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    Switzerland will ban the use of electric cars for 'non-essential' journeys if the country runs out of energy this winter, the government has announced. Emergency plans drawn up in the event the Swiss are hit by blackouts also call for shop opening hours to be reduced by up to two hours per day, heating systems in nightclubs to be turned off, and other buildings to be heated to no more than 20C. Crisis measures could see streaming services and games consoles banned, Christmas lights turned off, and all sports stadiums and leisure facilities closed. Switzerland will ban electric cars from the roads this winter if the country start suffering blackouts in order to conserve energy (file image) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next 'I won't take lessons from wealthy Americans': Tory MP slams... What energy crisis? Christmas-mad father decks his house out... Share this article Share Switzerland fears an energy shortage in the coming months because it is highly dependent on imports to get it through winter. The country gets around 60 per cent...
    HUNGARY has begun establishing itself as a significant electric vehicle manufacturing player by bringing several new battery plants to its country. But the central European nation’s locals worry its rapid expansion of electric car battery factories will deplete local resources and create an unhealthy dependence on China. 2The assembly line for the C01 electric sedan at a factory for Chinese EV startup LeapmotorCredit: Getty Most of Hungary’s new electric vehicle (EV) battery plants are located just outside of Debrecen, a city with a population of 203,914, — according to World Population Review. Electric car battery manufacturing uses vast amounts of water. In one day, Hungary’s up-and-coming Chinese-run CATL EV battery factory will use as much water per hour as the entire Debrecen population, Financial Times reports. Debrecen is an hour from the nearest major river and has previously suffered from climate change-induced drought. READ MORE ON ELECTRIC CARSTIRE TYPES What type of tires do electric vehicles need?LEADING THE WAY I’m a pet expert – here’s why dogs prefer travelling in electric cars The CATL battery plant also needs a massive continual power supply...
    Vladimir Putin will 'send Ukraine back to the 18th century' by pushing ahead with attacks on the country's energy facilities, one of his top allies has claimed. Pyotr Tolstoy, the deputy speaker of the Duma, warned there would be no let-up in the Russian strikes on Ukrainian power stations ahead of winter. 'The infrastructure of Ukraine will be destroyed, and Ukraine will be sent back to the 18th century,' the member of Putin's United Russia party declared. In a tirade on French broadcaster BFM, the MP from Russia's rubber-stamp parliament, who has been sanctioned by the US, the EU and Britain, warned that Ukraine's allies 'will pay the price'. He added that the West should 'prepare itself for a war that will last years'. But Mr Tolstoy's bizarre intervention appears to be at odds with a statement made by the Russian defence ministry yesterday. A resident wounded after a Russian attack lies inside an ambulance before being taken to a hospital in Kherson, southern Ukraine on Thursday A Ukrainian paramedic helps an injured resident moments after a Russian strike in...
    Fox News’s Ben Domenech predicted the rise of “millennial girl boss-energy types” in the Democratic Party after they get clobbered in the midterm elections. Domenech joined Laura Ingraham on Monday night to discuss the likelihood that Republicans will sweep the midterms and take back control of Congress. He predicted that the results would mean the old Democratic leadership in Washington would get cast aside, but so would Beto O’Rourke, Stacey Abrams, and others who were meant to represent the party’s next generation. To this point, Domenech offered a hypothesis for what he thinks will happen next for the Democrats as a whole: I think that one of the things that we should understand here is we are going to move to a Democratic Party very quickly that is all being led by these millennial girl-boss energy types. And that’s going to be crazytown in terms of what they’re going to offer to the country and what they’re going to say. Domenech concluded by blaming this future extreme shift of the party on President Joe Biden’s policies and his “false approach”...
    Russia unleashed a fresh wave of missile strikes on cities and towns across Ukraine yesterday as Vladimir Putin seeks to shut down the country’s electricity, heating and water supplies ahead of winter.  They rained down on power facilities from Odesa, the Black Sea resort in the south, to Kovel, a medieval town near the Belarus border in the north, leaving about 40 per cent of the energy infrastructure out of action.  It was the thirteenth day in a row that drones and missiles have targeted the war-torn nation’s power system, resulting in blackouts, water shortages and desperate pleas from leaders for citizens to limit usage.  Firefighters work to put out a fire at energy infrastructure facilities in Rivne on Saturday, as Russia unleashed a fresh wave of missile strikes across Ukraine in a bid to cripple the country Putin, humiliated by military setbacks in his bungled invasion, is trying to weaponise winter in Ukraine by freezing the nation into submission – just as he is weaponising his control over energy supplies in Europe by driving up prices.  The tactic was...
    Bitcoin is the world's most popular cryptocurrency, but new research suggests its environmental impact may be underestimated. In a new study, academics in the US have presented 'energy-related climate damages' from human activity in the past five years, including Bitcoin mining. Bitcoin mining is the energy-intensive process of creating new Bitcoins by solving computational problems that verify transactions in the currency.  The researchers say Bitcoin mining uses more energy per year than the whole of Austria and is more environmentally costly than beef production or the mining of precious metals such as gold and copper.  Rather than being considered akin to 'digital gold', Bitcoin should be compared to energy-intensive products such as beef, natural gas and crude oil, the experts say. Researchers at The University of New Mexico find digital cryptocurrency Bitcoin is more comparable to the impacts of extracting and refining crude oil than mining gold Climate damages attributable to Bitcoin (BTC) mining averaged 35 per cent of its market value between 2016 and 2021 - more than beef production (33 per cent) and the mining of multiple precious metals...
