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    KIPP Public Schools, a charter school operator in California, announced on Thursday that one of its teachers identifies as a “proud queer Asian-Latinx educator,” and “often teaches his 5-year-olds about the complexities of intersectionality.” “Kris Sanchez, a teacher at @kippsocal, identifies as a ‘proud queer Asian-Latinx educator’ and often teaches his 5-year-olds about the complexities of intersectionality,” tweeted KIPP Public Schools, a network of 270 public charter schools with more than 160,000 students, according to its website. Kris Sanchez, a teacher at @kippsocal, identifies as a “proud queer Asian-Latinx educator” and often teaches his 5-year-olds about the complexities of intersectionality. Head to our #KIPPBlog to learn how Kris affirms the identities of all his students. https://t.co/4QgFAVVMVN pic.twitter.com/abUcTa3YNG — KIPP Public Schools (@KIPP) June 2, 2022 Included in the tweet was a link to a blog post by Kris Sanchez, a teacher at KIPP Comienza Community Prep, Los Angeles, California, who describes himself as “a zesty Kindergarten teacher” and “a proud queer Asian-Latinx educator.” Sanchez explained how he reads the book, A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo — a fictional book...
    DENVER (CBS4)– In classroom 165A at North High School in Denver, a group of Latinx students are having conversations that are sometimes difficult to have. (credit: CBS) “Especially being Brown you have more doubt being put in you growing up,” said Bernadette Moreno, a sophomore at the school. The students are sharing their stories of pain and beauty, through a poetry book they recently created called “Our Sacred Community.” The book highlights what it was like for Latinx students growing up in the Northside as it was gentrifying. “The people around me are always frowned upon and looked at in a negative manner,” said Carlos, a senior in the class. “They like to take our culture but they hate the people that it’s tied to.” The students created the book in a “Latinos in Action” class, spearheaded by teacher Tim Hernández, who also grew up in Denver’s Northside. Hernández said they got the inspiration from Colorado Poet Laureate Writer Bobby LeFebre, then they began walking the neighborhood, taking photos, and then putting those photos into words. “A lot of the...
    The amount of student loan debt in the United States is $1.8 trillion dollars — and counting. The price to get an education has never been more expensive. The student loan crisis has affected a lot of students but statistics show that it disproportionately affects the Latinx community. Around 72% of Latinx students take out loans to attend college, compared to 66% of white students, according to a 2020 study from Student Borrower Protection, a nonprofit organization focused on ending student debt. The study also found that 12 years after starting college, the median Latinx borrower still owes 83% of their initial student loan balance while the median white borrower owes only 65% of their original balance. This disparity can be attributed to a number of reasons including the lack of knowledge of the financial aid system, fear of accumulating more debt or the lack of support experienced during college and beyond. Why Latinx students are afraid of debt UnidosUS and the University of North Carolina's School of Law conducted a survey of Latino students who began but didn't complete...
    Black and Latinx students are disproportionately harmed by the state’s failure to exert oversight and take action against some school district disciplinary practices, including transferring students to alternative and often inferior programs, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday by parents and an advocacy group. The suit alleges that students of color continue to be overrepresented in expulsion and suspension rates reported by school districts annually and that the state has not done enough to address the disparity. It also alleges that lax state intervention and reporting policies allow school districts to mask some disciplinary practices by transferring students to alternative schools, where honors and advanced placement courses are not often offered and college-required courses may not always be available. State policy requires school districts to publicly report expulsions and suspensions, but not student transfers. Tony Thurmond, state superintendent of public instruction, and the California Department of Education are named as defendants in the suit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court. A spokesperson from the education department declined to comment on the suit, which he said officials have not yet...
    by Ray Levy Uyeda This story was originally published at Prism. Many students across the country returned to in-person instruction over the past month, but for families of color, the pandemic has shaken their trust in schools’ ability to care for their children’s well-being and safety—and that has led to a surge in the number of BIPOC families opting for homeschooling. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, prior to the onset of the pandemic, 3.3% of Black families homeschooled their children. Since the 2019-2020 school year when the data was gathered, that number has increased to 16.1%. While the rate of homeschooling is higher for all racial groups, Black families reported the greatest percentage difference from pre-pandemic to current day. Latinx families reported the second-greatest increase, from 6.2% before the pandemic to 12.1% now. “There’s a surge, and honestly a lot of it is because some parents are concerned about their children’s welfare and the possibility of them contracting [COVID-19],” said Monica Olivera, a Texas-based blogger for MommyMaestra, a site where Latinx families can learn more about the process...
