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    Keith Raniere, the leader of notorious sex cult NXIVM, was assaulted in his prison in Arizona by another inmate, leaving him unconscious and nauseous for a week Convicted sex cult leader Keith Raniere has been beaten up and knocked unconscious in his prison in Tucson, Arizona by another prisoner - before being housed with an intersex inmate next to a cage smeared with human feces. Raniere, who is serving his first year of a 120-year sentence, says he was assaulted by Maurice Withers as he walked to his table with his food one morning, and faced disciplinary action for 'fighting' despite not fighting back. Withers, 33, was put behind bars for sex trafficking crimes in Madison, Wisconsin and punched Raniere in the face, leaving him with a black eye and nausea for a week, despite never having spoken to him before. 'I was given a disciplinary ticket for 'fighting' and have had my privileges revoked and was placed in segregation 'pending investigation,' Raniere said, also claiming he 'did not fight back' in the sworn affidavit on September 6. He remains in a...
    A free speech watchdog has ranked New York’s elite school, Columbia University, as the worst in the nation for tolerating alternative viewpoints on campus, receiving an ‘abysmal’ score after taking disciplinary action against seven academics. The Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression (FIRE) monitoring group also awarded low scores to the University of Pennsylvania, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Georgetown University, and Skidmore College. The University of Chicago came first for campus free speech, scoring 77.9 out of 100 points. Kansas State University, Purdue University, Mississippi State University and Oklahoma State University rounded out the top five. The scorecard comes amid a long simmering debate about free speech, cancel culture and deplatforming on U.S. campuses, and if so-called ‘snowflake’ students deserve protection from opinions they find hurtful. Unveiling the ranking of 208 top schools, the watchdog’s CEO Greg Lukianoff said the ‘situation for freedom of speech and academic freedom has been in trouble’ for decades and had ‘gotten far worse in the last few years’. ‘Our new and improved rankings are intended to reward universities that protect and defend the freedom of...
    Will Smith was asked to leave the Oscars after hitting Chris Rock but refused, the Academy said on Wednesday - also declaring that he had violated their code of conduct. The 58-year-old actor marched onto the stage on Sunday and hit Rock, after Rock told a joke about Smith's wife. Shortly after, Smith was announced as the winner of the best actor award and went up to collect his statuette to a standing ovation from many of his peers. On Wednesday the Academy said it had launched 'disciplinary procedures' against Smith, and confirmed he ignored their request for him to leave his seat. 'The Board of Governors today initiated disciplinary proceedings against Mr. Smith for violations of the Academy's Standards of Conduct, including inappropriate physical contact, abusive or threatening behavior, and compromising the integrity of the Academy,' their statement said. 'Mr. Smith was asked to leave the ceremony and refused, [but] we also recognize we could have handled the situation differently.'  Smith will receive 15 days notice of a vote as well as an opportunity to be heard by written response....
    LA sheriffs have arrived at Will Smith's family home amid safety fears after a drone was allegedly sighted over the actor's property, just days after he slapped Chris Rock at the Oscars. The officers arrived at Smith's mansion in Los Angeles on Tuesday afternoon, ahead of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences holding an emergency board meeting today to discuss disciplinary action against the star. The academy, which condemned Smith's actions, said it was reviewing the episode but the inquiry is expected to take a few weeks, sources familiar with the matter said. LA County Sherriff's were seen driving through the gates of the Calabasas mansion in a patrol car at 2.40pm after they received a call about an alleged drone sighting over the property. But by the time the officers arrived at the estate, the reported drone had disappeared, the Sheriff's department told the Sun. It comes after View host Whoopi Goldberg, who is also a member of the Academy, said she believes Smith will be able to keep his Oscar following the controversy but he will...
    (CNN)Lawyers who backed former President Donald Trump's bogus election reversal gambits are facing fresh opposition for their involvement -- in the form of a flashy new campaign, launched this week by fellow members of the legal community, aimed at potentially disbarring the Trump-aligned attorneys. Those who have sought disciplinary responses for Trump's legal allies say the post-election conduct crossed ethical lines into the realm of professional misconduct -- and that the tactics were well outside the normal bounds of legal challenges to election procedures.Federal judge to personally review 111 documents former Trump attorney John Eastman wants to keep secretAlready several ex-Trump lawyers, including Rudy Giuliani and John Eastman, have found themselves subject to state bar reviews.Disciplinary proceedings for ex-Trump attorney Sidney Powell are set to unfold in a state court in Texas, where she is licensed, after a March 1 petition from the Texas Bar's disciplinary commission asked the court to find her in violation of the professional code for attorneys in the state. RELATED: Garland's first year leading Justice Department clouded by questions of investigating Trump Read MoreThe threat...
