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    Students who live in campus housing at UC Berkeley were caught in a surge of COVID-19 cases at the university that brought an advisory from officials over the weekend. In a message posted Sunday at 9 a.m., the university confirmed a “surge in confirmed COVID-19 cases among students, including students living in student housing.” Officials also said the university was seeing “a need to quarantine more students, because they were exposed to the virus.” Another message posted two hours later said all residential students received a message from the university about how to help reduce the transmission of the virus. The university asked students to follow current public health orders not to attend indoor gatherings, large or small, with people outside the household. “Even if you think it’s safe, it’s probably not,” the university warned. According to the university’s coronavirus dashboard, 34 positive tests were revealed Sunday, about 1.8% of the tests analyzed. On Sunday, the university counted 44 positive tests. In all, the university has totaled 581 positive cases since Sept. 1, about 0.5% of its overall tests. Related Articles...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — UC-Berkeley officials warned Sunday of a surge in confirmed COVID-19 cases after 44 students tested positive for the virus over the weekend. Since August, officials said, there have been 588 confirmed cases among the student population. But the university’s COVID dashboard shows that 44 people tested positive on Saturday, representing 3.2% of the 1,362 tests analyzed. “As you may be aware, we’ve seen a surge in confirmed COVID-19 cases amongst students, including some students who live in campus housing,” the officials warned in an email to its student population. “As we are committed to your safety and well-being, we are asking for your help in reducing virus transmission.” Among the behaviors officials cautioned about was the tendency for students to gather with classmates and friends. “We understand that local shelter in place orders may have been lifted, but with the current levels of rising transmission, we need to each do all that we can to help keep ourselves and our community healthy,” the warning stated. “Berkeley remains in the Purple Tier, due to widespread community...
    (CNN)The University of California, Berkeley has removed the name on its anthropology building, Kroeber Hall -- named for prominent American anthropologist Alfred Kroeber -- because of his controversial history with Native Americans.A proposal to rename the building was submitted last July to the Building Name Review Committee headed up by the school's chancellor, Carol Christ, according to the university.Alfred Louis Kroeber, who was born in 1876, was the founder of the study of anthropology in the American West.The proposal lists several key factors in wanting his name removed including "research practices that were always objectionable to many Native Americans and that society now recognizes as reprehensible and has made illegal." The proposal then describes the practices, which include collection of remains and sacred funerary objects of Native American ancestors and other indigenous people from their graves without consent from tribes or individual descendants.Campus workers removed the lettering from the exterior of Kroeber Hall. It also names Kroeber's treatment of a Native American genocide survivor named Ishi, who is believed to have been placed as a living exhibit in Berkeley's archeological...
    BERKELEY — A fourth building on the UC Berkeley campus was stripped of its name this week, this time because of the writings and treatment of Native Americans by the hall’s namesake. Kroeber Hall lost its name Tuesday. The building was named after Alfred Louis Kroeber, known as the founder of anthropology in the west. One of the main reasons for the name removal was his views and writings that were a symbol that “evoked exclusion and erasure” of Native Americans, according to the university. UC Berkeley’s Building Name Review Committee recommended the removal of the name in October to Chancellor Carol Christ; Christ supported the change and received approval from UC President Michael Drake. The committee said that Kroeber, born in 1876, collected the remains of Native American ancestors from gravesites, and had them stored for research. The practice, labeled “salvage anthropology,” is now illegal, although it was not at the time of his collection, wrote the committee. Still, it was considered “immoral and unethical” at the time, the committee said. Lettering removed by a campus workman from the...
    BERKELEY (BCN) — University of California at Berkeley officials on Tuesday stripped another hall of its name, the fourth in a year’s time. Kroeber Hall, which honored anthropologist Alfred Kroeber, was unnamed because he continues to be associated with the ideas of exclusion and erasure of Native Americans. Kroeber is remembered as the founder of the study of anthropology in the American West. But he is also remembered for taking custody in 1911 of a Native American man he named Ishi, who became a living exhibit for museum visitors. The hall will be temporarily named the Anthropology and Art Practice Building. UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ said in a statement that some of Kroeber’s writings and views “clearly stand in opposition to our university’s values of inclusion and our belief in promoting diversity and excellence.” She added that unnaming the hall would “help Berkeley recognize a challenging part of our history, while better supporting the diversity of today’s academic community.” Phenocia Bauerle, a Native American of the Apsaalooke tribe who directs Native American student development at the university and...
    BERKELEY — After months of speculation, UC Berkeley confirmed it will tear down a 111-year-old rent-controlled apartment building to make way for a larger new student housing project. But the university maintains that the current five tenants won’t have to vacate 1921 Walnut St. during the pandemic, and their relocation packages “could easily reach six figures.” “The university is ready and able to be flexible and accommodating, We can and will balance the needs of thousands of students who require housing, and the needs of these five tenants,” said Dan Mogulof, UC Berkeley’s assistant vice chancellor of communications and public affairs in an email. Tenants were sent a letter Tuesday night by UC Berkeley, informing them of the decision to include 1921 Walnut St. in its plans. The site is part of the larger “Anchor House Project,” formerly known as the “Gateway Student Housing Project,” which could add 760 plus apartment-style student housing beds to the campus. Construction is expected to begin at the end of 2021, with an estimated opening in 2024. “While we need to move as quickly...
