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    by Reagan Reese   Many of America’s top medical schools have implemented Critical Race Theory (CRT) as a part of their mandatory programs, according to the Critical Race Training in Education database. Approximately 58 of the top 100 medical schools ranked by the U.S. News & World report include CRT in their courses and student training, according to the Critical Race Training in Education database. Of the top schools, 46 provide students and staff with resources by Robin DiAngelo, the author of “Nice Racism,” a book about how progressive white people perpetuate racial harm, and Ibram X. Kendi, the author of several books on antiracism including “Stamped.” CRT holds that America is fundamentally racist, yet it teaches people to view every social interaction and person in terms of race. Its adherents pursue “antiracism” through the end of merit, objective truth and the adoption of race-based policies. “As with our higher education database, some have embraced CRT explicitly, while others have a continuum of programming, such as ‘antiracism,’ ‘equity,’ and ‘Diversity, Equity and Inclusion’ that does not easily fit into a...
    Gary Freed, DO, received the Leila D. Denmark Lifetime Achievement Award from the Georgia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He trains PCOM Georgia students to perform newborn exams with an infant mannequin in the Simulation Center. Gary Freed, DO, FAAP, FACOP, a member of the PCOM Georgia Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine clinical education department, received the Leila D. Denmark Lifetime Achievement Award from the Georgia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics on Friday, November 18. This recognition is the highest award the chapter bestows and honors his lifetime of work and contributions to the pediatric profession. For the complete story, click here. The award is named after Leila Daughtry Denmark, MD, one of the first women pediatricians in Georgia who was among the oldest known practicing physicians until her retirement at the age of 103, after 73 years in practice. Dr. Freed, who retired from Emory University School of Medicine in 2017 and began teaching at PCOM Georgia two days later, is the first Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine to receive this honor in the state. At Emory University School...
    Gary Freed, DO, received the Leila D. Denmark Lifetime Achievement Award from the Georgia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He trains PCOM Georgia students to perform newborn exams with an infant mannequin in the Simulation Center. Gary Freed, DO, FAAP, FACOP, a member of the PCOM Georgia Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine clinical education department, received the Leila D. Denmark Lifetime Achievement Award from the Georgia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics on Friday, November 18. This recognition is the highest award the chapter bestows and honors his lifetime of work and contributions to the pediatric profession. For the complete story, click here. The award is named after Leila Daughtry Denmark, MD, one of the first women pediatricians in Georgia who was among the oldest known practicing physicians until her retirement at the age of 103, after 73 years in practice. Dr. Freed, who retired from Emory University School of Medicine in 2017 and began teaching at PCOM Georgia two days later, is the first Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine to receive this honor in the state. At Emory University School...
    A woke oath taken by students at a prestigious medical school pledging to tackle white supremacy and embrace indigenous medicine has been blasted as harmful to patients. The University of Minnesota medical school's class of 2026 recited an oath which also promised to 'uproot the legacy and perpetuation of structural violence deeply embedded within the healthcare system'. But a leading doctor has now warned adopting political messages instead of focusing on healthcare could harm the public. The oath said: 'We commit to uprooting the legacy and perpetuation of structural violence deeply embedded within the healthcare system. 'We recognize iniquities built by past and present traumas rooted in white supremacy, colonialism, the gender binary, ableism and all forms of oppression.' Dr Marc Siegel (pictured), clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, said the contents of the pledge were a 'mess' RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next PICTURED: Credit Suisse trader, a first-year lawyer and a... Linguists slam Cambridge University for teaching 'woke'... Share this article Share Students committed to 'promoting an culture...
    A professor from Yale is coming under fire for a video in which she explained how she is part of a program that helps children from the age of three-years-old with their 'gender journey'. Christy Olezeski is the Director and co-founder of the Yale Pediatric Gender Program. Olezeski who has a Phd states on her website how her mission is to 'provide comprehensive family-centered care for children, adolescents and young adults questioning their assigned gender and/or seeking gender-affirming consultation,'  However, in a video that was posted to Yale Medicine's YouTube page but has since been taken down, she explains how she starts treatment on children as young as three - before they have even begun kindergarten.  Christy Olezeski is Director and co-founder of the Yale Pediatric Gender Program In a YouTube video, since taken down, Dr. Olezeski explains how she runs a program that helps children from the age of three-years-old with their 'gender journey' In the video she states: 'I am the director of the Yale gender program, which is an interdisciplinary program working with gender-expansive individuals [ages] 3...
