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    The fall season is always an exhilarating time for classical music fans, and this week’s calendar brings events for every interest: thrilling symphonic works, opera, and chamber music are among the highlights. Salonen conducts: San Francisco Symphony music director Esa-Pekka Salonen is back in Davies Symphony Hall, with three excellent programs to launch the 2022-23 season. First on the schedule is the Symphony’s Opening Night Gala on September 23; Salonen gets the season off to an enchanting start with Mendelssohn’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The performance features members of the African-American Shakespeare Company, along with sopranos Anne-Marie MacIntosh and Elisa Sunshine, and members of the San Francisco Symphony Chorus. Opening weekend continues with Salonen conducting the Symphony’s first-ever performance of Florence Price’s Violin Concerto No. 2; featuring American violinist Randall Goosby, in his S.F. Symphony Orchestral Series debut. Also on the program: Richard Strauss’ mighty tone poem, “Also Sprach Zarathustra,” and Mozart’s Overture to “The Impresario.” This is a one-night-only performance, 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The next program, with performances Sept. 29 and Oct. 1-2, features Mahler’s Second Symphony, also known as...
    From San Francisco to the South Bay, the classical music scene gets off to a thrilling start this month. Two operas — San Francisco Opera’s world premiere of “Antony and Cleopatra,” and Opera San Jose’s new take on “The Marriage of Figaro” — launch the season with must-see performances. Also on the calendar are Innovative programs by New Century Chamber Orchestra, Symphony San Jose, and the San Francisco Symphony’s fall appearance in Berkeley. Here are five highlights of the fall season. A world-class couple: San Francisco Opera launches its centennial season with the world premiere of “Antony and Cleopatra.” This hotly anticipated new opera by Bay Area composer John Adams is based on Shakespeare’s play and other classical sources. Elkhanah Pulitzer directs the production, setting the ancient world’s epic power struggles amid the glamour of 1930s Hollywood. Company music director Eun Sun Kim conducts, and the cast features bass-baritone Gerald Finley and soprano Amina Edris in the title roles of the iconic lovers. Details: Sept. 10-Oct. 5; War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco; $26-$422; $25 tickets for live-streamed matinee Sept. 18;...
    Was Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen born to sing Handel?  Opera lovers might think so, once they’ve heard this dynamic, rich-voiced countertenor in one of the composer’s masterworks. Audiences will get the chance beginning this weekend, when West Edge Opera opens its Festival 2022 season with Handel’s “Julius Caesar,” starring Cohen in the title role of the legendary Roman general. West Edge’s summer festival returns on the same weekend when light opera company Lyric Theatre is kicking off a new festival at San Jose’s Hammer Theatre Center (more on that later). West Edge’s new production of “Julius Caesar,” conducted by Christine Brandes and directed by West Edge general director Mark Streshinsky, opens July 23 as the first of three full productions in the company’s new venue at the Oakland’s Scottish Rite Center. Continuing through Aug. 14, the season also includes “Ariane and Bluebeard” by Paul Dukas, starring mezzo-soprano Renée Rapier; the American premiere of “Coraline” by Mark-Anthony Turnage, with Kendra Broom in the title role; and a workshop performance of a new opera, “Bulrusher,” by composer Nathaniel Stookey and playwright Eisa Davis. Cohen,...
    Have you ever wondered why your Spot’s ears perk up when it’s perfectly quiet? Or why Fido barks a minute before the delivery person appears with a package at your front door? Well, it’s quite simple. In addition to some dogs being able to smell people or objects as far as 12-miles away, dogs have much more sensitive hearing than humans. Although my dog Sueshi sometimes acts like she doesn’t hear me at all when I am giving her a command, in fact dogs can hear sounds four times farther away than we can. Dogs can hear higher frequencies, can differentiate sounds (such as the sound of your car versus other cars), and are good at pinpointing the exact location of sounds. With such superior hearing, you can imagine it might be hard for dogs to tune out distracting noises. Perhaps that’s why studies show that music, particularly classical music, helps reduce stress levels in shelter dogs as measured by their heart rate and observable behaviors. Dogs who listened to classical music were more likely to lay with their heads...
    PEARL, Miss. (AP) — A string quartet performed classical music, movie scores and hymns during a concert this week inside a Mississippi prison. Two violinists, a viola player and a cellist from First Baptist Church of Jackson played for 68 inmates Tuesday at Central Mississippi Correctional Facility. “Music is a language that anyone from any country, any system, anyone can understand because it’s the beauty that God gave us,” cellist Sarah Beth Mullen said a news release Thursday from the Mississippi Department of Corrections. Beth Masters, the department’s director of the women’s prison seminary, arranged the concert, which took place in the prison chapel. “I wanted to uplift them and give them some classical inspiration with a little bit of the free world,” Masters said. In addition to hymns such as “Amazing Grace” and classical works by Bach, Beethoven and Mozart, the musicians played selections from “The Sound of Music,” “Raiders of the Lost Ark” and “The Lion King.” One of the inmates, Torri Sanders, said she enjoyed the experience. “Having that music poured into us — everything you put...
    An initiative of the Ministry of Youth, Culture and Communication (Department of Culture), the Volubilis International Festival of Traditional World Music will be held from July 22 to 25. Launched in collaboration with Fez Meknes Regional Council, this art event is placed under the high patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI and takes place in the archaeological site of Volubilis and Meknes. The event is part of a series of festivals organized by the ministry to protect cultural and artistic heritage and intangible heritage in its various creative and expressive manifestations, a statement from the organizers said. Organized in collaboration with Meknes Provincial Council, Meknes Municipality and Mechoir Stinia Municipality, the festival aims to strengthen artistic creativity and openness to world cultures through artistic dialogue. The Volubilis International Festival of Traditional World Music is part of festivals such as the Jerash Festival and the Carthage Festival, and is an annual event dedicated to creating bridges between the past, present and future and celebrating cultural heritage in its various forms. In addition to Morocco, the festival offers animated artistic...
