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    Miller ended up being returned to his prison cell. In recent years, Alabama has had several incidents related to botched executions. In 2018, the state called off the execution of Doyle Hamm after being “unable to establish an intravenous line,” reports the Associated Press. “The Alabama Department of Corrections verges somewhere between malpractice and butchery,” said Bernard Harcourt, a lawyer who represented Doyle Hamm, according to the AP. “What it demonstrates is we really shouldn’t be given this incompetent bureaucrats the power over life and death.” The New York Times reports that it was not immediately clear when the state would try to execute Miller again. Alabama Governor Kay Ivey said she expected that the execution would be rescheduled “at the earliest opportunity.”
    An Alabama man who was scheduled to be executed by lethal injection is still alive because officials could not find his vein before a midnight deadline to execute him. Alan Miller, 57, who was convicted in a 1999 of killing three people in workplace rampage, is now enjoying an unscheduled reprieve in his cell after prison officials made the decision at about 11:30pm. Alabama Corrections Commissioner John Hamm said the state halted the scheduled execution of Miller late Thursday after they determined they could not get the lethal injection underway before a midnight deadline for the death warrant.  'Due to time constraints resulting from the lateness of the court proceedings, the execution was called off once it was determined the condemned inmate's veins could not be accessed in accordance with our protocol before the expiration of the death warrant,' Hamm said.  The execution team at the Holman Correctional Facility began trying to establish intravenous access, but he did not know for how long. Miller had explained previously how he was afraid of needles. Mere hours before, Miller had tucked into a...
    (CNN)The state of Alabama halted the execution of an inmate Thursday evening due to an inability to meet protocols before a midnight deadline, officials say.Alan Eugene Miller was scheduled to be executed by lethal injection after a US Supreme Court ruling earlier Thursday vacated a lower court injunction. But officials were unable to access Miller's veins within certain time limits, according to AL.com. "Due to the time constraints resulting in the lateness of the court proceedings, the execution was called off once it was determined the condemned's veins could not be accessed in accordance with our protocol before the expiration of the death warrant," said Alabama Department of Corrections Commissioner John Hamm, according to AL.com. Miller has been returned to his cell on death row, Hamm said. Judge blocks Thursdays execution by lethal injection of Alabama death row inmate who says he requested to die by nitrogen hypoxiaMiller was sentenced to death for the 1999 murders of his former and contemporary co-workers, Lee Michael Holdbrooks, Christopher S. Yancy and Terry Lee Jarvis, each of whom was fatally shot. A forensic...
    Alabama Department of Corrections Alan Eugene Miller. Nitrogen hypoxia was the execution method Alan Eugene Miller says he selected, leading to a legal debate that lasted until just a few hours before his death warrant was set to expire and reached the U.S. Supreme Court. Miller is set to be executed tonight, September 22, 2022, after a U.S. Supreme Court decision came shortly before a midnight deadline. Miller had asked to be executed by nitrogen hypoxia, a move the state would not allow, according to the Montgomery Advertiser. Miller was convicted of killing Christopher Yancy, Lee Holdbrooks and Terry Jarvis, according to WTRF. Here’s what you need to know:Oklahoma Was the First State to Allow Execution By Nitrogen HypoxiaOklahoma became the first state to use nitrogen hypoxia execution, also known as death by nitrogen execution, in March 2018, according to Oklahoma Watch. The article spelled out in graphic detail how nitrogen hypoxia execution happens, if all goes according to plan. Oklahoma Watch reported: The condemned man enters the room where he will draw his last breath. He...
    U.S. District Judge R. Austin Huffaker ruled that death row inmate Alan Eugene Miller should not be put to death unless it is by his chosen method A federal judge on Monday halted the scheduled lethal injection of an Alabama death row inmate, ruling that he 'likely faces irreparable injury' if he is not executed by his requested method. U.S. District Judge R. Austin Huffaker issued a preliminary injunction blocking Alabama from putting Alan Eugene Miller, a delivery truck driver convicted of killing three co-workers in 1999, to death on September 22 as previously scheduled. The judge found that the state likely lost Miller's paperwork requesting to be executed by nitrogen hypoxia - a supposedly more humane method akin to suffocation - which Alabama has authorized but not yet implemented.  An Alabama jury took 20 minutes to convict, in a 10 to 2 vote, in July 2000 and decided that put Miller should be put to death. Two appeals of the verdict were denied. 'Miller will likely suffer irreparable injury if an injunction does not issue because he will be...
