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    TERRY BRADSHAW returned to Fox Sports for Thanksgiving - but fans were distracted by a 'bizarre' Snapchat filter applied to the NFL legend's face. The iconic analyst, 74, opened the Thanksgiving show by paying tribute to his 97-year-old mother. 3Terry Bradshaw has revealed he is "cancer-free" after a host of health issuesCredit: AP 3He returned to the FOX studios for Thanksgiving footballCredit: Getty 3Fans were in hysterics at his 'turkey' Snapchat hatCredit: FOX SPORTS Bradshaw is a long-time FOX Sports personality and has been a beloved stalwart in sports since the mid-1980s. The former first-overall pick revealed earlier this summer that he has twice battled cancer. It came after fans voiced their concerns about his health following Bradshaw's Sunday Night Football presentation on September 25. Terry is back on our screens for this year's Thanksgiving NFL action, which sees Dallas Cowboys take on New York Giants at AT&T Stadium. Read More on NFLHAND CARVED The time John Madden ripped apart a 'turducken' with his bare hands on LIVE TVMISSING MAN Terry Bradshaw misses FOX NFL show in Qatar and fans think...
    FINDING the right Halloween costume is no easy task, especially when the very best are all online. Well, thanks to Snapchat you can now try on some of the finest instantly from your home. 1Stranger Things is among the choice of costumesCredit: Snap The popular chat app has unveiled new augmented reality lens experiences that show you how it'll look on you. So you no longer have to take a gamble ordering a costume online and waiting for it to arrive to see if it suits you. There are some big names to choose from, including Disney, Squid Game, Stranger Things, Minecraft, Power Rangers, Transformers, Jurassic World, The Office, Chucky, Harry Potter, Ghostbusters, and Cobra Kai. All you have to do is take some full body shots within the app and you will see how it looks. Read more about SnapchatSNAP HAPPY Snapchat's CEO is a multi-billionaire - and he's married to Miranda KerrWYLL SAY IT What does WYLL mean on TikTok and Snapchat? Snapchat uses clever AR tech to virtually fit the clothes to your body. The company has...
    In this article METACNBC's Sofia Pitt using Matt Reed's HoriZuck Lens for Snapchat.Nightmares really do come true. Snapchat user Matt Reed has created a filter called HoriZuck Lens that will turn your face into Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s viral Horizon Worlds avatar. I tried it and it felt wrong. If you're not sure what I'm talking about, let me fill you in. Earlier this month, Zuckerberg shared a screenshot of his Horizon Worlds VR avatar on his Facebook page to announce that the project had launched in France and Spain. The internet went wild. Critics slammed the poor quality of the graphics, especially considering the metaverse project is costing Meta $10 billion.Mark Zuckerberg during Metaverse conversation on CNBCSource: CNBCIn response to the backlash, Zuckerberg posted a new avatar days later. He said the original avatar was "basic" and "major updates to Horizon and avatar graphics coming soon." "The graphics in Horizon are capable of much more — even on headsets — and Horizon is improving very quickly," Zuckerberg said on August 19. But as with all viral internet phenomena,...
    SNAPCHAT was originally launched as Picaboo on July 8, 2011, but the creators, Reggie Brown, Evan Spiegel, and Bobby Murphy renamed the platform to Snapchat in October 2013. The platform had 57million users in its second year as a rebranded app and jumped to 293million users in 2021. 1Users can make their own Snapchat filter in a few simple stepsCredit: Getty - Contributor How do I make a Snapchat filter? The popular filters found on Snapchat haven’t always been there. The lenses and discover feature didn’t hit users’ phones until January 2015 when 40 percent of adults in the US were using Snapchat. In June 2017, the company changed its processes so users could create their own Snapchat filters for a small fee. The process is fairly simple, with the website doing the majority of the work. Step 1: Log on to the create your own filter website and either upload an existing filter you’ve created or choose from a drop-down menu listing event options. Step 2: When you have selected the event from the drop-down menu and selected the...
