Sunday, Sep 25, 2022 - 13:36:12
1000 results - (0.009 seconds)

University:

latest news at page 1:
    A New York doctor and Massachusetts native who died at the age of 55 is being remembered for his kindness toward others. Westchester County resident Anthony Francis Korosi, of Hastings-on-Hudson, died peacefully on Monday, Sept. 19, according to his obituary. Korosi was born in Boston and attended the Roxbury Latin School. He went on to receive a bachelor's degree from Cornell University and went to medical school at the University of Pittsburgh. He completed his residency at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. "A truly brilliant nephrologist, he possessed an exceptionally keen clinical acumen and helped countless patients over the years," his obituary reads. "Caring and kind, he always put the patient’s needs first and continued to do so even after his colorectal cancer diagnosis in December of 2018." Korosi had a love of reading the news, skiing, Boston sports, and spending time with his family, his obituary said.  "His face would beam with delight when watching his daughters perform on stage or on the tennis court," his obituary reads. He is survived by his wife, Laura; their daughters, Rachel...
    Brett Favre was insatiable in his desire to gain assistance to pay for a new volleyball facility at the University of Southern Mississippi, despite the potential misuse of state welfare, according to a report.  Favre allegedly pressed for state officials to help him build a new volleyball complex according to the most recent court filing relating to Mississippi's welfare scandal, obtained by ESPN.  Favre has not been charged with regard to the welfare misspending case, but did receive $1.1million in state welfare money for no-show speaking gigs, which he has since repaid, according to state officials.  State Auditor Shad Whit last year demanded repayment of $77m of misspent welfare funds -- including $1.1m to Favre -- from several people and groups.  In a Facebook post when he repaid the first $500,000, Favre said he did not know the money he received came from welfare funds. He also said his charity had provided millions of dollars to poor children in Mississippi and Wisconsin.  The former Packers quarterback is accused of attempting to funnel $5m into the new volleyball complex built at...
    Hundreds of the state’s best and brightest rising high school juniors and seniors will flood Georgia Southern University’s Statesboro Campus during the summer of 2023 to participate in the Georgia Governor’s Honors Program (GHP), the state’s most prestigious four-week, residential summer program. The GHP provides students with academic, cultural and social enrichment and covers all tuition fees and boarding costs. Students apply to attend GHP for a variety of majors in academic studies or fine arts and have the opportunity to develop personally and academically by selecting an additional elective outside of their major area. When the contract came up for renewal, Georgia Southern submitted a proposal to host the program. “We are thrilled for the opportunity to host the Governor’s Honors Program at Georgia Southern,” said Georgia Southern University President Kyle Marrero. “Having these students on our campus will allow us to showcase our spectacular facilities and academic programs. We look forward to welcoming these students and their families.” The dates for the 2023 program are June 18 through...
    Philadelphia law enforcement has released surveillance footage of the killing of a 23-year-old recent graduate of Temple University. The city is giving a $20,000 reward for information leading to the capture of the person responsible for shooting Everett Beauregard. The footage showed someone opening gunfire on Beauregard when his back was turned during the midnight hours Thursday. THREE KILLED IN SHOOTING, ANOTHER FOUND DEAD AFTER FIRE DOUSED IN CHICAGO SUBURB "Tragically, Mr. Beauregard's life was cut short by this horrific act of violence and for no apparent reason whatsoever. This was not a robbery attempt as we initially believed," Philadelphia Police Capt. Jason Smith said during a press conference Friday, according to ABC 6. Beauregard had just hopped off the train and was heading back home after participating in an event with a friend, per FOX 29. He was shot at the 400 block of North 35th Street around 12:30 a.m., according to police, who have stressed that the shooting appears to be unprovoked. #Philadelphia WATCH: Video has been released of the shooting murder of...
    A Maryland man is being accused of interfering with the investigation into the death of the son of University of Maryland football coach Mike Locksley, according to court documents. Meiko Locksley, 25, was shot in the chest and killed in September 2017 in Howard County in the 5500 block of Harpers Farm Road in Columbia, though no killer has ever been brought to justice for the murder. According to reports, Gaithersburg resident John Willie Kennedy, Jr. is the latest to bring renewed attention to the cold case after he was allegedly caught lying under oath in front of a grand jury during the investigation into Locksley’s death. It is unclear what Kennedy allegedly lied about to the grand jury. Kennedy was charged with obstruction of justice and obstruction of an official proceeding. Few details have been released by police regarding any potential suspects in the murder, but investigators have stated that they believe it not to have been a random shooting.
    Welcome to the Glean, MinnPost’s twice-daily roundup of Minnesota news. Hennepin County Sheriff's OfficeAhmed Mohamed UmarKARE staff report a Minneapolis man has been charged in connection with a Thursday bomb threat at the University of Minnesota. KMSP’s Jared Goyette reports that a man who allegedly attacked a train engineer with a knife, causing the engineer to jump from a moving train near Sauk Rapids, is facing felony charges. Over at the Hill, Rebecca Klar reports that Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz have struck a deal to advance an antitrust bill that would let news orgs collectively negotiate with tech platforms for compensatin to distribute content. KSTP visits the apple breeders at the U of M’s Horticultural Research Center in Carver County. Article continues after advertisement For Minnesota Monthly, Macy Harder interrogates the stereotype of the Minnesotan, as portrayed on TV, whether Marshall from “How I Met Your Mother” or Tom Wambsgans from “Succession.” The Star Tribune’s Alex Chhith reports that demonstrators assembled at the University of Minnesota Thursday showed support for Mahsa Amini, an Iranian woman...