    A UC Berkeley campus building will be stripped of its name because of the legacy of its namesake, an anthropologist whose work included the “immoral and unethical” collection of Native American remains, the university announced Tuesday. Kroeber Hall, named after Alfred Louis Kroeber, will be stripped of its name in a year’s time and will temporarily be called the Anthropology and Art Practice Building. The university’s Building Name Review Committee announced the decision Tuesday after unanimously voting to remove the name last fall. Last year, the university renamed two other buildings over their namesakes’ controversial legacies of promoting racist rhetoric and colonialist ideas. Kroeber Hall, built in 1959, houses the anthropology department, the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology and the Worth Ryder Art Gallery. Phenocia Bauerle, a member of the Apsáalooke tribe and director of Native American student development at the university, said the renaming acknowledges Kroeber’s harm to Native Americans. “Kroeber wasn’t the sole actor in the California genocide, but he definitely played a part in the process that alienated California Indians, and he created a hierarchy of...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – The family of a UC Berkeley freshman who disappeared last September has offered a $10,000 reward for information in connection with the case. Sydney Kaitlyn West, 19, was last seen near the Golden Gate Bridge around 6:45 a.m. on September 30, 2020. According to her family, a private investigator has followed up on dozens of tips, but none have led to West’s whereabouts. Camera footage has been reviewed and interviews have been conducted among West’s friends and acquaintances, but there are no leads. Sydney West (San Francisco Police Dept.) “We know that there was a lot of pedestrian, car and bicycle traffic on the Golden Gate Bridge the morning Sydney disappeared.  Someone may have seen something — any piece of information could help lead us to Sydney,” parents Kimberly and Jay West said in a joint statement. Sydney West is from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, but also grew up in the Pleasanton area. She is described as standing 5’10”, weighing about 130 pounds, with light brown hair and blue eyes and possibly wearing glasses. West...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- President Joe Biden signed 17 executive orders Wednesday, and Thursday will mark his first full day in office, all as the U.S. is amid the COVID-19 pandemic.Experts ABC7's JR Stone talked with Wednesday night weighed in on what Americans can expect in the coming days, weeks and months."Deal with COVID and deal with the economy. Those are the two big big things."RELATED: New CDC director extends eviction moratorium due to COVID-19 until at least March 31As far as the things that Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris will face right away? Henry Brady is the Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. He says COVID-19 and the economy go hand-in-hand."It's not just that the government has stopped the economy. People have stopped the economy. People don't want to go out as long as it feels dangerous to go out, so you can't solve the problem by saying lets open up or not open up. You have to solve the COVID problem first," said Brady.For a better experience, click here to view the...
    Loading the player... UC Berkeley’s African American Studies Department has received a $2.8 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand its community impact. “Black Studies Collaboratory,” a three-year project that is overseen by the department, is set to expand Black studies outside of the classroom to educate the community and general public led by professors Leigh Raiford and Tianna S. Paschel. According to Berkeley News, the project will consist of of academic think tanks, summer labs for graduate students, and award research grants for African American faculty and students. Read More: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar promotes vaccinations: ‘Let’s do this together’ The projects aims to explore topics including prison abolition and global Black feminism that will ultimately translate into a course that’ll be open to the public in spring 2023. Ula Taylor, UC Berkeley professor and H. Michael and Jeanne Williams Chair of African American Studies, said the vision of the department was to expand outside of the classrooms in order to educate people on the nuances of the Black experience. The U.C....
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The COVID-19 pandemic is having a major impact across the world and also in cities across Northern California. The latest number of confirmed cases in the U.S. can be found at the CDC's 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the U.S. page. (The CDC updates the webpage on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.)Join anchor Kristen Sze for ABC7's daily interactive newscast about the novel coronavirus outbreak in the Bay Area and other hot topics. You can check here to stream the show Monday-Friday at 3 p.m. GET HELP: Resources and information about COVID-19 CA REOPENING TIERS: Map shows which counties can, can't reopen under Newsom's new 4-tier system COVID-19 VACCINE: Find out where you are in line LATEST LOCAL CASES: Updated number of COVID-19 cases, deaths in San Francisco Bay Area Here are the latest developments on the respiratory illness in the U.S.: Jan. 17, 2021 10 a.m.Cal cancels basketball games due to COVID-19UC Berkeley has canceled upcoming basketball games against USC, UCLA, the University of Washington and Washington State University. Cal Basketball said on Twitter Sunday...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The U.S. saw an unprecedented, violent assault on its Capitol last week, and according to a UC Berkeley professor and chair of the university's Center for Right-Wing Studies, the events of Jan. 6 were not surprising."The markers were not sudden at all," said Dr. Lawrence Rosenthal.RELATED: FBI warned of violent 'war' at Capitol in internal report issued day before deadly riot: ReportRosethal joined ABC7's Kristen Sze on "Getting Answers" Thursday afternoon to discuss the markers of the right-wing, Donald Trump supports who stormed Washington, D.C. and also how the movement that inspired the attack compare to members of the Confederacy during the Civil War.Following the election of Joe Biden, Donald Trump encouraged his supporters with phrases like "Stop the Steal" and urged them to visit Washington, D.C., Rosenthal said."Online people talked about creating caravans to come to Washington," he said. "There's no way in which it was a surprise."He said the people involved in the storming of Capitol have a violent past."They have a long history of playing at the edge of violent and militia-like behavior,"...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- We're ten months into the COVID-19 pandemic and while physical health remains top of mind, for many, their mental health is still on the backburner.A new program through UC Berkeley's Digital Health Equity and Access Lab hopes to help.Dr. Adrian Aguilera is the director.RELATED: ABC7 talks to California surgeon general Nadine Burke-Harris about COVID-19's impact on children"We want to target the folks with the fewest resources, in terms of services available and things like that," Dr. Aguilera said. "But, it really is open to everybody."The free program is called StayWell at Home. Participants receive daily texts for 60 days that provide tips on managing the stress of social distancing and stay-at-home orders."This program is based in cognitive behavioral therapy which has years of research behind it in terms of showing effectiveness for improving symptoms of mental health such as depression and anxiety," Aguilera said. "The focus is on changing our thinking so it's more helpful for us, and more adaptive in a situation."Participants receive texts such as: "You are a wonderful human doing the best you...