    A physician who serves as chair of a woke antiracist organization is alleging that some U.S. medical schools are actively discriminating against white students. Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, is alleging that five schools are in breach of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin. He alleges the schools are granting scholarships based on race rather than academic ability - and as a result are discriminating against white applicants as they  try and fill their quotas of minority students and demographics, who in the pastwere previously 'underrepresented' within the student body.  Goldfarb is the board chair of Do No Harm, whose raison d'etre is to combat antiracism and discrimination in the world of medicine. The group have identified five schools as pushing the 'discriminatory' policies. They include the Florida College of Medicine,  University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Oklahoma-Tulsa School of Community Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine and the Medical College of Wisconsin.    Dr. Stanley Goldfarb is the board chair of Do No Harm, whose raison d'etre is to combat antiracism...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy will deliver remarks to the Class of 2022 when the University of Maryland School of Medicine hosts its first in-person graduation for students and families since 2019 on Thursday. Dr. Murthy’s address to the medical school’s 213th graduating class will discuss the “two-year impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public health,” specifically some of challenges students faced while in training and the lasting impact on their careers. READ MORE: Dr. Anthony Fauci To Deliver Keynote Remarks At University Of Maryland, Baltimore's Commencement CeremonyThe ceremony is set for 2 p.m. on Thursday, May 19, at the Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore. Besides being the school’s first in-person graduation ceremony for students and families since 2019, it will also be the final graduation for University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece, who is stepping down after 16 years. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Bright And BreezyReece is shifting back to a faculty role, where he will lead the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Center for Advanced Research, Training & Innovation and...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — It was a very special morning for some local graduates. Eyewitness News was at the Kimmel Center for the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine commencement. It was the first in-person graduation for Penn’s medicine students since the start of the pandemic. Students from 2021 and 2020 were also honored during the event. A big congratulations to all of them and a thank you for all they’ve done during the pandemic.
    A Yale worker was able to steal $40 million from her employer by buying then reselling tablet computers over 10 years - until she was busted by an anonymous tipster who saw her load them into her car.  Jamie Petrone-Codrington, 42, would place orders for iPads and Microsoft Surface Pros for the college that came in under $10,000. Orders for IT equipment below that amount did not have to be approved by her superiors.  She repeated the scam thousands of times over an estimated 10 years, and sold the tablets to an unidentified business in Long Island. Petrone-Codringham, who admitted wire fraud Monday, was first probed by staff at Yale in June 2020 over her spending on computers. But that internal investigation did not recommend any action against Petrone-Cordrington, of Lithia Springs in Georgia, and she was allowed to continue with the scam until July 2021. Petrone-Codrington, who blew her ill-gotten gains on three mansions, five luxury cars, holidays and designer handbags, was finally busted by an anonymous tip-off made to Yale bosses about her antics. They passed on the...
    A former Yale University School of Medicine administrator has admitted to stealing $40 million worth of computers and electronic equipment from the institution, which she then sold to fund her lavish lifestyle, using the proceeds to buy multiple homes, a fleet of luxury cars, and pay for international vacations.  Jamie Petrone-Codrington, 42, from Lithia Springs, Georgia, on Monday pleaded guilty to federal wire fraud and tax charges related to her years-long scheme.  She could face up to 23 years in prison when she is sentenced for her crimes on June 29, the US Attorney's Office for the District of Connecticut said in a statement.   According to court documents and statements, beginning in 2008, Petrone-Codrington worked at the Yale University School of Medicine's Department of Emergency Medicine. She most recently served as the director of finance and administration. Jamie Petrone-Codrington, 42, a Yale University School of Medicine employee, has pleaded guilty to wire fraud and tax charges for stealing $40 million worth of computers, which she then sold to fund her lavish lifestyle. She is pictured with her husband in Italy...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Ground-breakthrough research done in Baltimore may be the answer to helping doctors get one step closer to treating Parkinson’s Disease. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have found a way to treat the disease using new innovative technology. READ MORE: Post-Pandemic Pushback: Washington's Cherry Blossom Festival ReturnsDoctors say about 1 million Americans have Parkinson’s Disease. It’s a disorder that affects brain cells in a specific area and makes it challenging for people to do everyday tasks like walking or picking up something. Doctors say there are medications that help people live with it but that have never actually provided relief—until now. It’s an emotional day for Kim Spletter. Spletter has been living with Parkinson’s Disease and says it hasn’t been easy. “I’m stepping on my toes when I walk,” she said. But now, her life has completely changed. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine led a pivotal trial using a non-invasive procedure to treat advanced Parkinson’s Disease on one side of the brain. “It’s a combination of acoustical energy and focused...