    EVERY adult in the UK is now eligible to book their Covid jab as the rollout continues at pace. As the government pushes for people to get vaccinated, it has partnered with social media platforms to encourage users to get jabbed. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest updates 2The NHS Covid vaccine filter now availableCredit: PA How can I get Covid vaccine sticker on TikTok? TikTok users who want to celebrate receiving their Covid vaccine can add a sticker to their videos. When uploading your clip, there will be a sticker icon in the edit window. Once you've chosen the Covid vaccine sticker, you can pin it to where you want it in the frame - plus how big you want it. The "duration" option also allows you to decide how long you want the sticker to feature in the video for. How can I get Snapchat Covid vaccine filter? Snapchat has introduced a...
    PEOPLE across the globe are turning themselves into characters that look like they've jumped straight out of a Pixar movie. The viral trend has emerged following the release of a new filter on Snapchat that alters your appearance. Read all the latest Phones & Gadgets news Keep up-to-date on Apple stories Get the latest on Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram 1The 'Pixar' filter on Snapchat turns you into a Disney characterCredit: Snapchat/The Sun I am LOSING my mind laughing at this Snapchat filter and how expressive it is. I wanna be a Pixar character!!! pic.twitter.com/SVXsCU0FW1— Basic Cable MJ (@redheadmuppet) June 11, 2021 What is the Pixar filter? The effect, variously described as a "cartoon filter" or "Pixar filter", has been doing the rounds on social media for months. They're available on a range of apps, including Instagram and Snapchat, and make the subject look like a character from a Disney flick. Pixar has a long-standing style for its human characters, with traits shared by animated folk in movies ranging from The Incredibles to Soul. The filters and lenses play...
    This week, a federal appeals court ruled that the parents of three young teenagers who died in a car crash while using Snapchat’s “speed filter,” should have the right to sue Snap over what they claim is the platform’s role in the accident. NPR reports that in May 2017, three young men were driving at rapid speeds down a long, cornfield-lines road in Walworth County, Wisconsin. While the 17-year-old driver of the vehicle accelerated to 123 miles per hour, one of the men opened the Snapchat app on his phone where he used the app’s highly controversial “speed filter,” which displays the users’ current speed on-screen to document the drive. The vehicle then ran off the road and crashed into a tree, killing all three young men immediately. Now, a federal appeals court has ordered that the parents of the young men should have the right to sue Snap Inc. The ruling, from a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, has set off an intense debate about the future of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA),...
    A SNAPCHAT filter that makes beards disappear has started a new TikTok trend. TikTok users have been filming their "no beard" Snapchat filter looks and shocking their partners who have some priceless reactions. 2TikToker Lee Snow revealed his #nobeardfilter lookCredit: TikTok / Lee Snow If you haven't seen the trend just hop on TikTok and search for "no beard filter". The search term already has around 100 million views. Most of the videos start with a person covering their beard with their hand so the filter can't work. Once they move their hand away, the filter springs into action and makes them look clean shaven. 2This TikTok user thought his result was pretty accurateCredit: TikTok / Lee Snow A lot of people have protested that the filter doesn't really show what they look like without a beard but it's hilarious to try it out. The filter tends to work best on shorter beards because longer ones may still partially appear below the chin. How to use the no beard filter The filter is found on Snapchat so you'll need to...
    People are using a viral Snapchat filter to virtually remove their beards. @leemsnow/TikTok A trend that uses a "no beard" filter has gone viral on TikTok. The filter is actually found on Snapchat, where you can record and download a video using it. People are using it to show their friends and family what they'd look like without a beard. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. On TikTok, a trend is growing where people with beards surprise their spouses, friends, or family members by using a filter that virtually removes their facial hair. The #nobeardfilter hashtag now has over 16.7 million views on TikTok, but anyone looking to try the trend themselves won't be able to locate the filter on the app. Instead, the "no beard" effect is a Snapchat filter. The challenge itself is fairly straightforward: someone who has a beard will record themself with the front-facing camera, sometimes covering the bottom part of their face with a hand to prevent the filter from recognizing them. Then, they remove their hand and show a family member...