    BERKELEY (KPIX 5) – President-elect Joe Biden has indicated he wants to chart a new course for sustainable energy in this country. And by selecting Jennifer Granholm as his nominee for Secretary of Energy, he has chosen someone who isn’t afraid to be high-profile. Granholm has been teaching courses on clean energy and government policy at Cal’s Goldman School of Public Policy. Before becoming a professor at Cal, Granholm was Michigan Attorney General and eventually, a two-term Governor of the state. Granholm first worked with then-Vice President Biden to help rescue Michigan’s auto industry in President Barack Obama’s first term.  As her public profile continued to rise she became a political commentator on CNN and eventually hosted her own cable news show, “The War Room.” UC Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Professor Daniel Kammen, a friend and colleague of Granholm, said her grasp of technology and politics makes her a perfect fit for the job. “She really understands the complexities of big institutions,” Kammen said. “The Department of Energy has 14,000 employees and its right at the center of the Biden-Harris agenda.” That...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- A UC Berkeley professor will be nominated by president-elect Joe Biden to one of the nation's highest positions and part of his cabinet.Sources say Jennifer Granholm, former Michigan governor and UC Berkeley alum and professor, will be nominated to lead the Department of Energy.RELATED: Biden picks California AG Xavier Becerra to be 1st Latino health secretary"She really wants to make sure that we create jobs, keep jobs, and make sure that people have good jobs," says UC Berkeley Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy Henry Brady.Granholm will be nominated to lead the Department of Energy.She was governor of Michigan from 2003 to 2011 and previously worked with then vice-president Biden on bailouts for Michigan's auto industry. Brady has worked closely with Granholm during his years at UC Berkeley.RELATED: Joe Biden expected to nominate retired general Lloyd Austin for defense secretary"I think one of the reasons she's been so focused so much here at Berkeley on doing research on how you'd preserve jobs is because she is concerned about that she saw what happened when...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF / CNN) — President-elect Joe Biden is poised to tap former Michigan Gov. and UC Berkeley professor Jennifer Granholm to lead the Department of Energy, two people familiar with the matter say, inviting a longtime adviser who played a critical role in his debate preparations over the years to join his Cabinet. Granholm, who is a distinguished adjunct professor at the Berkeley School of Law and Goldman School of Public Policy and an alum joins two other Biden cabinet nominees with ties to Cal. Janet Yellen, Biden’s nominee for Secretary of Treasury is an emeritus professor of economics at Berkeley, while Homeland Security Secretary nominee Alejandro Mayorkas received his bachelor’s degree there. Granholm has long taken a deep interest in energy issues and was considered to be a top candidate for Energy secretary if Hillary Clinton had won four years ago. Now, she will have her chance, if confirmed by the Senate. Energy secretary, along with Transportation and other posts, are expected to be announced later this week as Biden works to select his Cabinet by Christmas. Jennifer Granholm, former...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- U.C. Berkeley is alerting students to be mindful of the state's stay-at-home order, yet it is contradictory as to how to adjust accordingly.They include the state's advice to avoid traveling over the holidays, but the university is also telling them they can't stay in the dorms.RELATED: California State University extends fall 2021 application deadline to Dec. 15The dorms will be closed starting Dec. 20 and the University expects students to leave.The memo that went out does not offer a solution, except to say students should contact Cal Housing immediately if they don't have a place to stay.If you have a question or comment about the coronavirus pandemic, submit yours via the form below or here.Get the latest news, information and videos about the novel coronavirus pandemic hereRELATED STORIES & VIDEOS: Map: CA counties that can, can't reopen under new rules COVID-19 risk calculator: The safest and most dangerous things to do this holiday season Want to get a COVID-19 test in time for the holidays? Here's what you need to know Updated number of COVID-19...
    BERKELEY — A man was robbed and carjacked at gunpoint Sunday night at a UC Berkeley owned parking garage, authorities said. The victim was not injured. Authorities said the carjacking and robbery happened at about 9:30 p.m. Sunday on level P1 at the Underhill Parking Structure at College Avenue and Channing Way, which is underneath a multi-purpose sports field. UC Berkeley police said the man was approached by four suspects, two armed with handguns, who took his gray 2018 Ford Fusion and some personal property from him. The suspects were last seen driving west on Channing Way, some in the Fusion and the others in an older white Honda sedan. Detailed descriptions of the suspects were not immediately available. Police have not said if the stolen car has been recovered or if any arrests have been made. Anyone with information about the carjacking and robbery is asked to call UC police at 510-642-6760. Check back for updates.  