    Schools are turning to solar energy to help save money as budgets in school systems across the country are falling short. By investing in solar energy, school districts can increase teacher wages, purchase new supplies and equipment and help students. Source: NowThis Earth/YouTube According to new data by Generation180, one in 10 schools across the country were using solar energy at the beginning of this year. Generation180 is a nonprofit that promotes and tracks clean energy and notes this is twice as much as there was just 7 years ago. The savings in electric bills are helping schools send those funds into other places that it is desperately needed. According to the government, after salaries, energy is the biggest expense for public K-12 schools. This equals around $8 billion a year. Now, thanks to new federal funding and climate legislation, schools can focus on energy upgrades. The New York Times reported that if roughly all 130,000 K-12 schools were to fully transition to solar, there would be an annual reduction of  60 million metric tons in carbon emissions,...
    Ivan Pechorin, point man for Vladimir Putin's development of the Arctic, died after 'falling overboard' into the sea from a boat near Vladivostok Vladimir Putin's point man for developing Russia's vast Arctic resources has died after 'falling overboard' while sailing off the country's Pacific coast. Ivan Pechorin, 39, was managing director of Putin's Far East and Arctic Development Corporation and had recently attended a major conference hosted by the Kremlin warmonger in Vladivostok. He is the latest in a long line of senior officials linked to Russia's energy sector and the Kremlin to die in suspicious circumstances in recent months. Pechorin fell off the side of a boat in the waters close to Russky Island near Cape Ignatiev, said Russian daily Komsomolskaya Pravda. His body was found after a search lasting more than a day. 'Ivan's death is an irreparable loss for friends and colleagues, a great loss for the corporation,' an official statement  from the corporation read. 'We offer our sincere condolences to the family and friends.' The corporation's former CEO Igor Nosov, 43, also died suddenly in February,...
    "The protest on Wenceslas Square was called by forces that are pro-Russian, are close to extreme positions and are against the interests of the Czech Republic," said Czech Prime Minister Petr Fiala. Fiala criticized the demonstrators, claiming they were expressing pro-Russia views “that are not in the interest of the Czech Republic and our citizens.” Fiala’s collation government survived a vote of no confidence on Friday. The Guardian reports that Pavel Blažek – the Czech Republic’s minister of justice and a member of Fiala’s party – warned last week of the risks involved in not addressing the country’s energy issues. “If the energy crisis is not resolved, the political system of this country is at risk,” Blažek said. Organizers have vowed to stage further protests unless the government resigns by September 25.
    BORIS Johnson will use his final week in No10 shoring up his legacy with a blizzard of visits defending his record. Rather than winding down, the PM is “flat out” on a packed schedule to remind voters of his achievements and outlining his hopes for the future. 1Boris Johnson will spend his final week as PM travelling the country in bid to cement his legacyCredit: AFP A series of domestic trips will be particularly focused on his commitments to level up, boost Britain’s energy supplies and cut crime. Pals said he wants to reassure Brits that his successor will pick up the mantle of promises made during the 2019 election when he bows out on September 6. One senior source said: “He’ll be out and about basically every day showing voters what he has delivered over the last three years and laying the groundwork for his successor to take over.” Mr Johnson is even considering making one final policy speech this week around the country’s energy security as the Ukraine war spikes global demand for gas. READ MORE ON BORIS...
    (CNN Business)In Sri Lanka, people queue for miles to fill a tank of fuel. In Bangladesh, shops shut at 8 p.m. to conserve energy. In India and Pakistan, power outages force schools to shut, businesses to close and residents to swelter without air conditioning through deadly heat waves in which temperatures top 100 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius).These are just some of the more eye-catching scenes playing out in the Asia Pacific region, where various countries are facing their worst energy crisis in years — and grappling with the growing discontent and instability caused by knock-on increases in the cost of living.Sri Lanka protesters burn politicians homes as country plunges further into chaosIn Sri Lanka and Pakistan, the sense of crisis is palpable. Public anger has already caused a wave of ministers to resign in Colombo and contributed to Imran Khan's downfall as prime minister in Islamabad. Yet many suspect the political reckoning has only just begun; both countries have been forced into desperate measures, going cap in hand to the International Monetary Fund and introducing shorter working weeks in...
    by Thomas Catenacci   Millions of Americans across the Midwest, Southwest and West are expected to face blackouts throughout the summer months, an industry analysis concluded. A variety of factors, including drought conditions and low wind conditions, are expected to put Americans in roughly 28 states at risk of experiencing blackouts this summer, according to a report from the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), a U.S. regulatory authority, published Wednesday. The region managed by the Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO) across 15 Midwest states is at the highest risk of “energy emergencies” during the summer due to capacity shortfalls, the analysis showed. “The Western Interconnection, Texas, Southwest Power Pool (SPP) … are at ‘elevated risk’ of energy emergencies during extreme conditions,” NERC added. “[MISO] is in the ‘high risk’ category, facing capacity shortfalls in its north and central areas during both normal and extreme conditions due to generator retirements and increased demand.” The Midwest’s “high risk” rating means its resources are “potentially insufficient” to meet peak load amid both normal and extreme conditions, NERC stated in an accompanying release. While extreme temperatures and low...