    They are known to be very intelligent. But it seems dolphins are cultured too. A study suggests they are fond of classical music. Dolphins played Bach, Grieg, Saint-Saens, Debussy and Beethoven showed more sociable behaviour. The mammals showed more interest in each other, gave more gentle touches and swam in synchrony for longer, researchers from the University of Padua in Italy found. Giving them toys or playing other sounds did not have the same effect. The way the dolphins behaved after hearing the music suggested they were feeling happy, perhaps because it activated their brains to produce endogenous opioids – chemicals such as endorphins which influence mood. (Stock Image) Famed for their intelligence, dolphins also seem to be fond of classical music, which appears to make them more sociable  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Now Nature goes woke! Top science journal forces writers to... Why some wildlife experts fear the celebrity campaign to ban... Share this article Share ‘We know that, in a wide range of animals, endorphins are related to social...
    HOUSTON, Texas -- Houston-based violinist Demola has gained more than 2-million followers online as he fuses multiple genres to create a global sound for his music. Demola moved to Houston from Lagos, Nigeria in 2014 to pursue a career in music. He grew up playing classical violin and has used his skills to play all kinds of music from classical to hip-hop to jazz. He's known for doing covers of popular songs like Drake's "Hotline Bling", but has created his own sound with his new album "Feelings," which he released in April of 2022.He not only plays the electric violin, he also plays guitar, ukulele, keyboard, djembe, and he sings. He's also the official violinist for many award winning, legendary R&B groups including Tony! Toni! Toné! and Dwayne Wiggins.
    Musicians, conductors, and especially composers of color in classical music are few and far between. Pictured here is Guyanese conductor, clarinetist, and composer Rudolph Dunbar (1907-1988) directing an orchestra during a performance at the Royal Albert Hall, U.K., in 1942. Those with a passable knowledge of classical music composition might be excused for assuming that this genre was almost exclusively the province white men (with a smaller subset of often overlooked white women). But in the late 18th century, for example, fans of no less stature than former U.S. President John Adams were describing the orchestral leader Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, a prolific composer of concertos and string quartets, as “the most accomplished man in Europe.” Bologne, the son of an African girl enslaved and impregnated by a wealthy plantation owner, and later known as the “Black Mozart,” was so talented that his erstwhile namesake and contemporary Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was rumored to have modeled the sinister role of Monostatos in The Magic Flute after Bologne, as a way of salving an acute sense of jealousy he felt toward Bologne’s abilities. But when...
    HARLEM, New York (WABC) -- A big and classical orchestra piece written by a Black composer, will be performed for the first time Friday night in Harlem, after the piece was pulled from the radio mid-broadcast decades ago because of the color of the composer's skin.Rehearsal for Friday's performance of "The Ordering of Moses" at Riverside Church in Harlem was running a little late Thursday night ... 85 years late.The sweeping and dramatic classical music piece was first performed in 1937 in what was supposed to be the historic first national radio broadcast ever of a new classical work by an African American composer, R. Nathaniel Dett.But as the broadcast, on the old NBC radio network began, it seemed that much of America would not abide such an achievement from a Black man.ALSO READ | Subway surfers caught on video walking atop Brooklyn J trainEMBED More News Videos An eyewitness captured shocking video of several people standing on top of a moving subway train in Brooklyn on Friday. "About 3/4 of the way through it was just abruptly cut and...
    A musician who wants to make classical music more accessible to more diverse performers and audience members has been named this year’s recipient of a college scholarship founded in honor of slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. Joseph Weinberg, who graduated from Pittsfield High School in Massachusetts last weekend, plans to use the $2,000 Daniel Pearl Berkshire Scholarship to major in music with a focus on double bass performance at The Juilliard School in New York City. Weinberg, who started playing double bass his freshman year, said Tuesday he has been inspired by his own experiences in youth orchestras such as Massachusetts Music Educators Association All-State Orchestra, where too many of the musicians looked just like him. In addition, some Black friends have told him they feel like outsiders in the classical music world. “Orchestras end up looking so white,” he said. “It would be nice if they looked a little different.” Classical music too often appears elitist, he said. “It is beneficial to the classical music world that it gains a wider audience, and it is in dire...
    PLAYING music to your houseplants is one way to help them grow -and according to a gardening expert, there's a particular playlist you need to select to help them flourish. If you don't have a green thumb knowing what to do to keep your plants thriving can be difficult. 2According to scientific research playing classical music helps plants growCredit: Getty However, knowing the basics about how much water and sunlight they need, plus adding this simple trick can help your plant flourish. Gardening expert Teo Spengler on lifestyle site hunker.com says playing music is a secret weapon to have in your arsenal to keep plants lush. Research has shown that music can actually help plants grow. It's tied to the sound vibrations from the notes. Plants, in particular, seem to respond well to classical music. More expert gardening tipsPLANTING IDEAS Gardener's $5 hack could help keep your houseplants alive longerA-PEELING TIPS This trash item can help start seedlings - but only for certain plants One of the earliest projects linking music to plant growth was undertaken in 1962 by botanist Dr....
    Sign up to get Artscape in your inbox every Friday afternoon. The old way of thinking about classical music may be changing. Once an art form that celebrated the musical genius of mostly white men, performed by orchestras that had a dearth of melanated musicians for a primarily white audience, things are slowly starting to shift. The Institute for Composer Diversity found, according to the San Francisco Classical Voice article from August, that on average, orchestra seasons from 2015-16 to 2017-18 performed work by composers of color 3 percent of the time. The 2019-2020 season was slightly better, with 8 percent of works by composers of color. In the 2021-2022 season, scheduled performances included 17 percent of works by composers of color.  The protests that erupted across the country in 2020 after the murder of George Floyd might offer some explanation for the uptick — as institutions took deliberate steps to address disparities within their own organizations. But you can also look at the legwork put in by organizations who have been working to change things for decades. Case in point:...