    A digital program offered by the University Store at Georgia Southern University saved students more than $1.3 million in textbook costs during the 2021-22 academic year.  From August 2021 to May 2022, the Day1Access program helped students save $1,330,991.86 by providing digital course materials at a reduced cost versus traditional textbooks. Since its inception in 2019, the Day1Access program has saved Georgia Southern students more than $2.6 million in required course materials costs. “The cost of higher education is a major concern, and this is just one way Georgia Southern is trying to lower the financial burden for its students,” said Dr. Carl Reiber, Georgia Southern University Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs. “Day1Access is proving beneficial not only for the cost savings for students but is also a way for students to gain access to educational materials no matter where they’re studying.” Through the program, students gain codeless access to their purchased required course material on the first day of class. Charges are placed on the first day of the...
    Dozens of Johns Hopkins University students are protesting a private police force for the university after the school revived its plan to add additional security, reports WJZ. While some students are in favor of additional security around the school, many are upset and claim they would not feel safer with more police. The protests got so loud, the town hall meeting addressing the plans was halted, continues the outlet. Three years ago, Johns Hopkins University saw student protests about adding a private police force. This was the first of three town hall meetings between the Baltimore Police Department and the university as the school moves to implement the plan. To read the full story by WJZ, click here.
    The University of Minnesota and two other universities will be researching how the media portrays health equity and how frequently it covers the topic. Cornell University, Wesleyan University, and the University of Minnesota School of Public Health have been awarded a grant to track media content and examine its impact on attitudes, values and behavior. The project, Collaborative on Media and Messaging, will also connect with journalists, public health officials, affected communities and advocacy organizations to apply the research findings to advance race and health equity. The $5 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation runs through August of 2025. The universities will split the research into three parts: Wesleyan will monitor news coverage and political commercials to identify developing social safety net issues and messaging that have racial equity implications; Cornell will conduct surveys and experiments to determine if the messaging is effective for promoting health and racial equity; and the University of Minnesota will conduct interviews and listening sessions with stakeholders in health equity advocacy, community organizing, public health practice and journalism to identify the problem areas in...
    Police are looking for a woman who stabbed another person at Boston University's College of Fine Arts.  Police responded to an assault at 855 Commonwealth Avenue around 8:40 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 22, Boston University Police said. Upon arrival, officers found a person suffering from an apparent stab wound.  They were taken to a local hospital with a non-life-threatening injury. Police believe the suspect and the victim were known to each other and said there is not threat to the community.  The suspect is described as a 35-year-old Asian woman, standing 5'5," with a slim build and shoulder length black hair, according to police.  Police said they know who the suspect is but are working to find her as she is not present on BU's campus. Anyone with information is asked to contact Boston University Police at 617-353-2121. 
    By Jason Gale | Bloomberg Brain and nerve conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and stroke are significantly more common among Covid-19 survivors than those who’ve never had the disease, according to a study of millions of patient records that raises alarms about the pandemic’s devastating aftereffects. Former Covid patients had a 42% increased risk of neurologic problems a year after testing positive, the study published Thursday in the journal Nature Medicine showed. That translates to an extra seven cases of impaired cognition, memory disorders, Parkinson’s-like disease and dozens of other brain-related conditions for every 100 people who caught the coronavirus, according to scientists led by Ziyad Al-Aly, chief of research and development at the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. “We’re seeing the early warning signals of the toll the pandemic will leave in its wake — waves of disease and disability that clinicians and governments need to pay attention to,” said Al-Aly, who’s also a clinical epidemiologist at Washington University. “Some of the effects are life-threatening and have the potential to literally change people’s lives forever.” The findings add...
    For the second time in almost two weeks, a bomb threat prompted a shelter-in-place at Northeastern University, WHDH reports. Northeastern Police informed students about police activity near Curry Student Center around 10:40 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 22, the department said on Twitter. Students were being told to shelter in place and avoid the area at all costs. This was in response to an alleged bomb threat that was reported earlier that evening in the area of 346 Huntington Avenue, WHDH reports citing Boston Police.  The campus was given an all-clear and the shelter-in-place was lifted around 11:17, the outlet reports. However, students and staff were being asked to avoid the center as Snell Quad, Northeastern Police said. This is the second potential bomb threat to hit Northeastern's campus after a staff member was injured by an explosive package that was delivered to Holmes Hall earlier this month. A "second similar package" was also found in the surrounding area but was determined to be safe.  The investigation into that incident is being assisted by the FBI Boston Division and is still active. Meanwhile,...
    When parents send their children to a University of California campus, they expect the student to grow academically, to be well-fed and to live in a safe and clean environment. When patients show up at a UC hospital, they trust that the facility will be adequately staffed. And when California confronts a wildfire or a global pandemic, all of us rely on UC’s expertise and support to see us through it. Now, a bill on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk — awaiting signature or veto — threatens the university’s ability to provide these critical services to California students and patients. When we were members of the state Legislature, we worked tirelessly to ensure that the University of California was equipped to serve Californians. We’re deeply concerned that Senate Bill 1364 will harm the very people UC is expected to help, and we call on the governor to protect Californians and veto the measure. On its face, SB 1364 would limit contract workers at UC and enforce wage and benefit parity measures. In reality, the bill would create debilitating and redundant administrative,...