    Recently, making my way through the New York Times — and yes, at 77 and a creature of habit, I still read its paper version — I found two articles of special interest to me, one above the other, on page 17. These days, I hardly need to say that the front page (and its online equivalent) remains a riot of Ukraine news. That day, four major Ukraine stories were piled atop one another there (plus grim photos) with the overarching headline being: “Survivors Found in Theater Rubble, but Suffering Widens.” There can be no doubt that the ongoing disaster in Europe and Russia remains a story of major and developing, even world endangering, significance. Still, I wondered whether there shouldn’t also have been a place somewhere far more obvious for those two buried stories on page 17. The smaller one at page bottom was headlined, “Drought Conditions Expected to Worsen, and Spread Farther, Through the Spring.” Just 12 modest paragraphs, it offered the latest news on the climate-change-induced megadrought, the worst in 1,200 years, that’s now struck much of...
    On Friday’s broadcast of HBO’s “Real Time,” host Bill Maher proposed a “grand bargain” on energy where the left gives ground on increasing the use of nuclear power or on increasing fracking and the right gives ground on building up the green energy sector. Maher justified the fracking element by arguing that as long as America uses energy, it should use energy that is produced domestically. Maher stated, “If we were not in total government paralysis, I feel like this country, if it was a normal country, or the way it used to be, seminormal, we could make a grand bargain. Where the left gave up some things, they would — I mean, nuclear, I’m not for nuclear. I know it’s not a perfect solution, way less. But it’s like, there are no perfect solutions, give a little on that one or maybe even fracking. As long as we’re going to use the energy, use it here…use the stuff that we get…because we’re a big energy producer now. We won’t do that. And the right, they could give up a...
    Saint Alban les Eaux nuclear power plant, commissioned in 1985, exterior view, town of Saint Maurice l'Exil, department of Isere, FranceEric Bascol | Istock Editorial | Getty Images For Europe, the war in Ukraine has created an urgent priority to stop being dependent on Russian gas. The International Energy Agency, a policy organization with members from 31 national governments, and the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, both recently published plans for how Europe should accomplish this. The two published plans are roughly parallel, recommending the EU focus on renewables, efficiency, and imports of liquid natural gas. They do, however, differ in one obvious way. The plan from the IEA recommends keeping existing nuclear plants operating, while the plan from the EU makes no explicit reference to nuclear power at all. Addressing natural gas imports from Russia is no small feat. About 25% of the EU's energy consumption comes from natural gas, according to the Directorate-General for Energy for the EU. And the EU only produces 10% of the natural gas it needs, importing the rest from countries like Russia...
    New York (CNN Business)The United States and Europe have pummeled Russia with unprecedented sanctions over the past several weeks as Vladimir Putin's army bears down on Ukraine. But the West has largely left Russia's largest export untouched: energy.Until now.European Union officials on Tuesday said the bloc would slash imports of Russian natural gas by two thirds this year, and the EU announced a plan to achieve energy independence from Moscow "well before 2030." That would separate Europe from its single biggest energy supplier.Separately, President Joe Biden announced Tuesday a ban on Russian oil, natural gas and coal imports to the United States. And the UK government said Tuesday it would phase out Russian oil imports by the end of 2022 and explore ways of ending natural gas imports as well. America's ban is largely symbolic. The United States relies very little on Russian energy: The country's crude represented less than 2% of all US oil imports in December, according to the US Energy Information Administration. Overall, Russian crude and petroleum products made up about 5% of US imports at the...
    U.S. Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said President Joe Biden's State of the Union address 'left a little to be desired' for Democrats because he did not push issues like renewable energy, student loan debt, education or immigration. The New York Democrat said Biden's speech on Tuesday, where he focused on COVID recovery and the conflict in the Ukraine, failed to capitalize on moving away from Russian oil by committing to green energy.  'I think it was a lost opportunity,' Ocasio-Cortez, 32, told MSNBC. 'There is profound bipartisan support to a long-term shift away from fossil fuels.' She added that Biden had glossed over issues of 'crisis in education,' student loan debt and immigration, key issues that she said deserved the Democratic party's focus. U.S. Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said President Joe Biden failed to push for Democratic policies, including a shift away from fossil fuels, a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers, student loan forgiveness and mental health education during his State of the Union Speech on Tuesday Biden's speech focused on COVID recovery and the conflict in the Ukraine. The president touched on...
    by Jarrett Stepman   President Joe Biden delivered his first State of the Union address on Tuesday night, it’s a good time to ask: How has Biden done as president and what is the actual state of our union? According to the American people, things aren’t going great. A CNN poll in early February asked Americans what they thought of Biden’s presidency and what he’s done right since entering office Jan. 20, 2021. The top answer by a wide margin, according to that poll—hardly likely to be skewed against Biden and Democrats—was nothing at all. Want to keep up with the 24/7 news cycle? Want to know the most important stories of the day for conservatives? Need news you can trust? Subscribe to The Daily Signal’s email newsletter. Learn more >> Over half of those surveyed couldn’t come up with a single success during Biden’s first year in office. “I’m hard-pressed to think of a single thing he has done that benefits the country,” one respondent wrote, according to CNN. Yikes. When Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said in his speech at last...