    A Maryland man now has a pig to thank for his second chance at life. In a medical first, surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center transplanted a pig heart into a human patient, reporting three days later that he is doing well, the University of Maryland School of Medicine announced in a press release Monday. The patient, 57-year-old David Bennett, will be monitored over the coming weeks to see if the transplant provides "lifesaving benefits," according to the statement. The highly experimental surgery was the patient's last chance to live, as he suffered from terminal heart disease and did not qualify for a human heart transplant. AUSTRALIANS WAITING FOR ORGAN TRANSPLANTS WILL BE DENIED LIFESAVING PROCEDURES UNTIL FULLY VACCINATED: REPORT "It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” Bennett said ahead of his surgery in a press release. Surgeons received the green light to proceed after the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization...
    A version of this piece first appeared on Common Sense  Universities are supposed to be bastions of critical thinking, reason and logic.  But the Covid policies they have adopted — policies that have derailed two years of students' education and threaten to upend the upcoming spring semester — have exposed them as nonsensical, anti-scientific and often downright cruel. Some of America's most prestigious universities are leading the charge. At Georgetown University, fully vaccinated students are randomly tested for Covid every week. Using a PCR test, which can detect tiny amounts of dead virus, asymptomatic students who test positive are ordered to a room in a designated building where they spend 10 days in confinement. Food is dropped off once a day at the door. I spoke to several students who were holed up. One of them told me she would sometimes call a friend to come and wave at her through the window, just to see a human face. Another told me that the experience in quarantine 'totally changed' her feelings about the school.  'Everyone's just fed up at this point,'...
    The arrival of the omicron variant has led some politicians and public health grandees to call for a return to business closures and 'circuit-breaker' lockdowns. The variant has been found worldwide, including in the US and the UK. The variant has already surpassed delta – dominant before omicron – in the UK. Early reports from South Africa confirm that the variant is more transmissible but produces a milder disease, with a lower chance of hospitalization and death upon infection. My message is this: we can’t stop the spread of COVID, but we can end the pandemic. In October 2020, I wrote the Great Barrington Declaration (GBD) along with Prof. Sunetra Gupta of Oxford University and Prof. Martin Kulldorff of Harvard University. The centerpiece of the declaration is a call for increased focused protection of the vulnerable older population, who are more than a thousand times more likely to die from COVID infection than the young. (From right to left) Drs. Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford University, Sunetra Gupta of Oxford University and Martin Kulldorff of Harvard University are co-authors of The Great Barrington...
    Joe Buck has piled up highlights during his iconic announcing career, but his bizarre attempt at explaining the frightening head injury suffered by Los Angeles Chargers tight end Donald Parham Jr. won’t go into the broadcasting Hall-of-Fame. During the first quarter of Thursday Night Football’s matchup between Los Angeles and the Kansas City Chiefs, Parham slammed his head on the turf in a very scary scene. A Fox camera awkwardly zoomed in on Parham as he remained on the ground in the end zone and obviously appeared to be injured. Donald Parham gets knocked out and the cameraman comes running in for the extreme closeup … bruh pic.twitter.com/81rKKuW3Fp — T̷R̷O̷Y̷ ̷H̷U̷G̷H̷E̷S̷ (@TommySledge) December 17, 2021 The game was delayed as players knelt on the field and medical staff tended to Parham before the Chargers tight end was carted off on a stretcher with his arms shaking. The Chargers released an update during the game, stating Parham “is currently undergoing tests, imaging and evaluation for a head injury at UCLA Harbor Medical Center and is in...
    SOME students in Atlanta can expect to get a surprise holiday stimulus payment of $6,300 by December 15. The stimulus payments come as student debt in the United States recently topped $1.7trillion. 3Some students in Atlanta can expect some hefty holiday checksCredit: Getty 3The Morehouse School of Medicine announced the stimulus checks on WednesdayCredit: Getty One school in Atlanta is taking steps to lessen the burden for its students. Morehouse School of Medicine will offer students a $6,300 grant, which is being referred to by some as a holiday stimulus check. The school's president, Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice, wrote an email to students on Wednesday outlining how they may use the extra cash. "I am happy to announce that Morehouse School of Medicine will provide a financial gift of $6,300 to assist each of our currently enrolled, degree-seeking students with additional academic, financial, and mental health support costs such as childcare, food, transportation, housing, and healthcare needs," the email said. The school currently has more than 750 students, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The money comes from the...
    Do the COVID-19 vaccines affect my chances of pregnancy? No, there’s no evidence that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, influence your chances of getting pregnant despite a myth suggesting otherwise. Medical experts say there’s no biological reason the shots would affect fertility. And real-world evidence offers more assurance for anyone worried about their chances of conceiving: In Pfizer’s study, a similar number of women became pregnant in the group given the vaccine as in the group given dummy shots. Researchers are starting to study anecdotal reports of short-term changes to periods after the vaccine, but there’s no indication so far that the shots put fertility at risk, said Dr. Mary Jane Minkin, a gynecologist and professor at the Yale University School of Medicine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and obstetrician groups also recommend COVID-19 vaccines for pregnant individuals, who have a higher risk of severe illness if infected with the coronavirus. Research shows pregnant people who get the virus are more likely to be admitted to intensive care, receive invasive ventilation and die than their nonpregnant...