    Hugh Bonneville's youthful appearance on Wednesday's One Show caused a frenzy of speculation over whether he was using filters for the video link, with some viewers suggesting he looked 'weird' and too airbrushed. With so many people working from home and wanting to look good in video calls, MailOnline decided to subject ourselves to popular filters to see how you can look your best - without people asking whether you have been 'living in filterland'.   We started with Zoom's basic 'touch up my appearance' setting and then applied five filters within Snapchat to test out as a comparison: Beauty by Naomi Campbell, Catfish, Jolie, Airy Purple and Beauty Set.  Airbrushed: Hugh looked unrecognisable during an appearance on The One Show on Wednesday night as he appeared via a video link with a 'weird' filtered face Mailonline's Shivali Best and Ryan Morrison before any filters have been appliedZoom's touch up my appearance This is the most common tool used to smooth out wrinkles and flaws for users joining a meeting or a video call and is found in the Zoom...
    This Week in Cars: The Porsche 911 GT3, the Chevy Bolt EUV, the Chip Shortage Will Restaurants Screen Guests for Vaccination? © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo Hugh Bonneville's youthful appearance on Wednesday's One Show caused a frenzy of speculation over whether he was using filters for the video link, with some viewers suggesting he looked 'weird' and too airbrushed. With so many people working from home and wanting to look good in video calls, MailOnline decided to subject ourselves to popular filters to see how you can look your best - without people asking whether you have been 'living in filterland'.   We started with Zoom's basic 'touch up my appearance' setting and then applied five filters within Snapchat to test out as a comparison: Beauty by Naomi Campbell, Catfish, Jolie, Airy Purple and Beauty Set.  Full screen 1/3 SLIDES © Provided by Daily Mail Airbrushed: Hugh looked unrecognisable during an appearance on The One Show on Wednesday night as he appeared via a video link with a 'weird' filtered face...
    This week, the headlines have been dominated by Joe Biden, who was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. While photos of Biden were widely shared, photos of another senator almost stole the limelight, as an image of Bernie Sanders in a folding chair became a global meme. Off the back of the meme, Snapchat has launched a hilarious new filter that allows users to place Sanders and his folding chair around their homes, using augmented reality. The photo became a worldwide meme after the Vermont politician was photographed in a fold-down chair, wearing a grey, oversized jacket and some knitted wool mittens at Biden's inauguration HOW TO USE THE BERNIE FILTER 1. Open the Snapchat app 2. Tap on the small smiley face icon to bring up the filters 3. Tap Explore, before typing Bernie Mittens into the Search bar 4. Tap on the Bernie Mittens filter, and the US senator should pop up on your screen   5. Decide where you'd like to place him, or pinch the screen to change his size. Once you're happy with...
    TikTok : If there is a crucial and determining element for the success of any current social network and / or application, that is viral. Whether it’s a stupid YouTube challenge, a filter from a photo app, or a phrase seen in a 40-year-old movie or on a TV show last Saturday. There is no set formula, but when a viral hits, it hits big. And video and photo retouching filters are one of the best examples. Snapchat’s anime filter Do you remember a year ago the filter of Sasha Dog, the sad dog that swept Instagram? Well, in the last hours / days another filter has gone viral. A filter called ‘Anime’ that belongs to Snapchat, and is being used in a massive way by users of this network and others such as Instagram or TikTok. And what does it do? Well, as its name suggests, it turns you into a character out of an anime – a Japanese animated film or series. The filter transforms your face as if it had been...
    Snapchat’s anime filter was used more than 3 billion times in the first week after it was released, Snap said today, confirming what we already knew: it was a huge hit. The filter, which morphs its subject into an anime character, is just the latest in a line of fun AR lenses from Snapchat that have gone viral and helped drive usage on the platform. During its third quarter, Snapchat had 249 million daily users, up from 238 million last quarter. The company’s revenue was also up to $679 million, a 52 percent increase even as the pandemic chilled ad spending elsewhere. “The adoption of augmented reality is happening faster than we had previously anticipated.” There are signs that Snap’s growth is more robust than drive-by filter users. The average number of Snaps created each day is up 25 percent year over year, the company said (though it didn’t say exactly how many that is). Time spent watching shows on Snapchat also grew by 50 percent. Snap called out the success of its AR features, in particular, when highlighting where...
