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    Crafting business owner Sara Davies, 38, is a judge on BBC TV's Dragons' Den. She competed in Strictly Come Dancing last year and was made a MBE in 2016 for services to the economy. Married to childhood sweetheart, Simon, she lives in County Durham and is mum to Charlie, eight, and Oliver, five. YOU SHOULD NOT MULTI-TASK AS A MUM  I'm one of those ridiculous people who tries to fit too much stuff into my life. It works, but only if I'm fully in the moment. I've learned it's better to do one thing and do it well, than try to do several things subpar. It started when I had my sons. I chose to go back to work when they were young, but I always tried to have one day a week off to spend with them — and in that day we would shoehorn in a whole week's worth of activities. Mum‑guilt doesn't serve anyone, so when I'm at work I give it 100 per cent, too. The Dragons' Den schedule is intensive, but because I need to...
    People shop in a supermarket as inflation affected consumer prices in New York City, June 10, 2022.Andrew Kelly | Reuters A slate of earnings reports in recent weeks show consumers are tightening their belts and prioritizing essential purchases as interest rates rise and inflation persists. But the Club's retail holdings — Costco (COST) and Procter & Gamble (PG) chief among them — appear well positioned to manage these shifting consumer behaviors in a worsening economic climate.
    ONE woman has revealed that her parents named her after a popular Disney cartoon character. But though she seemed to think the association was a funny one, she took to TikTok to call out an even more embarrassing name trend. 2An influencer called out the weird baby name TikTok trendCredit: Tiktok/mickeymilkov The Chicago-based TikToker hit out at a popular TikTok trend in which users reveal the baby names their parents considered before settling on their actual names. Many people have claimed their mom and dad were toying with unique or weird names before settling on common ones – and this TikToker doesn't believe it. “This trend is [cap],” text on a TikTok video read. “Cap” is slang for “lie.”  “If your name is Ashley, your name was never gonna be Harlow,” she claimed, calling out a hypothetical person. Read more on weird baby namesNONSENSE NAME Mom shares 'unique' baby name but worries it’s ‘setting them up for failure’WHAT'S IN A NAME? I'd like to call my future daughter Salmonella “Not a chance. That’s bananas!” she said as she laughed. “You...
    A trader works at the New York Stock Exchange NYSE in New York, the United States, May 18, 2022. U.S. stocks plummeted on Wednesday as weak earnings from major retailers stoked concerns about the impact of inflation.Michael Nagle | Xinhua News Agency | Getty Images
    (CNN)This week's trial proceedings in Russia over WNBA star Brittney Griner's detention have shed more light on the details of her arrest, including her testimony that she wasn't provided key information on her rights granted under Russian law.Seated in a courtroom near Moscow Wednesday, Griner denied accusations from prosecutors of drug smuggling and said she did not intend to bring cannabis oil found in her luggage in February into Russia at all. Brittney Griner testifies she signed documents without understanding what they said after being stopped at Moscow airportGriner pleaded guilty to the charges earlier this month in an attempt to mitigate her sentence, which could be up to 10 years in prison. Her arrest and trial have been the source of international outcry, and the US State Department has classified her detention as wrongful.Yet as her trial is expected to continue into next month, CNN has learned the Biden administration offered Russia a prisoner exchange of Griner and fellow detained American Paul Whelan for a convicted Russian arms trafficker serving a 25-year sentence in the US -- a proposal...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Through seven hearings this summer, the House Jan. 6 panel has maintained two consistent themes: Donald Trump’s stubborn resistance to advisers who told him that Joe Biden won the election, and the former president’s role in inciting the Capitol insurrection. Each hearing has had a separate focus — this week’s was domestic extremism — but the nine-member panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack has not strayed from its central findings: that Trump made historically unprecedented moves to overturn his 2020 election defeat and then turned a blind eye as his supporters beat police and broke into the Capitol to defend him. A rundown of what we’ve learned so far from the public hearings of the select Jan. 6 committee — and what’s next: TRUMP IGNORED HIS ADVISERS At every hearing, the panel has played video testimony from White House aides and Trump associates who said they told Trump that Biden won the election and advised him to drop his false claims of widespread voter fraud. Many were emboldened by former Attorney General Bill...
    Washington (CNN)If the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the US Capitol has taught us anything, it's that our understanding of that day is far from settled. While much of the country watched the insurrection in real-time one and a half years ago on live television, the panel's public hearings have delivered critical context to the circumstances around it. Here's the latest.Tuesday's hearingMembers of the panel previewed on Sunday their next public hearing, on Tuesday at 1 p.m. ET, which will zero in on how the violent mob came together and the role of extremist groups in the deadly insurrection. The hearing will be led by Democratic Reps. Jamie Raskin of Maryland and Stephanie Murphy of Florida, CNN has learned.Read MoreConnecting the dots. "We are going to be connecting the dots during these hearings between these groups and those who were trying -- in government circles -- to overturn the election. So, we do think that this story is unfolding in a way that is very serious and quite credible," Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California...