    Sakioshi Ucchiama, a three-time winner of the Kondo Student Athlete Versus School Championship (Kondo Incre) in May, is a sixth-year student in the medical faculty of the University of Tokyo. On June 23, shortly before the Japan Championships, which was the Tokyo Olympic selection meeting, the junior teacher of the Junior High School and High School Track and Field Club conducted an interview to get a closer look at the truth. The face of talented individuals who go both in Banbu and Pudo. (Click here for the second part of three chapters) What kind of research did you do to get on the ground for the Intermediate High School Championship of High School 3 and pass the Tokyo Science III class? உச்சியாமாI was not focused on studying until high school 2, but for now, I was studying with the intention of getting good grades in regular school exams. I do my best in English and took Iken 1st grade at 2 in high school. At the beginning of High 3, other subjects were distorted, but I wondered if English...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — As the Covid-19 pandemic wanes in the United States, hospitals nationwide may not be prepared for the next pandemic, according to a new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center. The study was published last month in the Journal of Healthcare Management. The study’s lead author, Dr. David Marcozzi, professor of emergency medicine at the school of medicine and the chief clinical officer and hospital senior vice president, and his colleagues developed and published a surge index tool that linked standard reported hospital information to healthcare preparedness elements. READ MORE: Maryland State Police Warns Residents Of Fraud Scheme Using State Police Barrack Number The tool, called the Hospital Medical Surge Preparedness Index (HMSPI), used data from 2005 to 2014 to produce a score designed to predict how well a hospital can handle a sudden influx in patients due to a mass shooting or infectious disease outbreak. Such data included the size of the medical staff, the number of hospital beds, and the amount of equipment and supplies. Medical...
    (CNN)More than 60 years ago, Marion Gerald Hood was rejected from a medical school because of his race. This week, the school apologized.The Emory University School of Medicine formally apologized to Hood, inviting him to speak at the Atlanta, Georgia, university Thursday as part of a Juneteenth event. "As a university, acknowledging our past is a necessary step toward an empowered future," said Carolyn Meltzer, the School of Medicine's executive associate dean for faculty academic advancement, leadership and inclusion, in a statement. "Our conversations with Dr. Hood have solidified the School of Medicine's commitment to accountability, in alignment with the university's strategic goals for a more inclusive Emory."During the talk, Hood spoke about his journey to medicine, including how he became interested in the subject and why he applied to Emory in the first place. The school initially wasn't on his radar, he said, but he applied when an Emory professor received an honorary degree at Hood's graduation ceremony from Clark College. "And when they gave him the honorary degree, I said to myself, 'Gosh, he can come over here...
    NUTLEY, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine has graduated its first class. The medical school opened in 2018 with the goal of addressing a doctor shortage in New Jersey. READ MORE: MTV VMAs Returning In-Person To Barclays Center This September CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas shows us how it hopes it’s different approach to training can create healthier communities. With its inaugural class, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine is ushering 18 new doctors into a world already experiencing many firsts. “No medical students who came before you, or after you, will have your unique experiences,” said New Jersey Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli. COVID has been the ultimate teacher, from medical breakthroughs to highlighting disparities, and only reinforcing how trusted relationships with patients can have life-saving outcomes. “Patients are more than what’s in their medical chart. They’re human beings. It’s really important for physicians and all caregivers to really get to know the person,” said Robert Garrett, CEO of Hackensack Meridian Health. At the medical school, they call it the “human dimension.” It’s a program that pairs students like George Zhou...
    A psychiatrist who spoke at Yale University’s School of Medicine about fantasies of shooting white people told The New York Times Saturday that her remarks were taken out of context to “control the narrative.” In an audio recording posted by journalist Bari Weiss on Substack, Dr. Aruna Khilanani gave her talk on “The Psychopathic Problem of the White Mind” on April 6 as part of an online lecture, according to the Times. “I had fantasies of unloading a revolver into the head of any white person that got in my way, burying their body and wiping my bloody hands as I walked away relatively guiltless with a bounce in my step. Like I did the world a f–king favor.”https://t.co/VKJQXpLo8A — Amy Kremer (@AmyKremer) June 5, 2021 “I had fantasies of unloading a revolver into the head of any white person that got in my way, burying their body, and wiping my bloody hands as I walked away relatively guiltless with a bounce in my step,” Khilanani said. “Like I did the world a fucking favor.” The psychiatrist claimed people...