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — University of California-Berkeley police are searching for four people suspected of carjacking a victim at gunpoint Sunday night in a university-owned parking garage. UC Berkeley police said that at about 9:30 p.m. Sunday, a person on level P1 of the Underhill parking structure at College Avenue and Channing Way was approached by four suspects — two armed with handguns — who took his gray 2018 Ford Fusion, as well as some other personal property. The suspects were last seen headed west on Channing, in both the gray Fusion and in an older white Honda sedan. Police did not release any description information on the carjackers. The victim was not injured, police said. Anyone with information about this carjacking is asked to contact UC Berkeley police at (510) 642-6760.
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — Police with the University of California at Berkeley are searching for four people suspected of carjacking a victim at gunpoint Sunday night in a university-owned parking garage. UC Berkeley police said that at about 9:30 p.m. Sunday, a person on level P1 of the Underhill parking structure at College Avenue and Channing Way was approached by four suspects — two armed with handguns — who took his gray 2018 Ford Fusion, as well as some other personal property. The suspects were last seen headed west on Channing, in both the gray fusion and in an older white Honda sedan. The victim was not injured, police said. Anyone with information about this carjacking is asked to contact UC Berkeley police at (510) 642-6760. © Copyright 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
    Six out of the 10 most racially segregated municipalities in the Bay Area are in Marin County, according to a new report published by the University of California, Berkeley. Prepared by the university’s Othering & Belonging Institute, the report calculated segregation in each of the Bay Area’s 101 municipalities using data from 2010 census tracts and categorizing demographics into five racial categories — Latinos, Whites, African-Americans, Asians and other. “The project revealed that despite its reputation as a progressive and inclusive region, the Bay Area, like the rest of the country, remains highly segregated,” said lead researcher Stephen Menendian. Since 1980, Marin has had a twofold increase in the level of segregation, according to the report. The study focused on ranking municipalities by what it called “inter-municipal segregation” — or the “segregation of the residents from the larger region” — as opposed to “intra-municipal segregation,” or “the segregation of people between neighborhoods within the city.” By that measure, the study ranked East Palo Alto first. Latino residents comprise 64.5% of the city’s population of 28,155. Ross, with a population of...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — U-Berkeley campus police asked for the public’s help Saturday in locating a couple reported missing since they went on a hike on Thanksgiving. Fernando Torales-Acosta and Boyue Shen told family they planned to go on a hike on Thursday and would call when they returned. They have not been heard from since, according to a post on social media by UC Berkeley police. UC Berkeley PD received a report of a missing couple, Fernando Torales-Acosta and Boyue Shen. They told family they planned to go on a hike on Thursday 11/26/20 and would call when they returned. They have not called and have not https://t.co/oERcznoK9f pic.twitter.com/omfO11dRhV — UC Police, Berkeley (@UCPD_Cal) November 28, 2020 Torales-Acosta is listed as a graduate student in the UC Berkeley physics department. The couple’s car is a green Toyota RAV4 with license plate 7ZRU960. Anyone with information is asked to call (510) 642-6760.
    RICHMOND (CBS SF) — Losing a parent is one of the most traumatic events anyone will ever go through. So when Cynthia Ramirez-Parra saw her mother be hospitalized, she turned to what some may see as an unconventional place for comfort, her late father’s graveside. It’s a place that Ramirez-Parra considers her safe space. And it’s where she visits the most important man in her life. “I know that he’s here … hearing me,” said Ramirez-Parra. “My father was a very strong, bold man that had high expectations for his daughters. He wanted us to see us succeed in any way possible. I was pretty much his golden child.” He was murdered two years ago, an event that devastated his daughter. So Ramirez-Parra comes to his graveside often to share life’s highs and lows with her dad, visits she sees as a blessing. “A blessing because now when I am there I feel like he’s there,” explained Ramirez-Parra. “I feel like I have his support, that he is hearing me out.” And the Richmond resident has had a lot of...
    DAVIS (CBS13) – UC Davis has apologized to a fraternity it accused of holding a potential COVID-19 superspreader event. Last week, the school said it had launched an investigation into Theta Chi fraternity, alleging it threw a party after one of its members tested positive. Investigators were not able to find evidence to back up those claims. Chancellor Gary May apologized for causing “discomfort and embarrassment” to the fraternity. Earlier this year, University of California, Berkeley reported a spike in students testing positive for the COVID-19 and is attributing the increase in cases to a series of fraternity and sorority parties. UC Berkeley University Health Services Medical Director Anna Harte and Assistant Vice Chancellor Guy Nicolette revealed the sharp rise in coronavirus cases in a statement published on the UC Berkeley website.