    A WOMAN who used to hate her name so much she told people she was called Tanya has grown to love her unusual moniker. She took to TikTok to respond to someone who was asking if "Tiger Lily is her real name", as she explained: "So name is Fritha which is Anglo Saxon for peace, but my middle name is Tigerlilly." 2Fritha took to TikTok to admit she'd hated her unusual name growing up, but has now learned to love itCredit: tiktok "I really like my name now but in the 80s and 90s everyone was called Donna or Emma or Rachel or Kylie, and I used to really want to have a name like that." She added in the caption: "I used to tell people my name was Tanya as I hated my name so bad. I love it now though!" People quickly took to the comments section to reveal their own name embarrassments, with one writing: "My name is ione venus and I hated it growing up but absolutely love having a unique name now!" "So my...
    Washington (CNN)The House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, US Capitol attack has gone to great lengths to present the findings of its sprawling investigation in a succinct, digestible way. Each presentation to this point has carefully contextualized the circumstances around the attack while bolstering the committee's mission of connecting election lies with bad outcomes. But the sheer volume of new details has made the committee's work tricky to follow at times, even if you've kept up with every presentation. Here's everything we've learned from the panel's public hearings so far this month. What we learned ThursdayRead MoreIn its third June hearing, the committee detailed how former President Donald Trump tried to pressure his vice president to join in his scheme to overturn the 2020 presidential election. The presentation featured live testimony from two witnesses, former Pence attorney Greg Jacob and retired Republican judge J. Michael Luttig. Throughout the hearing, the panel walked through how conservative Trump attorney John Eastman put forward a legal theory that then-Vice President Mike Pence could unilaterally block certification of the election -- one...
    Washington (CNN)The farther away we get from January 6, 2021, the more we learn about the circumstances surrounding it.The past 72 hours in particular have brought a flurry of revelations related to the attack on the US Capitol, including CNN's exclusive report detailing messages among former President Donald Trump's inner circle before and after the insurrection.Here's everything you need to know, and what to watch for next.Mark MeadowsCNN obtained 2,319 text messages that Trump's White House chief of staff Mark Meadows sent and received between Election Day 2020 and President Joe Biden's inauguration on January 20, 2021.Read MoreThe texts offer the most vivid picture to date of how Trump's inner circle, supporters and Republican lawmakers worked behind the scenes to try to overturn the 2020 election results and then how they reacted to the violence that effort unleashed at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.The logs, which Meadows selectively provided to the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, show how the former chief of staff was at the nexus of sprawling conspiracy theories that baselessly claimed the election...
    Cheryl Strayed, 53, is the author of four books, including her bestselling memoir, Wild — about her 1,100-mile solo trek along the Pacific Crest Trail — which was turned into a movie starring Reese Witherspoon. Cheryl lives in Portland, Oregon, with husband Brian and their children, Carver, 17, and Bobbi, 16. I’ve always joked that I’ll say the thing sober that other people will only say after a couple of glasses of wine. Even as a child this was true.  When I was young, my mother’s friends, a married couple, came to the house. I cornered the husband and asked him: ‘What made you love your wife?’ I don’t think he’d ever asked the question of himself, let alone been asked it by an eight-year-old girl.  Author Cheryl Strayed, 53, (pictured) says don't be afraid to show weakness. She says that she has the confidence to say things sober that some would say after two glasses of wine  Back then, I also realised that being vulnerable allowed you to connect with other people. It was a strength. When I was...
    Sheku Kanneh-Mason MBE, 23, is a British cellist, who rose to fame after winning the 2016 BBC Young Musician award — the first black musician to do so — and performing at Harry and Meghan’s wedding. He lives in London. I was six when I started playing the cello — my six siblings and I all took up instruments at a young age. Music practice can be isolating, so it was comforting having other people practising in the next room. I would go to music courses where there were no other black people apart from my siblings. Having them there made me feel less alone and meant that I was never fazed by performing, even after being diagnosed with type one diabetes at 12. Sheku Kanneh-Mason MBE, 23, (pictured) who lives in London, said he has never felt held back by having type one diabetes My mum had noticed that I’d become very pale and thin. I’d been drinking loads of water and going to the toilet a lot. The doctor told us that if we’d waited a couple more days,...
    HOLLYWOOD -- "American Idol" is back for a new season... its 20th overall, and the fifth on ABC. Once again, it offers unknown talented singers a once in a lifetime shot at stardom.Katy Perry is thrilled to be back for another season of 'American Idol'... joining fellow judges Luke Bryan and Lionel Richie. All three say they've learned a lot over the past four years."I think our filters get less and less, the judges, but our standards get higher and higher," said Perry."Katy and Luke are perfect partners," said Richie. "We're artists, not executives. We know exactly what we had to go through to make it. We know what they have to go through to make it. Once they understand we're there to groom them, to help them, it's a family.""I think what really impresses us as judges is when a kid grows, and has humility," said Bryan. "They don't really know they're amazing."Host Ryan Seacrest is celebrating his 20th season with the reality series... and attributes the show's longevity to its focus on the up and coming young talent."They...