    Tennessee’s governor is calling for an investigation after a scandal emerged involving a transgender clinic at Vanderbilt University. “The ‘pediatric transgender clinic’ at Vanderbilt University Medical Center raises serious moral, ethical and legal concerns,” Lee said in a statement. “We should not allow permanent, life-altering decisions that hurt children or policies that suppress religious liberties, all for the purpose of financial gain. We have to protect Tennessee children, and this warrants a thorough investigation.” Initially, the scandal, which includes bragging about the cost that can be charged for a sex change surgery and targeting children for such activity, was reported by The Daily Wire‘s Matt Walsh on Twitter. Namely, Shayne Taylor, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine, noted in front of an audience that sex change surgeries are extremely lucrative, and that they are covered by the Affordable Care Act, commonly called Obamacare. “These surgeries are labor intensive,” Taylor said. “They require a lot of follow-up. They require a lot of O.R. [operating room] time, and they make money – they make money for the hospital.” Taylor continued: And this...
    Scott Olson/Getty A pharmacist prepares to administer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the Southwest Senior Center on September 09, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. President Joe Biden’s declaration that “the pandemic is over” raised eyebrows and the hackles of some experts who think such messaging could be premature and counterproductive. But to many Americans who have long since returned to pre-COVID 19 activities and are now being forced back into the office, the remark may ring true. The problem is that what “back to normal” feels like may differ from person to person, depending on the individual’s circumstances and by what criteria they are judging the pandemic to be over. The Conversation asked three scholars of different parts of U.S. society affected by the pandemic – public health, education and the economy – to evaluate just how “over” the pandemic is in their worlds. This is what they said: Public health: Not All Black & White Lisa Miller, adjunct professor of epidemiology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical...
    New Tennessee Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti joined Dan Mandis on Nashville’s Morning News, broadcast weekday mornings on Nashville radio station 99.7 WTN to discuss Vanderbilt University’s transgender surgeries on minors, America’s fentanyl crisis, and Title IX gender identity executive order. Mandis: Going to go right to the newsmaker hotline and welcome into the program the new Tennessee Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti. Jonathan, how are you? Skrmetti: Great, Dan. How are you? Mandis: I’m good. So I appreciate you joining us. You have been a very busy man. You just were sworn in on September 1, so about what, three weeks ago? Skrmetti: Yes, it’s three weeks today. Mandis: So you’ve seemingly done a lot in the last couple of weeks, so you definitely hit the ground running. I want to ask you, first of all, just here in the last couple of days, this Vanderbilt story blew up. Matt Walsh and The Daily Wire, they were just on here in one of the previous segments exposing Vanderbilt University Medical Center of gender mutilation with trans surgeries on minors. Governor Lee...
    Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy was joined on the newsmaker line by Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson, who is calling for Vanderbilt Medical Center to cease all irreversible pediatric transgender surgeries until the Tennessee General Assembly convenes in January to complete investigations and propose legislation. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line right now, our good friend, State Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson. Good morning, Jack. Johnson: Good morning, Michael and Clint. Good to be with you guys this morning. Leahy: Well, thanks, Jack. And I know you’re very busy. Yesterday, Jack, you met with Matt Walsh. And Matt Walsh uncovered this very controversial video of a couple of doctors at Vanderbilt’s gender clinic who said transgender surgeries are good because they make money for the hospital. And then another doctor said, if you don’t want to do these surgeries, you can leave if you’re a conscientious objector. The question is, what did you meet with...
    Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist Roger Simon in-studio to discuss Vanderbilt University’s pediatric transgender clinic and the life-altering gender surgeries being performed on minors. Leahy: In-studio, all-star panelist, my former boss at PJTV, Academy Award-nominated screenwriter, and senior contributing editor at The Epoch Times, Mr. Roger Simon. Good morning, Roger. Simon: Good morning, and it’s cooling off. Isn’t that nice? Leahy: It is, and mercifully so. Let’s get right to it. So, the big news: our friend Matt Walsh at The Daily Wire, you and I both went to the documentary … Simon: I wrote a review of it for Epoch Times. It was glowing. Leahy: Yes. It’s called What Is a Woman? Well, he released on Tuesday a videotape taken in 2018 of physicians at Vanderbilt University and Medical Center saying things like, transgender surgery: we’ll  make a lot of money at the hospital for it. And another doctor...
    A student at the University of Utah was taken into custody Wednesday after she allegedly threatened to detonate a nuclear reactor kept inside one of the campus' science buildings - if the school's football team didn't win its game last week. The 21-year-old female suspect, identified as Meredith Miller, was booked into the Salt Lake County Jail Wednesday for the reported offense, on charges of making a threat of terrorism. The bizarre bomb threat came ahead of the No. 13 Utes’ home game against San Diego State on Saturday, where Utah was a heavy -2000 favorite. However, Miller still seemed wary that her team may not take home a win, and decided to take matters into her own hands - albeit in an ill-advised manner. According to police, on the eve of the game, Miller 'posted threats of violence' on Yik Yak - a community billboard app where users to anonymously engage with others within a 5-mile radius. Those threats, police said, saw the student assert  that she would 'detonate the nuclear reactor that is located in the University of Utah causing a mass...