    TOTTENHAM'S Europa Conference League campaign has been thrown into disarray after Uefa confirm the game against Rennes 'can no longer be played'. The final group game fixture was scheduled to take place on December 9, but it was called off at the last minute due to a Covid outbreak in the Tottenham first-team. 2Uefa have confirmed a new date for the fixture could not be agreedCredit: REUTERS 2Conte says the situation 'is serious'Credit: AFP Spurs asked for the game to be rescheduled to allow the group to be completed, but Uefa have announced a date could not be agreed upon. And the dispute has been sent to the Control, Ethics and Disciplinary Body to be resolved. In a statement, Uefa said: "Following a COVID-19 outbreak in the team of Tottenham Hotspur FC ahead of the UEFA Europa Conference League group stage match against Stade Rennais FC, scheduled to take place on 9 December 2021 in London, the match could not take place. "Unfortunately, despite all efforts, a solution that could work for both clubs could not be found.  "As a...
    A Russian politician stripped off and got into the shower after failing to turn off his Zoom camera during a disciplinary meeting for a fellow official.  Maxim Petlin, 48,  a member of the anti-Kremlin Yabloko party, was seen getting up from his desk, undressing and parading naked in front of the camera at his home in Yekaterinburg. The other participants appeared to try not to focus on Petlin, who is the chairman of Yabloko's Sverdlovsk branch, and continued their meeting as if nothing was happening.  Maxim Petlin, 48, stripped off and got into the shower after failing to turn off his Zoom camera during a disciplinary meeting for a fellow official Petlin, a member of the anti-Kremlin Yabloko party, was seen getting up from his desk, undressing and parading naked in front of the camera at his home in Yekaterinburg But the footage, from a disciplinary hearing for a municipal MP, was leaked to Mash news outlet. Asked about the 'embarrassment' by URA.ru Petlin said: 'Did I appear naked? What is this nonsense? 'There was an online meeting today. I...
    WHEN we speak about the bravery of jump jockeys, we usually refer to sickening falls, broken bones and staggering feats of endurance.  And Bryony Frost, Britain’s most successful female National Hunt rider, is as physically courageous as any male colleague.  2National Hunt superstar Bryony Frost surpassed even the sport's normal levels of bravery by speaking out against bullying and harassmentCredit: PA 2Fellow jockey Robbie Dunne was found guilty by a disciplinary hearing of four counts of bringing horse-racing into disreputeCredit: PA But by reporting the bullying and harassment she suffered at the hands of journeyman jockey Robbie Dunne, Frost has gone beyond even the degrees of fearlessness we normally associate with her sport.  Frost, 26, has spoken about being outcast because she turned whistleblower.  She has told of being given the silent treatment in the weighing room.  And she told an independent disciplinary hearing that even a fellow female jockey had told her she was wrong to report Dunne’s behaviour.  But the independent panel’s verdict, that Dunne is guilty of four counts of bringing the sport into disrepute, is...
    (CNN)A high-ranking Capitol Police officer, who was also a vocal Donald Trump supporter, told those under his command not to wear riot gear on January 6, according to internal documents reviewed by CNN that detail allegations submitted to an officer tip line. In this case, an unidentified Capitol Police lieutenant emailed the tip line to say the supervising officer in question "may have assisted the insurrection attempts through passive action." The lieutenant said the officer had "been rather vocal in the past about his support for Trump, but little was thought of it until the ... examples I observed." January 6 vs. September 18: How law enforcement hopes to prevent another riotSpecifically, the lieutenant detailed how other squads wore Civil Disturbance Unit "hard gear," but the officer at the center of the complaint told his squad not to wear theirs. The lieutenant believed the decision "resulted in one or more officers being sent to the hospital." The tipster also described the high-ranking officer leaning against a wall, taking no action, as other officers tried to hold back the mob.Read...
    Three members of the first CIA teams sent to Afghanistan to hunt down Osama bin Laden and topple the Taliban after 9/11 have been told they face disciplinary action for refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19, DailyMail.com has learned. Because of the clandestine role they cannot speak publicly but are understood to be furious that their careers are on the line because of the Biden's administration's vaccine mandates. Details emerged from a group chat shared with DailyMail.com in which staff said they had been told they could face disciplinary action including being dismissed if they refuse.  It is part of wider unease about the mandate among paramilitary officers who are often encouraged to break rules to accomplish their missions, according to Toby Harnden.  His new book, 'First Casualty: The Untold Story of the CIA Mission to Avenge 9/11' details the story of the first teams sent to Afghanistan after the Al Qaeda attacks. 'I've heard a number of CIA officers express concern about the vaccine mandates,' he said.  'Some of these officers find it outrageous that some of those who...