    An inmate in Alabama has been saved from his scheduled execution via lethal injection after he maintained the state lost paperwork he filed requesting a different method of execution. U.S. District Judge R. Austin Huffaker Jr. blocked the state of Alabama from carrying out the execution of Alan Miller Monday and said the execution can only proceed if it is done via nitrogen hypoxia, according to a report. Death by nitrogen hypoxia would see Miller breathe in pure nitrogen, causing him to be deprived of oxygen and lead to his death. ALABAMA COULD USE NEW UNTESTED METHOD FOR EXECUTION OF PRISONER The method reportedly remains untested, and the state of Alabama maintains that it is not prepared to implement it. BREAKING: Judge blocks execution of Alan Miller Thursday by any means OTHER than the (as yet untested) nitrogen hypoxia-ADOC told a judge last week it's not ready to use the new method because it hasn't finished developing a protocol and training employeeshttps://t.co/JHKyojBcmD— Jonathan Hardison (@FOX6Hardison) September 20, 2022 The execution of Miller had been slated...
    Alabama said it will be unable to execute convicted murderer Alan Eugene Miller with the untested method of nitrogen hypoxia by next week, when he is scheduled to be put to death. Miller claimed he signed a document in 2018 saying his preferred method of execution was nitrogen hypoxia, but a signed affidavit from the commissioner of the state Department of Corrections, John Hamm, said the state is unable to fulfill that request by next week. ALABAMA COULD USE NEW UNTESTED METHOD FOR EXECUTION OF PRISONER BREAKING: Alabama says it will not be ready to execute Alan Eugene Miller by nitrogen hypoxia by next Thursday, the night he is set to die. pic.twitter.com/tCIUShpMPW— @JonWVTM13 (@JonWVTM13) September 15, 2022 The court-ordered affidavit said the state "cannot carry out an execution by nitrogen hypoxia" but is "ready to carry out the Plaintiff's sentence by lethal injection" on Miller's scheduled execution date of Sept. 22. Execution by nitrogen hypoxia is when a person is killed by being enclosed in a space where oxygen is completely replaced with...
    The state of Alabama is currently deciding whether to execute Alan Eugene Miller with the untested method of nitrogen hypoxia rather than traditional methods. The method was signed into law in 2018 by Gov. Kay Ivey (R) after the state had problems with lethal injections and wanted alternatives, according to the Associated Press. It has also been approved for use in Oklahoma and Mississippi. COUNTRY LEGEND TEDDY GENTRY ARRESTED ON DRUG CHARGES Death by nitrogen hypoxia would have the prisoner breathe in pure nitrogen, which would cause the prisoner to be deprived of oxygen and lead to his or her death. The method is untested and has not been used in any of the states it is approved for, according to CBS News. Miller claimed he signed a document in 2018 saying he would prefer to be executed by nitrogen hypoxia rather than lethal injection because of his fear of needles, according to reports. “I did not want to be stabbed with a needle,” Miller said while testifying to a U.S. district judge. The...
    Prosecutors argued Miller was trying to delay his execution. Houts told the judge that the state had tried to fit Miller with a mask in preparation for execution by nitrogen, but Miller declined. One of Miller’s attorneys, Mara Klebaner, said she does not want Miller used as a “test case” with an “untested protocol” if the state’s nitrogen hypoxia protocol is not final. Oklahoma and Mississippi are the two other states that have authorized execution by nitrogen hypoxia. Russell Bucklew, a man incarcerated in Missouri, attempted to get approved for nitrogen hypoxia; his request was denied in a lawsuit that went to the U.S. Supreme Court. Justice Neil Gorsuch stated that the method could not be used because nitrogen hypoxia was untested and could not be properly prepared. Miller, 57, was convicted of killing three men in a workplace shooting spree in August 1999.
    Alan Eugene Miller says the state lost the paperwork he turned in selecting the alternate execution method of Nitrogen hypoxia Alabama could be ready to use a new, untried execution method called nitrogen hypoxia to carry out a death sentence later this month, a state attorney told a federal judge on Monday. James Houts, a deputy state attorney general, told U.S. District Judge R. Austin Huffaker Jr. that it is 'very likely' the method will be available for the execution of Alan Eugene Miller, currently set for September 22 by lethal injection. The final decision on whether to use the new method is up to Corrections Commissioner John Hamm, he said, and litigation is likely. While lethal injection is Alabama's primary execution method, the state in 2018 approved an untried method, nitrogen hypoxia, as an alternative amid mounting questions over lethal injection.  State law gave inmates a brief window of time in which to designate hypoxia it as their preferred execution method.  In a federal lawsuit filed last month attorneys argued Miller turned in a form selecting nitrogen, but the...