    Shell becomes the latest company to withdraw all of its joint ventures with Russian state-backed Gazprom, just a day after rival BP said it would abandon the 19.75 per cent holding in the wake of the invasion of Ukraine. The oil titan announced it will end its joint ventures with Gazprom and related entities, and quit the Sakhalin 2 liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant by selling its 27.5 per cent stake. Shell also said it will quit their 50 per cent stake in the Salym Petroleum Development and the Gydan energy venture, owned and operated by Russian gas giant Gazprom.  Sakhalin 2, located off Russia's northeastern coast, is one of the world's largest integrated, export-oriented, oil and gas projects, as well as Russia's first offshore gas project - producing around 11.5 million tonnes of LNG per year.  Shell, whose Russian assets were reportedly valued at $3billion at the end of last year, also said it will stop working on the controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline project, which was completed last September.  The oil giant have reportedly invested an estimated £750million in the...
    Transmission towers are shown on June 15, 2021 in Houston, Texas. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), which controls approximately 90% of the power in Texas, has requested Texas residents to conserve power through Friday as temperatures surge in the state.Brandon Bell | Getty Images Texas led the country in building new renewable energy projects last year, according to a report released this week by the American Clean Power Association, continuing a promising trend in a state that's largely dependent on planet-warming fossil fuels. Texas installed 7,352 megawatts of new wind, solar and energy installation projects in 2021, significantly outpacing California, which installed 2,697 megawatts of storage projects. Oklahoma, Florida, and New Mexico were the other top producing states. Texas also surpassed other states in the amount of storage it has under construction or in advanced development, reaching nearly 20,000 megawatts, followed by California at nearly 14,000 megawatts. Texas is experiencing a rise in renewable energy deployment not necessarily due to concerns over human-caused climate change, but rather because of the low costs of renewable energy sources like solar...
    AS household energy bills continue to rise, too few people are asking: “Why?” This wasn’t inevitable. 6Spineless ministers have swallowed ludicrous claims over fracking - leaving us to pay the price with sky-high fuel bills, writes Douglas MurrayCredit: Getty 6Household energy bills continue to rise and too few people are asking 'why?'Credit: Alamy It is in part the result of successive British governments being timid and short-sighted in a way that has real-world consequences that hit all of us in the pocket. During the past decade this country had the opportunity to transform its energy position. It was shown that the UK was sitting on vast reserves of shale gas. This was a godsend. Over the previous decade — as North Sea production declined — this country went from being a net exporter of gas to a net importer. So when it turned out we could have accessed our shale reserves with modern “fracking” techniques, any government should have leaped at the chance. Not least because the areas of Lancashire and Yorkshire under which these reserves sit could...
    London (CNN)The prospect of an imminent Russian invasion of Ukraine has heightened alarm in the region, threatening to plunge the country's 44 million inhabitants further into the grips of conflict.But a move by the Kremlin would also ripple far beyond the two nations' shared border. Experts fear it could usher in a new era of uncertainty in eastern Europe, disrupt supply chains and the global economy, and force a shift in geopolitical influence that damages the credibility of the West.These fears could yet be averted. The Ukrainian government is downplaying the immediate risks of a full-scale invasion, even as officials on all sides scramble to find a diplomatic solution of a standoff that the Biden administration warns is precariously close to war.If an incursion does occur, it is unclear what form it would take -- and predicting the intentions of Russian President Vladimir Putin is a notoriously unwise exercise. "Any contemporary warfare would be horrifying, but there are gradations to the horror," said Nigel Gould-Davies, a former British ambassador to Belarus who is now senior fellow for Russia and Eurasia...
    In the Netherlands, the US company Meta has announced the establishment of the country’s largest data center in the Zeewolde Agricultural Municipality, refreshing the debate over the location of these giant energy-intensive infrastructure. Meta, Facebook’s parent company, was perhaps unaware that plans to set up a large data center in the Gewold municipality in the Netherlands would become a national affair. On December 17, 2021, the city council voted in favor of allowing Meta to use a large piece of farmland, where the company plans to set up a giant data center called Tractor Field 4. But on December 21, questioned by concerned residents, the Dutch Senate blocked the practice and put the matter in the hands of the government. For his part, Meta believes the city council vote is one “Positive results”, Though it remains “A lot more work needs to be done before the investment decision can be considered”. In other words, the American company is waiting to get all the necessary approvals and approvals before it is happy to start work. Meta promises a “Good neighbor” Zeewolde...
    Kazakh law enforcement officers gather in a square during a protest against LPG cost rise following authorities' decision to lift price caps on liquefied petroleum gas in Almaty, Kazakhstan January 5, 2022.Pavel Mikheyev | Reuters As the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan plunged into chaos this week, an internet shutdown hit the world's second-biggest bitcoin mining hub, in yet another blow to miners searching for a permanent and stable home. Less than a year ago, China banished all of its cryptocurrency miners, many of whom sought refuge in neighboring Kazakhstan. But months after these crypto migrants set up shop, protests over surging fuel prices have morphed into the worst unrest the country has seen in decades, leaving crypto miners caught in the middle. After sacking his government and requesting the aid of Russian paratroopers to contain the fatal violence, president Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev ordered the nation's telecom provider to shutter internet service. That shutdown took an estimated 15% of the world's bitcoin miners offline, according to Kevin Zhang of digital currency company Foundry, which helped bring over $400 million...