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- Crews are battling a six-alarm building fire in Berkeley, officials say. The blaze first started out as a 2-alarm fire Saturday evening.The fire is burning along the 2000 block of University Ave near the U.C. Berkeley campus. Police say University Avenue between Milvia Street and Shattuck Avenue is currently closed.ABC7 News' Matt Boone is on the scene and says the structure appears to be an apartment building that is under construction. Nearby buildings and businesses have been evacuated, including the McDonalds on Shattuck Ave. This is now a 6 alarm fire. We have no reported injuries at this time.— Berkeley Police (@berkeleypolice) November 22, 2020#BREAKING Fire crews are on scene in Berkeley trying to put out a fire in what appears to be an apartment building under construction on University Ave near Shattuck. Neighboring businesses have been evacuated. pic.twitter.com/emDz9PxW5Y— Matt Boone (@MattBooneNews) November 22, 2020Fire units from Oakland, El Cerrito and Albany have been called into assisting Berkeley firefighters.Officials say Shattuck Avenue, Addison Street, Milvia Street and Berkeley Way may also be impacted as well, and...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- A six-alarm fire is being reported at an apartment building in Berkeley, one block away from U.C. Berkeley.The fire is burning along the 2000 block of University Ave. University Avenue between Milvia Street and Shattuck Avenue is currently closed.It's reported that nearby buildings are being evacuated, including the McDonalds on Shattuck Ave. #BREAKING Fire crews are on scene in Berkeley trying to put out a fire in what appears to be an apartment building under construction on University Ave near Shattuck. Neighboring businesses have been evacuated. pic.twitter.com/emDz9PxW5Y— Matt Boone (@MattBooneNews) November 22, 2020Fire units from Oakland, El Cerrito and Albany have been called into assisting Berkeley firefighters.Officials say Shattuck Avenue, Addison Street, Milvia Street and Berkeley Way may also be impacted as well, and ask for drivers to plan an alternate route.Picked up Postmates pizza and across the street is this inferno going on in Berkeley, CA. pic.twitter.com/ypVz9LlPuZ— TheVideoGameManiac (@TheVGM_SFW) November 22, 2020No word yet on any injuries or cause of the fire.Stay with ABC7 News for the latest developments.
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- A two-alarm fire is being reported at an apartment building in Berkeley, one block away from the U.C. Berkeley.The fire is burning on University Ave.It's reported at nearby buildings are being evacuated and the fire can be seenStay with ABC7 News for the latest developments.
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- A two-alarm fire is being reported at an apartment building in Berkeley, one block away from the U.C. Berkeley.The fire is burning on University Ave.It's reported at nearby buildings are being evacuated and the fire can be seenStay with ABC7 News for the latest developments.
    A former University of California at Berkeley professor nicknamed the "NorCal Rapist" was convicted Wednesday of attacking women in a string of sexual assaults and kidnappings dating back almost 30 years.   Roy Charles Waller, 60, was found guilty on 46 counts, including rape, sodomy and kidnapping in connection with attacks on nine women between 1991 and 2009 in six counties throughout Northern California. TWO MARRIED TEXAS AG PROSECUTORS SHOT, ONE FATALLY, AT THEIR EL PASO HOME  After a nearly month-long trial, a jury in Sacramento deliberated for 2 and a half hours Wednesday before handing down the guilty verdict, the Sacramento Bee reported. Waller likely will face life in prison and his sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 18. Investigators identified Waller as a suspect using GEDMatch, a U.S. online service that compares autosomal DNA data files from different testing companies. It received national news coverage in April 2018 after the same technology was used to arrest Joseph DeAngelo, former police officer, in the Golden State Killer case. DeAngelo pleaded guilty in June to 13 murders and 13 rape-related charges...
    (CNN)The University of California, Berkeley is cutting ties with part of its past and renaming two buildings that are named for men with controversial and racist legacies.The names from LeConte Hall and Barrows Hall were removed Wednesday, according to a statement from university chancellor Carol Christ. This comes after a formal review process found the buildings' namesakes had values not consistent with those of the university, the school said.LeConte Hall was named after brothers John and Joseph LeConte, who were prominent, early members of the faculty. They came from a slaveholding family in Georgia. The namesake for Barrows Hall was former University of California president David Prescott Barrows, who the school says held "deeply racist views" and supported white supremacy. Honoring the unforgivable "A building name is more than a symbol," Christ said in a statement. "Those who we choose to honor reflect who we are and what we believe in. I have committed my administration to doing everything in its power to identify and eliminate racism wherever it may be found on our campus and in our community."The chancellor...
    SACRAMENTO  — A man nicknamed the NorCal Rapist was convicted Wednesday of raping nine women in their homes between 1991 and 2006 after investigators used DNA technology to identify him. A jury in Sacramento found Roy Charles Waller, 60, guilty on all 46 counts after 2 1/2 hours of deliberations a day earlier. Waller showed no emotion and looked down at the defendant’s table when the jury’s decision was read, the Sacramento Bee reported. He faces life in prison when he is sentenced Dec. 18. Waller raped women in six Northern California counties, from Sacramento to Chico. Sometimes he would kidnap the women and force them to withdraw money from ATMs and steal their personal items. Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn called the crimes “horrific,” saying the victims were terrorized for hours at a time. Prosecutors said they used the same DNA and genealogy websites to zero in on Waller that they used to arrest former police officer Joseph DeAngelo in the Golden State Killer case. DeAngelo pleaded guilty in June to 13 murders and 13 rape-related charges stemming from...
