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    Three new polls released in the final days of early voting show Senator Raphael Warnock (D-GA) a little ahead of Herschel Walker, although Walker is within the margin of error in two of the three polls. Emerson College found Warnock ahead, 49 percent to 47 percent, with 4 percent undecided out of 888 very likely voters and those who already voted. That poll has a 3.2 percent margin of error and was conducted November 28 through 30 on behalf of The Hill. SurveyUSA found Warnock at 50 percent to Walker’s 46 percent and 4 percent undecided out of 1,214 likely voters. The poll has a 3.6 percent margin of error and was conducted November 26 through 30 on behalf of WXIA-TV. Both polls were published Thursday. On Friday, CNN published the results of a SSRS poll finding Warnock at 52 percent and Walker at 48 percent among 1,184 likely voters, with a 3.8 percent margin of error. That poll was conducted from November 25 through 29. In the SurveyUSA poll, undecided voters lean towards Walker; if their 4 percent is assigned to...
    The Committee of Government Oversight amended a resolution Thursday to require all proposed ballot issues to receive 60 percent of the vote in order to amend the state constitution, not just citizen-led amendments. State Representative Brian Stewart (R-Ashville) requested the committee to adopt an amendment to his resolution, House Joint Resolution (HJR) 6, to include legislative ballot initiatives to also require 60 percent of the vote on Election Day in order to be enacted. “I think if we’re gonna go to the ballot it’s just frankly a simpler argument to say 60 percent across the board and so that was actually a change I requested and I appreciate the chairman for getting it added promptly today,” Stewart said. The original proposal only changed the threshold for citizen initiatives. Stewart said he started with just citizen-led initiatives because legislative-led initiatives must receive a three-fifths majority in the House and Senate for lawmakers to place them on the ballot. Republican Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose is a vocal supporter of the resolution. According to LaRose, lawmakers design state constitutions to serve as...
    by Philip Wegmann   President Biden has a civics lesson that he is fond of and regularly repeats. It is about how the United States is unique in the world because of the founding ideals enshrined in the Declaration of Independence. “Unlike every other nation on Earth, we were founded based on an idea,” he notes before adding that “while we’ve never fully lived up” to those principles, “we have never given up on them.” An overwhelming majority of Americans, 89 percent, agree that a civics education about those founding principles is “very important.” And yet, a similar majority across the political spectrum, 71 percent, do not believe that their children receive “an honest picture” of American history in school. Those are among the findings from a recent nationwide survey conducted by RealClear Opinion Research in concert with the conservative Jack Miller Center. Americans overwhelmingly express a healthy appetite for civic education, but report a general dissatisfaction with what they believe is currently offered in the K-12 classroom. The survey of more than 1,000 parents comes at a moment...
    The House committee investigating the events of Jan. 6, 2021, is nearly done with its work. Witness interviews, including one on Monday with former Trump administration adviser Kellyanne Conway, are wrapping up. Agreement on the “scope of the investigation” to be included in the final report is “very close” to being reached, committee member Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said this week, and that document will soon be ready for the public to review. Before the year is out, Schiff declared, America will “have the evidence.” Sure—but what will we do with it? Will anything come of these toils? That was the essential question posed in a recent Harvard Gazette interview with Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), another committee member, which deserves attention beyond campus grounds. Raskin was revealingly noncommittal in his replies, unwilling to make any prediction of concrete success. Insofar as he answered the Gazette’s questions at all—Raskin bounced between tacit acknowledgement and unconvincing denial of the futility of his committee’s work. It reads an awful lot like admission of defeat. The Gazette’s story is a brief Q&A—five...
    Delta Airline pilots can expect a hefty pay rise of 34 percent over the next three years, amid fears that the push for better pay and benefits will be felt among customers through higher priced tickets. According to estimates from a website that prepares pilots for interviews, Pilot pay at Delta Air Lines ranges from $66,853.80 per year for a new first officer up to $257,657.40 per year for a senior captain. That pay rise could mean the equivalent of $89,584.10 for new first officers and $345,260.92 from 2022 -2025, which is nearly 90,000 more than what top pilots are earning at present. Pilots have been demonstrating their bargaining powers while the short-staffed industry has started to see a boom in travel demand following the lull over the past couple of years due to the pandemic. If the deal is approved by Delta pilots, it is widely expected to act as a benchmark for contract negotiations at rivals United Airlines and American Airlines. Delta pilots will get an 18 percent raise on the date their contract is signed, followed by three...
    Apple could move parts of its production out of China after governmental protests delay products and the company is eyeing Vietnam and India as new hubs.  Apple has accelerated plans to move its productions outside Zhengzhou, China - where iPhone City is located - in recent weeks, a source involved in the discussions told the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).  COVID-19 protests and wage disputes have broken out in the city, which employs up to 300,000 workers, leaving Apple's busiest time of year in shambles with production and delivery delays.  Consumers are facing the longest wait times in the iPhone's 15-year history, with estimated ship dates being after Christmas, WSJ said. In addition, Apple's fourth quarter productions are around 10million less than expected, with iPhone Pro and Pro Max being hit the hardest.  In November, the company issued a notice that iPhone backups could happen due to the health restrictions in Zhengzhou.  It is now eyeing India and Vietnam to reduce its dependency on Taiwanese-based assemblers led by Foxconn Technology Group.  Tim Cook's company Apple is looking to work parts of its production out...