    CORAL GABLES (CBSMiami) – A world away from the searing, disjointed sights and sounds of war, the mellifluous, soothing sound of classical music fills the University of Miami. “It’s called Melody and it’s just a beautiful tune that everyone in Ukraine would recognize,” says Marina Radiushina, a Ukrainian-trained, world-renowned classical pianist. READ MORE: Florida Lawmakers To Hold Special Session After Gov. DeSantis Vetoes New Congressional Map“We all know what’s going on in Ukraine right now. People need support and we need peace. So, all of this is to just bring peace,” said Radiushina. From Odessa, Ukraine, originally, Radiushina also happens to be the artistic director for the Miami Chamber Music Society. She single-handedly raised thousands for this classical concert aptly titled “Homeland” using the talent that’s taken her around the world: music. Mike Eidson, the founder of Miami Chamber Music Society, explained, “Music, like most of the arts, it transcends borders. So the people in Ukraine can love the same music by the people in Miami Florida. It’s a common language.” READ MORE: Miami, Tampa Home Prices See Big JumpsInna Mlademovic, from...
    LAKE FOREST (CBSLA) — When the conflict in Ukraine broke out, concert violinist Iryna Krechkovsky felt helpless. “I was born and raised in Ukraine, Ivano-Frankivisk, the western part of Ukraine,” she said. READ MORE: Future Impact of Russian Oil Ban on American Gas PricesEven though she spent most of her life in North America, first Canada and then the United States, she still felt a strong attachment to Ukraine — especially when her cousin, a violinist for the Kyiv Opera, joined the Ukrainian Army. “You know it feels guilty to be here — to be safe,” Krechkovsky said. “But we’re trying to do what we can.” Racked with guilt, Krechkovsky knew she had to help. As the co-founder of Chamber Music Orange County and with help from her violinist sister Marta, Krechkovsky gathered a group of classical musicians and planned a benefit concert featuring classical Ukrainian music. All proceeds from the paid streaming concert will be donated to humanitarian aid provided by the United Ukrainian American Relief Committee. READ MORE: Pursuit Ends In Multi-Vehicle Crash On 710 Freeway“The thought behind...
    HARLEM, Manhattan (WABC) -- Acclaimed violinist Ezinma, whose fusion of hip-hop and classical music has made her a viral sensation, is launching a new foundation in Harlem to introduce underserved children to classical music.Meredith Ezinma Ramsay, known affectionately as "Classical Bae," has performed with headliners such as Beyoncé, Yo-Yo Ma, SZA, Kendrick Lamar and Joshua Bell. Now, her new foundation, Strings By Heart, aims to bring more diversity, access and inclusion to the classical music world through music education.She kicked off the new mission Friday with a tour of Harlem public schools.ALSO READ | Brittney Johnson becomes first Black actress to play Glinda in 'Wicked' on BroadwayEMBED More News Videos The Broadway show "Wicked" is making history this Black History Month. Sandy Kenyon interviews the actress breaking new ground. Ezinma wrote the score for the 2018 documentary "The Times of Bill Cunningham" about the late New York Times photographer and also worked on the score for the Marvel blockbuster "Black Panther." Yet her ascent to the heights of the classical music world was not an easy one."I remember the isolation...
    APPLE may have leaked the potential name for its upcoming classical music service via the latest Android Apple Music beta update. A data string was uncovered by 9to5Google and revealed in an “APK Insight” post. 1Apple Classical is thought to be the name for Apple's forthcoming Android music appCredit: SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett The team went through the files and discovered references to “Apple Classical,” which is thought to be the name of the new service, according to the site. There has been no confirmation from Apple and the name could always change before being officially released. Last year, Apple purchased the classical music streaming service Primephonic and promised its listeners a new music service dedicated to the genre would be forthcoming. Apple said it would bring popular features from that service, such as playlists and exclusive tracks, along with Primephonic’s complete music library, to its new app. While pop and rock music can be easy to categorize online – by band/artist, album name and genre – classical music can be notoriously difficult usually requiring a lot of extra information....
    SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — The Emerging Black Composers Project is a 10-year program at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music that spotlights early-career Black American composers. “Being a composer, it’s a challenging task, regardless of age, regardless of color. There are many people who don’t get the opportunity to even hear their music,” said Jonathan Bingham, a 2021 EBCP winner. “When we move forward into the 21st century, there is a shift in demographics. We want to keep the audience membership healthy in classical music.” Since 2020, the project has encouraged entries from Black composers under 35. Recipients are awarded a cash prize, mentorship and performance of their work by the San Francisco Symphony conducted by music director Esa-Pekka Salonen. “A lot of black composers have been told in years past that there was no place for them on the podium, there was no place for them on stands of musicians across the world and that has changed,” said Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser, the chair of the project and the resident conductor of engagement and education for the San Francisco Symphony....
    A GRIEVING mum made an incredible discovery in her son’s notebook after the 12-year-old died in a freak accident. Kyan Pennell died on January 31 after getting caught between a trailer and a gate at the family home in Tuchekoi, southeast of Gympie, in Queensland. 4Although only 12 years old Kyan had developed a love of classical musicCredit: Facebook 4Kyan's mum Amanda is hoping her son's music can be recorded in time for his funeral on SundayCredit: Studio10 The lad had a passion for classical music and had been teaching himself the piano in the months before he died. Kyan had started writing his own composition but he’d kept what he was doing secret from his parents. His tragic death left the family heartbroken, Yahoo News reports His mum Amanda though discovered an unfinished song in a notebook of Kyan’s and now she is trying to bring his music to life ahead of his funeral on Sunday. While she has not heard the piece, she has put out an appeal on Facebook to hopefully get musicians to play what Kyan...
