambling to see if they, too, were victims of a global cyberespionage campaign that penetrated multiple U.S. government agencies and involved a common software product used by thousands of organizations. Russia, the prime suspect, denies involvement. Cybersecurity investigators said the hack’s impact extends far beyond the affected U.S. agencies, which include the Treasury and Commerce departments, though they haven’t disclosed which companies or what other governments were targeted. What happened? The hack began as early as March when malicious code was snuck into updates to popular software that monitors computer networks of businesses and governments. The malware, affecting a product made by U.S. company SolarWinds, gave elite hackers remote access into an organization’s networks so they could steal information. It wasn’t discovered until the prominent cybersecurity company FireEye determined it had been hacked. Whoever broke into FireEye was seeking data on its government clients, the company said — and made off with hacking tools it uses to probe its customers’ defenses. “There’s no evidence...
    Governments and major corporations worldwide are scrambling to see if they, too, were victims of a global cyberespionage campaign that penetrated multiple U.S. government agencies and involved a common software product used by thousands of organizations. Russia, the prime suspect, denies involvement. Cybersecurity investigators said the hack’s impact extends far beyond the affected U.S. agencies, which include the Treasury and Commerce departments, though they haven’t disclosed which companies or what other governments were targeted. ___ WHAT HAPPENED? The hack began as early as March when malicious code was snuck into updates to popular software that monitors computer networks of businesses and governments. The malware, affecting a product made by U.S. company SolarWinds, gave elite hackers remote access into an organization's networks so they could steal information. It wasn't discovered until the prominent cybersecurity company FireEye learned it was hacked. Whoever broke into FireEye was seeking data on its government clients, the company said — and made off with hacking tools it uses to probe its customers' defenses. “There’s no evidence that this was meant to be destructive,” said Ben...
    By MATT O'BRIEN and FRANK BAJAK, AP Technology Writers Governments and major corporations worldwide are scrambling to see if they, too, were victims of a global cyberespionage campaign that penetrated multiple U.S. government agencies and involved a common software product used by thousands of organizations. Russia, the prime suspect, denies involvement. Cybersecurity investigators said the hack’s impact extends far beyond the affected U.S. agencies, which include the Treasury and Commerce departments, though they haven’t disclosed which companies or what other governments were targeted. ___ WHAT HAPPENED? The hack began as early as March when malicious code was snuck into updates to popular software that monitors computer networks of businesses and governments. The malware, affecting a product made by U.S. company SolarWinds, gave elite hackers remote access into an organization's networks so they could steal information. It wasn't discovered until the prominent cybersecurity company FireEye learned it was hacked. Whoever broke into FireEye was seeking data on its government clients, the company said — and made off with hacking tools it uses to probe its customers' defenses. “There’s no evidence that...
    Dmitry Nogaev/Getty The feds say the Treasury and Commerce departments have been breached by hackers from leveraging a backdoor planted in a popular network monitoring app. The U.S. is pointing at Moscow as the likely culprit behind the break-ins. But they’re not pointing at the loud, aggressive, and troll-happy military hackers we’ve come to know in the years since they meddled in the 2016 election. Instead, U.S. officials have told reporters that a stealthier, more sophisticated crew—the A-Team of Kremlin hacking—is to blame, potentially signaling a return to the kind of high profile break-ins that the group became notorious for in 2015. These officials say hackers from Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service, referred to as “Cozy Bear” or APT 29, are now the top suspects for a breach in the SolarWinds Orion software, which has governments and corporations around the world scouring their networks for signs of intrusion. “This looks like a very well executed and careful operation but at the moment it is too early to say what the scale of the compromise is,” Matt Tait, a former information...
    The feds say the Treasury and Commerce departments have been breached by hackers from leveraging a backdoor planted in a popular network monitoring app. The U.S. is pointing at Moscow as the likely culprit behind the break-ins. But they’re not pointing at the loud, aggressive, and troll-happy military hackers we’ve come to know in the years since they meddled in the 2016 election. Instead, U.S. officials have told reporters that a stealthier, more sophisticated crew—the A-Team of Kremlin hacking—is to blame, potentially signaling a return to the kind of high profile break-ins that the group became notorious for in 2015. These officials say hackers from Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service, referred to as “Cozy Bear” or APT 29, are now the top suspects for a breach in the SolarWinds Orion software, which has governments and corporations around the world scouring their networks for signs of intrusion. “This looks like a very well executed and careful operation but at the moment it is too early to say what the scale of the compromise is,” Matt Tait, a former information security specialist for...