    IT’S been a painful year to be a consumer with surging prices – but a few changes could make a significant dent in your grocery bill. The latest data from the Department of Agriculture shows food prices have climbed by 10.9 percent in October compared with 12 months ago. 1Isabella Flint shares swaps for surging grocery items including eggs and chicken And certain items have gotten extra expensive in the past year, with eggs up by 43 percent and butter by 33.6 percent. Meanwhile, coffee beans are up by 14.8 percent, fruits and veg are up by 9.3 percent, chicken by 14.5 percent and milk costs 14.5 percent extra. While these are expensive, there are some cheaper alternatives you can try, according to Isabella Flint, chief executive officer of Fanatically Food. While she is a chef, Ms. Fint told The U.S. Sun you don’t have to be a professional to make “gourmet meals”. READ MORE ON GROCERYGONE OFF Major grocery store pulls American favorite from shelves over safety concernsXMAS CAME EARLY 10 items that got cheaper last month & it's good news...
    SAN FRANCISCO — Just over two minutes remained in the fourth quarter when the Chicago Bulls trimmed the Warriors’ double-digit lead down to one. Golden State needed a bucket, and an unlikely hero emerged. With five seconds on the shot clock, Draymond Green pulled up for a 3-pointer. Odds tell us that shot was likely to miss — Green is a career 31 percent from 3 — but it swished in to shift momentum back the Warriors’ way as they pulled away for a 119-111 win on Friday night at Chase Center. Green knew he’d be open; his relatively low 3-point percentage gives defenders little reason to defend him from beyond the arc. But a more aggressive start to the season offensively has Green feeling confident taking those shots. “I really just want to keep stepping in and taking them with confidence when I’m open,” Green said. “But it feels great. My game feels great. My touch feels good, so I feel like I’m in a really good space.” The 32-year-old made both of his 3-point attempts in his 13-point...
    by Casey Harper   The U.S. economy added 263,000 jobs in November, more than economists expected. “Notable job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality, health care, and government,” the Bureau of Labor Statistics said. “Employment declined in retail trade and in transportation and warehousing.” The unemployment rate remained steady at 3.7%, with about 6 million unemployed Americans seeking work. “Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.4 percent), adult women (3.3 percent), teenagers (11.3 percent), Whites (3.2 percent), Blacks (5.7 percent), Asians (2.7 percent), and Hispanics (3.9 percent) showed little or no change over the Month,” BLS said. “Among the unemployed, the number of permanent job losers rose by 127,000 to 1.4 million in November. The number of persons on temporary layoff changed little at 803,000.” On top of that, there are many Americans who would like a job but have given up looking. “Among those not in the labor force who wanted a job, the number of persons marginally attached to the labor force held at 1.5 million in November,” BLS said. “These individuals...
    by Jennie Taer   Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is underreporting the number of illegal aliens released into the country without any tracking technology by more than 18,000%, according to an internal document exclusively obtained by the Daily Caller News Foundation. ICE disseminated the document to participants, including ICE Director Tae Johnson and other top agency officials as well as leaders from nonprofit organizations, of a Thursday event about ICE’s “Alternatives to Detention” program, which the agency put in place in 2004 to monitor illegal aliens released into the U.S. interior with ankle bracelets and cell phones. ICE disclosed to the attendees that there are 49,459 illegal aliens that aren’t monitored with any tracking equipment as of Nov. 14, while its own website says there are 266 as of Nov. 19. The figure sent to the program attendees is over 18,000% more than the figure ICE has on its website. The agency put Alternatives to Detention in place in 2004, and is used as a “flight-mitigation tool” when illegal aliens are released into the country and are waiting for their years-long court proceedings, according to...
    In its twisted road to independence, one that began over a century ago with many failed attempts, the Ukrainian referendum that took place on December 1, 1991, stands out as a great turning point. In the days leading to the vote, even the most ardent Ukrainian supporters of independence were uncertain, concerned about the large numbers of ethnic Russians in Soviet Ukraine, particularly in Crimea and eastern regions. But when the votes were tallied 31 years ago today on December 3, 1991, the results surprised even the most optimistic of observers—over 90 percent of the population of Soviet Ukraine voted for independence. With an 84 percent voter turnout, people from all regions participated, including Ukraine’s estimated 17 percent of ethnic Russians who had made up considerable portions of the country’s eastern provinces. Exceeding expectations, every one of Ukraine’s 25 administrative regions voted for statehood. What’s more, the people of Ukraine voted for their president on the same day in which all six candidates favored independence. The 1991 national referendum results shed light on today’s brutal and inhumane Russian war in...
    The Minnesota Vikings got great news on a player who has really impacted wins so far this season. At 9-2, the Minnesota Vikings are sitting pretty going into Week 13 of the NFL season. Though the Philadelphia Eagles have a slightly better record than Minnesota, the Vikings  are right there with them at the top of the NFC. With a 99 percent chance to win the division they have left in the dust, the Vikings do still have a shot at a first-round bye, though FiveThirtyEight only gives them a 17 percent chance there. A win this week improves their chances by three percent according to the model. But with how their strong record has positioned them, they’re looking ahead toward the postseason, and one piece of injury news looks great for what they’ll need there. Christian Darrisaw is on his way back from injuryLeft tackle Christian Darrisaw is working his way back from a concussion, back at practice today. Darrisaw did have a red jersey on, so he’s still not participating in contact drills, but being back in any...