    So here we go, California, jumping from pandemic to endemicity — dragging with us a new word and the heavy psychological baggage that the COVID emergency is over, but COVID-19 isn’t. What am I supposed to do with that? Do I wear a mask to the grocery store? Do I prep my kids to take them off at school? What happens if, God forbid, I ditch the mask only to commit a bare-faced sneeze in public (although a masked one was no joy)? On Thursday, Dr. Mark Ghaly, head of California’s Health and Human Services Agency, announced the state is moving to a “SMARTER” approach to COVID-19 (that’s the painfully clever acronym for shots, masks, awareness, readiness, testing, education in the form of open schools, and treatments — Rx — to make it work). Ghaly’s comments came one day after the state lifted its indoor mask mandate. Translation? To steal from Tom Petty (who knew waiting is the hardest part) it’s time to move on, it’s time to get going. The news didn’t feel like a...
    Jamie Lynn Spears continued to defend herself in a new interview after she was accused of not doing anything to help her older sister, Britney Spears, end her conservatorship. Britney and Jamie Lynn were publicly feuding in the lead-up to the release of Jamie Lynn's memoir, "Things I Should Have Said." The book was published Jan. 18.  Jamie Lynn's series of sit-down interviews had all eyes on the sisters' social media spat as Jamie Lynn continued to spill family secrets, including details of the conservatorship. Jamie Lynn further dived into the details with Alex Cooper during Thursday's episode of the "Call Her Daddy" podcast. Jamie Lynn Spears continued to defend herself against claims she didn't help Britney Spears end her conservatorship during a recent interview. ( Kevin Winter/Getty Images) Here are five things we learned from Jamie Lynn's tell-all interviews: BRITNEY SPEARS' SISTER JAMIE LYNN DOUBLES DOWN ON CLAIM SHE TRIED TO HELP POP STAR OUT OF CONSERVATORSHIPJamie Lynn claims Lynne Spears pushed for the conservatorship to continueJamie Lynn accused mom Lynne Spears of being the one to push for...
    Sign up here to get our updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. The holidays are over, the kids are back in school and everybody, it seems, has COVID-19, from Whoopi Goldberg to late night TV hosts Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers to Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison to, likely, many of your friends, family members and acquaintances. Thanks to the new and more transmissible omicron variant, Minnesota’s confirmed COVID-19 cases have risen dramatically in recent days, and Gov. Tim Walz said in an MPR interview earlier this week that this COVID-19 surge could peak in the third week of January, based on Mayo Clinic modeling. That means a lot more people are going to be hearing that a close contact has tested positive for COVID-19. At the same time, many people are vaccinated against the virus, and the new omicron strain seems to, yes, move more quickly but also potentially cause less severe disease, particularly for vaccinated people. Given all those dynamics, here’s a look at...
    (CNN Business)For 11 weeks, the only words from Elizabeth Holmes in her criminal trial came from old TV interviews, an audio recording of an investor call and text messages presented to the jury.But over the course of two days this week, and a brief appearance the week prior, Holmes took the stand for roughly nine hours before a packed San Jose courtroom. She testified about the origin of Theranos, the evolution of its blood-testing devices and the positive feedback she claimed to have received along the way. Elizabeth Holmes testifies in her own criminal trialHolmes admitted to some of the prosecution's most damning allegations while offering up alternative explanations. At times, she displayed some contrition. But throughout her testimony, she attempted to sow doubt that she had any intention to deceive -- a key part of what federal prosecutors are seeking to prove. She also deflected responsibility onto others by simply naming who held certain roles at the company."The defense can benefit if it can undermine the government's narrative that Holmes knew about and directed the alleged fraud at Theranos,"...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki said she's learned her lesson and will refrain from providing political analysis from the podium after she was accused earlier this month of violating the Hatch Act. Psaki make the comments Tuesday after a reporter asked during her daily press briefing whether President Biden was "surprised" by how close the gubernatorial race is in Virginia between Democratic nominee Terry McAuliffe, the former Virginia governor, and Republican nominee Glenn Youngkin. PSAKI PROMISES 'TO CHOOSE MY WORDS MORE CAREFULLY' FOLLOWING HATCH ACT VIOLATION COMPLAINT "I've learned my lesson," Psaki responded. "I'm not going to do politics from here or political analysis. I can confirm that the president is going to Arlington later this evening and that that is my hometown as well. And, of course, the vice president [is campaigning there] as well.  "But beyond the scheduling details, I will leave political analysis to my friends over at the DNC," she added. Psaki promised earlier this month to choose her words more carefully after Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) filed a complaint accusing...
    Gwyneth Paltrow's raunchy new Netflix series Sex, Love & Goop has been hailed as 'life-changing' by viewers who say it is the 'best sex education they've ever received'. The six-episode series sees the actress-turned-wellness-guru team up with five sexual health experts to work with couples struggling with their sex lives, including parents who have started to feel more like roommates.    The couples are introduced to a range of techniques they can use to overcome their issues, whether that is practising 'energetic orgasms' or playing with a Wolverine claw sex toy in bed. 'Orgasm doesn't have to be slot A goes into slot B,' explains somatic sexologist Jaiya Love. 'It could be anywhere on their body.' To prove the point, she later tells one husband: 'Right behind the knees, that's like genitals.' Gwyneth Paltrow's raunchy new Netflix series Sex, Love & Goop has been hailed as 'life-changing' by viewers who say it is the 'best sex education they've ever received'. They watch five couples, including Damon and Erika, pictured, who are mismatched sexually. In one scene, Damon gives his partner an energetic...