    Governments and major corporations worldwide are scrambling to see if they, too, were victims of a global cyberespionage campaign that penetrated multiple U.S. government agencies and involved a common software product used by thousands of organizations. Russia, the prime suspect, denies involvement. Cybersecurity investigators said the hack’s impact goes beyond the affected U.S. agencies, which include the Treasury and Commerce departments, though they haven’t disclosed which companies or what other governments were targeted. ___ WHAT HAPPENED? The hack began as early as March when malware was snuck into updates to popular software that monitors businesses and government computer networks. The malware, affecting a product made by U.S. company SolarWinds, gave the attacker remote access into an organization’s networks so it could steal information. It wasn’t discovered until the prominent cybersecurity company FireEye learned it was hacked. Whoever broke into FireEye was seeking data on its government clients, the company said — and made off with hacking tools it uses to probe its customers’ defenses. “There’s no evidence that this was meant to be destructive,” said Ben Buchanan, Georgetown University cyberespionage...
    Governments and major corporations worldwide are scrambling to see if they, too, were victims of a global cyberespionage campaign that penetrated multiple U.S. government agencies and involved a common software product used by thousands of organizations. Russia, the prime suspect, denies involvement. Cybersecurity investigators said the hack’s impact goes beyond the affected U.S. agencies, which include the Treasury and Commerce departments, though they haven’t disclosed which companies and other governments were targeted. ___ WHAT HAPPENED? The hack began as early as March when malware was snuck into updates to popular software that monitors businesses and government computer networks. The malware, affecting a product made by U.S. company SolarWinds, gave the attacker remote access into an organization’s networks so it could steal information. It wasn’t discovered until the prominent cybersecurity company FireEye learned it was hacked. Whoever broke into FireEye was seeking data on its government clients, the company said — and made off with hacking tools it uses to probe its customers’ defenses. “There’s no evidence that this was meant to be destructive,” said Ben Buchanan, Georgetown University...
    The Chinese embassy in Washington has claimed its Twitter account was hacked after it appeared to retweet Donald Trump's unfounded claims of election fraud.  Eagle-eyed Twitter users noticed on Wednesday that the official Chinese account had shared the tweet, in which Trump claimed that Democrats 'cheated' in the election - weeks after Beijing officially acknowledged Joe Biden's victory.   But the embassy denied involvement late last night, saying that 'the Chinese embassy Twitter account was hacked this afternoon and we condemn such an act'.  'For clarification, the embassy didn't do any retweeting on December 9', Beijing's diplomatic mission said.   President Trump repeated his unfounded claims of election fraud on Wednesday Twitter users were surprised when the Chinese embassy appeared to retweet Trump's claims  But China insisted late last night that it had been hacked and had not retweeted anything  Like many of Trump's post-election ramblings, Trump's original tweet was marked with a warning that 'this claim about election fraud is disputed'.   China was conspicuously cautious in acknowledging Trump's election defeat even after Joe Biden was widely declared as...
    A new smartphone tool that will track the first American patients to get the coronavirus vaccine may be vulnerable to manipulation.  The technology, which was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is called V-SAFE. It will use text messages and web surveys so the first immunization recipients in the US can report any symptoms or side effects they are experiencing. But a report from The Washington Post says federal and state health officials are worried that hackers or anti-vaxxers could access the CDC's system and use it to file false and misleading reports about the safety of the shots. V-SAFE is a smartphone tool developed by the CDC to track patients who received the first coronavirus vaccines that uses a QR code so people can fill out surveys about side effects Health and technology experts say hackers and anti-vaxxers could gain access to the QR code to file false and misleading reports about the safety of the jabs. Pictured: The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland...
    Cybersecurity researchers recovered 75,000 'highly sensitive' documents from USB devices auctioned off on eBay. The University of Aberlay purchased 100 secondhand devices and all by 32 of them contained 'deleted' files that could be extracted using publicly available tools. The files were collected using a USB Write Blocker, a forensic tool used to pull mass data from devices, and a standard computer. Once the image files were collected, the team saw records included passwords, bank statements, health records and more - enough data for hackers to blackmail sellers. Scroll down for video  Cybersecurity researchers recovered 75,000 'highly sensitive' documents from USB devices auctioned off on eBay. The University of Aberlay purchased 100 secondhand devices and all by 32 of them contained 'deleted' files that could be extracted using publicly available tools Professor Karen Renaud from Abertay's Division of Cybersecurity, said: 'This is extremely concerning, and the potential for this information to be misused with extremely serious consequences is enormous. 'An unscrupulous buyer could feasibly use recovered files to access sellers' accounts if the passwords are still valid, or even...