    The coronavirus pandemic has been challenging for Latinx students in the past year but it has also shaped their future plans. Many chose to go to graduate school to add another degree to their resume before they hit the job market. Graduate enrollment is up 4.4% overall this spring, compared to an increase of 1% in spring 2020, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Latinx students continued to see the biggest jump – up 14% this spring compared to an 8% gain a year ago. Chelsea Hylton, a graduate student at the University of Southern California studying digital journalism, said the uncertainty of the job market was what made her apply to grad school, with the intention of expanding her portfolio.  "Without the pandemic, I don't think that I would've applied to grad school or would've even considered it a viable option," Hylton said.Chelsea Hylton, a graduate student at the University of Southern California, is pursuing a master's degree in journalismSource: Annika Ide  During this time, however, Hylton contracted Covid-19. Away from her home in Los Angeles, she...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A Rochester teacher has become the first Latinx educator to be named Minnesota Teacher of the Year, according to Education Minnesota. Natalia Benjamin is a high school English learner and ethnic studies teacher at Century High School. “Many of my students are navigating new cultures and places,” Benjamin wrote in an essay read by the panel who selects the winning teacher. “I hope that I can be a small part of their journey in succeeding as they follow their dreams.” Benjamin has been in her current position since 2015, and was a substitute teacher and paraprofessional at Rochester Public Schools for two years before that. “Natalia sets her students up for success by fostering a safe, positive and welcoming learning environment for every child,” Century’s Assistant Principal Molly Murphy wrote in support of Benjamin’s nomination. “Natalia creates an open, supportive environment with mutual respect among the students.”   More On WCCO.com: Sheriff: Body Found In Isanti Co. Believed To Be Amanda Vangrinsven 'They're Not Happy With The Job': Minnesota Police Chiefs Speak Out On Staffing Issues...
    College enrollment is down due to the coronavirus pandemic but the Latinx student population has been hit particularly hard. Spring 2021 undergraduate enrollment is down 5.9% from last year, according to the National Student Clearinghouse. Latinx enrollment, which had been rising before the pandemic, showed some of the biggest swings: A decrease of 1.9% in spring 2021 compared to an increase of 2.1% in spring 2020. Community colleges, which include large Latinx student populations, saw a 13.7% decrease in enrollment in spring 2021, compared to an increase of 1.7% in spring 2020. Students dropped out for are a variety of reasons: Family members became sick or lost their jobs and the student had to help support the family. Or, they just couldn't afford it anymore. And, instead of falling further behind, they decided to drop out.Jorge Alvarez, a "super" senior at Rutgers University on the pre-med track, said he struggled financially during the pandemic.Photo: Denisse QuintanillaThe pandemic also worsened some of the problems already faced by Hispanic college students including language barriers, challenges due to immigration status, or lack of...
    A Texas group of social justice activists called “Dallas Justice Now” (DJN) is urging “wealthy white liberals” to not send their children to Ivy League Schools in order to leave those spots open for “students from Black, LatinX, and other marginalized backgrounds.” The group issued a pledge calling on “white liberals and allies of the Black Lives Matter movement” to keep slots open at the most expensive, elite institutions for applicants who might otherwise not qualify. The group explained their reasoning in a press release: Dallas Justice Now, a social justice activist group dedicated to ending institutional racism and creating opportunities for the black community in the segregated city of Dallas, is today asking white liberals and allies of the Black Lives Matter movement to make sacrifices to open up opportunities for students of color. Specifically, white allies are being asked to sign a pledge to commit to not sending their children to Ivy League or US News & World Report Top 50 schools and instead leave those spots open for students from Black, LatinX, and other marginalized backgrounds who were denied access to these...
    Creative Commons/RubyTMinnesota, we have an education problem. The system is failing our 76,000 Limited English Proficient (LEP) students, and while Gov. Tim Walz’s Due North Education Plan is a step in the right direction, it still falls short of actually giving students the help they need. The 2019 MDE State of Our Students Report shows the four-year graduation rate for English Learner students is 65.7% compared to 88.4% of white students overall. Further, only 30.8% were achieving grade level reading proficiency in reading and only 29% in math. These results are being further aggravated by the pandemic. How is this acceptable? For far too long, Latinx and English Learner (EL) students have been left behind in Minnesota’s education system. Our education system must focus on providing each of these children and their families, regardless of ethnicity or language(s) spoken, high-quality education. They deserve more and it’s time to do something about it. Over the past year, LatinoLEAD’s education action team committee, composed of some of Minnesota’s top Latinx education leaders, has been working on proposals to address the lack of...
    Loading the player... Governor Ned Lamont announced Connecticut will become the first state to require high school curriculums to offer Black and Latinx courses. Read More: Connecticut reporter fired for calling Tim Scott an ‘Uncle Tom’ The law was signed by Lamont in 2019 and according to a news release, high schools may begin to offer the course in the 2021-2022 school year and will be required to offer it during the Fall 2022-23 school year. “Increasing the diversity of what we teach is critical to providing students with a better understanding of who we are as a society and where we are going,” the governor said in the memo. “Adding this course in our high schools will be an enormous benefit not only to our Black and Latino students but to students of all backgrounds because everyone can benefit from these studies. This is a step that is long overdue, and I applaud the work of the General Assembly, State Board of Education, and everyone at the State Education Resource Center whose collaborative work helped get this done.”...
    Facebook says that it will expand an online course in deep learning to more students to help improve the diversity of its AI division. After a successful pilot program at Georgia Tech, the company will roll out this graduate-level course in deep learning to more colleges across 2021. The focus will be on offering the system to universities that serve large numbers of Black and Latinx students. It’s hoped that, by improving the diversity of the people building these systems, some of the more odious biases will be weeded out.  This is part of a broader program to encourage people to enter the computer science field even if their undergraduate training is in another area. In 2019, the company put $4.2 million into Northeastern University’s Align program which helps encourage under-represented groups take graduate programs. It helps, too, that the global pandemic means that there’s a greater embrace of online learning, which itself can reach people that would otherwise be unable to participate.
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