    A worker uses a mobile phone torchlight to illuminate his cutting space at the fish market, where portable emergency lighting runs due to a power cut, in Beirut, Lebanon, on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021.Francesca Volpi | Bloomberg | Getty Images Natural gas from Egypt may start flowing to Lebanon within two or three months, and hopefully "long before" the country's elections in 2022, according to Amos Hochstein, the U.S. State Department's senior advisor for global energy security. The governments of four countries in September reached an agreement to pipe gas from Egypt, through Jordan and Syria, to ease the power crisis in Lebanon. At the time, Egypt's Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla said the plan, which is backed by the U.S., would be put into action at the "earliest opportunity," Reuters reported. Hochstein said there is still work to be done before the pipeline is ready, but said he is confident that the plan, as well as an effort to interconnect Jordan and Lebanon's power grids, will succeed. "Every week that goes by, I am more optimistic that we're going to...
    (CNN)On a quiet Sunday morning, an ear-splitting roar reverberated across the English village of Eggborough as four giant concrete cooling towers imploded and crashed to the ground, transformed to clouds of debris in a matter of seconds. Just moments after their demolition, it became hard to imagine the structures were ever there, so out of place they were, jutting 90 meters into the sky among the green fields surrounding the River Aire. The Eggborough power station is just one of 14 coal plants the United Kingdom has laid to rest over the past decade. In 2012, 40% of the UK's power came from coal. By 2020, it was below 2%. Last year, the country went for 67 days without using any coal for power at all. Climate leaders at the COP26 talks in Glasgow, Scotland, will on Thursday intensify their efforts to put an end date on the use of coal, the biggest single contributor to the climate crisis. At the G20 meeting in Rome over the weekend, leaders failed to specify how they would phase out coal. It will...
                      by Thomas Catenacci  The U.S. has reduced emissions more than any other country in the world despite former President Donald Trump’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Accords. “In the last 10 years, the emissions reduction in the United States has been the largest in the history of energy,” International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Director Fatih Birol said at a Department of Energy press conference in 2019. “Almost 800 million tons. This is a huge decline of emissions.” Since 2000, the year the U.S. emitted the most carbon dioxide, emissions have declined by more than 17%, according to the IEA. Emissions have declined 3.7% since 2015 when world leaders signed an agreement with various climate commitments during a high-level United Nations conference. During both periods, U.S. energy output has increased 38% and 14% respectively, the IEA data showed. “The United States has led the world,” Republican Louisiana Rep. Garret Graves remarked during a House Oversight Committee hearing Thursday. “We’ve reduced emissions more than the next 12 emissions-reducing countries combined.” China which also signed the 2015 Paris agreement...
    The U.S. has reduced emissions more than any other country in the world despite former President Donald Trump’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Accords. “In the last 10 years, the emissions reduction in the United States has been the largest in the history of energy,” International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol said at a Department of Energy press conference in 2019. Immediately after taking office in 2017, Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris accords, arguing the agreement harmed American economic competitiveness and wouldn’t make a significant impact on the climate. The U.S. has reduced emissions more than any other country in the world despite former President Donald Trump’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Accords. “In the last 10 years, the emissions reduction in the United States has been the largest in the history of energy,” International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Director Fatih Birol said at a Department of Energy press conference in 2019. “Almost 800 million tons. This is a huge decline of emissions.” Since 2000, the year the U.S. emitted the most carbon...
    (CNN)China and the United States are the world's two biggest greenhouse gas emitters, so any attempt to address the climate crisis will need to involve deep emissions cuts from these two powerhouse nations.China's emissions are more than double those of the US, but historically, the US has emitted more than any other country in the world. There are many factors to consider when judging a country's climate credentials, and as leaders gather in Glasgow, Scotland for COP26 from Sunday, the US' and China's plans will be in the spotlight. Here's how the two stack up against each other.In 2006, China overtook the US as the world's biggest emitter of carbon dioxide (CO2) -- the most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere.Read MoreIn 2019, the last year before the pandemic hit, China's greenhouse gas emissions were nearly 2.5 times that of the US', and more than all the world's developed countries combined, according to an analysis from Rhodium Group.In terms of CO2-equivalent -- which is a way of measuring all greenhouse gases as if they were CO2 -- China emitted 14.1...
    (CNN)The US and UK will be sharing technology and expertise with Australia to help it build nuclear-powered submarines as part of a newly-announced defense pact between the three countries. The move has sparked fury in France, which has lost a long-standing agreement to supply Australia with diesel-powered subs. But it's not only the French who are furious. Anti-nuclear groups in Australia, and many citizens, are expressing anger over the deal, worried it may be a Trojan Horse for a nuclear power industry, which the nation has resisted for decades.New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke personally to her Australian counterpart, Scott Morrison, to tell him the vessels would not be welcome in the waters of her country, which has been a no-nuclear zone since 1984.Six countries -- the UK, US, China, Russia, India and France -- already have nuclear-powered subs in their fleet, and many major developed economies, including the US and UK, use nuclear in their energy mix. In France, 70% of the country's electricity is nuclear. So what's all the fuss about? Here's why some Australians are bothered...
    Minnesota lawmakers made headlines earlier this year when they approved a bundle of financial incentives to draw a timber product mill to the city of Cohasset in northern Minnesota. But the Legislature, along with state and county officials, also threw down cash for another project aimed at economic development in northern Minnesota: The expansion of a plant in Mountain Iron — a city of 2,800 people between Virginia and Hibbing — that manufactures solar panels. Part of an effort to diversify a regional economy reliant on natural resources like wood and iron ore, the plant — run by Ontario-based Heliene, Inc. — is expected to be the second-largest solar panel manufacturing plant in the country once the new project is done. Right now, Heliene is the only such manufacturer in the midwest. Martin Pochtaruk, Heliene’s president, said the company aims to help the U.S. meet new goals announced by President Joe Biden to produce half the nation’s electricity via solar energy by 2050. “Our product, made in Mountain Iron, Minnesota, is the simplest renewable energy engine to such electrification,” Pochtaruk...