    Oklahoma is planning to put a prisoner to death roughly every month, a speedy pace for a rarely invoked punishment that's banned in several other states. The first of the 25 executions, slated for Aug. 25, was scheduled Friday by the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals after a federal judge greenlighted the reintroduction of lethal injection as a method of execution in the state. The planned executions over the next 29 months account for just over half of the Sooner State's death row inmate population of 44. SUPREME COURT ALLOWS DEATH ROW INMATE TO DIE BY FIRING SQUAD “The family members of these loved ones have waited decades for justice,” Oklahoma Attorney General John O’Connor said. “My office stands beside them as they take this next step in the journey that the murderers forced upon them.” O’Connor asked for the batch of 25 executions to be scheduled last month after a federal judge approved the use of the lethal injection method, which had been the subject of litigation. He pointed to the fact that the earliest...
    (CNN)Four days after a federal court ruled against death row inmates arguing Oklahoma's lethal injection protocol is cruel and unusual, the state's attorney general asked for more than two dozen executions to be scheduled.Executions in Oklahoma are scheduled by the state Court of Criminal Appeals. The motion from Attorney General John O'Connor requests executions take place every four weeks, starting no earlier than late August in order to give the Department of Corrections time to prepare.Federal judge Stephen P. Friot ruled Monday in a long-running case the state's lethal execution drug combination does not violate the Eighth Amendment guarantee against cruel and unusual punishment.Attorney Jennifer Moreno told CNN on Tuesday the plaintiffs are considering an appeal, saying the state's protocol "creates an unacceptable risk that prisoners will experience severe pain and suffering."The attorney general is asking for 25 prisoners to be scheduled for execution. One prisoner, Wade Greely Lay, is scheduled to have a jury trial next May to determine whether he is competent to be executed, and O'Connor says his execution date should be delayed until after the trial...
    (CNN)Oklahoma's use of a three-drug lethal injection method is constitutional, a federal judge ruled Monday following a lawsuit from nearly 30 people on death row challenging the protocol. The suit, brought on behalf of 28 death row prisoners, named officials with multiple Oklahoma corrections agencies and claimed the state's lethal injection method violates the Eighth Amendment because it causes "constitutionally impermissible pain and suffering," according to the ruling.In a judgment filed Monday, Judge Stephen Friot of the US District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma ruled against the prisoners and upheld the constitutionality of the method.Ultimately, Friot ruled the prisoners' attorneys fell "well short of clearing the bar set by the Supreme Court" for lethal injection challenges. Oklahoma death row inmate who requested firing squad is executed by lethal injectionThe state's lethal injection protocol uses a combination of the drugs midazolam as a sedative, vecuronium bromide as a paralytic, and potassium chloride to stop the heart. Read MoreFriot described a "battle of the experts" during the week-long trial earlier this year, in which testifying experts frequently and strongly contradicted...
    PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona prisoner is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection in less than three weeks for killing an 8-year-old girl, marking the second condemned man to decline lethal gas since the state refurbished its gas chamber — a method of execution that hasn’t been used in the United States in more than 20 years. Frank Atwood declined to pick a method of execution when corrections officials asked him if he wanted to die by lethal injection or the gas chamber. Lethal injection is Arizona’s default execution method when condemned prisoners refuse to make a selection. Clarence Dixon, who earlier this month became the first prisoner to be executed in Arizona since July 2014, also had refused to make a choice on his execution method. The last lethal gas execution in the United States was carried out in 1999 in Arizona, which refurbished its gas chamber at the prison in Florence, southeast of Phoenix, in late 2020. The state also had purchased materials to make hydrogen cyanide gas, which was used in some past U.S. executions...
    PHOENIX (AP) — A prisoner scheduled to be executed in three weeks in what would be Arizona’s first use of the death penalty in nearly eight years will die by lethal injection and not in the gas chamber — a method that hasn’t been used in the United States in more than two decades. Clarence Dixon declined to pick a method of execution when officials asked him if he wanted to die by lethal injection or the gas chamber, leaving him to be put to death by lethal injection — the default method for condemned prisoners who don’t make a decision, Dixon’s defense team said Wednesday. Dixon is scheduled to be executed on May 11 with an injection of pentobarbital for his conviction in the 1977 murder of Arizona State University student Deana Bowdoin. Prosecutors believe the execution will likely be delayed if a judge goes forward with a hearing to determine whether Dixon is mentally fit to be put to death. The last lethal gas execution in the United States was carried out in 1999 in Arizona. The horrific...