    STARTING this month, struggling Americans may grab one-time payments ranging from $438 to $1,600. The payments are from the federally-funded Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and the Energy Crisis Intervention Program (ECIP) in 12 Missouri counties. 1Eligible Missouri residents may now apply for energy assistance However, the North East Community Action Corporation (NECAC) is also accepting applications for the one-time payment. Applications for the elderly and disabled began November 1 while applications for families and individuals began December 1. Last year, NECAC helped around 9,000 households with utility assistance and is expecting to increase that number. The maximum benefit are as follows: Read More on Energy BillsCOST EFFICIENT 'Circuit breaker' trick could shave $300 or more off your energy billsHELPING HAND Exact date Americans will receive up to $800 winter relief check in the mail Propane-heated homes - $990 It's Natural gas - $652 Electricity - $636 Wood - $438 ECIP will also offer monthly payments for income-qualifying households through September 2023, with a maximum of up to $1,600. The monthly income limit for...
    Mask are poised to become mandatory in indoor venues in Los Angeles in the coming weeks as Democratic officials panic over rising Covid cases. The county's Covid response policy states that after a period of 'high' Covid transmission, a mask mandate will be triggered. In previous instances the period was set for 14 days. Los Angeles County is recording 3,186 daily Covid infections a large increase from the 1,000 daily cases recorded at the start of November. It is also recording eight deaths each day. Dr Barbara Ferrer, LA County's director of public health, said Thursday that the locality was moving from 'low' to 'medium' Covid transmission. If case and hospitalization trends continue, it will reach 'high' by next week, she warned.  Covid has been replaced as the respiratory virus causing the most issues for Americans, with flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cases filling up hospitals around the US. Covid cases in the US have risen in recent days, but still remain well below the 100,000 daily cases at the start of December last year and the 90,000 daily cases...
    US men's national soccer team players have already earned nearly $300,000 in their ongoing World Cup run in Qatar, and with four more wins, they could almost triple that figure. The current minimum payout for each member of the 23-man roster is $294,000, but that jumps to $383,000 with a win over the Dutch on Saturday, $559,000 for a fourth-place finish, $696,000 for third, $794,000 for fourth and a whopping $892,000 for a World Cup title in Qatar. The math on individual playouts is complicated by the equal-pay agreement between US men's players, US women's players, and the US Soccer Federation. America's top women's players stand to earn $822,000 each if their male counterparts take home the trophy. Weston McKennie and Tyler Adams of United States celebrate after Christian Pulisic of United States (not pictured) scored their side's first goal against Iran on Tuesday  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Gregg Berhalter hints that Gio Reyna WON'T start against... USA defender Walker Zimmerman is hilariously asked 'how is... Share this article Share Currently,...
    The Biden economy added a whopping 263,000 jobs last month, crushing expectations of 200,000, and wages are growing as well, leading one economist to declare “another happy jobs day.” The U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) adds that unemployment remains at a near-historic low of 3.7% in November, “and has been in a narrow range of 3.5 percent to 3.7 percent since March.” University of Michigan School of Economics Professor Justin Wolfers exclaimed, “It’s yet ANOTHER happy jobs day. Payrolls rose +263k, well above expectations.” “This expansion just keeps on rolling on,” added Wolfers, a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. RELATED: ‘This Is a Very Strong Economy’: Experts Cheer October Jobs Report – Blast Those Claiming ‘Recession’ Wolfers also takes on those who have been falsely pushing “recession” talking points. “BTW, remember all that recession talk? It was nonsense. Bollocks. Cow dung,” he tweets. “There never was a recession. And the economy sure doesn’t look like it’s in one now. Job growth at this rate is the economy singing: ‘This is a robust expansion.'” And he also slams the doom...
    The U.S. added 263,000 jobs in November, beating economist expectations of 200,000 and despite Federal Reserve rate hikes. The unemployment rate also stayed held steady from October at 3.7 percent, the Labor Department reported on Friday. The report is good news for President Biden with the economy still battling inflation and amid mounting recession fears. There also also been a wave of layoffs in the tech industry with massive firms such as Amazon announcing hiring freezes. Media companies such as CNN and the Washington Post have also been letting staff go in the stark economic climate.  DoorDash also said it would reduce corporate staff by 1,250 and AMC Networks said it would lay off 20 percent of the workforce.  The U.S. added 263,000 jobs in November, beating economist expectations of 200,000 and despite Federal Reserve rate hikes RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Supreme Court KEEPS block on Biden's $400 BILLION student... This way, monsieur: French President Macron has to GUIDE... A toast to everyone getting along? Anna Wintour joins the... What tensions?...
    Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock has a four-point advantage over Republican Herschel Walker in one of the final polls of the last Senate race to be decided in 2022.  A CNN survey released Friday found that 52 percent of Georgia likely voters said they were backing Warnock, to 48 percent who said they supported Walker in the December 6 run-off race, in which early voting has already started.  Nearly all Democrats, 99 percent of those surveyed, said they're supporting Warnock, with Walker hitting nearly the same highs among Republicans, at 95 percent.  The small number of Georgians who identified as independents are tilting toward Warnock - 61 to 36 percent. A majority polled, 59 percent, said Walker is not honest and trustworthy. While a slim majority 52 percent, found Warnock - a pastor by trade - honest and trustworthy.  Warnock got high-profile help Thursday night, with the return of former President Barack Obama.  Obama gleefully mocked one of Walker's recent weirder statements.  'Since the last time I was here Mr. Walker has been talking about issues that are of great importance to the people...