    SNAPPING selfies is a national pastime, and there’s nothing more fun than adding a filter to see how you’ll look as a different gender or an OAP.  But the latest trend to sweep social media is seeing people turn themselves into anime characters. 5The most popular Snapchat filter is called Anime Style Credit: Snapchat Transforming yourself into a cartoon online is nothing new, but the demand for the unique Japanese style has taken off online.  Tik Tok and Instagram have been awash with people posing up a storm in the signature look, after a new filter was added to Snapchat.  The hashtag #animefilter has hundreds of posts online, as people tried out the look on themselves, pets, famous photos and even tattoos. If you’re trying to find it on the app to give it a go, the official name of the filter is Anime Style. What is the new Anime Style filter on Snapchat? 5The filter tracks your facial features in real time and is a hit with fansCredit: Snapchat The Anime Style filter is one of thousands currently...
    Face filters are the new norm on photo and video-sharing apps like Snapchat, TikTok, and Instagram. But, a new anime filter is all the rage—so much so that Snapchat users are manually porting their filtered photos and videos to other apps for widespread use. Hide Anime Style The filter, which is called Anime Style, but users have coined #animefilter, is exactly what it sounds to be. Results vary depending on a person’s bone structure, skin tone, and hair color, but the overall look is very spot-on for a Japanese anime cartoon. Additionally, different effects appear if the user chooses to widen or squint their eyes. Hide @judah This filter keeps adapting to your face apparently #animefilter #anime #fyp ♬ original sound – Judah Carew Hide @vikura This filter is EVERYTHING #foryoupage #animefilter #anime #animecouples #couplegoals #cute #bf #gf #kawaii #foryou #xyzbca #fyp ♬ Miku – Anamanaguchi & Hatsune Miku Hide @auggietalkstoo I like it. #anime #animeskin #animefilter #WorldPeace ♬ Steven Universe – L.Dre Hide Some users have even placed the filters on their pets, favorite celebrities, and iconic pop culture...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The city of Chicago launched a new social media engagement tool to promote wearing masks and help slow the spread of COVID-19.It's a first-of-its kind augmented reality lens on Snapchat, and it only unlocks when the user puts on a face covering.The social media platform is popular amongst Millennials and Gen Zers, a demographic that has seen a recent rise in case numbers in Chicago, officials said."Our youth are smart, civically-minded people," said Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot. "They know their personal actions help keep them and their friends and families safe. By using this fun, unique tool we reach them where they are-on their phones, on social media-and at the point when they have a choice to make about wearing that mask."Coronavirus Illinois: State announces 1,612 new coronavirus cases, 8 deaths; new mitigation efforts in place for Region 7 City officials said Snapchat collaborated with Ogilvy-Chicago to design an AR lens that is "quintessential Chicago."Mayor Lightfoot also launched her own Snapchat account as another method of connecting to Chicago's youth. Anyone interested in following the mayor can...
    DOG owners everywhere are suddenly fans of Snapchat after the app added an adorable Disney feature for canines. One savvy social media user discovered the hilarious filter and immediately took to Facebook group Dogspotting Society to let fellow pet lovers know about it. 7Snapchat has created a new Disney filter for dogsCredit: facebook Uploading two cute snaps of her fluffy white pooch, Danielle Sugden wrote: "For those that don’t know… Snapchat has a new filter and it basically Disneyfies your dog. YOU ARE WELCOME. Plz post your Disney dawgs here." As hundreds and hundreds of users began commenting and sharing their own snaps and videos, Danielle later added: "I’m so stupid - I never use snapchat (until now) didn’t think it had a name but saw someone write in the comments… the filter is called ‘cartoon face’ ???? LOVING ALL YOUR DISNEY PETS! ????." 7Some pets didn't look too impressed with the resultsCredit: facebook 7Most dogs looked like they had come straight out of a Disney filmCredit: facebook The post has since racked up over 5,000 comments and they're sure...
    An executive from Snapchat’s mother or father business apologized for a controversial Juneteenth filter that slipped by the company’s overview procedures irrespective of enter from black workers. Oona King, the vice president of variety, fairness and inclusion of Snap, shot down allegations that the company introduced the filter asking consumers to smile to “break the chains of slavery” without consulting any black staffers. “The mischaracterization on social media — that White executives at a tech firm failed, nevertheless once more, to consist of Black perspectives — is fully untrue,” King, who is black, informed employees in a Saturday letter. “What is accurate is that regardless of our diverse backgrounds, we are all human, and individuals make faults.” King stated black staff members were being “fully involved” in creating and approving the filter but admitted that Snap officers unsuccessful to recognize how it may possibly offend people today on a holiday getaway marking black Americans’ liberation from slavery. Snapchat pulled the filter and apologized following it sparked a backlash Friday. “This miscalculation has taught us a important lesson, and I...