    Donald Trump’s campaign website has been ‘seized’ by hackers who claim to have evidence that ‘completely discredits’ him as a president and proves his ‘criminal involvement’ in the manipulation of the 2020 election. 
    When law enforcement arrested three alleged young hackers in the US and the UK last month, the story of the worst-known hack of Twitter's systems seemed to have drawn to a tidy close. But in fact, the technique that allowed hackers to take control of the accounts of Joe Biden, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, and dozens of others is still in use against a broad array of victims, in a series of attacks that began well before Twitter's blowup, and in recent weeks has escalated into a full-blown crime wave. In mid-July, Twitter revealed that hackers had used a technique against it called "phone spear phishing," allowing the attackers to target the accounts of 130 people including CEOs, celebrities, and politicians. The hackers successfully took control of 45 of those accounts and used them send tweets promoting a basic bitcoin scam. The hackers, Twitter wrote in a post mortem blog post about the incident, had called up Twitter staffers and, using false identities, tricked them into giving up credentials that gave the attackers access to an internal company tool that...
    Just after dark on September 10 last year, Justin Wynn and Gary DeMercurio carefully slunk along a dimly lit hallway inside the Polk County courthouse, an ostentatious Beaux-Arts building in the center of downtown Des Moines, Iowa. For the second time in three nights, the two intruders had picked the lock on a basement-level emergency exit door at the side of the building. Now they were back inside, deep in the warren of the building’s underbelly. From their visit two nights earlier, they knew that just ahead, in a darkened maintenance office, there was a box on a wall holding a ring of keys—keys that would give them the run of the entire rest of the courthouse. But on this second visit, the lights in that room were on. When Wynn peaked around the corner, he was surprised to see a maintenance worker sitting there in the room—the man was looking at a computer screen, facing the same wall where the keys were stored, just at the edge the man’s peripheral vision. Wynn, a 29-year-old with a baby face...
    The alleged Twitter hackers were reportedly taken down by rival gang who shared a database that led the FBI to the mastermind Florida teen and his two accomplices.  Graham Ivan Clark, 17, was arrested Friday in Tampa. Nima Fazeli, 22, of Orlando, Florida; and Mason Sheppard, 19, of Bognor Regis, U.K. have also been charged in relation to the hack, which took place on July 15.  The scheme commandeered Twitter accounts of prominent politicians, celebrities and technology moguls and scammed people around the globe out of more than $100,000 in Bitcoin. It also saw the men allegedly make thousands by selling people's usernames.  But the accused youngsters were easily traced thanks to a rival group of hackers who had earlier shared a database full of usernames and private messages that then led FBI to the three men, Wired reports.      That information was shared at the beginning at April and acquired by the FBI on April 9.  The data gathered from that showed bitcoin addresses and IP addresses which law enforcement are said to have used to trace the three men arrested.  ...
    Hackers involved in the high-profile hijacking of Twitter accounts earlier this week were a group of young pals with no links to state or organized crime, according to a new report. The attack, which Twitter and the FBI are investigating, started with a playful message between hackers on the platform Discord, a chat service popular with gamers, according to the New York Times. Cybersecurity experts were stunned by the startling revelation that Wednesday's breach, unprecedented in scale for the social media site, seemingly amounted to youthful hijinks.  'An incident such as this could have extraordinary serious consequences - manipulation of the markets, disinformation relating to an election, etc,' Brett Callow, a threat analyst at cybersecurity firm Emsisoft, told DailyMail.com.  'However, in this case, reporting suggests that the hack was carried out by a group of young people who may have done nothing worse than execute a bitcoin scam,' he said. 'Twitter got lucky.' Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is seen above. Wednesday's massive hack of the social media site was perpetrated by a group of young pals with no state...
    The FBI is leading a federal inquiry into Twitter's security breach that saw hackers hijack high profile accounts - as the social media giant scrambles to investigate how its most catastrophic attack yet was able to occur. Sources say federal investigators are now probing the Twitter attack, which initially appears to have been a bitcoin scam but has sparked fears the hackers could have wreaked havoc on the stock market, meddled in elections or even potentially started a war.  A day on from the breach, which resulted in Twitter stopping all verified accounts from tweeting or resetting their passwords for hours as they tried to contain it, they have still not revealed how it happened or to what extent its internal systems were compromised.   Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk were among the victims of the four-hour attack on Wednesday afternoon that saw hackers infiltrate Twitter's internal systems and post bogus tweets from the high profile accounts asking people to send bitcoin.  The scammers received more than $116,000 worth of cryptocurrency, which equates to 12.8 bitcoin, from over...