    In the 2022 midterms, President Joe Biden escaped something that plagued the United States’ last two Democratic presidents, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton: a major red wave. The red wave that countless right-wing pundits on Fox News and Fox Business were predicting in the weeks leading up to the November 8 election never materialized. Democrats narrowly lost the U.S House of Representatives but kept their majority in the U.S. Senate and enjoyed gubernatorial victories in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Arizona and other swing states. The 80-year-old Biden still doesn’t have great approval ratings; a Reuters/Ipsos poll released in late November found approval for Biden at 40 percent, which was an improvement from 36 percent or 37 percent in previous Reuters/Ipsos polls. But then, Obama and President Ronald Reagan also had less-than-stellar approval ratings during their second terms in office. And former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is warning fellow Republicans to “quit underestimating President Joe Biden.” In an opinion column published on his Gingrich360 website, Gingrich argued that Biden has a good shot at being reelected in 2024 — an assertion...
    A new report from the New York Inspector General has revealed that minority prisoners are often treated differently than White prisoners in the state's prisons.  The report, released on Thursday, Dec. 1, and titled "Racial Disparities in the Administration of Discipline in New York State Prisons," contains data supporting the fact that minority prisoners were more likely to be issued "misbehavior reports" than White prisoners during the six-year period that was examined.  According to the report, a Black prisoner was nearly 22 percent more likely to be issued a misbehavior report than a White prisoner, while a Hispanic prisoner was 12 percent more likely.  Additionally, prisoners categorized as "Other" were nine percent more likely to be issued a misbehavior report, the report said.  The findings also revealed that of Department of Corrections and Community Supervision employees who issued 50 or more misbehavior reports to prisoners, 226 employees only issued them to non-White prisoners, and 114 employees issued them only to Black or Hispanic prisoners, according to the report. The racial disparities also increased over time, increasing slightly between 2017 and...
    Getty Jayson Tatum #0, Boston Celtics On December 1, former Boston Celtics legend Paul Pierce tweeted a video of a conversation between him and former teammate Kevin Garnett. In their conversation, the two discussed Jayson Tatum, where Pierce compared Tatum’s current standing as a player to Kevin Durant of the Brooklyn Nets. “I think, after last year’s playoffs, (Tatum) surpassed Kevin Durant as far as the better player in the NBA today,” Pierce said. “Him going against Kevin Durant was like a passing of the torch. I’m not taking nothing away from KD. KD is still one of the greatest to ever play. He’s still one of the best in the game. I just think Tatum today has passed KD.” #truthistruth pic.twitter.com/mnd7KrrX8P — Paul Pierce (@paulpierce34) December 2, 2022 In 21 games, Tatum is averaging 31.6 points, 7.8 rebounds, and 4.5 assists while shooting 48.8 percent from the field, 36.6 percent from three, and 87.3 percent from the free throw line. Tatum’s efforts were recognized by the NBA, as he won the season’s first Eastern Conference Player of...
    More Americans will be able to obtain a $1 million mortgage than ever before, thanks to action recently taken by government agencies. The Federal Housing Finance Agency announced this week that the cap for home loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac - the federally-backed home mortgage companies - has increased to just over $1 million for the first time in history.  The new limit impacts home buyers looking to obtain a million-dollar mortgage with as little as three percent for houses in more expensive areas like New York and Los Angeles.  According to recent data, more than 12 percent of all homes sold in October were priced at or above $1 million.  Previously, Americans had to at least put 20 percent down to obtain a mortgage of that size.  Americans who live in certain designated 'high cost' areas could secure mortgages of $1 million with three percent down in 2023 The Federal Housing Finance Agency announced Tuesday that the previous cap had been raised from $970,800 to $1,089,300 The Federal Housing and Finance Agency designates roughly 100 places...
    The Election Integrity Network (EIN) has compiled a list of reports from election workers, poll watchers, and volunteer attorneys about questionable things they observed during Maricopa County’s midterm election, which experienced rampant tabulation machine and printer problems. EIN Chairman and election integrity attorney Cleta Mitchell denounced Maricopa County officials for “misinformation” regarding how bad the problems really were. Mitchell said, “Maricopa County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Gates, Director of Elections Scott Jarrett, and County Recorder Stephen Richer presided over a wholly mismanaged and disgraceful election on November 8 that has robbed countless voters of their political voices. Since the polls opened on Election Day, they have misled and misinformed the public about what really happened. But thanks to engaged citizens, we know the truth.” The group stated on its website, “Observers reported ‘chaos’ at multiple voting centers caused by printer and tabulator malfunctions, all day, contradicting statements by Gates and Richer that the problems had been ‘solved.’” Many of the individual reports submitted to EIN discussed how the technology problems lasted well into the day, often up until the...
    by Casey Harper   Inflation rose slightly in October, newly released federal data show. The Bureau of Economic Analysis released the Personal Consumption Expenditure index, a key inflation marker, which showed the index rose 0.3% in October. “Excluding food and energy, the PCE price index increased 0.2 percent…” BEA said. “Real DPI increased 0.4 percent in October and Real PCE increased 0.5 percent; goods increased 1.1 percent and services increased 0.2 percent…” Personal income and spending rose as well. “Personal income increased $155.3 billion (0.7 percent) in October, according to estimates released today by the Bureau of Economic Analysis,” BEA said. “Disposable personal income (DPI) increased $132.9 billion (0.7 percent) and personal consumption expenditures (PCE) increased $147.9 billion (0.8 percent).” President Joe Biden touted the numbers after their release. “Today, we learned inflation moderated and incomes grew in October, following news that our economy grew at an even stronger pace from July to September than previously thought,” Biden said. “We’re seeing initial signs that we’re tackling inflation as we transition to steady, stable growth.” Despite the slower increase, prices are...