    BERKELEY (KPIX 5) – With holiday travel being discouraged as COVID-19 cases keep rising, students at UC Berkeley and at colleges across the country are left in a predicament, to go or not to go home. Not only is the concern that students can potentially infect their loved ones when they go home but can also bring back the virus to the Bay Area. Michael Kramer, a recent graduate said, “It’s just sad, thinking that things are on the rise and I’m imagining with people traveling in and out for the holidays, cases are only going to go up.” College students from across the country will be heading home for the holidays. Some will be coming back to the Bay Area while others like Kramer will be heading down to Orange County to see his Mom and Dad for Thanksgiving. Kramer has opted to drive and is taking as many precautions as he can. “I, myself am going to get tested before I go down, when I get down and when I come back,” he said. Epidemiologists though warn testing...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — Two halls on the University of California at Berkeley campus have had their names removed because the names are associated with people who held racist views, university officials announced Wednesday. LeConte Hall was named after brothers John and Joseph LeConte, the latter of whom espoused racist ideas through scientific language. Barrows Hall was named after David Prescott Barrows, who believed the white race was better than all other races. New names have not been chosen for the halls. Renaming is a separate process from unnaming the buildings and that process is being developed, university officials said. Until new names are chosen, the former LeConte Hall will be called Physics South (Old LeConte Hall) and Physics North (New LeConte Hall) and the former Barrows Hall will be called the Social Sciences Building. “Our buildings should not be another reminder that we are and have long been despised,” said fourth-year Ph.D. student Caleb E. Dawson, co-president of the Black Graduate Student Association, in a statement. “They should signal otherwise, and those signals should correspond with institutional norms, policies...
    BERKELEY — UC Berkeley removed the names of two halls on campus Wednesday after concerns about the namesakes’ troubled past, including ties to slavery and racism. The LeConte Hall and Barrows Hall names were removed Wednesday morning and will become temporarily known as Physics South (Old LeConte Hall), Physics North (New LeConte Hall) and the Social Sciences Building (Barrows Hall). A 12-member Building Name Review Committee unanimously approved the recommendation for a renaming to Chancellor Carol Christ after it was suggested by members of the community, including student organizations and faculty. Both the chancellor and UC President Michael Drake signed off on the de-naming. In a survey of 634 people on campus, 87% favored renaming LeConte Hall, and of the 518 responses for Barrows Hall, 95% were for renaming it. “Our buildings should not be another reminder that we are and have long been despised,” said doctoral student Caleb E. Dawson, co-president of the Black Graduate Student Association, in a statement. This isn’t the university’s first renaming. In January, the well-known Boalt Hall part of UC Berkeley’s School of Law was...
    Two halls at UC Berkeley will have their names removed Wednesday in response to growing awareness of their namesakes’ controversial legacies, campus officials said. For now, Barrows Hall will be referred to simply as the Social Sciences Building, while the two buildings that comprise LeConte Hall will be known as Physics North and Physics South, according to a news release from the university. Their original namesakes were early, prominent members of the university faculty who also promoted racist rhetoric and colonialist ideas. A process for selecting new, permanent names is in the works, officials said. They will continue to go by their “default” names until they receive new ones. “The decisions reflect a new urgency being felt by U.S. civic and higher education leaders to remove building names and monuments that memorialize individuals who expressed racist and dehumanizing views,” the university said. Berkeley is the oldest campus in the University of California system and is home to several classical Beaux-Arts buildings and historic landmarks. The move to “dename” the halls capped a formal review process that found the original...
    BERKELEY, Calif. -- A pilot program that will provide COVID-19 contact tracing to members of the University of California, Berkeley community via smartphone may go statewide, university officials said Thursday.UC Berkeley community members are being asked to enroll Monday when the program goes live. It alerts them if they have been exposed to the coronavirus and it's meant to help slow the spread of the virus.The program launched at UC San Diego and UC San Francisco in September and has been valuable on those campuses.RELATED: New data shows how effective contact tracing is across Bay Area"California COVID Notify is a privacy-first approach to using smartphones to alert you when you have been exposed to COVID-19," UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ and Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost A. Paul Alivisatos said in a statement."It augments traditional contact tracing efforts and makes it possible to reach unknown contacts," the two officials added.Other UC campuses in expanding the pilot will join UC Berkeley, and if the pilot is successful, it may be rolled out statewide.RELATED: App for COVID-19 contact tracing faces hurdles, generational...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — A pilot program that will provide COVID-19 contact tracing to members of the University of California at Berkeley community via smartphone may go statewide, according to university officials. UC Berkeley community members are being asked to enroll Monday when the program goes live. It alerts them if they have been exposed to the coronavirus and it’s meant to help slow the spread of the virus. The program launched at UC San Diego and UC San Francisco in September and has been valuable on those campuses. “California COVID Notify is a privacy-first approach to using smartphones to alert you when you have been exposed to COVID-19,” UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ and Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost A. Paul Alivisatos said in a statement. “It augments traditional contact tracing efforts and makes it possible to reach unknown contacts,” the two officials added. Other UC campuses in expanding the pilot will join UC Berkeley, and if the pilot is successful it may be rolled out statewide. The program does not collect location information and...