    VIDEO3:3903:39Breaking down Bolt's new 4-day work week policyTechCheck As employers reimagine the workplace post-Covid, a four-day work week may become a new perk. Last month, technology company Bolt became one of the latest companies to jump on board. Earlier this year, New York-based crowdfunding platform Kickstarter announced it would pilot a four-day workweek. There's a campaign now underway from 4 Day Week Global to get more companies to sign on. The platform is launching a six-month coordinated trial starting in April 2022. "We are changing the model of work away from measuring how long you are at the office, and moving that towards what are people actually producing and what outcomes are we trying to achieve over the course of the week," said Joe O'Connor, global pilot program manager at 4 Day Week Global. To be sure, there have been some bumps along the way as employers work out how to maintain productivity while employees work fewer hours. The companies below ran pilots last year after the pandemic hit, and, after seeing positive results, made the four-day workweek part of...
    Adele has finally shown fans her upcoming album cover, confirmed it will be called 30, and revealed it will be released on November 19.  The singer, 33, announced the news in an Instagram post on Wednesday alongside a lengthy note in which she explained that she finally felt ready to release her music as she has 'never felt more peaceful', following her divorce from Simon Konecki.   The striking cover artwork featured a side profile shot of Adele posing in front of a blue-green background.  While she captioned the snap simply, '30 - November 19',  she also shared a picture of a lengthy statement in which she confessed that she spent many nights 'sobbing and consumed with grief' as she struggled to come to terms with the breakdown of her marriage - the inspiration behind her album.  'I've learned a lot of blistering home truths about myself': Adele shares first look at her new album cover and confirms it will be called 30 She began her lengthy note by reflecting on the tumultuous years following her split from Simon, admitting she...
    Rachel Mendelson/Insider In my experience, bisexual people can be seen as both not "gay enough" and not "straight enough." I experience straight-passing privilege in my relationship and have questioned my right to queer spaces. However, I have learned that my sexuality does not depend on my partner's gender. Business Insider: A daily selection of curated stories Loading Something is loading. Email address By clicking ‘Sign up’, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider as well as other partner offers and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Exploring and understanding my bisexuality has been a lifelong journey; one that came to life in the European gay bars when I lived abroad in 2019.  As I made new friends, danced to Beyoncé songs, and watched drag queens take over the stage every Tuesday night, I felt free. I was unapologetically myself, and the sweaty strangers around me loved and accepted me for it. After returning to the US, I wanted to find my first girlfriend. I didn't expect that a few months later I would start...
    Good afternoon. I want to speak today to the unfolding situation in Afghanistan: the developments that have taken place in the last week and the steps we're taking to address the rapidly evolving events. My national security team and I have been closely monitoring the situation on the ground in Afghanistan and moving quickly to execute the plans we had put in place to respond to every constituency, including -- and contingency -- including the rapid collapse we're seeing now. I'll speak more in a moment about the specific steps we're taking, but I want to remind everyone how we got here and what America's interests are in Afghanistan. We went to Afghanistan almost 20 years ago with clear goals: get those who attacked us on September 11th, 2001, and make sure al Qaeda could not use Afghanistan as a base from which to attack us again. We did that. We severely degraded al Qaeda in Afghanistan. We never gave up the hunt for Osama bin Laden, and we got him. That was a decade ago. Biden said: We went...
    (CNN)On a balmy Missouri evening in 1981, this was one of the hottest places to be. More than 1,500 revelers had gathered on the first floor of the Kansas City Hyatt Regency for a popular tea dance party hosted by the swanky 1-year-old hotel.As musicians performed big band hits, couples swing-danced under long, novel skywalks spanning the second and fourth floors that seemed to float in the sky, historians have recalled.Then, as the orchestra was said to be playing Duke Ellington's "Satin Doll," the fourth-floor skywalk collapsed onto the second-floor skywalk directly beneath it. Both walkways then crashed onto the ground floor, killing 114 people and injuring more than 200 others. Some speculative theories about the cause of the collapse were later debunked.The catastrophe on July 17, 1981, is one of the deadliest structural collapses in US history. That same year, the Champlain Towers South condo building in Surfside, Florida, was completed -- only to meet a similar, disastrous fate this June, when it partially collapsed killing at least 97 people.Read MoreForty years after the Kansas City disaster, the memories...