    (CNN)New York's Yeshiva University and an LGBTQ student club reached a compromise after the university lost a bid to have the US Supreme Court block a court order that requires the school to recognize that club.The pride group extended the compromise after the school said it would put all undergraduate club activities on hold while it took steps to "follow the roadmap provided by the US Supreme Court to protect (the university's) religious freedom." The university also cited upcoming Jewish holidays as part of its reasoning to pause club activities.On Wednesday, YU Pride Alliance said it would voluntarily agree to a non-legally binding "stay" or pause of a court order requiring Yeshiva University to provide the LGBTQ student club the same resources as it allots to other groups on campus.Yeshiva University puts all student club activities on hold days after Supreme Court declined to block an order requiring the school to recognize LGBTQ clubThe university said it appreciated the offered gesture, and that it looks "forward to it as an opportunity to resume the discussions we had begun, and which...
    The slamming of doors and clomping of feet at the crack of dawn isn’t the ideal alarm clock for most people. San Jose State wide receivers Justin Lockhart and Elijah Cooks don’t fall into this category. At least when it is their quarterback, Chevan Cordeiro, jarring them awake. “Chevan is the workhorse. We hear Chevan do stuff in the morning from our beds and we know it’s like, ‘Ok it’s about that time to get up,’” said Cooks. Lockhart added, “We tell Chevan to be as loud as possible.” The trio plans to make plenty of noise together on the field for the Spartans this fall, too. Three college teammates living together isn’t unique, but for this trio, there’s a twist: All three are first-year transfers; Cooks and Lockhart from the University of Nevada and Cordeiro from the University of Hawaii. The in-person wake-up call is just one example of how the trio has come together since arriving in the South Bay over the winter. It didn’t take long for the trio to bond as roommates or teammates. San Jose...
    (CNN)The scandal engulfing Columbia University and U.S. News & World Report rose to a new level last week, when Columbia acknowledged that some of the figures it had submitted last year to U.S. News were inaccurate. U.S. News initially removed Columbia from its ranking entirely, then demoted it from second to 18th place after Columbia declined to submit this year's ranking survey. Michael ThaddeusThe article that first exposed Columbia's misrepresentation was written not by a disgruntled rival but by a tenured professor in Columbia's own math department. Many people must have scratched their heads and wondered, "Why did he do it?"I am the Columbia math professor in question, and I would be the first to admit that what I did was both unusual and unpleasant. I began looking into the matter because my suspicions were piqued by Columbia's dubious claim to U.S. News that 83% of its undergraduate classes enrolled under 20 students. I assumed that Columbia would address the questions I raised promptly and forthrightly. I never guessed that its response would be so slow and clumsy, causing the...
    Benny Johnson/Newsmax A student was arrested after kicking a projector during a presentation on memes by pro-Trump activist and Newsmax host Benny Johnson. At a TPUSA chapter event on Tuesday at the University of Iowa, Johnson, an alum of the university, showed a meme video of then-candidate Kamala Harris astonished by her campaign bus, which is shown in the meme as a Border Patrol bus with a mariachi singer. As vice president, Harris has been tasked by President Joe Biden with handling migration along the Southern Border. A video of the presentation taken by an attendee showed another student, identified by The Daily Iowan as Travell Wright, walking up to the front of the room and kicking the projector. As he leaves, he shouts “Racist ass shit! Fuck you! Swear to fucking God.” ????BREAKING: I was Giving a speech about MEMES at the University of Iowa tonight with @TPUSA. A Kamala Harris Meme TRIGGERED the violent LIBS so bad they ATTACKED the *projector* and SMASHED IT to pieces. I told you: The Left Can’t Meme pic.twitter.com/nTwm6ijnV3 — Benny Johnson |...
    The Clinton Foundation’s Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) annual meeting will be held at Vanderbilt University on March 3-5, 2023. JUST ANNOUNCED: The #CGIU2023 meeting is heading to @VanderbiltU on March 3-5 next spring – our first major in-person convening since 2019. Learn more and apply to join global student leaders: https://t.co/tdVGoNvhaX pic.twitter.com/tSV4QpPo2K — Clinton Global Initiative University (@CGIU) September 20, 2022 Chelsea Clinton, Clinton Foundation vice chairwoman and former first daughter, made the announcement Tuesday during the Clinton Global Initiative 2022 meeting in New York City. “We are so excited to bring student leaders from around the world to Vanderbilt next year, and to support their efforts to improve lives and experiences on their college campuses, in their communities, and across the globe,” Clinton said. “Vanderbilt is a campus dedicated to both social innovation and fearless inquiry, and we are delighted to announce that they will be our host campus partner for CGI U 2023.” The Clinton Foundation’s CGI University is a “network of higher education institutions and professionals who support, mentor, and provide seed funding...
    (CNN)When Angelica Rose Brown was accepted into the University of North Carolina's Kenan Flagler Business School PhD. Program in 2020, she said it brought her one step closer to her career aspirations. Brown entered the program that year with high hopes: she wanted to do extensive research on code switching and diversity and inclusion issues, earn her PhD, and become a college professor teaching organizational behavior. But one year into the five-year program, Brown said her plans were derailed when professors forced her out of the PhD program, saying she was no longer a good fit. "Initially I experienced disbelief and then from there it was just immense psychological and emotional distress," Brown told CNN. "It was heartbreaking."Brown is now suing the university, three of her former professors and the UNC Board of Governors in federal court under claims that some faculty and school officials discriminated against her because she is Black and a woman. Read MoreIn the lawsuit, filed August 30, Brown also accuses three professors of retaliating against her after she reported the discrimination to the business school's...