    SNAPCHAT has been forced to apologise for an offensive Juneteenth filter. The tech giant removed the tone-deaf lens that was brought out for the US holiday that celebrates the emancipation of those who had been enslaved. We deeply apologize for the offensive Juneteenth Lens. The Lens that went live hadn’t been approved through our review process. We are investigating so this doesn’t happen again.— Snapchat (@Snapchat) June 19, 2020 This SnapChat #Juneteenth filter is...um...interesting. Smile to break the chains? Okay then. pic.twitter.com/Wyob3kT3ew— Mark S. Luckie (@marksluckie) June 19, 2020 The filter caused widespread offence because it encouraged users to smile to break some floating chains on the screen. People instantly took to Twitter to share their thoughts, which were largely negative. A tweet from Mark S. Luckie gathered widespread attention after he posted a video of how the filter worked. He wrote: "This Snapchat #Juneteenth filter is...um...interesting. Smile to break the chains? Okay then." 2Twitter user Mark S. Luckie posted this videoCredit: Twitter That why companies
    Jody Serrano2 hours ago•Filed to:snapchatsnapchatSnapjuneteenthsocial mediaSaveSnapchat is trying to explain what happened with its Juneteenth Lens.Photo: Robyn Beck (AFP via Getty Images) Snapchat apparently wants to make sure people know that both Black and white employees were involved in the creation of the offensive filter, or Lens in Snapchat jargon, it launched on Juneteenth that placed an approximation of the Pan-African flag behind users and asked them to smile to break the chains of slavery. The company addressed the issue in an internal email written by its vice president of diversity and inclusion, Oona King, that was published by the Verge on Sunday. In the email, King defended the company against the accusation that it had failed to include Black perspectives in the creation of the Lens, and said that Black Snap team members had been involved in every step of its development and approval. In hindsight, she said the company should have developed a more appropriate Lens. Trump Campaign Accuses Snapchat, a Platform That Still Exists, of ‘Trying to Rig the Election’Following Twitter’s lead on (finally) expressing its...
    Alyse StanleyFriday 2:46PM•Filed to:SnapchatSnapchatsnapSnapchat LensesjuneteenthGeorge FloydGEORGE FLOYD PROTESTSAugmented realityFiltersfilter41Photo: Denis Charlet (Getty Images)Snapchat received widespread criticism Friday for its Juneteenth filter that prompted users to celebrate the anniversary of the end of slavery in the U.S. by smiling to break chains. By mid-day, Snap quietly pulled the tone-deaf filter and the company has since issued a public apology. Apparently, this Lens was a beta version that went live by mistake, though I’m not sure if that’s more or less embarrassing. “We deeply apologize to the members of the Snapchat community who found this Lens offensive,” a Snap spokesperson told Gizmodo via email. “A diverse group of Snap team members were involved in developing the concept, but a version of the Lens that went live for Snapchatters this morning had not been approved through our review process. We are investigating why this mistake occurred so that we can avoid it in the future.” Using an approximation of the Pan-African flag as a backdrop and a banner that read “Juneteenth Freedom Day”, the filter prompted the user to smile—a...
    Snapchat has apologized for rolling out a special Juneteenth filter that asked users to smile for the camera, and when they did, would prompt a pair of chains to break in the background.  “We deeply apologize for the offensive Juneteenth Lens. The Lens that went live hadn’t been approved through our review process. We are investigating so this doesn’t happen again,” said Snapchat on Twitter.  We deeply apologize for the offensive Juneteenth Lens. The Lens that went live hadn’t been approved through our review process. We are investigating so this doesn’t happen again. — Snapchat (@Snapchat) June 19, 2020 Juneteenth, which is a holiday in all but four states, commemorates the abolition of slavery in Texas, over two years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the emancipation proclamation freeing slaves in rebel states.  Mark Luckie, a digital strategist who called attention to the filter early Friday morning, tweeted an example of the filter, which shows chains breaking after he smiles for the camera: “This SnapChat #Juneteenth filter is um…interesting…Smile to break the chains? Okay then.” This SnapChat #Juneteenth filter is…um…interesting. Smile...