    Orchestral concerts, recitals, and special events: February’s shaping up as a great classical music month. Here’s a look at some highlights. Back to Bach: The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra’s tackles Bach’s Mass in B-minor, with music director Richard Egarr conducting performances featuring countertenor Iestyn Davies in his first appearance with the early music ensemble, joining soprano Mary Bevan, tenor James Gilchrist, and baritone Roderick Williams as soloists. Details: 7:30 Feb. 2 at Bing Concert Hall, Stanford; 8 p.m. Feb. 4 at Herbst Theatre, San Francisco; 8 p.m. Feb. 5 at First Congregational Church, Berkeley; $20-$125; www.philharmonia.org. Blomstedt at Davies: During his 1985-95 tenure as San Francisco Symphony’s music director, Herbert Blomstedt conducted, to great acclaim, all six of Carl Nielsen’s symphonies. Now Blomstedt, the Symphony’s Conductor Laureate, returns to lead the composer’s Symphony No. 4, “The Inextinguishable.” Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 completes the program. Details: 7:30 Feb. 3-4, 2 p.m. Feb. 6; Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco; $20-$165; www.sfsymphony.org. “Eco” friendly: Directed by David Milnes, UC Berkeley’s own Eco Ensemble pays tribute to Toshio Hosokawa in a “Portrait Concert” featuring works by the lauded...
    Dennis Owens, a popular D.C. radio personality who for decades made classical music fun and approachable, died of degenerative heart disease on Sept. 26 in Naples, Florida, where he had retired. Owens was 87. For nearly four decades, Owens entertained listeners of WGMS not only with a wide repertoire of classical musical that soothed frayed nerves during rush hour, but also with a witty sense of humor that appealed to a broad audience. By all accounts, Owens prided himself on making classical music accessible. “Sometimes you think classical music … you have to have studied it. And he did not present it in that way. He made it reachable for everybody. He made it fun,” Christiane Owens, his wife of nearly 50 years, told WTOP. She recalled a young woman coming up to Owens at a concert to tell him that she wasn’t a fan of classical music and actually decided to listen to him as a penance for Lent — but she wound up becoming a classical convert. “The story ends with, ‘I am now a listener all the...
    One warm summer day, I met the composer Caroline Shaw in New York City, where we spent an hour in Central Park talking about her music. Not long after we found a bench, it began to rain, lightly at first and then harder and then really hard. But we had brought umbrellas, so we decided to ride it out. This was not, we gradually but inevitably realized, an especially wise decision, but we were each too stubborn to be the first to give up. Coincidentally we are both from North Carolina and therefore reflexively polite, so there was a lot of “Should we move?” and “Are we under the right tree?” and “Are we under a tree at all?” Nevertheless, we stayed put and kept talking, even as the rain came down hard enough to sound like a third party in the conversation when I replayed my recording. By the time we finished talking, we were, umbrellas notwithstanding, thoroughly soaked. But not unhappy. It all seemed like one of those oddball moments in a bubble that came and went, never...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yo-Yo Ma spent the better part of the pandemic playing cello to an online audience seeking solace in his music. On Friday, he marked his return to San Francisco by playing an energetic Bach cello suite before a live audience to inaugurate the opening of a new performance center designed to increase public access to classical and jazz music. Ma praised the top-notch acoustics in the San Francisco Conservatory of Music’s Bowes Center for Performing Arts and the “safe space that actually gives the students and faculty … the preconditions for creativity.” The towering campus in Civic Center was among a handful of construction projects that was allowed to continue during the pandemic to house students and provide them classrooms, a recording studio and a radio station under one roof. The centerpiece of the $200 million building, however, is a street-level recital hall with floor-to-ceiling glass windows to let passersby watch students hone their craft. With the recital hall and two other performance spaces in the building, the conservatory plans to offer free admission...
    SAVAREZ World-class. A term that gets tossed around casually, applied to this artist or that athlete or pretty much anyone who excels well beyond expectations. It rarely fits — but it does for Christie Lenée. And don’t take my word for it. In late August, the experts at Guitar World magazine named Lenée one of the “Best Acoustic Guitarists in the World Right Now.” And that’s not all. The 36-year-old graduate of Blake High School was also voted “Acoustic Guitarist of the Year for 2019” by the readers of England’s Music Radar. So, yeah, world-class.  Christee LenéeMonday, Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m. $30.50Jaeb Theater at David A. Straz Center for the Performing Arts1010 N MacInnes Pl., Tampastrazcenter.org “It’s an honor to be listed, and to stand among some of my favorite musicians on the planet,” she said in a phone interview from her home in Asheville, North Carolina. “I’ve put in a lot of hard work, and it pays off in different ways, but mostly from the sheer joy of playing music.” Lenée transforms her steel-string guitar into a one-woman orchestra,...
    LUTHERVILLE-TIMONIUM, Md. (WJZ) — Manuel Barrueco knows how to make a guitar sing. After all, the classical guitarist first picked up the instrument six decades ago as a boy in Cuba. “The kids in my family were playing — my sisters, my cousins. I would just sit there and be mesmerized by it,” Barrueco said. “I just thought it was the (coolest) thing ever.” READ MORE: New Details Emerge About Jeffrey Burnham's Alleged Killing Spree After He Was Denied BondBarrueco, now 68, would emigrate to the United States with his family in 1967, an experience he remembers being painful as a teenager. “We were leaving everything behind, we came as refugees,” Barrueco said. “The Cuban government just took everything you had. And my sister, one of my sisters, was left there, and it was very difficult and very painful.” His family would eventually settle in Newark, New Jersey. But even as he witnessed his surroundings change dramatically, there always remained one constant: the guitar. “In times that I, maybe when I’ve gone through a difficult stage in my life, the...