    It could soon cost more to drive on the New York State Thruway, and that includes the Tappan Zee Bridge. The New York State Thruway Authority’s board of directors will meet Monday, Dec. 5, to consider a proposed toll hike that would begin in 2024, WIVB in Buffalo reports.  Tolls would increase by 5-percent for E-ZPass customers in 2024 and 5-percent again in 2027, according to the outlet.  Those with out-of-state E-ZPasses or who are paying by mail would pay 75-percent more than the tolls for New York E-ZPass holders. That’s up considerably compared to the current 15-percent differential for out-of-state E-ZPass users and 30-percent differential for those who pay by mail. If the proposal is approved, drivers on the Tappan Zee Bridge would see tolls go up 35-percent over four years, from $5.75 to $7.75, according to Rockland County Executive Ed Day.  The Thruway Authority says the higher tolls are needed to help update aging infrastructure, but several local leaders have criticized the plan, including Day, who sent a letter to the Authority saying the move would hurt families....
    Patients are struggling to understand their doctors because of confusing medical jargon, a study has found. Almost 80 percent of people do not know that the word 'impressive' actually means 'worrying' in a medical context. Critics said using the word borders on 'disrespectful' because 'we're describing something as impressive that is causing real harm for patients'. More than one in five percent of respondents could not work out the phrase 'your tumor is progressing', which means a patient's cancer is worsening. And the majority of participants failed to recognize that 'positive lymph nodes' meant the cancer had spread. The researchers said future research should test alternative words to avoid miscommunications. A 13-question survey tested fairgoers in Minnesota on their knowledge of medical jargon terms often used by clinicians RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next FDA approves first-ever fecal transplant therapy to treat... EXCLUSIVE: Inside the mind of an incel: Disturbed young men... Majority of Covid deaths are among vaccinated Americans for... Scientists develop world's first test for pancreatic cancer... Share...
    A SIMPLE circuit breaker hack may save homeowners or renters up to $300 on their energy bills. The tip comes from TikToker alchemygoddess, who shared that she learned the hack from her energy company’s website. 1The TikToker was able to bring her energy bill down to just $40 Earlier this year, she shared a video, revealing the quickest way to cut down on electricity and save big on your bill - shut off your circuit breaker. “Why do I need electricity coming into my house while I’m not there,” the TikToker said. She shared that when she was living in Florida, she had moved from the projects to an upscale apartment. Before that, she was living in the projects where most of her bills were paid for as she was getting government assistance. Read More on Energy BillsSMART MOVE Final hours to apply for one-time rebate worth up to $200 – how to applyBOILING BILLS My easy unplug trick can help you save up to $165 on your energy bill However, once she moved, that quickly ended as her first...
    YOU might be able to score a better deal on Target clearance items if you're willing to wait. According to a recent video from bargain hunter Christine Michelle on TikTok, there are specific digits to look for at Target that will indicate the discount. 2Christine Michelle has a Target hack that can save extra on clearance itemsCredit: TIKTOK/ christi.mich 2Items that are marked at 30 percent off could go up to 70 percent on clearanceCredit: TIKTOK/ christi.mich In the past, clearance at the retailer used to be marked down up to 90 percent – but those days appear to be gone. But you can still score big markdowns as Michelle went to the clothing section where items on the rack were advertised anywhere from 30 to 70 percent off. She then grabbed a piece of clothing with a tag marked with a "30." "That means it's 30% off, so it could go all the way up to 70," Michelle explained. Read More on TargetLA VIE EN ROSE I did a plus-size Target haul in XXL, people are...
    HALF of Americans said there’s not enough time in the holiday season to do everything they want to do, new research has revealed. A survey asked 2,000 U.S. adults about how they spend their time during the holiday season and found that 52 percent try to fit in as many festive activities as possible. 1The majority of people feel the holiday season is too shortCredit: Getty This may be why half of Americans also wish the holiday season lasted longer than it actually does (54 percent). While most of these respondents said up to two more weeks would suffice (59 percent), 41 percent wouldn’t mind if the holidays went on even longer. According to respondents, it starts feeling like the holiday season in November (44 percent), but 35 percent said the early fall months, September and October, make them feel the excitement of the holidays. Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Dutch Bros, the survey found that a third of those surveyed claim that they’re the most festive person they know and 74 percent said prepping for the holiday...
    Georgia Labor Commissioner Mark Butler said Thursday that all Regional Commissions recorded a rise in unemployment rates in October.   “Job seekers have continued to experience a favorable hiring environment across multiple job sectors, despite a slight uptick in unemployment rates,” said Commissioner Butler. “As we prepare for peak holiday hiring, we encourage job seekers to take advantage of the many employment opportunities, both full-time and part-time, available across Georgia.” The labor force also rose in all Regional Commissions. Coastal Georgia Regional Commission – Bryan, Bulloch, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh, and Screven counties. (o-t-m – over the month / o-t-y – over the year) The October preliminary unemployment rate was up four-tenths to 3.0 percent o-t-m, the rate was 3.2 percent one year ago. The labor force was up 1,316 o-t-m and up 2,556 o-t-y, to 344,344. The number of employed was down 300 o-t-m and up 3,211 o-t-y, to 333,918. Initial claims were down 92 (-9%) o-t-m and down 200 (-17%) o-t-y, to 953....