    A female-to-male chest masculinization surgery, also called "top surgery," can bring in as much as $40,000, Taylor states. She also notes that a patient receiving "routine hormone treatment" will visit the clinic just a few times each year but "can bring in several thousands dollars ... and actually makes money for the hospital." \u201cVanderbilt opened its trans clinic in 2018. During a lecture the same year, Dr. Shayne Taylor explained how she convinced Nashville to get into the gender transition game. She emphasized that it's a "big money maker," especially because the surgeries require a lot of "follow ups"\u201d — Matt Walsh (@Matt Walsh) 1663703694 Taylor goes on to describe how vaginoplasty surgeries, in which a man is castrated and doctors surgically create a fake vagina using tissue from his penis, can make as much as $20,000 in revenue, citing data from the Philadelphia Center for Transgender Surgery. She excitedly states that figure is likely an "underestimate" given costs for hospital stay, post-op visits, anesthesia, and other associated medical bills. She adds that female-to-male "bottom...
    An international team of engineers have taken 3D printing to a whole new level by designing a fleet of drones that can build structures while in flight, unlocking new approaches to construction in hard-to-reach, unstable, or otherwise inaccessible places. These robots are the first of their kind to 3D print and hover simultaneously, and in proof-of-concept research published on Wednesday in Nature, researchers showed that the drones were able to coordinate and build tall cylinders out of polyurethane foam and a cement-like material. “We've demonstrated the first-ever robots that are 3D-printing in flight, and it's a pretty amazing achievement,” Robert Stuart-Smith, an autonomous manufacturing researcher at University College London and the University of Pennsylvania, and a co-author of the study, told The Daily Beast. By working with swarms of small robots that can make decisions as they build, tomorrow’s architects will be able to change building designs halfway through construction and tailor projects to fit a dynamic environment, he added. The potential implications are myriad. The new drones could provide new opportunities to construct buildings outside of the formulaic one-floor-after-another...
    In a new poll of Florida Republicans, former President Donald Trump fell flat against possible 2024 competitor Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL). DeSantis now holds a lead of 8 percentage points over Trump, 48% to 40%, according to the USA Today / Suffolk University poll. TRUMP ANXIETY SWELLS AMONG RANK-AND-FILE REPUBLICAN LAWMAKERS AND AIDES From left to right: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and former President Donald Trump. (AP Photos) This stands in stark contrast to the results of another USA Today / Suffolk poll that was conducted in January, at which time Trump led DeSantis by 7 points, 47% to 40%. "This doesn't necessarily mean DeSantis would lead in any other GOP primary state," David Paleologos, the director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center, said. "But it is one data point suggesting a shift in preferences from GOP voters away from Trump and toward DeSantis from Republicans who know both potential combatants quite well," he added. Further, in a hypothetical 2024 battle against President Joe Biden, DeSantis is favored by a larger...
    A bankruptcy judge earlier this month approved a $2.5 billion reorganizational settlement plan to compensate 80,000 men who claim that they had been sexually abused while children by scouting leaders — another day of bad headline news for scouting on top of many previous stories regarding sexual abuse perpetrated by scout leaders, controversy regarding policies about the role of homosexuals leaders and scouts in the organization, various issues related to the addition of girls to their ranks, and the high profile withdrawal of Mormons among others. For the casual observer, scouting seems to be on their deathbed with a terminal prognosis. Do not count scouting out. Even with all of bad news about scouting, a closer inspection suggests that scouting might actually be one of the most critically important activities for youth during these remarkably challenging times. Research from the American Psychological Association’s yearly Stress in America studies, among other quality research, has indicated that there is a mental and physical health tsunami among youth now. The Surgeon General released an unprecedented advisory last December highlighting the exploding mental health...
    More On: lana del rey Anna Marie Tendler seems to shade John Mulaney after his child’s birth Did Lana Del Rey wear an $18 Shein dress on the red carpet? Lana Del Rey rewears mesh mask in ‘Chemtrails Over the Country Club’ video Lana Del Rey reportedly engaged to boyfriend Clayton Johnson No summertime sadness over here. Lana Del Rey’s ingenious contribution to the pressing issues in the world through her melancholic music is finally set to be studied at New York University’s Clive Davis Institute next month. The university is launching a course dedicated entirely to studying the iconic singer/songwriter’s connection to social justice movements including Black Lives Matter, Me Too, and Times Up, according to Variety. Titled “Topics in Recorded Music: Lana Del Rey,” the two-credit course will run from Oct. 20 until Dec. 8, and will be taught by acclaimed journalist and author Kathy Iandoli. The course will also explore the singer’s relationship to feminism as well as her musical influences, the outlet reports. According to Variety, the...
    Researchers at Vanderbilt University are leading the development of an artificial intelligence algorithm that can track and count monkeypox lesions, the university recently announced in a press release. Monkeypox is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as “a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus.” The CDC adds that the monkeypox virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox. The research team is being led by Dr. Eric Tkaczyk and Benoit Dawant. Tkaczyk is the director of the Vanderbilt Dermatology Translational Research Clinic, an assistant professor of dermatology and biomedical engineering, and VA staff physician. Dawant is a Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Engineering and director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Surgery and Engineering. The Vanderbilt researchers are also “spearheading the effort to develop lesion classification guidelines, which will be used when evaluating the potential use of tecovirimat, an antiviral that is FDA-approved against smallpox, as a therapy for monkeypox,” the press release further states. Vanderbilt researchers are leading the development of an artificial intelligence algorithm...