    With COVID corralled for now, the G-7 band got back together last week. In the past, whenever the heads of the free world’s seven leading economies gathered, they served up pretty much only nothing-burgers, smothered in bupkis, with a side of zilch.  This, the first post-pandemic G-7 summit, delivered more of the same. However, this was also Joe Biden’s first trip abroad as president, and the meeting revealed some insights about Biden as a foreign policy leader.  Lesson #1. The Grandpa Thing Works. Biden has the folksy, friendly Chauncey Gardener shtick down. The same moderate, reassuring presence that helped get him elected plays well on the world stage—and not just with the G-7 club. His international poll numbers are impressive. America’s global image abroad is on the rebound. There is a question, however, as to how long the Uncle Biden act will play well on the international stage. Biden is not the first president to play this role.  BIDEN, AT G-7, SAYS US, RUSSIA CAN WORK TOGETHER TO HELP PEOPLE OF ‘LIBYA’ – MEANT TO SAY ‘SYRIA,’ AIDES SAY Dwight Eisenhower...
    The former daughter-in-law of Trump CFO Allen Weisselberg says she's reluctant to bring any harm to her dear friend Donald Trump and believes he did not take part in tax evasion schemes, as she has been caught up in the ongoing criminal investigation into his family business.   Jennifer Weisselberg, who a source tells DailyMail.com will be testifying before a grand jury called in the case, claims the former president is a 'sweet' and 'generous' man who helped pay for her children's private schooling out of kindness and good-will, rather than to dodge taxes.  If there was any unlawful activity within the Trump Organization it would be thanks to her former in-laws who still work for the company, she told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview. Up until 2018, the mother-of-two was married to Barry Weisselberg, who manages Trump's Central Park ice rinks, and her father-in-law was Allen Weisselberg, who became the chief financial officer when Trump became president.   'Allen orchestrated the finances, and Donald is just sort of naïve,' Jennifer said. 'It's provable that his trusted CFO is putting [Trump] and his...
    Laura Ingraham summarized the "facts" established this week that "show that our government…is apparently more concerned about helping the CCP than it is about protecting our national interest. LAURA INGRAHAM: I want to summarize what has been a blockbuster week -- one where we've learned a great deal about how our country really works.  This week, we have established the following facts:  Fact one:  Last night we heard a former U.S. Secretary of State -- who also headed the C-I-A -- tell us that when the Trump Administration tried to learn the truth about the origins of COVID, it faced opposition from its own career staff.   … Fact two: This week we saw e-mails from Doctor Fauci showing that he was warned about the possibility COVID leaked from a CCP-controlled lab.  Rather than trying to get to the truth about what had happened, he provided political cover for the CCP -- while at the same time maintaining close relations with his colleagues in China. And last night, Secretary Pompeo let him have it.   … Fact three:  We know, beyond any...
    More from: Mike Vaccaro History is not on the Knicks side The Knicks officially have no other choice Julius Randle, Tom Thibodeau need to flip Knicks script again Shadow of Atlanta sports failures hangs over Hawks bid to take down Knicks Julius Randle and RJ Barrett have to regain mojo — and fast As great as he’d been, as superb a career as he’d built for himself, the Yankees still weren’t Joe DiMaggio’s team as 1941 dawned. That, sadly, could never happen as long as the captain emeritus, Lou Gehrig, was still alive. The Yankees had managed to shake off Gehrig’s stunning retirement in 1939, going on to win 106 games and a fourth straight World Series, but in 1940 his absence (and the rapid aging of other key team members) hobbled them badly. DiMaggio wasn’t able to carry the Yankees by himself, leading some to wonder if he could indeed follow the pathway established by Gehrig, and before him Babe Ruth. Gehrig did his part to try to change that perception. In February 1941, just before spring training,...
    Alleged murderer and his tiger wanted after ditching police in high-speed pursuit NBC cancels Golden Globes for 2022, saying HFPA must first address its problems Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad © Provided by Dot Esports Monday, May 3 marked the start of the Epic Games v. Apple trial in Oakland, California, with the two companies facing off over the iOS developer’s August removal of Fortnite from the App Store and the policies that led up to that point. So far, the trial has featured a two-day testimony from Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney, an outspoken critic of Apple and the man responsible for suing the phone maker. Lawyers from Epic and Apple both cross-examined Sweeney throughout May 3 and 4, with questions ranging from basic video game topics to complex ones around Fortnite cross-wallet transactions and cross-platform play between devices, as well as Epic’s desire to break open the App Store policies through a legal, marketing, and public relations campaign. Other testimonies so far include: Benjamin Simon, the CEO of popular yoga app...
    (CNN)In a flower shop scented by buckets of roses, lilies and sweet peas, George Spetsieris has helped his funeral customers write final messages to their loved ones for more than 30 years. "The majority of people, believe it or not, are at a loss for words," he explained. There was one phrase, though, that he most frequently recommended for the tiny floral enclosure cards -- "Our thoughts and prayers are with you during these difficult times."Since March 2020, when the malevolent coronavirus first tore through New York City, he has added two new words."Now it has become 'Our thoughts are with you during these difficult and unusual times.' That's the way that we've acknowledged what's been going on around us," he said.Read MoreSpetsieris' flower shop is in Queens, New York, a borough that recorded nearly 10,000 deaths from Covid-19, according to the NYC Department of Health."Two blocks away, Elmhurst Hospital was the epicenter. We were getting calls for sympathy arrangements. They would ask us, 'What should we say?' There really are no magic words to this. How do you put...
