Thursday, Aug 18, 2022 - 09:43:58
4 results - (0.000 seconds)

editorial oversight:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. It’s critical that California’s new state controller recognize and respect the responsibilities and boundaries of the job. The position is mostly an administrative post and provider of critical watchdog oversight. The controller manages a state office of more than 1,400 workers and ensures tax dollars are efficiently and effectively spent. With a few exceptions, it is not a policymaking position. Which is why, as the field of candidates from the June primary is now narrowed to two for the Nov. 8 runoff, the choice for voters should be clear: Lanhee Chen would provide the independent leadership and objective government oversight needed to run the state controller’s office. A Stanford public policy and law instructor and fellow at the university’s Hoover Institution, Chen has enjoyed bipartisan support as a policy advisor in Washington. In contrast, his runoff opponent, Malia Cohen, a former San Francisco supervisor who now sits on the state Board of Equalization, sees herself and her role as controller as being a “social justice warrior” who uses the...
    The deceit from BART has no bounds. A scathing grand jury report calls out the transit agency for blocking its inspector general from conducting audits mandated by Bay Area voters. BART board members and management have limited the inspector general’s access to workers and stymied the independence and confidentiality of her investigations. The findings last month of the Alameda County civil grand jury reinforce the message of our prior reporting and editorial: The leaders of BART — which serves the counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco and, most recently, Santa Clara — resist any oversight of their billions of dollars of spending and are beholden to labor unions at the expense of riders and taxpayers. What was shocking was the response from BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost: “BART strongly believes in the mission of the Office of the Inspector General to provide the objective oversight wanted by the public.” What disingenuous poppycock. BART leaders don’t want objective oversight. They’ve spent the past three years trying to undermine the district’s highly qualified inspector general, Harriet Richardson. It’s time for the state...
    Santa Clara County residents deserve better performance than they’re receiving from Sheriff Laurie Smith. She should have resigned in September. It is appalling that the sheriff invoked her Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination rather than answer a grand jury’s questions about a pay-to-play concealed weapons investigation involving her own office. Now she is effectively stalling an agreement to establish a civilian watchdog to audit how her office runs the scandal-plagued county jails and its police enforcement. In effect, she is thumbing her nose at the Board of Supervisors’ desire to shape up conditions at the county jails. A competent sheriff would welcome the oversight sought by the board. It’s been five years since three jail deputies killed Michael Tyree, a 31-year-old mentally ill Santa Clara County inmate, in his jail cell. Tyree’s death resulted in the board calling for a civilian-led commission to review the sheriff’s handling of the jails. Scores of jail reforms were recommended, including the establishment of civilian oversight. Then, in March, 2018, supervisors approved an ordinance creating the county Office of Correction and Law Enforcement Monitoring...
    By The Associated Press Recent editorials of statewide and national interest from Pennsylvania’s newspapers: For new police oversight commission to work, Philly must learn from its past The Philadelphia Inquirer July 8 After weeks of protest against police brutality and racism in policing, Philadelphia City Council unveiled its radical new idea: a Citizens Police Oversight Commission. How radical? It was first tried in Philadelphia more than half a century ago. The new oversight body would presumably be different than the existing Police Advisory Commission it would replace. Voters in November will need to approve a charter amendment establishing the commission, though specifics on its structure, powers, or funding won’t be fleshed out until after the vote. The current commission, established in 1994, has a long legacy of being ineffectual at oversight, primarily due to its small budge and lack of authority -- making it easy for police commissioners, and the department as a whole, to sideline and ignore. In recent years, the police response to the PAC’s recommendations can be summarized as ‘thanks but no thanks.’ Commissioner Ross rejected PAC’s...
1