    LISTENING to heavy metal belting out of the speakers will get you tucking into burgers and chips. Meanwhile, the soothing sounds of classical music such as Franz Schubert has you ­Chopin down on sweet food including yoghurt, chocolate and cereal bars. 9The sounds of classical music has you ­Chopin down on sweet food like chocolate, we reveal what your musical tastes will have you munchingCredit: News Group Newspapers Ltd Researchers from the Miyagi ­University in Japan asked 800 people to listen to 20 songs from four genres — classical, jazz, hip-hop and rock/heavy metal. They were then asked to consider which of 16 food items they fancied eating, ­rating each from “not at all” to “very much”. Scientists found that while listening to orchestral soundtracks including Elgar’s Salut d’amour and JS Bach’s Air On The G String, healthy and indulgent sweets came out top. Yoghurt, low-fat milk, soy milk latte, soy cereal bar, chocolate milk, strawberry milk latte and chocolate bars were a hit with classical fans. Jazz songs such as Dave Brubeck’s Take Five and Miles Davis’s Walkin’ had...
    Listening to Bach or Beethoven could leave you reaching for the biscuit tin – but turning down the burgers, a study suggests. Nearly 800 participants listened to 20 tracks from four genres of music – classical, jazz, hip-hop and rock/metal. After hearing each song, they were asked to rate on a scale their intention to eat 16 food items and their emotional state during the track. They felt calmer when listening to classical music and preferred sweet foods, researchers led by Miyagi University in Japan found.  The likes of Elgar also appeared to turn people off savoury junk food such as burgers and chips. Listening to Bach or Beethoven could leave you reaching for the biscuit tin – but turning down the burgers, a study suggests (stock image) Researcher Charles Spence, of Oxford University, told journal Food Quality and Preference that the link between eating types of foods and music could be explained by our emotional state because previous studies have also found that people rate sweet foods as more calming. ‘People’s buying/eating intention might be increased in the...
    The fall season is always a new beginning, but has this one ever felt so welcome, or so necessary?  After a year of cancellations and postponements, the Bay Area’s classical music organizations are back with a wide array of events for every interest and comfort level. The season is already underway: Last weekend, Cal Performances brought Yo-Yo Ma’s Not Our First Goat Rodeo tour to Berkeley’s Greek Theatre, and San Francisco Opera opened its season with “Tosca” (soprano Ailyn Pérez stars in the title role of Puccini’s timeless melodrama through Sept. 5.) And there’s much more to come as the season continues. Keep in mind that each presenter has its own protocols – as of this writing, masking is universally required; proof of vaccination and/or a negative COVID test is also a must in most venues. Be sure to check for updates before attending any in-person events. Opera al fresco: Remember San Francisco Opera’s 2017 Opera in the Ballpark? Featuring a production of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni,” it was a huge hit. Now the company is inviting audiences to return for...
    Apple announced on Monday the acquisition of Primephonic, a service of streaming specialized in classical music which has a wide catalog of high-quality content whose main differentials are the contextual details of the repertoire and the recommendations selected by experts. All the musical pieces of the recently acquired service will join the 75 million songs already available on Apple Music, numbers that place it ahead of Spotify. In parallel, the original Primephonic app will no longer be available to new subscribers and will stop working on September 7. Apple says it will use Primephonic’s detailed information (metadata) to improve track search and navigation capabilities. In this way, users will be able to classify their music not only by composers, albums and titles, but also by instruments and orchestra details. Apple and an opportunity for classical music Photo by Samuel Sianipar on Unsplash Those of Cupertino will launch next year a dedicated classical music application. It will combine the best of the classic Primephonic user interface with additional new features that, according to the vice president of Apple Music and...
    In this article AAPLTim CookSource: AppleApple has acquired classical music streaming service Primephonic, the company announced in a release Monday. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The acquisition adds to Apple Music's growing library of more than 75 million songs and builds on the platform's existing classical music content. Spotify follows close behind with more than 70 million songs. Apple said it plans to launch a classical music-focused app next year that harnesses Primephonic's existing user interface. Apple will take Primephonic offline on Sept. 7, and current subscribers will get six free months of Apple Music, the company said. Over the next few months, Apple also said it plans to take advantage of Primephonic's detailed information about classical tracks to improve browsing and search capabilities. Subscribers will also get access to playlists and exclusive audio. Apple quietly buys dozens of companies every year, often to acquire engineers with expertise in particular areas or to add key technology to an ongoing initiative. But some of the company's largest and highest-profile acquisitions have been in the music space: It bought streaming...
    Michael Morgan was ahead of his time. The beloved music director of the Oakland Symphony opened the doors of classical music, welcoming new audiences to the concert hall and expanding the limits of what symphonic programs could offer. Morgan, who died Aug. 20 in Oakland of complications from a recent kidney transplant, was 63. He is survived by his mother, Mabel Morgan, and sister, Jacquelyn Morgan. The longtime Oakland resident conducted throughout the Bay Area and beyond. His work included terms as music director of the Walnut Creek-based Festival Opera, the Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Bear Valley Music Festival, along with guest appearances with organizations including the San Francisco Symphony. But it was Morgan’s inclusive style of music-making at the Oakland Symphony that distinguished him. His directorship elevated the organization’s profile, both in the kinds of music he presented and the wide reach he achieved in attracting new audiences to the orchestra’s home in the Paramount Theatre. His programs often made surprising connections, pairing repertory standards with works by unsung composers and music from other genres. One characteristically eclectic...