    It was a banner weekend for the Maryland Terrapins football program, which continued its undefeated streak on the field and celebrated several popular alums who graduated to the NFL and starred on the biggest stage. On Saturday, Sept. 17, the Terrapins improved their record this season to 3-0 after topping SMU by a close 34-27 score in advance of their hotly anticipated matchup against fourth-seeded Michigan Wolverines next weekend. The following day, more history was made when the Atlanta Falcons squared off against the Los Angeles Rams in a matchup that featured a pair of popular unheralded underdog prospects from the Terrapin program. Jake Funk, a two-star recruit who has undergone two ACL surgeries, wasn’t invited to the NFL Rookie Combine, and was picked in the seventh round laced up at running back for the Rams, while undrafted rookie wide receiver Jared Bernhardt, who was known more for playing college lacrosse than his one year of pigskin, suited up for the Falcons. The Terrapins’ hot run continued onto Monday Night Football, where star Bills receiver Stefon Diggs - a Gaithersburg...
    A major $2 billion expansion to Cooper University Hospital was announced Monday, Sept. 19 in Camden.  Gov. Phil Murphy and former Gov. Chris Christie were among the prominent officials at a ceremony welcoming the new venture that will take a decade to complete, hospital officials said. The new investment – the largest in Camden County’s history – will dramatically expand the academic health system’s Camden campus to meet the current and future projected demand at Cooper University Hospital and MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper. The $2 billion expansion will add three new clinical towers and 100 new private rooms. With the addition of new rooms, the hospital will have 745 total beds. Construction is expected to begin as soon as next year.
    PALO ALTO — Stanford University has gained ownership of a big apartment complex in Palo Alto that’s next to the college through a byzantine array of transactions, public records indicate. Oak Creek Apartments located at 1600 Sand Hill Road in Palo Alto is the residential complex that’s at the center of a web of intricate real estate endeavors that Stanford wove this month. The apartment complex totals 759 units in several three-story buildings next to Stanford University. Stanford, acting through an affiliate, completed two notable transactions: The university-controlled affiliate took over a $125 million loan that the sellers obtained in 2015, and the university’s affiliate also took ownership of the ground lease that the college had provided to the sellers. The sellers of the ground lease and the borrowers of the $125 million loan were San Francisco-based Merena Properties and Woodside-based Pivnicka Properties. Both of these transactions were completed a few days ago, according to documents filed on Sept. 15 with the Santa Clara County Recorder’s Office. The university, through its board of trustees, had already owned the land beneath...
    by Benjamin Yount   One Wisconsin lawmaker wants to know why the UW System needs its own news service. State Sen. Steve Nass, R-Whitewater, wrote a letter to UW President Jay Rothman last week, asking why the university is offering university-related stories for TV stations, newspapers, and other media outlets to use. “There are currently at least 227 people working for the various public relations, communication and marketing offices at all 13 campuses and system administration.  According to the salary database maintained by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for UW System employees, the most current data available (2019-2020) shows these 227 people were paid at least $10.5 million annually,” Nass wrote in his letter. “This legion of taxpayer supported public relations bureaucrats in the UW System already have the ability and access to issue press releases, share materials with media sources and promote story ideas.” Nass’ issue appears to be that he doesn’t trust the UW to be an honest news source, especially when writing about the university. “It would appear that the UW System, a state government agency, has...
    Campus police at the University of Maryland are attempting to locate an armed robber who allegedly targeted an area business, authorities said. On Monday, Sept. 19, the University of Maryland Police Department issued an alert after confirming an alleged armed robbery the day before near campus with the Prince George’s County Police Department. Shortly after 9 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 18, the University of Maryland Police Department was notified by the Prince George's County Police Department of an off-campus robbery with a weapon in the 8700 block of Baltimore Avenue, between Tecumseh Street and Berwyn Road, according to officials. It is alleged that the wanted suspect entered the business with a handgun and declared a robbery. He then got into a nearby vehicle that was waiting and fled the area. Officials said that the Prince George's County Police Department is investigating this incident. No other information was provided by investigators. Anyone with information regarding the incident or suspect has been asked to contact the Prince George’s County Police Department by calling 911 or (301) 352-1200. More information is expected to...
    (CNN)The University of Oregon has issued an apology after some students yelled a bigoted chant during Saturday's football game against Utah's Brigham Young University.The university "sincerely apologizes for an offensive and disgraceful chant coming from the student section" during the game, it said in a statement on Twitter."These types of actions go against everything the university stands for, and it goes against the spirit of competition," the statement said. "We can and will do better as a campus community that has no place for hate, bias or bigotry." Racist chanting mars Real Madrids 2-1 derby victory over Atlético MadridVideos of the incident made by a BYU fan show Oregon fans chanting ""F**k the Mormons" repeatedly.The student who shot the video -- who did not want to be named -- said she is a Mormon and is used to people making comments against Mormons, but asked, "When's it gonna be time for Mormons to be included in religious acceptance?" Read MoreThe chanting happened at least five times, she said."I wouldn't say it made me emotional," she told CNN. "It was just...
    The Virginia Commonwealth University initiated Adam's Law, which incorporates additional instruction in the school's required hazing prevention training. Going forward, VCU will require students to have completed 12 credit hours before they are eligible to join a fraternity or sorority. Alcohol will no longer be allowed at fraternity or sorority events that involve new members. Additionally, if students wish to host events that provide alcohol, they must notify the school in advance and secure a third-party vendor. The VCU and the family released a joint statement acknowledging changes to fraternity and sorority life at the university. It read, “This is a blueprint to foster a safer and healthier community for students who are part of fraternities and sororities and to create a climate of respect and inclusion that is needed for academic success.” The university also announced February 27 as an annual hazing prevention day. In addition, VCU stated that it would create a physical memorial to Adam Oakes on campus. “Adam was a beloved son, grandson, nephew, cousin, student and friend. He had a tremendous future...