    MILL VALLEY (KPIX) — When President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in to office in January, he will be facing a list of difficult problems — none more pressing than COVID-19, which has now claimed more than 237,000 American lives. In his address to the nation Saturday night, Biden made it clear what “Job One” will be. On Monday, he will name an advisory panel to create a national plan for dealing with the pandemic. “That plan will be built on bedrock science,” Biden said. “It will be constructed out of compassion, empathy and concern. I will spare no effort — none … to turn around this pandemic.” That plan has been a long time coming, according to Dr. Jon Swartzberg, professor emeritus with UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health, division of infectious diseases. “When we look back at what the Trump administration did in terms of combating this pandemic, I think everyone will admit it was an utter failure,” he said. Dr. Swartzberg said the most important thing President Biden can do is rebuild trust in the messaging over the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The COVID-19 pandemic is having a major impact across the world and also in cities across Northern California. The latest number of confirmed cases in the U.S. can be found at the CDC's 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the U.S. page. (The CDC updates the webpage on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.)Join anchor Kristen Sze for ABC7's daily interactive newscast about the novel coronavirus outbreak in the Bay Area and other hot topics. You can check here to stream the show Monday-Friday at 3 p.m. GET HELP: Resources and information about COVID-19 CA REOPENING TIERS: Map shows which counties can, can't reopen under Newsom's new 4-tier system COVID-19 RISK CALCULATOR: Quiz yourself on the safest, most dangerous things you can do as CA reopens LIFE AFTER COVID-19: Here's what restaurants, gyms, schools, sports will look like when they reopen LATEST LOCAL CASES: Updated number of COVID-19 cases, deaths in San Francisco Bay Area Here are the latest developments on the respiratory illness in the U.S.: Nov. 5, 2020UC Berkeley football player tests positive for COVID-19UC Berkeley's...
    What’s the latest poop on coronavirus outbreaks? Scientists at the University of California at Berkeley may be able to tell you. The scientists have been gathering samples of human waste from sewers in the San Francisco Bay Area to determine “hotspot” areas where the coronavirus is most prevalent, according to a report. Evidence of coronavirus infection is often present in waste samples, the scientists told FOX 2 of the Bay Area – and they decided that accessing samples from sewers would be more efficient than going door to door to request samples from residents. PLAN TO DETECT CORONAVIRUS IN WASTEWATER MAY HELP PINPOINT CONTACT TRACING NEEDS “Wastewater naturally pools the waste from hundreds to even millions of people in a single sample,’ team leader Kara Nelson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at UC Berkeley, told the station. “So if you can collect a representative sample of wastewater and analyze it, you can gain a tremendous amount of information that you likely couldn’t gain through testing people individually,” she added. Wastewater agencies from three Bay Area counties are assisting...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- In a BioSafety Level 2 lab at U.C. Berkeley, scientists spend all day looking at wastewater. At first read, it may sound gross but it is the work of a lifetime for scientists like Rose Kantor, a postdoctoral scholar at the Nelson lab. The lab was funded and staffed in a matter of months in response to the pandemic."This is a sample of raw sewage, this is 40 milliliters, it came from a manhole," said Kantor showing me a small vial, "this sample could represent up to a million people."The method works like this -- wastewater is collected over a 24-hour period, the sample is put through an 8-hour process to break down its contents, then tested for COVID-19.RELATED: Yosemite Valley's wastewater tests positive for COVID-19Scientists at the lab believe the method could be a promising new tool for public health agencies that have had trouble with mass testing, including long lineups and delayed results.Already, the lab has collected more than 500 samples all over the Bay Area, many of them testing positive for the virus."To...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — A large portion of California voters worry that other Americans won’t respect the results of the Nov. 3 presidential election and could inflict violence, a survey conducted by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS) found. The legitimacy of the election and the post-election aftermath were big issues among the over 6,600 poll respondents. In all, 87% of voters expressed worry that other voters would dispute the outcome, and 88% said violence is somewhat or very likely in such an event. The survey also found that 40% of likely voters in Berkeley who responded doubt the election will be conducted fairly. That sentiment appeared especially strong among local supporters of President Donald Trump, with 56% of them questioning the fairness of the election and 78% expressing little confidence in voting by mail. “The lack of public confidence that all votes will be counted and that both parties will respect the election outcome are worrisome signs of a political system that is under unusual stress,” IGS co-director Eric Schickler said. Also, 53% of Trump-supporting respondents felt that...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — A team of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley launched a pop-up lab this month to test wastewater from throughout the Bay Area for the novel coronavirus, the university said Thursday. After months of study, coronavirus researchers determined that people who contract COVID-19 tend to shed the virus in their feces, offering an easy way to monitor the virus’ spread inside a neighborhood or an entire city. Monitoring wastewater for the virus can also act as an early warning system for potential outbreaks before they occur, as people who contract the virus can shed it through feces before they start showing symptoms. “Wastewater naturally pools the waste from hundreds to even millions of people in a single sample, so if you can collect a representative sample of wastewater and analyze it, you can gain a tremendous amount of information that you likely couldn’t gain through testing people individually,” UC Berkeley professor of civil and environmental engineering Kara Nelson said. Nelson leads a team of scientists that intends to study Bay Area wastewater in a 1,200-square-foot...