    Follow Gothamist on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and like us on Facebook. You can also get the top stories mailed to you—sign up here.Members of the coronavirus task force, including Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx, tried to warn White House officials against holding a Trump rally in Tulsa this weekend because of the clear health risks. Trump didn't listen.After being lambasted, AMC Theaters has reversed its face mask policy and will require customers to wear masks when theaters reopen.Facebook removed a video posted by Donald Trump's account that had manipulated a viral video of two toddlers after one of the children's parents lodged a copyright claim.The Louisville police department has fired one of the officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor, saying that Brett Hankison "displayed an extreme indifference to the value of human life."A newly-released report shows that the number of people killed by police activity in New York is more than twice what has been reported.Snapchat apologized and removed a tone-deaf Juneteenth filter which asked users to smile to break chains.The NY Times writes that Bernie Sanders...
    While companies all over the country scramble to finally acknowledge Juneteenth in the wake of Black Lives Matter protests, it looks like someone at Snapchat may have taken things too far. READ MORE: Morehouse grads create PSA calling for Juneteenth to be a national holiday This week, the social media app issued an apology after several people objected to its Juneteenth themed filter that prompted users to ‘smile’ to break chains, a tone-deaf allusion to the chains of oppression. “We deeply apologize to the members of the Snapchat community who found this Lens offensive,” a Snap spokesperson said in an email to theGrio. “A diverse group of Snap team members were involved in developing the concept, but a version of the Lens that went live for Snapchatters this morning had not been approved through our review process. We are investigating why this mistake occurred so that we can avoid it in the future.” snapchat made a juneteenth filter that made people smile to break chains? man if only they had thousands of dollars to hire black folks and put their current employees...
    Snapchat apologized on Friday for a Juneteenth filter that allowed users to break digital chains by smiling. Juneteenth represents the day that black slaves in Texas learned that they were free. Snapchat regularly adds special Lens filters to coincide with holidays, but the Juneteenth edition quickly came under fire. WHAT IS JUNETEENTH? THE HISTORY BEHIND THE OLDEST COMMEMORATION OF THE ABOLISHMENT OF SLAVERY IN THE US Author and digital strategist Mark S. Luckie posted a video of himself testing the filter that brought attention to many critics. Luckie’s tweet went viral and Snapchat apologized, noting it would investigate why this mistake occurred. “We deeply apologize to the members of the Snapchat community who found this Lens offensive,” a Snap spokesperson told Fox News. “A diverse group of Snap team members were involved in developing the concept, but a version of the Lens that went live for Snapchatters this morning had not been approved through our review process. We are investigating why this mistake occurred so that we can avoid it in the future,” the spokesperson added. ALVEDA KING: AS RIOTS SPREAD ACROSS...
    Snapchat has a history of creating insensitive, and sometimes downright racist, content. Today, users were presented with a filter to “celebrate” Juneteenth — a remembrance of slaves being informed they were free years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed — but they were quick to call out Snap for yet another case of thoughtlessness. The filter urges users to “smile and break the chains” — smiling while taking a selfie causes virtual chains to rise behind the user’s head, and after smiling enough, the chains fracture. Spotted by Variety , Ashten Winger, who formerly worked at Snap as a developer, tweeted that “this is what happens when you don’t have any black people on the product design team.” In 2016, Snapchat released a Bob Marley-themed filter to celebrate 4/20, but it was seen by many as an augmented reality version of blackface. Just months later, Snap was in hot water again when it created a filter that would turn the user’s face into an Asian caricature featuring stereotypical slanted eyes and large teeth. Like the Juneteenth filter, the company eventually...
    New York (CNN Business)Snapchat apologized for releasing a filter meant to celebrate Juneteenth on Friday and removed it following criticism. The filter, set against the backdrop of a Pan-African flag, asked users to smile in order to break chains. "We deeply apologize to the members of the Snapchat community who found this Lens offensive," a Snapchat spokesperson told CNN Business. "A diverse group of Snap team members were involved in developing the concept, but a version of the Lens that went live for Snapchatters this morning had not been approved through our review process."The spokesperson added that it's investigating why this mistake occurred so that it can be avoided in the future. Mark S. Luckie, a vocal diversity advocate and former Facebook manager, tweeted about the filter, calling it "interesting" and saying "Smile to break the chains? Okay then." Other people called it "tone deaf" on social media. Juneteenth, the June 19 holiday, commemorates the end of slavery in the United States. A number of companies have given employees the day off this year after weeks of nationwide demonstrations over...