    As a result of the public accusations from DeLuca, more than a thousand former students claimed that the doctor unnecessarily penetrated them with his fingers during physical exams. Of the 1,212 rapes reported to the university in the 2020 fiscal year, all but 18 of them were allegations against Anderson. An internal investigation was launched in 2018. On May 11, 2021, the university released a 240-page WilmerHale report detailing the findings of its investigation into Anderson’s sexual abuse. The report alleged that the doctor had abused students and athletes for decades. It also accused some faculty of being aware of the ongoing abuse but failing to take appropriate action against Anderson. In response to the recent wave of sexual abuse allegations, the university announced earlier this year the creation of the Equity, Civil Rights, and Title IX Office, responsible for investigating misconduct cases. “This settlement allows the university to protect future generations of students and everyone in the university community. It complements a separate settlement reached earlier this year that adds a Coordinated Community Response Team to the...
    While opposed to formally recognizing a gay student group, the university made explicit its ongoing commitment to support gay students as well as to prohibit discrimination and harassment. On April 27, 2021, a cadre of former and past students sued Yeshiva University to force the institution to recognize their gay activist group, the Yeshiva University Pride Alliance. The students behind the suit suggested that the college's refusal amounted to a violation of New York's human rights law. In June, Democratic Judge Lynn Kotler of the New York Supreme Court First Judicial District ruled that Yeshiva University must approve the formation of the gay activist club. Kotler argued that the college did not constitute a "religious corporation," but was instead — according to its own charter — an "educational corporation," meaning the city's anti-discrimination law applied. A university spokesman took issue with Kotler's insistence that the university was not a religious institution, telling the Commentator: "As our name indicates, Yeshiva University was founded to instill Torah values in its students while providing a stellar education, allowing them to live...
    One person was killed in a two-vehicle crash on the Long Island Expressway. It happened just before 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18 in Islandia. A man was driving a 2008 Suzuki motorcycle eastbound at a high rate of speed when he rear-ended a 2012 Toyota Prius just east of Old Nichols Road, Suffolk County Police said.  The collision caused the Prius to veer into the concrete divider on the left side. The man, identified as Harvey Reaves, age 62, was transported via Suffolk County Police helicopter to Stony Brook University Hospital where he was pronounced dead, police said.  The driver of the Toyota, Raymond Lehmann, age 72, and a 71-year-old female passenger in the vehicle, were also transported to Stony Brook University Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries, said police. Police did not release Reaves' place of residence. Anyone with information on the crash is asked to contact the Fourth Squad at 631-854-8452. 
    A Long Island man has gone missing and authorities are asking for the public's help in locating him. Andrew Kampuries, age 25, was last seen by hospital personnel leaving the Nassau University Medical Center (NUMC) in East Meadow around 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18, Nassau County Police said. He is described as being around 5-foot-8, 170 pounds with brown hair, blue eyes, and wearing tan-colored medical-style scrubs. His possible destination is Massapequa. Detectives request anyone with information contact the Nassau County Missing Persons Squad at 516-573-7347 or call 911.   All callers will remain anonymous. Share this story by clicking on the Facebook icon below. Check back to Daily Voice for updates.
    The University of Oregon has issued a statement condemning 'offensive and disgraceful' chants aimed at Brigham Young University during a College Football game between the two schools on Saturday.  Footage emerged of a group of fans chanting 'f*** the Mormons' as Oregon defeated BYU at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, OR.  Oregon released a statement on Twitter Sunday expressing their disapproval of the chanting.  'The University of Oregon sincerely apologizes for an offensive and disgraceful chant coming from the student section during yesterday's game against Brigham Young University. 'These types of actions go against everything the university stands for, and it goes against the spirit of competition.  'We can and will do better as a campus community that has no place for hate, bias or bigotry.' WARNING - EXPLICIT LANGUAGE  pic.twitter.com/FYXHNrVXes— Nate Slack (@nateslack5) September 18, 2022 University of Oregon has issued a statement condemning 'offensive and disgraceful' chants College Football game between University of Oregon and Brigham Young University Saturday The Pit Crew, the University of Oregon's official student section, released a statement of their own on Saturday night,...
    Shawnee State University’s Office of Admissions will host a Showcase Day on Saturday, Oct. 29. The event welcomes high school students and parents who are interested in learning more about SSU and the various programs offered. Attending students have the opportunity to personalize their day at SSU by choosing three information sessions to take part in that will discuss the various programs and services that the university has to offer. The event will also offer tours of the campus academic and resource buildings as well as tours of the different housing options available to students. Lunch will be provided for the students in the Bear’s Den Dining Hall to allow them to experience the dining options at SSU. Students can browse informational tables starting at 9:00 a.m. with the Showcase Day starting at 9:30 a.m. More information, the agenda for the day, as well as how to register for Showcase Day can be found online at www.shawnee.edu/showcaseday. To learn more about ongoing events offered by Shawnee State University’s Office of Admissions, explore www.shawnee.edu/visit.