    Georgia Labor Commissioner Mark Butler said recently that all Regional Commissions recorded a rise in unemployment rates in October. “Job seekers have continued to experience a favorable hiring environment across multiple job sectors, despite a slight uptick in unemployment rates,” said Commissioner Butler. “As we prepare for peak holiday hiring, we encourage job seekers to take advantage of the many employment opportunities, both full-time and part-time, available across Georgia.” The labor force rose in all Regional Commissions. Employment rose in the Georgia Mountains Regional Commission, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission, and Southwest Georgia Regional Commission.   Claims were down in the Atlanta Regional Commission, Central Savannah River Regional Commission, Georgia Mountains Regional Commission,  Middle Georgia Regional Commission, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission, River Valley Regional Commission, and Southwest Georgia Regional Commission. Please see a synopsis of each regional commission below: o-t-m – over the month o-t-y – over the year   Atlanta Regional Commission – Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, and Rockdale counties.   The October...
    Georgia Labor Commissioner Mark Butler said Thursday that all Regional Commissions recorded a rise in unemployment rates in October.   “Job seekers have continued to experience a favorable hiring environment across multiple job sectors, despite a slight uptick in unemployment rates,” said Commissioner Butler. “As we prepare for peak holiday hiring, we encourage job seekers to take advantage of the many employment opportunities, both full-time and part-time, available across Georgia.” The labor force also rose in all Regional Commissions. Coastal Georgia Regional Commission – Bryan, Bulloch, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh, and Screven counties. (o-t-m – over the month / o-t-y – over the year) The October preliminary unemployment rate was up four-tenths to 3.0 percent o-t-m, the rate was 3.2 percent one year ago. The labor force was up 1,316 o-t-m and up 2,556 o-t-y, to 344,344. The number of employed was down 300 o-t-m and up 3,211 o-t-y, to 333,918. Initial claims were down 92 (-9%) o-t-m and down 200 (-17%) o-t-y, to 953....
    Georgia Labor Commissioner Mark Butler said Thursday that all Regional Commissions recorded a rise in unemployment rates in October. “Job seekers have continued to experience a favorable hiring environment across multiple job sectors, despite a slight uptick in unemployment rates,” said Commissioner Butler. “As we prepare for peak holiday hiring, we encourage job seekers to take advantage of the many employment opportunities, both full-time and part-time, available across Georgia.” The labor force rose in all Regional Commissions. Employment rose in the Georgia Mountains Regional Commission, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission, and Southwest Georgia Regional Commission. Claims were down in the Atlanta Regional Commission, Central Savannah River Regional Commission, Georgia Mountains Regional Commission,  Middle Georgia Regional Commission, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission, River Valley Regional Commission, and Southwest Georgia Regional Commission. Please see a synopsis of each regional commission below: o-t-m – over the month o-t-y – over the year   Atlanta Regional Commission – Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, and Rockdale counties.   The October preliminary...
    Median US home prices have fallen to $417,000, a new report has revealed - a signal to millions of Americans that, after a year of volatile rises, it now may be time to buy. The new number, recorded by Realtor.com, comes as markedly more affordable than June's record high of $449,000, which was seen after a rash of pandemic-fueled homebuying reduced the number of homes for sale to all-time lows. Inventory, however, has since rebounded, causing sales to subtly rise late this summer - giving buyers that had shied away from purchasing property over the past year some semblance of hope. That said, it may be premature to assume the real estate  volatility has reached a stopping point, Realtor researchers wrote - as lending rates remain historically high despite recently softening inflation. The rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage currently stands at 6.6 percent - after recently reaching a record seven percent or the first time in decades, meaning median payments are now up $900 a month from this time last year.  That number is also up drastically from 12 months ago - when the real...
    WALGREENS fans at hundreds of stores can now order a bevy of items right to their door for any anytime, day or night. The drugstore giant announced that its Same Day Delivery service will now be available 24 hours a day. 1Millions of Walgreens customers will soon be able to order 24/7 Customers at select stores can order more than 27,000 different items any time of day either on the Walgreens app or via Same Day Delivery online. Eligible items include over-the-counter medications, groceries and personal care products. “Walgreens knows that taking care of health and wellbeing isn’t exclusive to business hours and that needs can pop up at any time of day – that's why we’re always looking for ways to enhance the customer experience with convenient and trusted solutions,” Stefanie Kruse, group vice president of digital commerce at Walgreens, said in a statement. Almost 400 Walgreens' 24-hour locations across the country will participate in the new delivery hours. READ MORE ON WALGREENSSHUT DOWN Walgreens announces major update as it closes several stores - the neighborhoods SAVVY SHOPPER I’m...
    STRESS levels on Christmas day reach boiling point at exactly 9.37am, a new study has found. And for 62-percent of Brits the pressure is so much they reject normal drink and food rules - throwing back their first tipple at 9.30am. 3Stress levels on Christmas day reach boiling point at exactly 9.37am, a new study has foundCredit: Getty The study found one in five Brits said relatives blurting out controversial views worry them the most. And for 19 percent the annual grilling by relatives about their love lives makes them fret. More than three-quarters of Brits say mishaps like price tags left on pressies and forgetting key Christmas dinner staples added to the torment of festivities. And 19 per cent believe they have ‘mastered’ putting on Christmas celebrations. The study also revealed that it takes only until 10.02am for many of these best laid plans to have gone out the window. This is despite preparations beginning an average 14 days in advance. It is therefore unsurprising that relief is the most common feeling people experience once Christmas day over, followed...
    Child miners on the back of a vehicle en route to Numbi, DRC.Stephen Digges / Zuma Press This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The Australian clean energy industry has warned of growing evidence linking renewable energy supply chains to modern slavery and urged companies and governments to act to eliminate it. A report by the Clean Energy Council, representing renewable energy companies and solar installers, has called for more local renewable energy production and manufacturing and a “certificate of origin” scheme to counter concerns about slave labor in mineral extraction and manufacturing in China, Africa and South America. Released on Tuesday, the paper said slavery in all supply chains was a global problem. But Australia is on a trajectory toward generating the vast majority of its electricity from solar, wind, hydro, and batteries by 2030 and needs to play an active role in addressing it in renewable energy industries. “We’re at a moment in time when renewable energy supply chains are going to be scaling up significantly,” Dr Nick Aberle, the Clean...