    A New York City-based psychiatrist who shared her violent fantasy of shooting white people in the head during an Ivy Leave lecture claims her shocking words were taken out of context. Dr. Aruna Khilanani, a Manhattan-based psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, told the New York Times on Saturday that she only meant to use "provocation as a tool for real engagement" while saying she dreamed of executing white people. "Too much of the discourse on race is a dry, bland regurgitation of new vocabulary words with no work in the unconscious," Khilanani reportedly wrote in an email. "And, if you want to hit the unconscious, you will have to feel real negative feelings." Khilanani added that listeners and critics alike should not have taken her words literally — and could instead use them as a therapeutic tool. "My speaking metaphorically about my own anger was a method for people to reflect on negative feelings," Khilanani added. "To normalize negative feelings. Because if you don’t, it will turn into a violent action." Khilanani, who earned her New York state medical license in 2008, told the Times her...
    Christopher Capozziello/Getty Images After facing backlash for saying that she had harbored “fantasies” about shooting white people, psychiatrist and Yale lecturer Dr. Aruna Khilanani told the New York Times that her comments were taken out of context, and that she was speaking metaphorically. “Dr. Kilanani, a forensic psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, said in an email on Saturday that her words had been taken out context to ‘control the narrative,’” the Times report said. “She said that her lecture had ‘used provocation as a tool for real engagement.’” “My speaking metaphorically about my own anger was a method for people to reflect on negative feelings. To normalize negative feelings,” Khilanani also told the Times. “Because if you don’t it will turn into violent action.” In April, Khilanani gave a lecture at Yale University’s School of Medicine called “The Psychopathic Problem of the White Mind,” as part of the school’s Grand Rounds program, described by Yale as a “weekly form for the Yale Child Study Center faculty, staff and affiliates to come together and learn about all aspects relevant to the mental health...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The University of Maryland School of Medicine began the expansion of clinical trials for the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine in teenagers aged 12 through 17 this week. The clinical trials began just as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the extension of the Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer vaccine to now include those ages 12 and up. However, just as with the adult vaccine, more than one pediatric will be needed to fully vaccine children and teens across the globe. READ MORE: Man Shot And Killed In West Baltimore On Thursday The expansion of the PREVENT-19 study will evaluate the safety, effectiveness and immunity of the Novavax vaccine. The clinical trials will include participants aged 12 through 17 who will been seen at 75 sites across the United States. READ MORE: Its Getting Ridiculous Drivers Complain About Increase In Gas Prices Participants will randomly receive the Novavax vaccine or placebo in two doses given 21 days apart. Two thirds of the group will receive the vaccine and one third will receive the placebo. Participants will be...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Another morning means another full day of treating patients for physician assistant Brett Feldman. Physician assistant Brett Feldman, the director of Street Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, brings medical care to Los Angeles’ unhoused residents. (CBSLA) “Johnny, how’s it going,” Feldman greets a man recovering from hand surgery. READ MORE: Restaurants Struggling To Retain Workers As Eateries Reopen But Feldman, the director of Street Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, doesn’t see his patients in an office. “[He] stays at the bus stop and he tries to use it for shade,” Feldman says of Johnny, who is unhoused. “He had a photosensitive reaction from just constant exposure to the sun.” Los Angeles is home to an estimated 66,000 unhoused residents living at bus stops, on sidewalks, in parks and parking lots and off-ramp encampments throughout the city. “The number one thing that we treat is actually congestive heart failure,” Feldman says. A visit typically starts with Street Medicine Community Health worker Joseph Becerra coming up to a location and...
    Chika Okeke is a med student at University California, Irvine School of Medicine. She is also a Leadership Education to Advance Diversity–African, Black, and Caribbean (LEAD-ABC) Scholar.Source: Serena Tally As we head into the second year of the coronavirus pandemic, health-care workers have been applauded as heroes for fighting an unpredictable and deadly virus. It's taken a toll on them physically and mentally, yet applications to medical schools for the 2021 academic year have surged by 18%, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. "Over the last year, we've seen the Covid-19 pandemic increasing physician stress, which has led to higher rates of burnout, retirement and made physician shortages worse," said Robert W. Seligson, CEO of Physicians Foundation. Now, nearly 60% of nurses and 20% of physicians say they're looking to call it quits due to Covid stress. Some doctors have even decided to retire early, causing the worst staffing shortage in decades. But instead of deterring med students, the pandemic has actually motivated them even more to pursue a career in health care. "[W]e are witnessing health-care workers...