    A death row inmate in South Carolina has decided to be executed by firing squad, The State newspaper reported. The other option for Richard Moore was electrocution via the state’s 110-year old electric chair. He is set to be executed by a three-person firing squad on April 29. Lethal injection was not an option. Moore, 57, has been on death row since 2001. He made his decision formal on Friday and issued a statement. “I believe this election is forcing me to choose between two unconstitutional methods of execution, and I do not intend to waive any challenges to electrocution or firing squad by making an election,” Moore said. Moore was convicted in 2001 and did not dispute his guilt. In 1999, he entered a convenience store in Spartanburg County with the purpose of robbing it. Moore was unarmed, but the clerk had a gun that the two fought over. In the ensuing struggle the gun went off and fatally wounded the clerk. Moore also shot at a bystander and missed. A jury found Moore guilty after two hours...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The three-drug lethal injection method Oklahoma uses is constitutional and is unlikely to lead to inmates experiencing much pain before they die, Oklahoma’s solicitor general told a federal judge on Monday. Mithun Mansinghani told U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot that the four lethal injections the state has carried out since October “are definitive proof that the protocol works as intended.” Attorneys for 28 Oklahoma death row inmates are challenging the state’s three-drug protocol, arguing that the first drug administered, the sedative midazolam, is not enough to render the inmate unable to feel the terror and pain they would experience from the second two drugs, one that paralyzes them and a final drug that stops the heart. James Stronski, an attorney for the inmates, told Friot that if inmates aren’t properly anaesthetized, they would be paralyzed and unable to move or speak after the second drug is administered and then feel excruciating pain as the final drug, potassium chloride is injected to stop the heart. “If this is allowed to continue… this is a 21st Century burning...
    ATMORE, Ala. (AP) — Alabama executed an inmate by lethal injection for a 1996 murder on Thursday after a divided U.S. Supreme Court sided with the state and rejected defense claims the man had an intellectual disability that cost him a chance to choose a less “torturous,” yet untried, execution method. Matthew Reeves, 43, was put to death at Holman Prison after the court lifted a lower court order that had prevented corrections workers from executing the prisoner. He was pronounced dead at 9:24 p.m. CST, state Attorney General Steve Marshall said in a statement. Reeves was convicted of killing Willie Johnson Jr., a driver who gave him a ride in 1996. Evidence showed Reeves went to a party afterward and celebrated the killing. The inmate had no last words. After craning his neck to look around a few times, Reeves grimaced and looked at his left arm toward an intravenous line. With his eyes closed and mouth slightly agape, Reeves’ abdomen moved repeatedly before he grew still. Gov. Kay Ivey, in a statement, said Johnson was “a good Samaritan...
    By Jay Reeves | Associated Press ATMORE, Ala. — The U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for the state of Alabama to execute an inmate who contends an intellectual disability combined with the state’s inattention cost him a chance to avoid lethal injection and choose a new method. The nation’s highest court upheld a state appeal which had asked the justices to lift a lower court order that had previously blocked prison workers from executing Matthew Reeves. Reeves was convicted of killing a driver who gave him a ride in 1996. The state said it was preparing to execute Reeves by lethal injection on Thursday night. Reeves claimed the state failed to help him understand a form that would have let him choose a new execution method involving nitrogen. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. The U.S. Supreme Court considered Thursday whether to let Alabama execute a death row inmate who claims an intellectual disability combined with the state’s inattention cost him a chance to avoid lethal injection and choose a less “torturous,” yet...
    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court considered Thursday whether to let Alabama execute a death row inmate who claims an intellectual disability combined with the state’s inattention cost him a chance to avoid lethal injection and choose a less “torturous,” yet untried, method. The Alabama attorney general’s office asked the justices to lift a lower court order that blocked prison workers from putting to death Matthew Reeves, who was convicted of killing a driver who gave him a ride and then celebrating the man’s killing at a party with blood still on his hands. The state said it was preparing to execute Reeves, 43, by lethal injection at Holman Prison in case the court allowed it to go forward as scheduled at 6 p.m. CST. The state previously asked the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift a lower court injunction and allow the execution, but the panel on Wednesday refused and said a judge didn’t abuse his discretion in ruling that the state couldn’t execute Reeves by any method other than nitrogen hypoxia, which has never...