    RAVENSWOOD — The Thirsty Ears Festival will bring live classical music and craft beer from Empirical Brewing to Ravenswood this weekend.  The event kicks off 2 p.m. Saturday on Wilson Avenue, between Hermitage and Ravenswood avenues. A $10 suggested donation benefits Access Contemporary Music’s School of Music.  The annual street festival organized by Access Contemporary Music is now in its 6th year and showcases baroque to contemporary pieces in a relaxed setting for people who may be new to classical music.  “One of the new things we’ll have this year is a group called The Growlers, which is a bunch of Chicago Symphony musicians who play bass, which will be really fun for people,” said Seth Boustead, Access’ executive director. “I don’t anyone has ever seen six double basses perform together before, especially at that level. They’re such great players.” Other highlights include a screening of ACM’s Sound of Silent Film Festival, premieres by five Chicago composers and a mash-up of music from Gustav Mahler and Antonio Vivaldi performed by art-rock band Origin of Animal. “That’s really new for us...
    Shuttered last year by the pandemic, classical music organizations are making a thrilling comeback throughout the Bay Area. Here are some recently announced highlights on the July calendar. Merola celebrates diversity: The Merola Opera Program returns July 3 with a showcase concert celebrating diversity.  “What the Heart Desires” features artists from the annual opera academy in performances of works by composers Florence Price, Robert Owens, and Henry Thacker Burleigh, as well as contemporary composers Chen Yi, Stacy Garrop, and others. The program is curated by tenor Nicholas Phan and mezzo-soprano Ronnita Miller. Also on tap: a documentary film titled “Back Home: Through the Stage Door,” and the season-ending annual “Merola Grand Finale Concert.” Details: “What the Heart Desires,” July 3 performance filmed and available for streaming for Merola members on July 16, and to the public on July 30; “Back Home” film available to members Aug. 13, public Aug. 27; “Grand Finale Concert” performed live on July 31; available to members Aug. 20, public release date Sept. 3; merola.org. Salonen conducts Mozart, Sibelius: The San Francisco Symphony continues to expand its in-person...
    The works of the Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach are used by advertisers to provide 'a sound of reassurance' in television commercials, research has claimed. Musicologist Peter Kupfer of the Southern Methodist University in Texas studied the context in which Bach was used in 19 adverts that aired in the US from 2009–19. As with other classical pieces, he noted, Bach's compositions are also used as signifiers of prestige or class — or employed for humorous effect. However, the most common feeling it is used to foster is that of a 'reassurance that one's product choices will lead to happier, healthier and safer lives.'  For example, a 2012 advert starring Peanuts' Schroeder links the pianist's growing confidence as he plays Bach with the anxiety-easing of MetLife's financial planning. Despite this, however, Professor Kupfer says that there is nothing actually inherently reassuring about Bach's works. Rather, he concludes, their typically abstract nature and general associations with prestige allow them to embody different messages and connotations as needed. Scroll down for videos The works of the Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach are used by advertisers...
    Ranking the Best Adidas Sneakers for Men in 2021 (That Aren’t Yeezys) Two-Time Olympian Nzingha Prescod Hopes to Make Fencing More Accessible Through Fencing in the Park Harpist Madison Calley learned about Juneteenth and other parts of Black history while in college. Calley performed 'Lift Every Voice & Sing' for Apple Music's "Juneteenth: Freedom Songs" playlist. She told Insider the holiday inspires her to confront stereotypes about Black classical musicians. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Raised in a predominently white community, harpist Madison Calley didn't grow up celebrating Juneteenth, the African American and now-federal holiday commemorating the end of US slavery. She wasn't alone. As many as 28% of Americans recently responded that they knew nothing about the holiday prior to 2020's racial unrest. College ushered in Calley's awakening. There, she learned about Juneteenth and other elements of Black history. Now the LA-based musician and plant enthusiast is among prominent artists featured on Apple Music's "Juneteenth: Freedom Songs" playlist.Related Article Module: Congress just voted to make Juneteenth a federal holiday. Here's why the campaign took decades....
    Harpist Madison Calley Madison Calley/Apple Music Harpist Madison Calley learned about Juneteenth and other parts of Black history while in college. Calley performed 'Lift Every Voice & Sing' for Apple Music's "Juneteenth: Freedom Songs" playlist. She told Insider the holiday inspires her to confront stereotypes about Black classical musicians. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Raised in a predominently white community, harpist Madison Calley didn't grow up celebrating Juneteenth, the African American and now-federal holiday commemorating the end of US slavery. She wasn't alone. As many as 28% of Americans recently responded that they knew nothing about the holiday prior to 2020's racial unrest. College ushered in Calley's awakening. There, she learned about Juneteenth and other elements of Black history. Now the LA-based musician and plant enthusiast is among prominent artists featured on Apple Music's "Juneteenth: Freedom Songs" playlist. Related Congress just voted to make Juneteenth a federal holiday. Here's why the campaign took decades.   On the 20-track collection she performs a soulful rendition of "Lift Every Voice and Sing," often referred to as the Black...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Violist Dawn Johnson was born and raised in Miami and is part of a trio called ‘The String Queens’ in Washington D.C. They are teachers by day and classical music performers by night. READ MORE: Florida COVID Hospitalizations At Lowest Point In A Year “As a well-rounded musician, you teach and you perform. It’s not either/or, they complement one another to make you a better musician,” Johnson explained. Johnson grew up in Liberty City and attended Charles Drew Elementary School, which she credits for having a ‘very robust performing arts community.’ Her parents worked hard to provide exposure and opportunity through the arts to her and her sister. “We completely immersed ourselves in rehearsals and performances, making sure we were a part of a community youth orchestra. I grew up in the South Florida Symphony and Florida Youth Orchestra.” As a young violinist, she recalls the pivotal moment, when a teacher guided her to the viola, which would become an extension of her. “I remember my first teacher Judy Frishman, a most well-known violin teacher in Miami,...