    STUART LAWRENCE has been a teacher for 15 years and a proud parent for a decade. This Thursday marks 28 years since his older brother Stephen was murdered on April 22, 1993, aged 18, in a racially motivated attack that shocked the nation. 7Stuart Lawrence has written a fantastic new children's book called Silence Is Not An OptionCredit: Jamie Lorriman Stuart, 44, has dedicated his life to mentoring young people to find their paths. In his new children’s book, Silence Is Not An Option, he says it is vital for kids to find their voice and stand up for change. As schools and communities observe Stephen Lawrence Day this Thursday with activities themed on friendship and celebrating differences in communities, Stuart – dad to Theo, ten – says parents can help their children be part of a tolerant society. MY son Theo was born at 11 minutes past 11 on January 11, 2011. I remember looking at him moments after his birth and realising my life was about to change. He was now my priority. At the same time, I...
    Richard Melville Hall, known as Moby, 55, is a multi-award winning American singer, songwriter and music producer. He has sold 20 million records worldwide. Single, with no children, he lives in LA. I come from a family of addicts — my dad died from a drink-driving accident when I was around three years old and my mother was a pot-smoking hippie. I fell in love with alcohol myself when I had my first drink at the age of just ten. A friend’s mum gave me a glass of champagne at a New Year’s Eve party. As soon as the liquid passed my lips, the world felt perfect. It was a feeling I hung on to for 34 years of alcoholism. Richard Melville Hall, known as Moby, 55, (pictured) revealed how asking for help with alcoholism, taught him it's OK to be vulnerable and admit your weakness In the late 1990s things started to become really problematic. By then I was an established artist, having taken up music as a child, and I’d had hit singles and albums around the world....
    Chrissy Teigen is gracing the cover of People' Magazine's "Beautiful Issue" – and a few guest stars join her. People released three versions of the issue with covers featuring Teigen with her two children, alone and with her mom, Pepper. Teigen also spoke to People about a "roller coaster" of a year that made her stronger. The super model and mom of two opened up about her bond with husband, musician John Legend. "I thought I knew everything about John, and then [we] had children. Seeing him take care of them is beautiful," she told Poeple. "Seeing my partner be a father is really wonderful." Last year, Teigen announced she and Legend were expecting their third baby. However, in October, she revealed the devastating news that they had lost the child, a boy they called Jack. View this post on Instagram A post shared by chrissy teigen (@chrissyteigen) "I've learned how strong physically and mentally a body can be. I've learned how strong I am," Teigen told People. "This year has been a roller coaster for everybody in the world,...
    Invoking the mantle of science, politicians have undertaken destructive policies to combat a deadly pandemic. While initial measures taken in haste out of an abundance of caution may have been necessary, now, a year into the pandemic, the science is catching up.   Here are six of the most destructive narratives that have been debunked by facts and science. Extended lockdowns are necessary Early recommendations to stay home made sense in the face of limited testing and increasing hospitalizations, but this was never meant to be a sustained method to contain the spread.  CHAFFETZ & SAPHIER: WIDESPREAD COVID PANIC – HERE'S HOW THE LEFT MISUSED SCIENCE TO GAIN POLITICAL POWER Despite low transmission levels and adequate hospital beds, blue state governors maintained lockdowns much longer than even the World Health Organization recommended, resulting in businesses being closed, high unemployment, trillions of dollars spent in relief packages and worsening mental health crises.   The rise and fall of new cases over the winter months had nothing to do with restrictions in place or removed; only the actions of people traveling and congregating indoors had an effect. The restrictions have proven minimally contributory to the subsequent waves of infections. CLICK HERE TO GET...
    A CNN anchor invoked World War II Japanese internment camps Thursday while discussing Tuesday's deadly shootings at a trio of spas in Georgia.  Much of the mainstream media has rushed to conclude that the shootings that killed eight people at the Atlanta-area massage parlors were hate crimes after officials confirmed that six of the eight victims were Asian-Americans. Investigators said Wednesday that the suspected gunman, 21-year-old Robert Long, told them he was motivated by a "sexual addiction" and added that racism "did not appear to be the motive". Long has since been charged with multiple counts of murder and assault. However, CNN doubled down on the hate crime push, with anchor Poppy Harlow suggesting America's deep-seated animosity towards the Asian community was behind the shootings. Her guest, Connecticut Attorney General William Tong, himself a son of Chinese immigrants, blamed the attack on President Trump's rhetoric toward China at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.  LIBERAL MEDIA NEED TO WAIT FOR FACTS BEFORE BLAMING ATLANTA SHOOTINGS ON TRUMP, RACISM, CRITICS SAYS Video"You've been a victim of hate speech like this, repeatedly, and you made a really important point recently and that's that this country has a long history and legacy of hate...
    It's been one year since the coronavirus pandemic upended nearly every facet of daily life.Just last year, ABC7 hosted a town hall with UCLA doctors in our newsroom to discuss the virus that would reach every part of the world. This Friday at 5:30 p.m., some of those same doctors will talk about what we've learned since then - and where we go from here.Watch the virtual town hall by streaming it live here on ABC7.com, or watch on our TV by downloading our ABC7 Los Angeles apps on Roku, Fire TV, Apple TV and Android TV.