    A federal appeals court on Wednesday blocked the execution of an Alabama inmate scheduled for Thursday, ruling that the man was not given a chance to properly choose his execution method, The Associated Press reported. A three-judge panel sided with a lower court that blocked his execution, ruling that inmate Matthew Reeves could not be put to death until the state uses a new execution method, hydrogen hypoxia.  Reeves was convicted of murder in 1996 for the killing of Willie Johnson who died by a shot gun blast to the neck during a robbery, AP reported. Johnson reportedly picked Reeves up on the side of a highway for a ride on the highway.  Reeves was later accused of celebrating the killing, with witnesses saying that Reeves mimicked the dying man at a party shortly after his death. At the time, they also claimed that his hands were still stained with blood. Reeves was granted a stay of execution by U.S. District Judge R. Austin Huffaker, Jr. after lawyers for Reeves argued that he had an intellectual disability and was not given proper assistance in...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A federal judge on Friday declined to temporarily halt the executions of two Oklahoma inmates who are scheduled to die in the coming weeks. In his order, U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot wrote that inmates Donald Grant and Gilbert Postelle were not likely to succeed in their claims that Oklahoma’s three-drug lethal injection method presents the risk of subjecting them to severe pain and suffering. Friot oversaw a hearing on Monday that included testimony from several doctors and witnesses to the October execution of John Grant, who is not related to Donald Grant and who vomited and convulsed on the gurney after being injected with midazolam, a sedative that is the first of Oklahoma’s three-drug method. Friot, who also heard testimony from the prison official who oversaw John Grant’s execution, said the inmate’s consumption of significant quantities of soda and potato chips until shortly before his execution likely led to the problems. “The result of that for Grant was that, soon after the first drug was pushed into the IV line, and as he lay unconscious,...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Two men on Oklahoma’s death row — at the prodding of a federal judge — agreed to choose execution by firing squad as a way to delay their upcoming lethal injections, one of their attorneys told the judge. The two inmates, Donald Grant and Gilbert Postelle, want U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot to grant them a temporary injunction that would halt their upcoming executions until a trial can be held over whether Oklahoma’s three-drug lethal injection method is constitutional. A trial on the issue is set to begin before Friot on Feb. 28, but the judge has said in order to be added as plaintiffs, inmates must select an alternative method of execution. Grant, who is scheduled to die on Jan. 27, and Postelle, who has a Feb. 17 execution date, hadn’t previously selected an alternative method. “While it may be gruesome to look at, we all agree it will be quicker,” attorney Jim Stronski told Friot Monday after a daylong hearing in Oklahoma City. More than two dozen death row inmates who are plaintiffs...
    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit granted a temporary motion for stay of execution for two Oklahoma death row inmates on Wednesday, just a day before one of the inmates was scheduled to die by lethal injection.  The appeals court stayed the executions of Julius Jones and John Grant on the basis that they met two criteria required for an execution to be stayed. Prisoners must show that the execution method chosen by the state — in this case a three-drug lethal injection — presents “a substantial risk of severe pain" and they must also show that the risk of severe pain is substantial when compared to other available alternatives. Jones and Grant were part of a federal lawsuit seeking to challenge Oklahoma's three-drug lethal injection. However, Judge Stephen Friot denied a motion for a preliminary injunction that they and three other inmates sought, clearing the way for their executions in the next six months. Grant was scheduled to be executed on Oct. 28 while Jones was scheduled to be executed on Nov. 18. The five inmates were removed from the lawsuit because they did not...