    Snapchat removed a face filter meant to commemorate Juneteenth after users called out the tech giant for being “tone-deaf.” The filter prompted users to smile, after which chains would break behind them. The filter had the Pan-African flag as the backdrop. The filter was pointed out by Mark Luckie, a digital strategist, on Twitter. He called it “interesting,” clearly questioning the choice. “This SnapChat #Juneteenth filter is…um…interesting. Smile to break the chains? Okay then,” Luckie wrote. This SnapChat #Juneteenth filter is...um...interesting. Smile to break the chains? Okay then. pic.twitter.com/Wyob3kT3ew— Mark S. Luckie (@marksluckie) June 19, 2020 Juneteenth is a holiday dating back to 1865 celebrating when slaves in Texas found out about the Emancipation Proclamation two years after it has been signed. Snapchat did not immediately respond to a request for comment by the Daily Dot. We’ll update this story if we hear back. The filter was axed by Snapchat on Friday, according to CNBC, but not before a lot of people online criticized it, calling it “tone-deaf.” @smtv_97/Twitter @smtv_97/Twitter @MsChavN/Twitter This...
    Snapchat removed a Juneteenth filter after critics slammed it as tone deaf, reports said Friday. The filter, which shows chains appearing and breaking when a user smiles, included the Pan-African flag in the background and was criticized as out-of-touch, CNBC reported. “@Snapchat who on your diversity team cleared that #Juneteenth filter of breaking the chains? It’s offensive and it’s a no,” Twitter user @_Ayoo_Ki wrote Friday. The firestorm was started after digital strategist and Pulitzer Prize finalist Mark S. Luckie posted a video of himself trying out the filter with a sarcastic caption decrying it as “…interesting.” “Smile to break the chains? Okay then,” Luckie wrote on his Twitter account. The filter was subsequently yanked. The gaffe comes as the app’s CEO Evan Spiegel said the tech giant will keep its diversity report private because releasing the data would reinforce the idea that minorities aren’t properly represented in the industry, CNBC reported Juneteenth is one of America’s oldest holidays that is seeing a renewed interest in 2020 among Black Lives Matter demonstrations. It marks the official end of slavery in...
    Evan Spiegel, CEO and co-founder of Snap Inc.Adam Galica | CNBC  Snapchat took down its Juneteenth filter, which prompted users to smile in order to break chains, after being called out by critics for being tone deaf on Friday. Using the Pan-African flag as the backdrop of the filter, the app prompted users to smile, which then caused chains to appear and break.  Criticism of the filter spread when Mark Luckie, a digital strategist and former journalist, shared the filter on Twitter, calling it "interesting." Snapchat's parent company Snap did not immediately respond to CNBC's request for comment. The blunder comes after Snap CEO Evan Spiegel said the company will continue to keep its diversity report private, according to Business Insider. Spiegel said that releasing the data would reinforce the perception that minority groups are underrepresented in the industry. Juneteenth celebrates the end of slavery in the United States. A combination of the words June and nineteenth, the holiday commemorates when an U.S. army general informed enslaved African Americans in Galveston, Texas on June 19, 1865 that the Civil War...
    In its latest filter blunder, Snapchat has debuted a Juneteenth filter that allows users to “smile and break the chains.” The filter was panned by critics on Friday morning for its tone deafness. Atlanta-based digital strategist Mark S. Luckie demonstrated the filter on Twitter, calling it “interesting.” The filter shows what appears to be an approximation of the Pan-African flag, and prompts the user to smile — a common trigger for animated Snapchat filters — causing chains to appear and then break behind the user. Juneteenth is the anniversary of the day in 1865 when a group of enslaved people in Texas finally learned that slavery in the US had ended, more than two years after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. The Juneteenth filter arrives just over a week after report surfaced that Snap CEO Evan Spiegel was delaying the public release of the company’s diversity stats because he was concerned that “all these disclosures have actually normalized the current composition of the tech workforce.” He told CNBC in a June 11th interview that Snap was “actually...
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