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    A suspect has been charged after a shooting in the region forced several schools into lockouts. The shooting happened in Columbia County on Woods Road on Friday, June 10 in the town of Clermont. One injured victim was rushed to a local hospital for treatment, police said.  The suspect fled the scene and was apprehended in the city of Hudson by the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office and members of the state police. On Saturday, June 11, state police announced that an investigation determined Columbia County resident Tremaine A. Harris, age 21, of the Town of Ghent, specifically targeted and attempted to murder the owner of a private estate on Woods Road. Harris fired multiple times with a 12-gauge tactical shotgun, striking the victim in a leg, said state police.  Several additional estate employees were in the vicinity of the victim as Tremaine opened fire, said police. The injuries sustained by the victim are believed to be non-life-threatening, police noted. Harris has been charged with: Second-degree attempted murder, a Class B felony,  Second-degree criminal possession of a weapon, a Class C...
    Columbia University canceled 130 classes after unionized graduate student workers quit teaching on Nov. 3 in protest for higher wages, more benefits and a new arbitration process for discrimination and harassment claims, according to the union. The Student Workers of Columbia, which represents 3,000 graduate and undergraduate student workers, voted to initiate a strike after Columbia University offered to mediate with the group, according to an email from Columbia leadership obtained by the Daily Caller. Teaching assistants, research assistants, and graduate students who teach their own classes stopped working and began picketing following the union’s vote. The union went on strike in the spring of 2021 as well. According to an email sent from Provost Mary Boyce and reviewed by the Daily Caller, the university offered mediation one week before the strike began. “The University offered mediation over two weeks ago — more than a week before the strike started — and subsequently repeated the offer, which has not yet been endorsed by the Union,” Boyce said. “We believe mediation can be especially helpful in scenarios such as this one,...
    Submarines are quiet, deadly and expensive. Boats like those in the Virginia class, which is a U.S. attack submarine, can cost $3.4 billion and take seven years to build. The Navy has ambitious goals for the future of the underwater fleet, but some problems could stand in the way. "The Navy is undergoing a 20-year plan that will cost $21 billion to upgrade its infrastructure," said Aidan Quigley, a reporter at Inside Defense who covers the U.S. Navy and Marines. "Right now, the state of Navy shipyard infrastructure is not great. They've been underfunded for the past couple of decades." The Navy currently has 68 submarines in service. And it wants to start shipbuilding on two to possibly three Virginia-class attack subs per year, and roughly one Columbia-class submarine per year until around 2035. But according to the Congressional Budget Office, a lack of shipyard infrastructure could delay those plans. "The Navy is focusing on improving productive capacity via initiatives to increase on-time delivery and operational availability while reducing maintenance costs," said Navy Lt. Rob Reinheimer, in a statement to CNBC....
                      by Eric Lendrum  The Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School in New York City is facing widespread backlash from both students and parents after it rolled out a bizarre new class on “porn literacy,” the New York Post reports. Junior year students at the Manhattan-based school had to attend a “health and sexuality workshop,” expecting it to be a generic sexual education class. However, the class was revealed to be officially known as “Pornography Literacy: An intersectional focus on mainstream porn,” taught by the Director of Health and Wellness at the Dalton School, Justine Fonte. The class was made mandatory, and neither students nor parents were informed about the class’s contents ahead of time, or given the option to withdraw from the class. Fonte’s presentation to the class of roughly 120 students included explicit photos in order to determine “what is porn and what is art,” as well as a list of the most-searched keywords in porn in 2019, and the most popular sub-genres of pornography. As one student recalled, the collective reaction...
    Parents at the posh Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School are outraged they were never told of a fourth "R" being added to the curriculum: raunch. In addition to the usual reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic, the school this month launched lessons on porn — without informing families or allowing them to opt out, parents fumed. When juniors at the $47,000-a-year Manhattan school showed up for a health and sexuality workshop, most thought it was "just going to be about condoms or birth control," a student told The Post. NYC PRINCIPAL UNDER FIRE FOR EMAIL IMPLORING STAFF TO SUPPORT PALESTINIANS Instead, it was something called "Pornography Literacy: An intersectional focus on mainstream porn," taught by Justine Ang Fonte, who’s the director of Health & Wellness at another elite prep school, Dalton. The often-explicit slide presentation and lecture by Fonte to the 120 boys and girls included lessons on how porn takes care of "three big male vulnerabilities"; statistics on the "orgasm gap" showing straight women have far fewer orgasms with their partners than gay men or women; and photos of partially-nude women,...
    More On: schools Softball player forced to cut beads from hair, sparks probe into ‘culturally biased’ rules Dad who launched race rant in tony New Jersey town arrested outside school Front-runners come under attack during lackluster debate for NYC mayor Tennessee school guidance counselor accused of changing grades Here is a video showing an NYC teacher sucking on the nipple of a topless man while conducting a Zoom class. The video landed Amanda K. Fletcher, a Spanish teacher at Columbia Secondary School for Math, Science, and Engineering, in the “rubber room” pending a disciplinary process.   The city Department of Education removed Fletcher from her teaching duties last October after the Special Commissioner of investigation for city schools found that Fletcher, 37,  “engaged in an inappropriate sex act” while remotely instructing her class. Students from the Manhattan school who shared the video on Snapchat refer to the teacher  as “Profesora Fletcher.” The 11-second clip obtained by The Post shows her mouth on the chest of a shirtless man standing behind her. Fletcher, wearing headphones, then turns to face the camera,...