    AURORA, Colo. (CBS4) – In an effort to increase diversity among medical school students, the University of Colorado School of Medicine is celebrating a new scholarship fund. Organizers chose to name it after Dr. Charles J. Blackwood who became the first African American to graduate from the school in 1947 and was in the top 10 of his class. (credit: CU School of Medicine) The Trinidad native graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Colorado Boulder. READ MORE: Decrease In COVID Cases May Point To Seasonality In Coronavirus, Says Dr. Dave Hnida “I think he’s a person that not everyone knows about these days, and I think he was a hero, a pioneer to be the first Black man at the CU medical school,” said Terri Richardson, a doctor at Mile High Medical Society. READ MORE: Seeding Begins In Pine Gulch Fire Burn Area The scholarship fund is a collaboration with Mile High Medical Society, a group of Black health professionals in Denver, which works to tackle health disparities. MORE NEWS: FAA Records: United Flight 328 Plane...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — If you have recovered from COVID-19, a new study says you may only need one dose of the vaccine. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine studied 59 healthcare workers and found those who had the virus had a robust immune response after just one shot. This worked for both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Doctors say this could help with the crippling shortage of vaccines. “If there’s a shortage for months on end and we need to quickly pivot and change policy, we should consider this data to suggest people who have had COVID-19 maybe shouldn’t be the ones getting the vaccine right away, or that they should only get a single dose,” Dr. Anthony Harris, with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said. The CDC funded the study, but the agency didn’t respond to how the research could affect its guidance to distribute the vaccine in the two-dose regimen. For the latest information on...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Johns Hopkins School of Medicine is one of more than 50 clinical trial sites across the country testing potential therapies for COVID-19 outpatients with mild to moderate symptoms. The program is part of Operation Warp Speed. “I think we’re really going to get to a place where we have this is a treatable disease as opposed to an untreatable disease,” Dr. Kelly Dooley, of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Dr. Dooley is the principal investigator of the trial at Johns Hopkins. Her team of researchers has identified antibodies from patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and they’re using those to manufacture a treatment. “It’s essentially supplemental antibodies that we know target the virus very well,” Dr. Dooley said. The goal is to develop a remedy that someone could pick up at their local pharmacy which would stop the disease from worsening and prevent someone from winding up in the hospital. “We’re trying to get people at the beginning...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – On Monday, Pfizer announced that their coronavirus vaccine was more than 90 percent effective. On Friday, President Donald Trump announced it will soon be available throughout the nation.  “As soon as April, the vaccine will be available to the entire general population with the exception of the state of New York,” said President Trump during an address to the nation from the Rose Garden at the White House. Pfizer’s vaccine will have to be stored at minus 80 degrees celsius (-112 degrees Fahrenheit) and is administered in two dosages.   However, there are other ongoing coronavirus vaccination trials that will not need to be refrigerated.   “There is a lot of COVID studies going on. First of all, there are other vaccines we have to test and I do hope all the vaccines are safe and effective,” said Olveen Carrasquillo, MD. Dr. Carrasquillo says the Jannsen vaccine trial-one study is ongoing at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. “We are doing a study on another vaccine which is only one dose instead of two dosages and...
    President-elect Joe Biden on Monday named the members of a team of public health and science experts to develop a blueprint for fighting the coronavirus task force. A look at the members: Dr. David Kessler, co-chair. Professor of pediatrics and epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco, U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner from 1990 to 1997. Dr. Vivek Murthy, co-chair. U.S. surgeon general from 2014-17, who commanded public health force that dealt with Ebola, Zika and Flint water crisis. Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith, co-chair. Associate professor of internal medicine, public health and management at Yale University and associate dean for health equity research at Yale’s medical school specializing in health care for marginalized populations. Dr. Rick Bright. Immunologist, virologist. Ousted as head of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority after criticizing the federal government’s response to the coronavirus under President Donald Trump. Bright filed a whistleblower complaint alleging he was reassigned to a lesser job because he resisted political pressure to allow widespread use of hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug Trump pushed as a COVID-19 treatment....