    Getty Jayson Tatum #0, Boston Celtics After the Boston Celtics defeated the Miami Heat on November 30, Malcolm Brogdon did not mince words when talking about Jayson Tatum‘s MVP campaign with reporters after the game. “It’s incredible, man,” Brogdon said. “We’ve gotten to play him a good amount in my career and he’s taken a giant step every year. And to play the way he did last year, to be in the MVP race at times last year, and then to take the jump he’s taken this year has been pretty incredible to watch. Undoubtedly, he should be leading the MVP race right now. He’s playing at a at a superstar level.” Brogdon revealed that since becoming teammates with Tatum, he’s realized how good of a person he is. “Honestly, what a great dude JT is. He’s incredibly humble. For a guy that has the world at his fingertips at everything, the way he treats people every day, has been incredible to see. I think he’s a great guy, a great person beyond basketball. Even watching his mom...
    by Trevor Schakohl   Los Angeles County saw accidental fentanyl overdose deaths increase more than twelvefold from 2016 to 2021, according to a new County Public Health Department report. Accidental fentanyl overdoses killed 1,504 people in the county last year, a roughly 1,280% rise compared to the 109-individual death toll in 2016, according to the report released Tuesday. Total accidental drug overdose deaths more than doubled in that time, with deaths from accidental opioid overdoses and methamphetamine overdoses both rising by over 300%. Adults from 26 to 39 years old had the highest accidental fentanyl overdose rate of any age group in 2020, while 18- to 25-year-olds had the highest fentanyl overdose hospitalization rate that year, based on the report’s data. Men died of accidental fentanyl overdoses at a far higher rate than women. District Attorney George Gascón and Public Health Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer announced a new collaborative working group the same day aimed at ending the fentanyl crisis. Ferrer argued that the data indicates “tragedies resulting from fentanyl are indiscriminately impacting all populations regardless of age, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic...
    Getty Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson of the Golden State Warriors. It’s been a rocky season thus far for the Golden State Warriors. The summer was full of championship celebrations and extension talks, but now that the season is here, the Warriors sit at 11-11 on the year, placing them in the middle of the Play-In Tournament race. That being said, the year hasn’t been all bad. Klay Thompson began the season struggling, but since then, he’s turned things around. According to Zach Buckley of Bleacher Report, Thompson was one of the “biggest winners” of November. “Thompson wasn’t the only one holding the Warriors back earlier this season, but it’s no surprise that his return to form has coincided with the flexing of their championship muscle,” Buckley wrote. “Golden State, which has won eight of it past 11 games, has fared a whopping 24.5 points better per 100 possessions with Thompson than without him this month.” “We definitely owe him an apology.” – Shaq on Klay Thompson pic.twitter.com/3dYtRBJuZR — NBACentral (@TheNBACentral) November 25, 2022 The veteran guard’s...
    Corporate America has slashed swathes of jobs in recent months as it braces for a US recession - and is expected to continue doing so. In October, layoffs increased by 13 percent - the highest jump since February 2021. US employers also eased their hiring this month, with job creation slowing the most it has since January 2021. Just 127,000 jobs were created this month, much less than analysts expected and nearly half the 239,000 jobs created in October. Companies that enjoyed huge growth during the pandemic, particularly those in tech and e-commerce, are starting to pare back on spending ahead of what financial chiefs fear will be trying times. Major companies like Twitter, Lyft, Stripe, Meta and Amazon have made huge cuts to their workforces, upending a previously stable employer. In October layoffs increased by 13 percent - the highest jump since February 2021  Just 127,000 jobs were created this month, according to data from the ADP Employment report (Plotted: USBOL data) US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, pictured at the New York Times Dealbook summit on Wednesday, said a...
    The relentless drought plaguing the US could steal Christmas.  Tree farms across the US have been forced to close before Christmas due to a drought that has killed tens of thousands of trees The abnormally low rainfall has killed tens of thousands, if not more, of evergreen conifers this year and the trees left will cost, on average, nearly $100 - a 20 percent markup from last year. From New England to Texas, tree-cutting farms across the nation have been forced to close in the past few weeks due to this summer's drought that impacted growth and stressed mature trees until their needles turned brown. One farm in Kansas, Prairie Pines Christmas Tree Farm, has not closed its doors, but owner Kip Scott told KWCH-DT that he planted thousands of trees earlier this year but lost 75 percent to the drought. The price increase is not just due to a lack of supply, as inflation has forced growers to pay 50 percent more for supplies like fertilizers. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Most of England...
    With Rupert Murdoch’s media empire making a concerted effort to move on from Donald Trump ahead of 2024, Fox News provided Mike Pence a one-hour showcase on Wednesday as the ex-vice president positions himself for a White House run. “How do you know that that is God calling you? Because everywhere you go, people love you,” one-time Trump acolyte Ainsley Earhardt gushed to Pence at one point. In recent weeks, Murdoch’s media outlets have taken a shiv to Trump following the GOP’s disappointing performance in the midterms. Blaming the lack of an expected “red tsunami” on the twice-impeached ex-president pushing extremist candidates, the editorial boards of the New York Post and Wall Street Journal have called on GOP voters to dump Trump and back someone else in 2024—namely, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. In fact, after Trump announced this month that he was running for president again, the Post roasted its once-favorite politician with the below-the-fold headline of “Florida Man Makes Announcement.” The paper wrote: “If elected, Trump would tie Joe Biden as the oldest president to take office. His cholesterol...