    (CNN)Millions of Americans have gone without power this year. The biggest examples include California (heat), Texas (cold) and now Louisiana (hurricanes).With New Orleans, a major US city, powerless -- potentially for weeks -- in the aftermath of a hurricane with dangerously high temperatures setting in, it's worth taking a serious look at efforts to improve the nation's power system and make it more "resilient."RELATED: Ida left more than 1 million without power, possibly for weeks. And now comes the scorching heat Power outages can happen anywhere. Mark Dyson works at the Rocky Mountain Initiative, which advocates for carbon-free energy, and he told me everyone in the country needs to be concerned about this."I can't think of a single area of this country that doesn't have a looming catastrophic risk, like what we've seen on display in the last 18 months," he said. "If you can think of one, I can probably come up with a climate change scenario."Read MoreDyson is based in Colorado, so I asked about his neighborhood. That one was too easy."Wildfires," he said, and then described a...
    Former energy secretary Rick Perry joined ‘Hannity’ Thursday to give his take on President Biden's energy policies. RICK PERRY: It is stunning, Sean, to see how fast we went from energy independence to now reliant on countries like Iran to get our energy. You know, I didn’t think there could ever be anyone that would make me think that Jimmy Carter might have had it right, but Joe Biden and his policies that he’s putting in place making Jimmy Carter look kind of good—and I never thought I would say that but you think about where we were, the work that we did, the Americans that we put to work—whether it was building pipelines, good union jobs, building pipelines all across the country, stopping that keystone pipeline out of Canada—and then allowing the Russians to finish the Nord Stream 2! I mean it just absolutely makes no sense! The country that will hold the European Union hostage with energy just got the green light. It makes you kind of question, you know: What are on those computers that Biden’s son lost?  WATCH THE FULL INTERVIEW BELOW:  Video This article was written by Fox News staff.
    NAMIE TOWN, Japan (KABC) -- With billions of people watching the Olympics, the host country is using the Games as an opportunity to make a statement.Ten years ago, a massive tsunami barreled toward the Japanese coastline, killing 182 people.The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which sat right on the ocean, was protected by a 15-foot sea wall, but the tsunami was 50 feet. It smashed through, flooding the plant.Between the earthquake and the water, even the backup power was knocked out and reactors overheated.EMBED More News Videos The Japanese earthquake and tsunami that devastated the island country 10 years ago is considered one of the most powerful natural disasters ever recorded. Since then, experts have studied the event and have learned a lot. Through a translator, the mayor of nearby Namie Town described the deadly nightmare and how a radioactive cloud descended on his community. The whole town had to be evacuated, he said, with nothing but the clothes on their backs.Seemingly frozen in time, Namie Town still looks like the day everyone fled. Store fronts remain unchanged, buildings wrecked....
    Release Date:23.06.2021 | 11:35 GMT | Last updated:23.06.2021 | 11:35 GMT | Material use Reuters Explicit image Follow RT Alexei Likachev, president of the Rosatom Atomic Energy Agency, spoke about the Russian company’s talks with the Iraqi side about building nuclear reactors with Russian technology in Iraq. read more Today, Wednesday, Likashev said that “Rosatam” will sign documents with Baghdad on cooperation in the field of peaceful nuclear energy once the talks are over, the Novosti Agency said. Earlier, sources in Rosatom told the RT that plans to build a nuclear reactor in Iraq were still under discussion. The sources said: “The whole agenda for possible cooperation is being discussed within the framework of the dialogue with Iraq’s partners on nuclear issues, whether in the energy sector or in non – energy applications of nuclear technologies for peaceful purposes.” For its part, Iraqi officials announced that they “intend to build 8 nuclear reactors worth about forty billion dollars in the coming years to address the country’s power shortages and meet the growing demand...
    The Mihama nuclear power station's reactors are run by Kansai Electric Power Co., which recently obtained approval to re-start an old reactor which shut down in May 2011. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images Japan is re-starting a 44-year-old nuclear reactor located two hours from Osaka and Kyoto. Some energy experts are concerned that history — in the form of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster — could repeat itself. The reactor's owners won special approval to extend its lifespan beyond the 40-year limit. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. An 44-year-old nuclear reactor way past its prime is rumbling to life again, and Japan's energy experts are sounding the alarm.  The reactor is located two hours from the major southern cities of Osaka and Kyoto and is run by Kansai Electric Power. Per a report by the Korea Times, one reactor at the power company's Mihama station was re-started at 10 a.m. local time on Wednesday.  The Korea Times noted that this is the oldest reactor to be re-booted since the 2011 Fukushima disaster and that its owners required special...