    (CNN)It's hard to see art in the smoldering aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre, when White Americans destroyed a wealthy Black community in 1921, killing dozens and leaving entire city blocks in ashes. It's hard to see triumph in the innumerable chapters of racism, bondage and hatred that have darkened our American story for hundreds of years. But composer Adolphus Hailstork doesn't want us to look away. He doesn't want us to cover our ears, no matter how piercing the truth may be.There is art in this pain. And, if you listen, there is triumph, too. In his latest work, "Tulsa 1921: Pity These Ashes, Pity This Dust" with libretto by Herbert Woodward Martin, the story of those dark days is told by a young girl, picking through the destruction and lamenting the extinguished hopes of a thriving, industrious Black community. O, pity this dust, she sings. Read MoreThis work of manLaid low in the abstract earth.This emotional aria -- an operatic piece -- will premiere on June 19 during an online musical event commemorating the 100th anniversary of the...
    With summer approaching, the classical music scene continues to innovate. From live and in-person concerts to streaming events, there’s something for every musical interest and comfort zone. Here is a partial roundup. Live at Davies: It was an unforgettable evening: On May 6, members of the San Francisco Symphony under music director Esa-Pekka Salonen performed their first live concert in Davies Symphony Hall in more than a year. The crowd was sparse, masked, and socially distanced; the intermission-less program, limited to strings and percussion, evoked a world of emotion. That was just the beginning: Programs led by Jeremy Denk and James Gaffigan followed, and more in-person concerts are on the way, beginning this week with Ken-David Masur conducting works by Tchaikovsky, Somei Satoh and Qigang Chen (May 27-28). Berkeley Symphony music director Joseph Young leads a program featuring Bizet, Jessie Montgomery, and Carlos Simon (June 3-4); Joshua Weilerstein conducts Dvorak, Bohuslav Martinu and Florence Price (June 10-11); and Salonen returns with the U.S. premiere of Daniel Kidane’s “Be Still,” along with Bernstein’s “Serenade” and Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, with Augustin...
    HOW about this for an udderly mooving performance? Eight cellists play for a prize herd of Hereford cows. 5Eight cellists performed for a prize herd of cowsCredit: Carsten Snejbjerg/NYT/Redux/eyevine 5The lucky animals enjoyed the performance in a farmyard barn venue in DenmarkCredit: Carsten Snejbjerg/NYT/Redux/eyevine The regular classical music recitals are organised by Brit Jacob Shaw, 32, who runs the Scandinavian Cello School. Farmer Mogens Haugaard, from Lund, Denmark, said: “Whenever they hear the music, they come running. “It helps de-stress the cows, I’m sure of it.” 5The regular classical music recitals were organised by Brit Jacob Shaw, 32Credit: Carsten Snejbjerg/NYT/Redux/eyevine 5Mr Shaw runs the Scandinavian Cello SchoolCredit: Carsten Snejbjerg/NYT/Redux/eyevine 5Farmer Mogens Haugaard, from Lund, Denmark, said 'It helps de-stress the cows, I’m sure of it'Credit: Carsten Snejbjerg/NYT/Redux/eyevine Most read in NewsExclusiveCASHING INBashir raking in £17k-a-go as a speaker after Princess Diana interview shameJAILHOUSE ROCKPrison lunch lady, 34, joined drug ring after twice-daily romps with inmateDISTURBING TEXTSMLB All-Star called 'sex assault victim', 13, his 'slave', trial hearsHOUSE OF HORRORCouple forced to sell 'haunted' B&B after hearing woman's SCREAMSExclusiveDOG SNATCHERSHooded dog thieves...
    The Bay Area classical scene continues to thrive despite restrictions, with performances across a range of orchestral masterworks, new music, chamber, vocal, and opera. Here are some of the main attractions coming up. Orchestral music “Poetry” at California Symphony: Under music director Donato Cabrera, the California Symphony is about to launch its latest virtual series. “Poetry in Motion” features three Saturday performances, each running 20-45 minutes in length, conducted by Cabrera and featuring the California Symphony String Orchestra. Programs begin May 8 with the world premiere of “Next Week’s Trees” by California Symphony composer-in-residence Viet Cuong. Inspired by poet Mary Oliver, it’s the first piece Cuong has written for the Symphony since being named to the prestigious residency last year. Also on the schedule: a performance of Arnold Schoenberg’s “Verklärte Nacht” (Transfigured Night), premiering May 15; and Benjamin Britten’s “Serenade,” featuring the superb American tenor Nicholas Phan and California Symphony principal horn Meredith Brown (May 22). “Poetry in Motion” is produced in collaboration with Mercury Soul, a Bay Area collective of musicians, videographers, DJs, dancers, and visual artists whose co-founders...
    OTT platforms have been keeping the audience bound in their homes due to COVID-19 highly entertained. While thrillers have taken center stage with the likes of Undekhi, Raat Akeli Hai, Patal Lok, and others, international content is also getting ravenously consumed. But Bandis Bandits (2020), on Amazon Prime Video, was definitely a refreshing change. It’s a series that uses Indian classical music as its premise while everything else is weaved around it. We don’t know when was the last time, we watched something that had classical music at the core. Many raved about the show and Amit Mistry is one who was showered with praises for his role. Bandish Bandits Season 1 Review: Ritwik Bhowmik, Shreya Chaudhry’s Musical Saga Gets Its Tune Right With Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s Brilliant Soundtrack and Amazing Supporting Cast Mistry played Radhe’s uncle who blends pathos with humour so perfectly that it’s instantly likable. Earlier, in an interview, Mistry told us how he was spending his lockdown days with Sangeet sadhana and waiting to go back on sets. He also spoke about how classical music should be taught...