    A new report by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has laid bare the bleak state of the fentanyl crisis, with the number of fatal overdoses recorded sky-rocketing by 1,280% in just five years. Los Angeles officials briefed the public Tuesday about the new numbers, which have soared 13-fold from 109 deaths linked to fentanyl in 2016, to 1,504 in 2021. Juli Shamash, a Los Angeles mother and advocate, who lost her 19-year-old son Tyler to a fentanyl overdose in 2018, told the crowd that the drug 'is killing everyone and anyone.' 'To the parents out there that think, 'not my child,' think again. 'This is killing straight-A students, tracks stars. All races. All religions. All socioeconomic groups,' she warned. Juli Hamash and her husband Charles, who lost their 19-year-old son Tyler to a fentanyl overdose in 2018. The family have since become activists for increased drug education and overdose prevention measures Los Angeles County is confronting the shocking revelation that fentanyl linked deaths have increased 13-fold in just five years as the synthetic opioid has taken over...
    Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell indicated Wednesday that the central bank is on track to pare back its rate hike to only half a percent in December, after four straight jumbo 0.75 percent hikes.  Ongoing rate increases 'will be appropriate, but 'the time for moderating the pace of rate increases may come as soon as the December meeting,' Powell said in remarks at the Brookings Institution.  'It makes sense to moderate the pace of our rate increases as we approach the level of restraint that will be sufficient to bring inflation down,' Powell added, as the Fed works to get record-high inflation back down to its 2 percent goal.   He said the overheated labor market still needed to cool further for the Fed to have confidence the nation is on track to get back to 2 percent.  'It makes sense to moderate the pace of our rate increases as we approach the level of restraint that will be sufficient to bring inflation down,' Powell added Markets had priced in the likelihood of rate cuts later in 2023, but Powell warned...
    A Philadelphia parking authority officer was shot in the head in broad daylight by a thug in the City of Brotherly Love last Friday. The suspect was caught on a surveillance camera walking up behind the 37-year-old male parking official and shooting him in the head at point-blank range at around 4pm the day after Thanksgiving. The officer, who was on duty at the time of the crime, is seen in video footage immediately collapsing onto the sidewalk before help arrives. He is now in stable condition and the PPA is hopeful he will make a full recovery, having primarily been injured in his shoulder and ear. Police are still investigating the incident and have not yet made any arrests, but believe the victim was a 'target'. Following the shooting, Philadelphia Deputy Commissioner Frank Vanore said, 'It's bold. It's brazen and something we're definitely going to do everything we can to solve immediately.' 'We believe he was the intended target,' he continued. 'We have some witnesses saying a car pulled up, shots were fired, and then a car pulled away.'...
    MORE than two-thirds of Americans find themselves spending more time at home now than two years ago - and the economy may be to blame. According to a new survey of 2,000 Americans, 69 percent of respondents remain home due to external factors such as inflation and a looming recession. 1Americans are spending more time at home than two years ago, a new survey claimsCredit: Getty And with all that time on their hands, respondents have been staying busy with upgrading their homes. Over the last year, respondents have prioritized maintaining their yards and lawns (36 percent) the most, followed by their kitchens (30 percent) and living rooms (29 percent). On top of that, they spend 50 hours maintaining their lawn, 42 hours caring for their kitchen, 27 hours keeping up their dining room, and 33 hours on their home gym each year. Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of TruGreen, the results revealed that the average respondent will give up a DIY project and call a professional after two attempts. Read more money storiesSAVVY SAVING I made a $5 budget meal...
    School Board discusses a proposed resolution to ban teaching critical race theory. Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times/Getty Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.It is not news that public schools in the United States are now conflict zones. Across the country, K-12 teachers, school administrators, and counselors have become targets of a right-wing crusade against Critical Race Theory, gender identity, and social-emotional learning. Books are being banned from libraries as conservative extremists have taken over school boards.  In a new report titled “Educating for a Diverse Democracy: The Chilling Role of Political Conflict in Blue, Purple, and Red Communities,” education professors with UCLA and UC Riverside tried to unpack the impact of “a virulent stream of hyper-partisan conflict” in high schools nationwide. They spoke with 682 high school principals across the country and explored how their schools attempted to prepare students to participate in a diverse democracy while teachers and school administrators were forced to manage protests from activist parents. Researchers John Rogers from UCLA and UC Riverside’s Joseph Kahne found that...
    The CEO of AMC Networks has stepped down in a shock move after just three months on the job, and the company plans to lay off about one-fifth of its US workforce as it faces pressure from streaming competitors and a slowing economy. The cable network, home to hit shows such as Mad Men, The Walking Dead, Breaking Bad, and Better Call Saul announced the moves in a press release and internal memos on Tuesday. The layoffs at AMC Networks come at a time when several media companies including Amazon and Facebook-parent Meta Platforms are making deep cuts to their employee base to navigate a potential downturn in the economy.  AMC Chairman James Dolan blamed the large-scale layoffs on the dramatic shift away from traditional cable in favor of online streaming, a trend known as cord-cutting. Christina Spade, who served as CEO of AMC Networks since September, 'has stepped down from her role,' the company said on Tuesday without offering further details AMC Chairman James Dolan (center) blamed the large-scale layoffs on the dramatic shift away from traditional cable in...