    Shawnee State University’s Alumni Association will host its Alumni Awards Dinner on Saturday, September 24 at 6 p.m. in the Morris University Center Ballroom on SSU’s campus. During the dinner, the Alumni Association will present its awards for the years 2020, 2021 and 2022. The 2020 award recipients include Mandy Hannan (’14) for the Distinguished Alumnus, Kyle Brewer (’08) for the Medal of Merit, Lisa Buckler (’84) for the Alumni Community Service, Aaron Wamsley (’18) for Outstanding Recent Graduate, Christina Baker (’12) for Alumni Continued Service, and Nathaniel Chris Jones (’20) for Alumnus of Tomorrow. The 2021 award recipients include DeLano Thomas (’16) for Distinguished Alumnus, Dr. Curt Laird (’97) for Medal of Merit, Abby Fryman (’17) for Outstanding Recent Graduate, Adam Miller (’10) for Alumni Continued Service, and Derek Stapleton (’21) for Alumnus of Tomorrow. The 2022 award recipients include Dr. Amy Heim (’09) for Distinguished Alumnus, Zachary Brooks (’13) for Medal of Merit, Nancy Donini (’73) for Alumni Community Service, Nicholas Fryman (’18) for Outstanding Recent Graduate, Paul Yost (’92) for Alumni Continued Service, and Christa Harris (’22)...
    by Reagan Reese   A Christian university is being sued over its policy prohibiting the hiring of LGBTQ teachers. Students and educators filed a lawsuit against Seattle Pacific University in Seattle, Washington, alleging that the university violated its fiduciary duty and engaged in fraud by enacting a religious-based hiring policy which hinders educators in same-sex relationships from getting hired. The lawsuit targets the leaders of the board of trustees, calling them the “rogue board” and asking for their removal from their positions, as well as demanding a jury trial. The Free Methodist Church, which founded the school in 1891, threatened to remove its connection to the school if the policy was removed, the lawsuit alleged. Two members of the board of trustees for the university are leaders at the church. “This hiring policy, loathed by the SPU community, prohibits the employment of otherwise qualified LGBTQ+ people at SPU if an LGBTQ+ applicant or employee is married to, or in relationship with, someone of the same sex,” the lawsuit stated. “These men brush aside the severe and widespread harm they continue to...
    A University of Tampa student was fatally shot early Saturday morning after trying to get into a stranger’s car following a night of bar-hopping. Tampa police said the student had just taken an Uber home when, for some unknown reason, he approached a vehicle parked on his street and tried to climb inside. He was then shot in the chest by the driver sitting inside the vehicle, who told police he had “feared for his life” as he didn’t know the young man. No further information was available on any words exchanged between the two before the driver fired. While police have not released the student’s name, local news outlet WGRZ reports that family identified him as Carson Senfield, a college freshman. David Lilleck, the superintendent of Orchard Park Schools, sent out a community-wide letter announcing the “tragic loss” of Senfield, WGRZ reports. “Given Carson’s wide circle of friends, and the fact that Carson’s two siblings attend OPHS, the Orchard Park School District recognizes that his passing has a far-reaching impact,” Lilleck was quoted saying. He said Saturday was Senfield’s...
    University officials said they are “investigating these incidents and will hold anyone who violated the law or University policies accountable.” The University of New Mexico shared a statement with KOB 4, saying, “The University of New Mexico is committed to the principles of free speech and values its role as a public square for debate, a marketplace of ideas, and a place to test and challenge competing viewpoints and opinions. In this context, allowing speakers invited by a student organization on campus in no way implies an endorsement of the content of their speeches or their opinions. And those who disagree with the ideas expressed are encouraged to respectfully voice their perspectives.”Recent polling data from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education shows that only 37% of students say it’s never acceptable to shut down a campus speaker to prevent them from speaking. And 20% of students say it’s acceptable to use violence to stop a campus speech.
    From left, USG Chancellor Sonny Perdue, Regent Emeritus Elridge McMillan, former USG Chancellor Steve Wrigley and Governor Brian P. Kemp. McMillan presented Wrigley with the Elridge McMillan Lifetime Achievement Award at the USG Foundation Gala on Sept. 9. The 18th annual Regents’ Scholarship Gala on Friday, Sept. 9, raised more than $600,000 from generous sponsors to support and provide need-based scholarships for University System of Georgia (USG) students across the state. Hosted by the USG Foundation, the annual event included Governor Brian P. Kemp and First Lady Marty Kemp as well as supporters, donors, alumni, legislators, members of the Board of Regents and presidents from USG’s 26 public colleges and universities. The need-based scholarships funded through the gala will be awarded for the 2022-23 academic year. Each institution’s president selects scholarship recipients at their respective campuses. Over the 18 years it has held this annual event, the USG Foundation has awarded more than $18 million to support scholarships, faculty recognition and key USG initiatives. “Our donors’ support through the University...
    A FISHERMAN was stunned when he reeled in a bizarre-looking sea creature thought to be a terrifying deep-sea shark. Trapman Bermagui, from Sydney, posted a picture of the alien-looking shark on Facebook with people calling it the 'stuff of nightmares'. 2The deep-sea shark with blunging eyes & bizarre teeth is branded ‘stuff of nightmare’ on a Facebook postCredit: trapmanbermagui The sea monster was pulled lifeless from 2,133 feet underwater off the coast of Australia - with blunging eyes and small protruding teeth. People were left deeply disturbed by the creature from the deep with one person commenting: "Stuff of nightmares there." While another joked: "Looks really happy he's just had his braces off so is accentuating the gums and teeth." Others began speculating that the mystery catch was not a real shark at all and could be man-made. READ MORE SHARK STORIESSOMEFIN'S IN THE WATER Moment 20ft shark comes within feet of tourist boat off UK coast One person said: "Man-made...either a sculptor or mixing of DNA with the assistance of the crisper..." But the fisherman responded...