    It's been one year since the coronavirus pandemic upended nearly every facet of daily life.Just last year, ABC7 hosted a town hall with UCLA doctors in our newsroom to discuss the virus that would reach every part of the world. This Friday at 5:30 p.m., some of those same doctors will talk about what we've learned since then - and where we go from here.Watch the virtual town hall by streaming it live here on ABC7.com, or watch on our TV by downloading our ABC7 Los Angeles apps on Roku, Fire TV, Apple TV and Android TV.
    I have been reading and reporting about good news stories for many years now, and I thought I had seen my share of spreading sunshine, but then coronavirus happened as I was halfway through writing my book "Make Your Own Sunshine," and incredibly, I started to notice more stories than ever before about kindness and goodwill of others during this time of crisis. It’s one of the main themes I’ve seen in my own experience and documenting others’ that it is during the most challenging times – and the darkest of moments when the goodness of others shines the brightest.  As we were all in quarantine, socially distancing ourselves from the world and each other, I was talking by phone and video-chat to some inspiring people. I interviewed Rebecca Mehra from Washington State who bought groceries for an elderly couple in the parking lot who were too afraid to go in to get items themselves. 'HUG TENT' PROVIDES SAFE EMBRACES AT COLORADO ASSISTED LIVING CENTER Robertino Rodriguez, the respiratory therapist who decided to attach a picture of himself smiling on his...
    I AM not the first to observe that, for those of us who have not lived through wartime, this pandemic is the most challenging and destructive thing many have endured. Until Covid-19 came into our lives around a year ago, we were all living not so much cosseted lives but perhaps sleepwalking through every day oblivious to our good fortune. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 8Lockdown has been miserable, but it has made us appreciate the small thingsCredit: Alamy The luxury for most of us was that we simply never had to truly consider just how bloody lucky we were. That stark fact hit home this week when Boris Johnson outlined his road map out of lockdown — a four-step, four-month slog simply to get back to a semblance of the life we previously took for granted. Our kids went to school, college, university, had internships and apprentice- ships. We could see friends and family when we wanted. We could watch live sport and sit with other fans in stadia. On any given night of...
    Me in Philadelphia in May 2020, shortly before starting therapy. Julia Naftulin/Insider As a health journalist, I've spent the past five years writing about mental health and therapy. In April, after months of pandemic-related distress, I decided it was my turn to see a licensed psychotherapist. After 10 months of weekly hour-long sessions, I've learned how to parent myself and communicate better with others. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When the clock struck six o'clock on Thursday night in mid-April, I closed the lid of my work laptop and sobbed. I had spent the day sitting on the couch in my dimly lit living room, writing non-stop about the coronavirus pandemic. The sudden realization that shutting my computer didn't end the anxiety-provoking health crisis I was tasked with reporting on was too much to handle. Every night from mid-March until May ended with me in a puddle of tears, feeling trapped and disconnected from everyone and everything. As someone who's never been diagnosed with a mental illness, the enduring hopelessness I experienced in the first few...
    Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., waves while onstage with Oprah Winfrey, chief executive officer of Oprah Winfrey Network LLC, during an event at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California, U.S., on Monday, March 25, 2019.David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images ViacomCBS will perform what's become a rite of passage Wednesday, trotting out executives to explain why its new streaming service is awesome and different from all others. Wednesday's event will be the end of an era of sorts. Barring a surprise entrant from a non-media company, ViacomCBS's Paramount+ presentation will be the last of the major streaming investor days, which double as a consumer showcase of what's on each service. There are a certain traits that make or break an investor day. Specifics on price, a tentpole original shows, breadth of library content and hopefully a surprise or two. Here's a look back at all of the major streaming launch events in the past 18 months ⁠— the good, the bad, and the ugly.Apple TV+, March 2019 Price: Unsaid (later turned out to be...
    February 19, 2021 5 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Novak Djokovic, the Serbian professional tennis player, is the No. 1 ranked male tennis player by the Association of Tennis Professionals, but this isn’t anything new. Djokovic has been ranked number one for over 300 weeks throughout his entire career, and has increasingly been called one of the best tennis players of all time. But I think I’ve learned more about how to be better at business than I could ever learn about being good at tennis just from my time working with him. Over the last seven years, I have been fortunate enough to work with Djokovic on several international PR events, and each and every time we work together, I am always impressed about what I have learned from him, beyond a few tennis tips. Here are five business lessons from working with Djokovic that I have implemented not only in business also in my life. 1. Be grateful to those who have supported you Djokovic has all...