    An Alabama man who avoided execution in February is scheduled to be put to death Thursday for the 1991 killing of a woman taken at gunpoint from an ATM location and shot in a cemetery. Willie B. Smith III, 52, is set to receive a lethal injection at 6 p.m. CDT at a southwest Alabama prison for his conviction in the kidnapping and murder of 22-year-old Sharma Ruth Johnson. Prosecutors said Smith had a shotgun when he abducted Johnson in October 1991 from an ATM location in Birmingham. He withdrew money using her bank card and then took her to a cemetery and shot her in the back of the head. Johnson was the sister of a Birmingham police officer. This is Smith’s second execution date this year. Last Feb. 11 — while Smith was in a holding cell near Alabama’s death chamber — the state called off a lethal injection when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an injunction affirming he could not be executed unless allowed to have his pastor by his side. The Alabama...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A federal judge has declined to block Thursday’s scheduled execution of an Alabama inmate convicted of the 1991 kidnap and murder of a woman abducted outside an automatic teller machine. U.S. Chief District Judge Emily Marks on Sunday denied a request for a preliminary injunction sought by lawyers for Willie B. Smith III. Smith is scheduled to receive a lethal injection on Thursday at a south Alabama prison. His lawyers argued that Smith, whose IQ has been measured in the 70s, should have been given help to understand prison paperwork related to the selection of an execution method. Marks was directed Friday by the 11th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals to consider the injunction request. Marks denied the injunction request Sunday after ruling that Smith was not likely to prevail in the lawsuit brought under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Court records indicate his attorneys are appealing. Smith was convicted of the abduction and slaying of Sharma Ruth Johnson, 22. Prosecutors said Smith abducted Johnson at gunpoint from an ATM in Birmingham,...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — An appellate court ruled Friday that a federal judge prematurely dismissed a lawsuit arguing a low IQ-inmate — set to be executed next week in Alabama— should have been given help to understand the prison paperwork that laid the groundwork for the planned lethal injection. The ruling did not block Thursday’s execution. However, the three-judge panel directed the district court to decide a request for a preliminary injunction to prevent the state from executing Willie B. Smith III on Thursday. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a federal judge prematurely dismissed a lawsuit arguing that Smith was due help under the Americans with Disabilities Act in understanding paperwork related to execution method selection. The panel ruled a judge erred in saying Smith did not have standing to bring the claim. Lawyers for Smith said he has an IQ in the 70s and should have received help under the 1990 act that bars discrimination against those with disabilities. Thursday’s execution date and plan is still in place. However, John Palombi, an...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Federal judges heard arguments Wednesday about whether an Alabama inmate had the mental capacity to understand the paperwork setting up his planned execution next week, with a defense lawyer arguing the man’s cognitive deficiencies warranted disability assistance. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is considering an appeal by Willie B. Smith III, who was convicted of a woman’s 1991 kidnap and killing. His lawyer said the man has an IQ in the 70s and should have received help under the Americans with Disabilities Act to understand a form related to the selection of an execution method. Smith is scheduled to receive a lethal injection Oct. 21 in the death of Sharma Ruth Johnson, 22. Prosecutors said Smith abducted Johnson at gunpoint from an ATM in Birmingham, stole $80 from her and then took her to a cemetery where he shot her in the back of the head. This is Alabama’s second attempt this year to carry out Smith’s death sentence. The state called off prior execution plans last Feb. 12 after the U.S....
    WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear an appeal from a Missouri death row inmate who is seeking execution by firing squad. Over the dissent of the three liberal justices, the court left in place a lower court ruling against inmate Ernest Johnson that could allow him to be executed by lethal injection. He is on death row for killing three convenience store workers in Columbia, Missouri, in 1994. Johnson has argued that Missouri's lethal injection drug, pentobarbital, could trigger seizures because of a brain condition. Johnson still has part of a benign tumor in his brain. OPINION: BIDEN'S SECRET COURT-PACKING COMMISSION – HERE'S WHAT FIRST MEETING TELLS OF DEMS' PLANS The effect of the court's order Monday is to prevent Johnson from amending his lawsuit to include the possibility of execution by firing squad, which is not authorized under Missouri law. Based on prior Supreme Court rulings, an inmate who objects to the state's chosen method of execution has to suggest an alternate means. Johnson initially suggested he could be put to death using nitrogen...
    Members of the South Carolina House have voted to add death by firing squad as a state execution method due to a lack of lethal injection drugs. The bill, approved in a 66 to 43 vote on Wednesday, would require inmates to choose between being shot or electrocuted if there are no lethal injection drugs available, the Associated Press (AP) reported. “The state is one of only nine to still use the electric chair and will become only the fourth to allow a firing squad,” the outlet continued: The Senate already had approved the bill in March, by a vote of 32-11. The House only made minor technical changes to that version, meaning that after a routine final vote in the House and a signoff by the Senate, it will go to Republican Gov. Henry McMaster, who has said he will sign it. In a social media post on Wednesday, McMaster said the House “has given second reading to a bill that will restore the state’s ability to carry out the death penalty”: The S.C House has given second reading...
    The South Carolina House voted on Wednesday to add firing squads as an execution method for prisoners. The bill passed in a 66-43 vote, with one Democrat voting in favor and seven Republicans voting against it, the Associated Press reported. The South Carolina Senate passed a similar bill in a 32-11 vote in March. The bill would require a death row inmate set for execution to choose between a firing squad and the electric chair if the drugs for a lethal injection are not available, which is increasingly a factor in multiple states. The AP reports that South Carolina is one of only nine states to still use the electric chair, and would with the new legislation become one of four that uses firing squads. Since the House only made technical changes to the Senate bill, the Senate just has to sign off on it before it is sent to Gov. Henry McMaster’s (R) desk. McMaster has said before that he will sign the bill, the AP reported. South Carolina has 37 death row inmates, with three of them being out of appeals. States across the country...