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — A researcher at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has discovered how coronavirus can cause harmful and escalating inflammation. It is because of a region on the spike protein she calls a superantigen. “That region would be expected to trigger a very strong response, adaptive immune response, and now the response is so exaggerated,” says Ivet Bahar, Ph.D., distinguished professor and John K. Vries Chair of computational and systems biology at Pitt School of Medicine. Her work came about by trying to get a better handle on what happens in the severe pediatric coronavirus-related illness MIS-C or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. The symptoms of low blood pressure, fever and rash looked very similar to toxic shock syndrome, a potentially fatal illness caused by bacterial toxins. (Photo Credit: Provided) By using computer models, she found a surprise. “We started to compare the sequence and structure to existing superantigens, bacterial toxins, and found that there is a region that is very similar to a known bacterial toxin,” says Dr. Bahar. This segment of the spike protein causes...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Major news for COVID-19 patients fighting the virus. On Wednesday, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine said that it is operating one of the 25 nationwide sites that will test therapies aimed at treating early-stage COVID-19 cases. This trial is part of the National Institutes of Health ACTIV initiative. Pitt School of Medicine says it aims to develop a treatment that can prevent people with COVID-19 from progressing, which will later require them to go to the hospital. They say the first drug being studied in the trial is an antibody treatment made by pharmaceutical company Lilly. Researchers say Lilly’s antibody was shown to help people with COVID-19. According to the university, phase 2 of the trial is already underway. 110 participants will be recruited nationwide to receive an antibody. They’ll be compared to 110 participants who will receive a placebo. If the medication produces positive results, without significant safety concerns, it will advance to phase 3. Researchers are looking for people to participate in the study. For more information to see...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Researchers with the University of Miami have taken the next step in the race to create a vaccine against the coronavirus. They are now entering phase 3 of clinical trials of what they are calling the “Janssen vaccine.” “With the availability of test vaccines, I feel very encouraged, enthusiastic and optimistic that we will overcome this pandemic soon,” said Dr. Dushyantha Jayaweera, professor of medicine and principal investigator for Janssen’s UM site. Researchers say they need 1,500 volunteers, adding that they really need people of color to participate since those communities have been most severely impacted by COVID. “It is I critically important that we enroll a very diverse population for the study,” said co-principal investigator Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo. “That way we can ensure that the vaccine will be equally effective for all groups.” Download The New CBS4 News App Here Prospective study volunteers will need to be 18 or older. For more information on UM’s Janssen vaccine trial, email Janssencovidvaccine@miami.edu or call (305) 243-0952. To volunteer for the clinical trials, click here.
    Morehouse School of Medicine, one of America's most prestigious Black colleges, announced Thursday it has received $26.3 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies and will use the money to reduce medical school loan debt for students currently enrolled. Each student at the Atlanta-based school will receive approximately $100,000. Bloomberg Philanthropies is a charitable organization founded by former New York City mayor and one-time Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg. Morehouse School of Medicine (Facebook) The charitable organization is donating $100 million to a fund for students attending the nation's four historically Black medical schools: Morehouse in Atlanta, Charles R. Drew University College of Medicine in Los Angeles, Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and Meharry Medical College in Nashville over the next four years. Morehouse School of Medicine's President and Dean Valerie Montgomery Rice said the "historic investment" will "lift the crushing burden of student debt and empower our graduates to take on the systemic racial inequalities and injustice that have been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. MOREHOUSE GRADUATION SPEAKER TO PAY OFF STUDENT LOANS OF ENTIRE 2019 CLASS "These dollars will...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are citing evidence that there is a cheap and widely available option for some patients combatting COVID-19. This study went so well, that the World Health Organization is recommending this drug be used worldwide. They found people on a ventilator and oxygen should be given corticosteroids. Researchers say it’s rare your able to find a drug where the evidence of the effectiveness in saving lives is so consistent. It was the on trial in the country to test this drug. Between March and June, the steroids trial was given to random adults in the ICU with Covid 19, this was done in 121 hospitals across 8 countries. The trial found a 93% probability that the steroid would improve a patient’s outcome as opposed to not having the steroid. The results looked to be consistent across age, race, and gender. Now, this is not for everyone. Researchers say non-hospitalized patients who do not need respiratory help were not tested. Steroids currently are not recommended for...
    The dean of USC’s Keck School of Medicine will step down after not quite three years in her post, the university announced on Monday, marking a change of leadership during a pandemic that has altered healthcare and brought upheaval to American higher education. Dr. Laura Mosqueda’s last day as dean will be Sept. 15. The physician will take on a new role focusing on geriatric healthcare and elder justice, “part of USC’s long-term growth plan for our entire healthcare system,” according to a memo issued by Provost Charles Zukoski. No further reason was provided for Mosqueda’s departure as dean. Zukoski said in his memo that Dr. Narsing Rao, the chair of USC’s ophthalmology program, would take over as interim dean while the university searched for a permanent replacement. “Serving as dean of the Keck School of Medicine has been an honor,” Mosqueda said in a statement issued by the university’s press office. “I look forward to working with Interim Dean Rao on a smooth transition and to returning to geriatrics at a time when the field is poised for exponential...