    Santiago de Chile, Chile | AFP | Tuesday 08/06/2021 – Chile on Tuesday opened Latin America’s first solar power plant in the world’s driest and sunniest Atacama Desert (north), a plan to help the country achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. Covering an area of ​​700 hectares, 10,600 mirrors surround a tower 250 meters high, the top of which is bombarded by the sun’s rays. A tank containing molten salt is heated to over 560 degrees and produces steam, which operates a turbine that produces 110 MW of clean electricity. The infrastructure is connected to a nearby photovoltaic power plant, and the two together provide a total of 210 MW of renewable energy. Called the “Serrado Dominator” (Mountain of Dominance), the project has the uniqueness of being able to operate 24 hours a day, even in the absence of the sun, because molten salts generate 17.5 hours of energy. “This will save us more than 600,000 tons of CO2 emissions a year, which is equivalent to emitting 300,000 cars a year,” Chilean President Sebastian Pinera told a...
    Tokyo — This week the White House hosts a two-day Earth Day summit. Forty world leaders have been invited to the virtual event, during which Washington is expected to announce plans for further significant cuts in its carbon emissions.  But as an international organization warns that some nations' reliance on coal to power their economies back from pandemic lockdowns is driving the second-largest spike in carbon emissions ever, it will take more than one country's resolve to address the problem. Poll: Most Americans support global engagement on climate Staving off a climate catastrophe will depend on China, Japan and other major greenhouse-gas emitters dramatically reining in their reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal. China "hanging on" to the pastChina is the country that coal built. Its provinces have been compared to Appalachia, where coal is not just a cheap and plentiful fuel, but coal mining is a way of life. "Coal has been part of many of these provinces' economies, but also part of the culture," Alvin Lin, climate and energy policy director at the National Resources Defense Council in...
    New York : Family, friends and colleagues fired Katherine. Referential image. Photo: Antoine Demaison / . Last Friday, March 19, Salvadoran surfer Katherine Díaz died tragically after being struck by lightning, and this Sunday her family, friends and colleagues said goodbye to her at the General Cemetery of Puerto de La Libertad, in her native country. His remains will rest near his father, who passed away last year. #The Savior | Family, friends and colleagues say their last goodbye to the surfer Katherine Díaz, in the general cemetery of Puerto de La Libertad. Photos: LPG / Raúl Mercado. pic.twitter.com/dT1unC1pOc – The Graphic Press (@prensagrafica) March 21, 2021 Katherine Diaz He started surfing at the age of eight. He grew quickly in the discipline, as he lived on the El Tunco beach. Represented The Savior in national and international competitions from the 17 years. The young woman was preparing for the next World Surf Games, which coincidentally will host the aforementioned Central American country in May, and which will give numerous tickets to the Tokyo...
    Iberdrola recovers 5% on the Ibex 35 in nine sessions Iberdrola has just closed with Volkswagen the largest alliance for the supply of renewable energy in our country, on account of the collaboration between the two in the arrival of the electric battery factory in Martorell. That is where things began until the supply of energy for the Spanish plants of the German multinational automobile company and the start-up of recharging points for electric vehicles. While The company looks to Japan as it has just sealed a deal with Japanese renewable energy developer Cosmo Eco Power and the engineering company Hitz to develop in that country a new 600 MW offshore wind project, the so-called offshore. It is his second operation in the country, where it arrived a semester ago after the purchase of Japan’s Acacia Renewables, which has a 3,300MW offshore wind portfolio in the south of that country. Also, in this increasingly strong international diversification, it is already competing in Germany in an offshore wind auction in a project that reaches 300MW and that projects an investment...
    U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Jennifer M. Granholm is entering the job as much of the country rebounds from severe weather that stressed utilities and ultimately crippled Texas' independent power grid.  Granholm, who was confirmed and sworn in Thursday, told CBS News that the crisis in Texas "is one example of what we're going to continue to see over and over." Extreme cold and ice were more than Texas' power grid could handle, paralyzing coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar plants across the state, leaving more than 30 million residents without power, heat, and running water. The crisis accentuated the reality that Texas's energy infrastructure was not built to withstand arctic cold — the type of extreme conditions that are expected to become more frequent due to climate change.  One estimate predicts accumulated damages from the crisis could cost as much as $295 billion — more than Hurricanes Harvey and Ike combined.  Granholm called it a "climate disaster" and warned that similar events will continue to accelerate in frequency and impact if grids are not adapted and greenhouse gas...
    Wednesday, during an appearance on FBN’s “Kudlow,” Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) expressed his disapproval of Deb Haaland as the Biden Interior Secretary nominee. Barrasso warned Biden policies led by Haaland were detrimental to the Wyoming and national economies. “[Y]ou take a look at what this is going to do to the economy of our nation,” he said. “You’re talking about the loss of possibly a million jobs across the country. You know, Larry, what this is going to do to energy prices. It’s going to increase the cost of energy, whether it’s to heat your home or to drive your vehicle. All of these things are going to hurt — be hurt in the United States for our — for taxpayers, for hardworking families. I’m really worried in Wyoming. And what the Biden administration is doing is, essentially, it seems to be driving a stake through the heart of Wyoming’s economy, the energy economy.” “And then, with this coronavirus so-called relief bill, with this mandatory doubling of the minimum wages, we’re talking about across the country another 1.4 million jobs...
    President Biden officially announcing the United States' reentry into the Paris Agreement at the Munich Security Conference Donald Trump told his supporters that he would take the U.S. out of the Paris global climate agreement even before he took office in 2017. And he did. Only the process of leaving was long enough that it took until close to the end of 2020 before it became official. Now, 107 days after the United States left the accord, it’s back. On Friday, the United States officially reenters the Paris Agreement, along with 175 other nations. That leaves just Eritrea, Iraq, South Sudan, Libya, and Yemen as nations that are not signatory to the agreement—and most of those have been rather busy over the last few years. From even before it was negotiated, Republicans started pushing propaganda about the agreement, and making claims that it somehow benefits China, or is a gift to Europe, or at least definitely cripples American industry. But the truth is that the agreement is simply voluntary. No one in Paris, or anywhere else, has a hand in telling...