    London — Donald Trump's administration was not a conventional one in the view of many U.S. allies and some of the international reaction on Inauguration Day to the change in Washington didn't follow diplomatic norms.  German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier said he was, "greatly relieved that Joe Biden will be inaugurated as president and move in the White House."    "After 4 long years, Europe has a friend in America," said Ursula Von der Leyen, president of the European Union's governing body. Iran had a different take. President Hassan Rouhani, whose country was hit by round after round of damaging economic sanctions under Mr. Trump, said: "A tyrant's era came to an end today." In Moscow, Vladimir Putin's spokesman insisted that, "nothing will change for Russia." Perhaps the most candid comment came from Nicola Sturgeon, the leader of the government in Scotland, who said she was, "very happy to say 'cheerio,' to Donald Trump," adding: "Don't haste ye back." There had been suggestions that Mr. Trump might take post-presidential refuge at one of his golf clubs in Scotland. Such a visit...
    (CNN)The twin Georgia runoffs that will decide control of the Senate remained too close to call on Tuesday night. Despite that, a few interesting trends began to emerge via a look at the votes already counted and the exit polling. My thoughts are below. But before we get to them, two important caveats/notes: 1) All of the votes have not been counted. The exit polls may be adjusted. So, take all of this cum grano salis.2) Because the race between Sen. David Perdue (R) and Democrat Jon Ossoff was at the top of the ticket, I am using the exit poll from that race to make comparisons to the 2020 presidential exit polling in the state.Read MoreOK, here we go!* Black voters may be the difference: In November, Black voters made up 29% of the Georgia electorate and President-elect Joe Biden beat President Donald Trump among those voters by 77 points. According to exit polling Tuesday night, Black voters again comprised 29% of the electorate, almost exactly approximating their turnout in November, which is frankly unheard of for a January...
    Macy Gray, 53, rose to fame in 1999 with the release of her first album, On How Life Is. She has since released ten more albums, won two Brit awards and one Grammy. She lives in Los Angeles with her three children, Aanisah, 24, Tahmel, 23, and Happy, 22. As a girl, I had zero confidence. I was a very awkward, shy kid; tall and skinny, with lots of hair that I didn’t know what to do with. And, I was bullied at school. I remember, I’d go home and cry to my mum (who was a teacher, and very strict) that people had hurt my feelings. She’d say to me, ‘You just need to turn 40!’. Back then, I didn’t understand her, but now I completely get it. Macy Gray, 53, (pictured) who lives in Los Angeles, revealed how she became more confident and accepting of her flaws at age 45 I got my first record deal at 24, but it fell through — and I ended up getting pregnant. My ex-husband Tracey did nothing for my self-esteem. I...
    Liberal MSNBC host Rachel Maddow said she learned from the Donald Trump era not to blindly trust the word of government officials, an interesting assertion given her and her network's reliance on intelligence leaks, Democratic politicians, and MSNBC's deep roster of Obama government alumni. “This is a great time to be in the news business because we've never been more vital," she said Wednesday on "The Late Show." "Just to learn these basic rules again that if we didn't know them before, you know, don't listen to what they're saying. Just watch what they're doing. Don't take at face value something you get from a government official just because a government official is saying it. "Those rules became very easy to remember all of a sudden again in the Trump administration, which is good," she added, in remarks flagged by NewsBusters. "But they're good rules for us for all time." MEDIA FINALLY COVERS HUNTER BIDEN STORY AFTER AVOIDING CONTROVERSY BEFORE ELECTION Maddow's remarks were in the context of being incredulous toward false claims by Trump administration officials. However, she was one of the leading...
    After four days, the Senate confirmation hearings for Amy Coney Barrett are over and her appointment to the Supreme Court is all but guaranteed. Barrett's addition will shift the high court to a 6-3 conservative majority, casting uncertainty on the future of abortion rights and Roe v. Wade. Like many of the Supreme Court nominees that came before her, Barrett offered senators little insight into how she might view the landmark decision that legalized abortion nationwide. But after nearly 20 hours of questioning, senators were left with a few clues about how Barrett, a former law clerk and mentee of the staunchly conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, will approach cases involving abortion rights. Here are four things we learned about Barrett's view on abortion and Roe v. Wade during this week's Senate confirmation hearings: Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox 1. Barrett confirmed signing her name to advertisements that opposed abortionDuring this week's hearing, Barrett acknowledged she signed two anti-abortion rights advertisements that called for reversal of Roe v. Wade. In a two-page advertisement published in 2006, Barrett and...
    Dear Stoner: I left a jar of weed in an Uber the other night. I didn't contact my driver to try to get it back. Should I have? It was really good weed.Rory Dear Rory: We've posed several weed hypotheticals to Uber over the years and received no response, but the ride-share service's square policies have shown us what to expect, with company guidelines banning cannabis transport in Uber rides by both the rider and passenger, even in states with legal cannabis. In fact, Uber drivers have even reported riders for smelling like weed or possessing it during a trip, which has led to warnings and bans from the service. That said, I've bought weed (or learned where to get it) from Uber drivers on numerous occasions while traveling, so it all comes down to the driver. Unsplash/Victor Xok Marijuana Deals Near YouRelated Stories Ask a Stoner: Can I Tip My Uber Driver With Weed? CDOT's Stoned Driving Message Faces Uphill Climb Marijuana Laws in States Surrounding Colorado We Believe Local Journalism is Critical to the Life of...
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