    A black doctor saving lives amid the COVID-19 crisis is a medical student based at the very same hospital where he once worked as a security guard. For five years Dr. Russell Ledet, 34, worked as a security guard at the Baton Rouge General Medical Center in Louisiana.  Inspired to become a doctor himself, he studied on note cards and asked doctors at the center if he could shadow them. While most told him they were too busy to help, Dr. Patrick Greiffenstein, the chief surgery resident, took him on as a mentee and jumpstarted his career. Now Leted, who is also a US Navy Veteran, has a PhD in molecular oncology from New York University and is enrolled in both the MBA program and medical school at Tulane in Louisiana. Dr. Russell Ledet, 34, (above with wife and kids) is saving lives amid the COVID-19 crisis as a medical student based at Baton Rouge General Medical Center in Louisiana - the very same hospital where he once worked as a security guard for five years He said...
    MINEOLA, Long Island (WABC) -- NYU Long Island School of Medicine held its 2020 White Coat Ceremony Friday to welcome the incoming class of medical students in an unprecedented era on the heels of the COVID-19 pandemic.The medical school is introducing a new "hybrid" curriculum, a combination of in-person and tele-education that may serve as a microcosm for how many colleges will model curriculums for the upcoming school year."You arrive at a unique moment of time," said Dr. Joseph Grecco, senior vice president of NYU Winthrop Hospitals. "The class of 2023 will be part of the first medical students that become future physicians in the world changed by the global pandemic."Zoom speakers included Dr. Robert Grossman, Dean of NYU Grossman School of Medicine and CEO of NYU Langone Health; and Dr. Andrew Hamilton, president of New York University, among others."Time flies, and before you blink, you will have finished your three year training," Dr. Grossman told them.NYU Long Island School of Medicine, now in its second year, is NYU's flagship medical school on Long Island, situated on the campus of...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The University of Maryland School of Medicine was one of the first in the world to start vaccine trials for COVID-19. The institution says those tests were so promising, researchers are now able to move on to the next phase. Researchers have been watching how the human body reacts to a vaccine which was designed to beat COVID-19. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines According to doctors, the preliminary results appear to show that the vaccine did it’s job at boosting antibodies. “We have shown that there are measurable neutralizing antibodies and that is a very good sign that the vaccine will probably be to directly fight SARS CoV-2 virus,” said Dr. Kirsten Lyke with the school’s Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health. “I have experienced no side effect,” said Cynthia Sikorski who participated in the trial. “I am very proud to be affiliated with this study. I’m proud that I have had this opportunity and that I am blessed with good health...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Preliminary data from the Pfizer, BioNTech Phase 1 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine trials are showing promise, according to the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  Trials have been conducted at the University of Maryland’s Center for Vaccine Development.  CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Phase III efficacy trials for COVID-19 vaccines are expected to begin in the area soon, according to the University of Maryland’s Center for Vaccine Development. For the latest information on coronavirus go to the Maryland Health Department’s website or call 211. You can find all of WJZ’s coverage on coronavirus in Maryland here.  
    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) recently announced the selection of the Morehouse School of Medicine as the awardee for a new $40 million initiative to fight COVID-19 in racial and ethnic minority, rural and socially vulnerable communities. The Morehouse School of Medicine will enter into a cooperative agreement with OMH to lead the initiative to coordinate a strategic network of national, state, territorial, tribal and local organizations to deliver COVID-19-related information to communities hardest hit by the pandemic. “The Trump Administration has made it a priority to support and empower Americans who have been most impacted by COVID-19, including minority, rural, and socially vulnerable communities,” said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “This new partnership between the Morehouse School of Medicine and our Office of Minority Health will work with trusted community organizations to bring information on COVID-19 testing, vaccinations, and other services to the Americans who need it.” The initiative – the National Infrastructure for Mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 within Racial and Ethnic Minority Communities (NIMIC) – is a three-year project...
    Morehouse School of Medicine learned it was the recipient of a new $40 million initiative to fight COVID-19 while watching the White House coronavirus task force hearings Tuesday. “We found out when everyone found out — by watching the announcement on TV,” Dominic Mack, an associate professor and director of the National Center for Primary Care at the college, said, per The Hill. “It’s gratifying.” The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced a new partnership with Morehouse School of Medicine to fight COVID-19 in racial and ethnic minority communities, theGrio previously reported.  READ MORE: HHS awards Morehouse School of Med $40M for COVID-19 relief initiative “This new partnership between the Morehouse School of Medicine and our Office of Minority Health will work with trusted community organizations to bring information on COVID-19 testing, vaccinations, and other services to the Americans who need it,” said HHS Secretary, Alex Azar in a press release. .@HHS_ASH just announced the selection of @Morehouse School of Medicine as the awardee for a new $40M initiative to fight #COVID19 in racial and ethnic minority,...
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