    Malware attacks on prominent businesses and institutions are nothing new. But experts say the shift to working from home amid the COVID-19 pandemic may be making it easier for hackers to find a way in. The University of California, San Francisco paid a ransom of $1.14 million to hackers in June to recover data from its School of Medicine that had been encrypted in a cyberattack, the university announced Friday. The attack marked the third in a string of recent cyberattacks carried out against universities. The prestigious medical school is among several universities to have been targeted by ransomware in recent months. ‘Netwalker’, the ransomware software responsible for the UCSF hack, was used to carry out similar attacks against Michigan State University and Columbia College, Chicago in late May and early June. Michigan State opted not to pay its ransom at the advice of law enforcement, which resulted in financial documents and personal information from the university being published online. Carolyn Crandall, Chief Deception Officer at computer security service Attivo Networks, said the shift to remote work amid COVID-19 has...
    Duane Prokop/Getty Images Joy Reid, a weekend fixture of MSNBC, is expected to take over a top weekday hour at the network: 7 p.m., the hour vacated by Hardball host Chris Matthews, who retired amid controversy earlier this year. That’s according to the Wall Street Journal, which reported that Reid, who has been one of the guest hosts of the 7 p.m. hour, is likely to take the top job permanently. Page Six says the “deal is all but done.” Her Saturday and Sunday show AM Joy has earned a loyal following, consistently besting CNN in the ratings. The move to 7 p.m. on MSNBC is a big one, and it would put a Black woman in an evening lineup that is all white: the hour is followed by Chris Hayes, Rachel Maddow, Lawrence O’Donnell and Brian Williams. Mediaite’s Colby Hall made a strong case for Reid to get this very job back in 2017, in a piece we re-published on Mediaite yesterday when news of her expected promotion broke. But there remains an unresolved controversy in Reid’s career, mentioned...
    A Russian ransomware group whose leaders were indicted by the Justice Department in December is retaliating against the U.S. government, many of America’s largest companies and a major news organization, identifying employees working from home during the pandemic and attempting to get inside their networks with malware intended to cripple their operations. Sophisticated new attacks by the hacking group — which the Treasury Department claims has at times worked for Russian intelligence — were identified in recent days by Symantec Corp., a division of Broadcom, one of the many firms that monitors corporate and government networks. In an urgent warning issued Thursday night, the company reported that Russian hackers had exploited the sudden change in American work habits to inject code into corporate networks with a speed and breadth not previously witnessed. Ransomware allows the hackers to demand that companies pay millions to have access to their own data restored. While ransomware has long been a concern for U.S. officials, after devastating attacks on the cities of Atlanta and Baltimore and towns across Texas and Florida, it has taken on...
    The hackers who attacked the celebrity law firm ran by famed attorney Allen Grubman are back. The group, which calls itself REvil, has posted a new message on the dark Web saying it’s ready to auction off all the info it allegedly has on LeBron James, Nicki Minaj and Mariah Carey, starting at $600,000 per star. They also claim to have documents on Diddy’s Bad Boy Entertainment for a reserve price of $750,000, plus secret files on Universal and MTV for auction starting at $1 million per company. CORONAVIRUS AND CYBERATTACKS: 2020 CAMPAIGNS ALREADY BEING HACKED, EXPERTS WARN The hackers, believed to be Eastern European, claim on their site, “Bribery celebrity’s [sic] by the Democratical [sic] party, sexual harassment by top politicians, envy of celebrity’s for each other … all of that is waiting for you in files of Grubman company.” Grubman has refused to pay a ransom demand of $42 million. A source close to the law firm claimed the hackers were lying about the contents of the files to extort more money. The source said, “The firm handles...
    The hackers who attacked the celeb regulation agency ran by famed lawyer Allen Grubman are again. The group, which calls itself REvil, has posted a brand new message on the darkish Internet saying it’s able to public sale off all the information it allegedly has on LeBron James, Nicki Minaj and Mariah Carey, beginning at $600,000 per star. Additionally they declare to have paperwork on Diddy’s Unhealthy Boy Leisure for a reserve worth of $750,000, plus secret recordsdata on Common and MTV for public sale beginning at $1 million per firm. The hackers, believed to be Jap European, declare on their website, “Bribery celeb’s [sic] by the Democratical [sic] social gathering, sexual harassment by prime politicians, envy of celeb’s for one another … all of that’s ready for you in recordsdata of Grubman firm.” Grubman has refused to pay a ransom demand of $42 million. A supply near the regulation agency claimed the hackers had been mendacity in regards to the contents of the recordsdata to extort more cash. The supply stated, “The agency handles contracts and enterprise issues,...