    ATLANTA (AP) — A federal appeals court has declined to reconsider its earlier ruling that rejected the request by a man on Georgia’s death row to die by firing squad rather than by the injection of a sedative. Lawyers for Michael Wade Nance argued that his veins are severely compromised and that the execution method Georgia uses — injection of pentobarbital — could cause him excruciating pain in violation of his constitutional rights. They suggested instead that the state execute Nance by firing squad. A federal judge rejected that request and a three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta ruled in December that it could not consider his request for procedural reasons. The full appeals court on Tuesday issued a 7-3 decision declining to reconsider the panel’s decision. Nance, 59, was convicted and sentenced to death for killing Gabor Balogh in 1993. Nance had just robbed a Gwinnett County bank and abandoned his own car after dye packs hidden in the stolen money exploded. Balogh was backing out of a parking space at a liquor...
    A man on death row has requested that his execution be by firing squad rather than lethal injection and his legal team says it is “not a delaying tactic,” BBC reported Tuesday. According to Zane Michael Floyd’s federal attorney, Brad Levenson, Floyd would like to firing squad instead of a lethal injection that was sentenced by the state because it is more humane, according to BBC. Floyd, 45, was charged back in 1999 for the fatal shooting of 4 people at a supermarket in Las Vegas. The following year, after pleading guilty, he was sentenced to death. Floyd and his legal team have tried to appeal his case numerous times, even with a request for a Supreme Court hearing, which was declined. His lawyers have said they will try for clemency with the Nevada State Pardons Board, according to BBC. HUNTSVILLE, UNITED STATES: This 29 February, 2000, photo shows the “death chamber” at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Huntsville Unit in Huntsville, Texas, where convicted murderer Odell Barnes is scheduled to die by lethal injection 01 March. (Photo credit...
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — A convicted killer who is fighting a possible June execution date that would make him the first person put to death in Nevada in 15 years is calling for the state to consider the firing squad as an option, a rare method in the United States. Attorneys for Zane Michael Floyd say he does not want to die and are challenging the state plan to use a proposed three-drug method, which led to court challenges that twice delayed the execution of another convicted killer who later took his own life in prison. “This is not a delaying tactic,” Brad Levenson, a federal public defender representing Floyd, said Monday. But a challenge of the state execution protocol requires the defense to provide an alternative method, and Levenson said gunshots to the brain stem would be “the most humane way.” “Execution by firing squad … causes a faster and less painful death than lethal injection,” the attorneys said in a court filing Friday. Three U.S. states — Mississippi, Oklahoma and Utah — and the U.S. military allow...
    Miami : March 4, 2021 0 The South Carolina Senate has voted to add firing squad to the electric chair as alternative methods of execution for death row inmates in the absence of lethal injections in the state. The bill, approved this Tuesday by 32 votes to 11 for and 11 against (with the bipartisan support of several Democrats), would allow the state to restart executions after almost ten years. South Carolina will thus become the fourth state in the country that allows execution as a method of applying the death penalty after Utah, Oklahoma and Mississippi. It is also one of the nine states that use the electric chair. Its current laws allow prisoners to choose between lethal injection and the electric chair as the method of execution, but lethal injection is the default method applied when a convict refuses to make a choice. Prisoners cannot be executed by electrocution unless they have chosen that method. The shortage of injections has allowed many inmates to escape capital punishment. Since the last execution was carried out...
    The South Carolina Senate has voted to add firing squad to the electric chair as alternative methods of execution for death row inmates in the absence of lethal injections in the state. Miami World / RT The bill, approved this Tuesday by 32 votes to 11 for and 11 against (with the bipartisan support of several Democrats), would allow the state to restart executions after almost ten years. South Carolina will thus become the fourth state in the country that allows execution as a method of applying the death penalty after Utah, Oklahoma and Mississippi. It is also one of the nine states that use the electric chair. Its current laws allow prisoners to choose between lethal injection and the electric chair as the method of execution, but lethal injection is the default method applied when a convict refuses to make a choice. Prisoners cannot be executed by electrocution unless they have chosen that method. The shortage of injections has allowed many inmates to escape capital punishment. Since the last execution was carried out in May 2011, the number...