    BERKELEY —  UC Berkeley students have joined tenants in urging that a rent-controlled apartment building not be torn down to make room for student housing — something the university has no plans to do, at least for now. On Friday, Cal student government representatives sent an open letter to the University of California, which purchased the apartment building in July for $3.1 million. The letter, sent by the Associated Students of the University of California, said that although the university is in need of more housing, they reject the idea it should be built at all costs to the community. The letter also expressed concern over what they said was a lack of communication with the building’s tenants. “We’re compelled to make students aware of the dismissive attitude of the university, and express our solidarity with the tenants of the 1921 Walnut Street Association and the larger Berkeley community. Students do not want to displace other people in the city,” the letter reads. But the university maintains that there are no plans yet to demolish the building, and no imminent...
    Loading the player... The University of California at Berkeley is halting a eugenics research program after a bioethics professor pointed out to administrators that the practice is inherently racist.  Eugenics is defined as “the philosophy and social movement that argues it is possible to improve the human race and society by encouraging reproduction by people or populations with ‘desirable’ traits (termed ‘positive’ eugenics) and discouraging reproduction by people with ‘undesirable’ qualities (termed “negative” eugenics).” Osagie K. Obasogie, a University of California at Berkeley bioethics professor, got an email about the Genealogical Eugenic Institute Fund, for which faculty members were being encouraged to apply. Research in the field has almost always identified positive traits as those possessed by able-bodied White people.  The theory has been disavowed since the end of World War II, when Hitler used the eugenics to justify the Holocaust.  Read More: Teen who recorded Floyd death on phone to receive PEN award UC Berkeley had been offering an annual payout of $70,000 in research funds from the Genealogical Eugenic Institute Fund, a $2.4 million endowment that has been active...
    In late 2018, UC Berkeley bioethics professor Osagie K. Obasogie received a campus email about a research fund available to faculty members in the School of Public Health. He was stunned by what he read. The Genealogical Eugenic Institute Fund, the email said, supports research and education in eugenics — a field discredited after World War II as a horrifying ideology that sought to use science to improve the human race by promoting traits deemed superior and breeding out those judged undesirable. The judgments aligned strongly with social biases that favored white, able-bodied and financially stable people. Eugenics inspired Hitler’s Nazi Germany to kill 6 million Jewish people, and U.S. authorities to forcibly sterilize more than 60,000 people in California and more than 30 other states largely in the early 20th century. But Berkeley’s eugenic research fund has been very much active. The $2.4-million fund was offering an annual payout of about $70,000 in fiscal year 2020 to support research and education on policies, practices and technologies that could “affect the distribution of traits in the human...
    By Emmet Lyons and Sandee Lamotte | CNN We all know how much better we feel after a good night’s sleep. It turns out that sleep may be vital to arm us in the fight against influenza and Covid-19. Medical professionals are recommending that people make sure to get their flu shots this year, in part because some Covid-19 and flu symptoms are similar. A flu shot reduces the likelihood that your symptoms (if you get sick) are from the flu. To make that flu shot effective, sleep specialist Matthew Walker, the bestselling author of “Why We Sleep,” told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour practicing “good sleep hygiene” is important. Insufficient sleep in the week before getting a flu shot can lead to the production of less than 50% of the normal antibody response — a reaction that would render the flu shot largely ineffective, Walker told Amanpour. Walker specializes in the relationship between sleep and human health at the University of California, Berkeley. Walker cited a 2002 study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association, and a 2020 study...
    UC Berkeley East Bay university lands two Nobel prizes in two days, as biochemist Jennifer Doudna wins in chemistry for developing a revolutionary gene-editing tool and Reinhard Genzel wins in physics for black hole discoveries. Theme parks Facing bleak finances, amusement parks from Disneyland to the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk get little relief as Gov. Gavin Newsom says COVID-19 cases must fall significantly more for them to be allowed to re-open. Kamala Harris California senator won the VP debate against Republican Mike Pence, polls show. But it was an unremarkable affair dominated by predictable talking points that isn’t expected to have much effect on the overall race.
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — The parents of a missing University of California, Berkeley student are pleading for help in finding their daughter in a newly-released video. Sydney West was last heard from on September 30th. The 19-year-old’s last known location was in San Francisco near the area of Crissy Field and the Golden Gate Bridge. She was last seen wearing dark leggings, blue Vans shoes and a teal sweatshirt. Sydney West (San Francisco Police Dept.) “This is every parents worst nightmare. All we want is Sydnie brought home safe and brought back to our family,” her father says on the video. She is a white female with blonde hair, blue eyes, 5 foot 10 inches, and about 130 pounds. San Francisco police has urged anyone who sees West call 911 or their local law enforcement agency, prepared to provide information on her current location and clothing description, according to a press release.  
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- Dr. Anthony Fauci has been at the front and center of the U.S. response to COVID-19. On Thursday night, he spoke during a UC Berkeley fireside chat about the political climate of the pandemic and when we might see a return to normal."What we're involved with today is a divisiveness, the likes of which I've never seen," said Dr. Fauci, who has advised six presidents on serious U.S. and global health threats.RELATED: Dr. Fauci: 'We are not in a good place' as COVID-19 cases rise"The enemy is the virus," said Dr. Fauci, who said thinks he has been successful at shaping policy, while staying out of politics. "Science knows no political party."Director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, Dr. Fauci answered questions posed by UC Berkeley students and faculty.How have conspiracy theories affected public health efforts?"The examples of people not wanting to wear masks, or not believing that if you just go in a crowd you're not going to get infected or if you do...