    Hackers have leaked highly sensitive police files from over 200 police departments across the country, according to a Business Insider report Monday. All files are reportedly searchable by badge number. What do we know about this? Activist group DDoSecrets published what the outlet calls "hundreds of gigabytes' worth of potentially sensitive files" from police departments across the United States. The group has called the information dump "BlueLeaks." The group compiled the records, disseminating them into a searchable database that can pull up private information from a police badge number. Many of the files include information such as memos, emails, and officers' personal information. The group shared information on Twitter regarding the data dump. It wrote, "RELEASE: #BlueLeaks (269 GB) Ten years of data from over 200 police departments, fusion centers and other law enforcement training and support resources. Among the hundreds of thousands of documents are police and FBI reports, bulletins, guides and more." The outlet reported that much of the information purports to show "how law enforcement...
    When the Animal Crossing: New Horizons community learned about the hacker who gave out Raymonds to fight black market greed, the response was immense. PokeNinja, the generous soul behind the project, couldn’t keep up with all the people asking if they, too, could have a free gray cat in their game. “With the amount of messages coming in, I wondered how I could continue helping people, but on a larger scale,” he told News Brig over Twitter messages. The first time around, PokeNinja used a hacked version of the game to generate villagers to give away to other players. The method he used was time consuming, and couldn’t be scaled up to meet the enormous demand. But as PokeNinja read through the messages flooding his inbox, he discovered that he wasn’t the only one who wanted to fight back against the growing toxicity surrounding the Animal Crossing economy. Some fans wanted to learn how to hack their own games, so they could also give back to the larger Animal Crossing community. Others reaching out already knew how...
    BOSTON (AP) - Google said state-based hackers have targeted the campaigns of both President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, although it saw no evidence that the phishing attempts were successful. The company confirmed the findings after the director of its Threat Analysis Group, Shane Huntley, disclosed the attempts Thursday on Twitter. Huntley said a Chinese group known as Hurricane Panda targeted Trump campaign staffers while an Iranian outfit known as Charming Kitten had attempted to breach accounts of Biden campaign workers. Such phishing attempts typically involve forged emails with links designed to harvest passwords or infect devices with malware. TOP STORIES Gov. Ralph Northam to announce removal plans for Richmonds iconic Robert E. Lee statue Richmond police chief says rioters blocked firefighters from burning home with child inside AG Barr says evidence of foreign actors involved in civil unrest The effort targeted personal email accounts of staffers in both campaigns, according to the company statement. A Google spokesman added that “the timeline is recent and that a couple of people were targeted on both...
    Chinese and Iranian actors attempted to hack the Biden and Trump campaigns, a Google official announced Thursday. The attempts were apparently unsuccessful, and the campaigns have been briefed.  Google Threat Analysis Group official Shane Huntley tweeted that his group recently "saw China APT [advanced persistent threat] group targeting Biden campaign staff & Iran APT targeting Trump campaign staff with phishing. No sign of compromise. We sent users our govt attack warning and we referred to fed law enforcement." The reported hack attempts are a reminder that foreign actors continue to try to interfere in U.S. politics, as the nation heads into what promises to be a bitter presidential election. In 2016, successful hacks on the Democratic National Committee and Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta led to troves of emails that were released just before Election Day.  "We are aware of reports from Google that a foreign actor has made unsuccessful attempts to access the personal email accounts of campaign staff," the Biden campaign said in a statement. "We have known from the beginning of our campaign that we would be...
    A senior Google official says that Chinese and Iranian hackers attempted to access the personal email accounts of some staffers on President Trump’s reelection campaign, as well as former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign. But Shane Huntley -- who heads Google’s Threat Analysis Group -- tweeted Thursday that there was “no sign of compromise.” THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON CYBER SECURITY THREATS "We sent users our govt [sic] attack warning and we referred to fed [sic] law enforcement," Huntley wrote. He said Google detected Chinese hackers who were using malicious emails to try and breach the Biden campaign staffers’ accounts, with the Iranian hackers targeting the Trump campaign staffers’ accounts. “The Trump campaign has been briefed that foreign actors unsuccessfully attempted to breach the technology of our staff,” a Trump campaign aide told Fox News. “We are vigilant about cybersecurity and do not discuss any of our precautions.” The Biden campaign said in a statement that it is “aware of reports from Google that a foreign actor has made unsuccessful attempts to access the personal email accounts of campaign staff. We have known from the beginning of our...
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