    The South Carolina Senate passed a bill on Tuesday that added a firing squad as an alternative execution method for those facing the death penalty. The Senate passed the bill 32-11, adding the firing squad option to the electric chair in case an inmate choose one of them over lethal injection, the Associated Press reported. Republicans and some Democrats voted to pass the bill. South Carolina has not conducted an execution for almost ten years.  Death penalty executions stopped at the federal level when Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate Democrats negotiating changes to coronavirus bill Rural Americans are the future of the clean energy economy — policymakers must to catch up WHO official says it's 'premature' to think pandemic will be over by end of year MORE took office after former President TrumpDonald TrumpProsecutors focus Trump Organization probe on company's financial officer: report WHO official says it's 'premature' to think pandemic will be over by end of year Romney released from hospital after fall over the weekend MORE conducted over a dozen executions in 2020. The state is unable to conduct executions...
    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina lawmakers are considering a bill that would make the electric chair the default execution method for death row inmates in the state. A House subcommittee advanced Thursday legislation that requires death row prisoners to be electrocuted if lethal injection is not available as an option. Currently, death row prisoners who exhaust their court appeals can choose to die by either lethal injection or electrocution. The method defaults to lethal injection if a prisoner does not make a choice. But South Carolina ran out of the drugs needed for lethal injection in 2013 and hasn’t been able to buy more since. Two executions have been paused in the last three months because of the lack of drugs. The state Supreme Court last year delayed the December execution of Richard Bernard Moore, who was convicted for the 1999 killing of a convenience store clerk in Spartanburg County. Earlier this month, the high court also stayed the execution of Brad Sigmon, who was sentenced to death for a 2001 double murder in Greenville. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press....
    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina man has declined to select how he should be executed, furthering a potential showdown over the state's use of lethal injection. Lindsey Vann, an attorney for inmate Richard Bernard Moore, told The Herald-Journal on Friday that Moore declined to choose between lethal injection and the electric chair by the Friday deadline. That means the method of the scheduled Dec. 4 execution defaults to lethal injection under state law. But corrections officials say they don’t have any lethal injection drugs to carry out the execution. Moore, 55, has spent 19 years on death row after he was convicted of killing a convenience store clerk in Spartanburg. Moore’s attorneys are seeking to stay the execution. They say the coronavirus pandemic will make the execution dangerous for those involved in the execution and witnesses. They also say the corrections department is withholding information about its execution methods, preventing Moore from making an informed decision between dying by lethal injection or by electrocution, the two options provided by state law. Though Moore’s attorneys have sued the corrections...
    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The Supreme Court docket early Thursday cleared the way in which for a second federal execution in as many days. The vote to permit the execution of Wesley Ira Purkey to go ahead was 5-4, with the courtroom’s 4 liberal members dissenting. Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote that “continuing with Purkey’s execution now, regardless of the grave questions and factual findings concerning his psychological competency, casts a shroud of constitutional doubt over essentially the most irrevocable of accidents.” She was joined by fellow liberal justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan. Purkey was convicted of kidnapping, raping and killing a 16-year-old woman earlier than dismembering, burning after which dumping the teenager’s physique in a septic pond. He was additionally convicted in a state courtroom in Kansas after utilizing a claw hammer to kill an 80-year-old lady who suffered from polio. Purkey’s execution had been scheduled for Wednesday on the Federal Correctional Advanced in Terre Haute, Indiana. On Tuesday, Daniel Lewis Lee was put to dying on the facility after his eleventh-hour authorized bids failed....
    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The Trump administration was shifting forward early Tuesday with the execution of the primary federal jail inmate in 17 years after a divided Supreme Courtroom reversed decrease courts and dominated federal executions might proceed. Daniel Lewis Lee had been scheduled to obtain a deadly dose of the highly effective sedative pentobarbital at Four p.m. EDT Monday. However a courtroom order stopping Lee’s execution, issued Monday morning by U.S. District Decide Tanya Chutkan, remained in place. A federal appeals courtroom in Washington refused the administration’s plea to step in, earlier than the Supreme Courtroom acted by a 5-Four vote. Nonetheless, Lee’s attorneys stated the execution couldn’t go ahead after midnight below federal rules. With conservatives within the majority, the courtroom stated in an unsigned opinion that the prisoners’ “executions could proceed as deliberate.” The 4 liberal justices dissented. Two extra executions are scheduled this week, Wesley Ira Purkey on Wednesday and Dustin Lee Honken on Friday. A fourth man, Keith Dwayne Nelson, is scheduled to be executed in August. The Bureau of Prisons had continued with...
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