    The international advocacy group Human Rights Watch parted ways with its general counsel last week after she repeatedly used the N-word during a class she teaches at Columbia University. Dinah PoKempner, an adjunct professor, used the term 11 times in half a minute while recounting a conversation to students during an April 1 Zoom session, the Columbia Spectator reported. The decorated attorney, who is white, was discussing legal implications of hate speech at the time, according to the report. During the lesson, PoKempner relayed an anecdote that included dialogue between a Ku Klux Klan member and a lawyer associate of hers. “Unfortunately, the voices of the lawyer and his deponent were graven in my memory, and I did not edit as I spoke, using the original racist term,” she told the Columbia Spectator. “Students were understandably shocked, and they explained eloquently and patiently why they objected to use of the word.” Some students objected to her language during the class and the matter was discussed, according to the site. During a break in that exchange, PoKempner left her...
    More On: columbia university Columbia orders students to get tested after COVID detected in wastewater Truth-challenged Biden and other commentary Columbia University hosting 6 separate graduation ceremonies on race, ethnicities Graduate student workers at Columbia University go on strike The international advocacy group Human Rights Watch parted ways with its general counsel last week after she repeatedly used the N-word during a class she teaches at Columbia University. Dinah PoKempner, an adjunct professor, used the term 11 times in half a minute while recounting a conversation to students during an April 1 Zoom session, the Columbia Spectator reported. The decorated attorney, who is white, was discussing legal implications of hate speech at the time, according to the report. During the lesson, PoKempner relayed an anecdote that included dialogue between a Ku Klux Klan member and a lawyer associate of hers. “Unfortunately, the voices of the lawyer and his deponent were graven in my memory, and I did not edit as I spoke, using the original racist term,” she told the Columbia Spectator. “Students were understandably shocked, and they...
    The entire premise of undersea strategic deterrence is based on the need for nuclear-armed ballistic missile submarines to hold potential attackers at risk of catastrophic destruction, without being found, detected, or seen by enemies in any way.  This reality, which is increasingly becoming more complex for submarine weapons developers, might explain why the Navy’s new Columbia-class, nuclear-armed ballistic missile submarines are being engineered to be the quietest, stealthiest submarines … ever to exist.  The new submarines will also need to be higher tech in the sense that they will need to be less detectable, due in large measure to the reality that enemy platforms capable of submarine detection are getting much more advanced through the use of longer-range, more sensitive sonar systems, harder to detect, long-endurance, small undersea sub-hunting drones and advanced methods of aerial submarine detection; some of these detection systems include the use of air-dropped sonobuoys, high-tech sub-hunting surveillance planes and other systems, including the use of surface and shallow-depth laser scanner technologies engineered to find subs on patrol.   In light of this kind of global equation, it...
    They will secretly patrol the dark corners of the undersea, quietly tracking enemy movements sustaining a persistent threat of nuclear annihilation against anyone willing to launch a catastrophic first strike on the U.S. homeland. Assured destruction keeps the peace … the fundamental paradox of nuclear strategic deterrence, a strategy well underway by the Pentagon seeking to launch a new fleet of high-tech, heavily-armed ballistic missile submarines tasked with ushering in a new era in nuclear deterrence. The Navy has awarded a $9.5 billion deal to General Dynamics Electric Boat to build the first two Columbia-class nuclear-armed submarines, a monumental step toward ultimately building as many as 12 new boats to replace the aging Ohio-class. The first submarine is scheduled for delivery to the Navy in 2027, and the second one in 2029. The 560-foot boats will be armed with Trident II D5 nuclear missiles, fly-by-wire, computer-generated navigational controls, a stealthy X-shaped stern and ultra-quieting “electric drive” propulsion. The concept with the Columbias is to not only architect something that will be upgraded to accommodate new nuclear missiles as they emerge, but...
    GROTON, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut and Rhode Island officials are celebrating a new submarine contract for General Dynamics Electric Boat as a major economic win for the region's economy. The $9.47 billion contract with the U.S. Navy, which was announced Friday, is for construction and testing of the first two Columbia-class submarines. The 560-foot Columbia-class submarines are slated to be the largest constructed in the United States and will replace the older Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines, the company said. “This isn’t just a milestone for the shipbuilders at EB — the Columbia-class program will also be a major opportunity for industry partners up and down the supply chain for years to come, and a foundational piece for our region’s economic future,” said U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney, a Democrat who represents southeastern Connecticut. “Generations of shipbuilders and manufacturers will get their start working on this multi-decade program, and it’s an exciting time to get more people into the pipeline for the jobs and opportunities that will come with the start of this effort.” The first submarine is scheduled for delivery to...
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg is dead. The Supreme Court justice passed away at the age of 87, according to CNN White House Correspondent Kaitlan Collins, who tweeted the news a short while ago. A powerful figure in the fight for gender equality, Ginsburg was an advocate for women’s rights long before she became only the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court, per History. Ginsburg’s time in the country’s highest court spanned four decades, making her the fourth oldest justice to ever serve. From A Young Age Ginsburg Broke Barriers   Alex Wong / Getty Images Ginsburg was born Joan Ruth Bader on March 15, 1933, in Brooklyn, New York. Her father Nathan was a Jewish immigrant from Odessa, Ukraine, and her mother Celia was born to Austrian Jewish parents. Ginsburg had an older sister, Marilyn, who died of meningitis when she was only 14 months old. Celia was a strong advocate of Ginsburg’s education but tragically passed away due to cancer days before her daughter graduated from high school at the age of 15. Ginsburg attended Cornell...
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