    The Bay Area classical music scene continues to innovate with online content. Here are six highlights to enjoy this week. “Ring” Wraps: This weekend brings the final installment in San Francisco Opera’s latest “Ring” festival, with “Götterdämmerung,” the fourth of four operas in Wagner’s iconic masterwork, “Der Ring des Nibelungen,” available for streaming. There are also several live presentations related to the festival. Also on: mezzo-soprano J’Nai Bridges in an episode of “In Song,” the company’s new series featuring stars performing and talking about the music that inspires them. Details: Free, except live Ring-related lectures and events ($15); www.sfopera.com. Steinway Society: The streaming recital series presents the Bay Area debut of Russian-born Alexander Sinchuk, whose Home Concert Hall program includes works by Chopin and Rachmaninoff, along with the world premiere of “Sacred Music for Piano” by Serbian composer Svetislav Božić. Details: Concert accessible March 26-29; $20 per household; www.steinwaysociety.com. Sing into Spring: Opera Parallèle is launching “Close-Up,” a new virtual recital series exploring the art song repertoire. Catch the first installment this weekend with two gifted Bay Area artists: soprano Shawnette...
    Bill Burr caught some backlash on social media for jokes he made while presenting at the 2021 Grammys premiere ceremony. The standup comedian was tapped by the Recording Academy to present some of the awards earlier in the night prior to the main broadcast. He took the stage to piano music to present a handful of awards to Latin artists and almost immediately began showcasing some of his notorious off-color humor.  "Was I the only one that wanted to kill himself during that piano solo? I bought a suit for this," he joked. "I thought I was going to be on TV. I'm such a moron. I'm losing so much money." His distaste for classical music was ironic given that he was on stage to present a handful of music honors in the genre such as best choral performance, best classical instrument solo performance, best classical vocal album and best classical compendium. In addition, he was on hand to present awards in the categories for best Latin rock or alternative album, best regional Mexican music award and best tropical Latin album....
    HOLLYWOOD (CBSLA) – Here is a complete list of winners from the afternoon Premiere Ceremony of the 63rd annual Grammy Awards. The balance of the awards, including top honors of record, song, and album of the year, will be presented during the main telecast beginning at 5 p.m. Best Pop Duo/Group Performance READ MORE: Man In East Los Angeles Shot To Death By L.A. Sheriffs Deputy Or Deputies “Rain On Me,” Lady Gaga with Ariana Grande Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album “American Standard,” James Taylor Best Dance/Electronic Album “Bubba,” Kaytranada Best Rock Performance “Shameika,” Fiona Apple Best Rock Album “The New Abnormal,” The Strokes Best Rock Song “Stay High,” Brittany Howard, Songwriter (Brittany Howard) Best Progressive R&B Album “It Is What It Is,” Thundercat Best R&B Album “Bigger Love,” John Legend Best Traditional R&B Performance “Anything For You,” Ledisi Best R&B Song “Better Than I Imagined,” Robert Glasper, Meshell Ndegeocello & Gabriella Wilson, Songwriters (Robert Glasper Featuring H.E.R. & Meshell Ndegeocello) Best Rap Performance “Savage,” Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyonce Best Rap Album “King’s Disease,” Nas Best Country Song “Crowded...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- When most live music venues were shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic a year ago, one non-profit organization in New York City saw an opportunity to grow its audience online -- and make it more diverse in the process.The Orchestra of St. Luke's has been a Big Apple institution since the 1970s, but the group has really flourished since the opening of its DiMenna Center of Classical Music in Manhattan a decade ago.The organization is marking this 10th anniversary by continuing to create new programs, stream them online, and confront this unique time in our history.Harvard Professor Teju Cole is taking part in an online series called "Sounds and Stories," reading from a fable he wrote about the pandemic to music Cole selected to complement his words.ALSO READ | Virtual celebration marks 25th anniversary of groundbreaking Broadway musical 'Rent'EMBED More News Videos A quarter century ago, the landmark stage show "Rent" debuted on Broadway and redefined the American musical. The series on Wednesday evenings is hosted by actor David Hyde Pierce, best know for...
    Four dazzling new recordings and a half-dozen streamed shows offer a range of classical works for March. Here’s music you won’t want to miss. Sorrowful ‘Songs’ Two of today’s most influential artists — San Francisco composer Jake Heggie and Canadian author Margaret Atwood — have teamed up for a dramatic new song cycle. Composed by Heggie with texts by Atwood, “Songs for Murdered Sisters” was conceived by Canadian baritone Joshua Hopkins, whose sister, Nathalie Warmerdam, and two other women were murdered by Nathalie’s ex-boyfriend five years ago in Ontario. Heggie is best-known for his operas, including “Dead Man Walking” and “Moby Dick,” but his contributions to the song repertoire have also been significant, and Hopkins, accompanied by the composer on piano, gives this new work a moving performance. Co-commissioned by Houston Grand Opera and Canada’s National Arts Centre Orchestra, and directed by James Niebuhr, “Songs for Murdered Sisters” makes a powerful statement about the tragedy of domestic violence. Watch it on multiple streaming platforms until March 21; a CD recording is being released March 5 on the Pentatone label to...
    A CARER who tried to smother a disabled elderly woman with a pillow was found calmly listening to classical music when was arrested by police. Police bodycam footage shows the moment Barry Riley was detained on suspicion of attempted murder of the 75-year-old Ann Skelton. 3The 62-year-old Riley was found at his desk listening to music after attempting to murder Ann SkeltonCredit: SWNS:South West News Service 3Police bodycam footage caught the moment on videoCredit: SWNS:South West News Service 3Barry Riley, 62, was sentenced to 11-years and eight months in prisonCredit: SWNS:South West News Service In the video, the 62-year-old Riley is sat at his desk with his arms crossed listening to music as an officer explains why he is being arrested. The carer was jailed at Bristol Crown Court on Thursday for the attempted murder of Ms Skelton in a bid to attempt to cover up the fact that he had stolen more than £100,000 from her. During the attack, Ms Skelton managed to press her buzzer to alert other care staff, who arrived to find her slumped over the...
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