    The Secretary of Energy, Rocío Nahle, commented on Wednesday that the population can save energy after the blackouts registered in the north of the country. When asked about what the citizens of the capital and the general public could do, the official stressed that the population has been called to use the electricity. « East efficient savings is, if we are not occupying a room, not having the lights on, if we have a connected equipment and we are not using it, then disconnect it, and make efficient use of energy, « he said in a conference with the head of government of Mexico City, Claudia Sheinbaum. Later on Wednesday, the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) reported that the electricity supply was restored to 100 percent to the company’s users who were affected by the scheduled outages and blackouts in the north of the country, which affected mainly to Nuevo León, Tamaulipas, Coahuila, Sonora and Chihuahua. We recommend you AMLO asks Mexico to ‘tighten its belt’ in electricity consumption Do you want...
    Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry warned in the wake of a crippling snowstorm in Texas Monday that adhering to green energy ideology will result in people getting killed. “They don’t care about your lives in those cases,” Perry, who served as former President Donald Trump’s energy secretary for two years, said about liberal politicians, such as Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who support ambitious green energy policies. “I mean, think about if we were in the AOC world, fast forward 10 years, and everything is solar, everything is wind,” Perry, appearing on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News program, continued. “And you have this type of event, this type of, I mean, it’s 9 degrees in Round Top, Texas, we’re the same latitude as Houston, 9 degrees. And if you don’t have power, you’re gonna, you’re gonna die. I mean, there are countless lives that could be lost with this type of reckless adhering to a philosophy that, quite frankly, is not scientific.” Texas is currently being ravaged by a freezing storm that has left millions of residents without power partially due to frozen...
    The reform to the Electricity Industry Law by President Andrés Manuel López Obrador « is not an ideological initiative », it seeks to end the « abuses and looting » of the private initiative to the nation, and will be « the initiative of initiatives of this Legislature , the most important, « said the coordinator of Morena in the Chamber of Deputies, Ignacio Mier Velazco. The Puebla politician argued that with the presidential proposal, “we are not opposed to a legitimate and equitable competition, this does not have an ideological burden, but rather to respect conditions of equity, equality, free competition, that do not put the population at a disadvantage. national electricity industry to favor a few ”, he explained. The legislator anticipated that there will be a forum of « open parliament » and assured that « we are going to demonstrate, with arguments, what they did in the 2013 energy reform, which was only to favor private interests in a lying, false way, hiding in nooks and crannies of the regulation to plunder the country ”. He explained that in the previous energy...
    The president of the Council of Chambers and Business Associations of the State of Mexico (Concaem), Gilberto Javier Sauza Martínez, pointed out that faced with a scenario as complex as the one we live today, and that had not been seen in more than 80 years, the environment Certainty that must be guaranteed is essential, as well as access to competitive and functional goods and services for the population. Referring to the initiative to reform the Electricity Industry Law (LIE), proposed by the federal government, he said that it generates anxiety for companies that are in the process of investing in our country, but it also raises a wide possibility that electrical energy and other goods become more expensive, which is a very serious risk for sectors such as the industrial sector that has energy as one of its basic inputs. He referred that, in some sectors, up to 40 percent of its fixed expenses are in electricity and having variations means a very serious risk, in addition to this, it faces the risk of stopping or canceling foreign investments...
    The Danish Energy Agency has today formally announced that, as expected, it will build an artificial island in the North Sea, 50 miles off the coast of the Jutland Peninsula. This green energy hub will, when complete, be expected to supply 10GW: roughly the energy needs of 10 million households across Europe. Measuring around 120,000 square meters, the artificial island will receive, store and transmit power from nearby wind farms back to shore. Reuters reports that the project is likely to cost around $34 billion, and is expected to be operational by 2033.  Officials add that, eventually, it’s hoped that the island will house a “green fuel” plant which can then be sent to Denmark. That’s likely to be an extension of the Danish plan to use surplus wind power to run an electrolyzer to extract Hydrogen from seawater without any CO2 emissions. And Denmark, which is one of the European Union’s largest oil producers, is expecting to use this island to help renew its own energy industry. The nation has previously said that it will stop extracting fossil fuels...
    Don’t say we weren’t warned. It has been just over two weeks since Joe Biden became president, but already any lingering myths of “Joe Biden the moderate” have disappeared. The Swamp is back running the show, with Biden wasting no time implementing the destructive, job-killing policies Republicans cautioned Americans about on the campaign trail. While Biden might talk a good game about unity, actions speak louder than words, and instead of taking actions to unite Americans, Biden has done the exact opposite. Take Biden’s Day One decision to revoke the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline. With the stroke of a pen, hundreds of workers in Wisconsin found themselves laid off from their jobs. When all is said and done, cancelling the Keystone Pipeline will cost numerous Americans their jobs, including many good-paying, union jobs. Blue-collar union workers used to be the bedrock of the Democrat Party’s base of support. Joe Biden and John Kerry’s message to those workers now losing their jobs? Find a new one. Biden’s crusade to kill American jobs and end affordable energy prices doesn’t end...
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