    Remington has subpoenaed for the academic, attendance and disciplinary records for five kids who were shot dead in the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre after their families filed a lawsuit against the bankrupt gunmaker. The subpoena was revealed in a court filing made by lawyers for the families of the five children seeking modifications to an order of protection in order to prevent the release of the records. Remington also subpoenaed for the employment files of four educators who were killed during the horrific massacre, who are included in the lawsuit. The nine families who lost family members when 20-year-old Adam Lanza shot and killed 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut filed the wrongful death lawsuit against Remington on December 15, 2014. The case, which claims Remington recklessly marketed its Bushmaster Model XM15-E2S .223-caliber semiautomatic rifle, will go to trial this month. Connecticut State Police Detective Barbara J. Mattson holds a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model used by Adam Lanza in the 2012 Sandy Hook School shooting Veronique Pozner reacts with grief after learning...
    After being expelled at the end of the match against the Red Devils of Toluca, on Day 7 of the 2021 Apertura Tournament, the Disciplinary Commission revealed the punishment for Juan Ignacio Dinenno, forward of the UNAM Pumas. Through the disciplinary report of Day 7, the Disciplinary Commission reported that Dinenno received only one suspension match for “Causal 6: Using offensive, insulting or humiliating language and / or gestures”. Also read: Liga MX Femenil: General table of positions and results of Day 7 of Apertura 2021 According to ESPN, Juan Ignacio Dinenno earned the direct red at the end of the match for insulting the commissioner of the MX League, Odilon Trujilo, by saying “What are you doing here, you shitty shit?” 1 game suspension for Richard Sánchez after sending off against Leon 1 game also for Dinneno after the insults to the commissioner in Toluca @ESPNmx – CESAR CABALLERO (@ ccaballero10) August 31, 2021 This insult was heard by César Arturo Ramos, referee of the match, who after consulting with Trujillo about what happened, did not...
    08/06/2021 at 4:53 PM CEST This Thursday the UEFA has announced that it will open a disciplinary file after the racist screams, which took place this Tuesday night in the preliminary third round match of the Champions League between Sparta Prague and Monaco who finished 0-2. Racist shouts were heard in the match between Sparta Prague and Monaco and the European Football Union has opened proceedings against Sparta for “discriminatory behavior“,”provocative insulting messages” Y “object throws“, he explains in a statement. This Tuesday night, the meeting was interrupted for the complaint of several Monegasque players who said they were victims of racist screams from the public. French midfielder Aurélien Tchouaméni complained to his coach, Niko Kovac and then the English referee of the party, Michael Oliver, of the racist screams that were heard during the celebration of his goal. After finishing the match, Aurélien Tchouaméni reported this fact on social networks ensuring that “hate messages and death threats received will not arrive“and that will not let”hate won this match“I also challenge...
    In response to a European Commission request to improve the independence of the body, the head of the Supreme Court of Poland has suspended the work of the controversial disciplinary chamber. The disciplinary chamber of the Polish court established in 2017 can punish judges, but its independence and impartiality are contested. The Order Room consists of judges elected by the National Council of Judiciary, which is elected by Parliament. The PiS, the ruling party in parliament, dominates. No new cases will be accepted for the time being, said Malkorsada Manovska, Poland’s highest judge. For cases already pending, judges are asked to suspend treatment. This restriction applies until the legal dispute between Warsaw and Brussels is resolved, with November 15 being the last day. New judges have been appointed in various courts and lower courts that support the ruling party PiS. Chief Justice Igor Duleya Can no longer be acquitted of a criminal case, Decided the order room. Conflict with Brussels Last year the European Court of Justice ruled that the...
    After an investigation into the incidents of the final of the Eurocup, the European body accuses the FA for the disturbances caused by its followers English fans caused incidents around and inside Wembley Stadium) . UEFA announced on Tuesday that it will open a disciplinary procedure against the English Football Federation (FA) after an investigation into the incidents that occurred during the European Championship final between England and Italy on July 11. British fans without a ticket staged riots in and around Wembley Stadium, breaking the security lines and confronting the police. Read also The European body opened a disciplinary investigation two days after the game and brought four charges against the English Federation: invasion of the field by its fans, throwing objects, whistling during the national anthem and use of fireworks. “Following an investigation by a UEFA Ethics and Discipline inspector, disciplinary proceedings have been opened against the English Football Association for a possible violation of article 16 (2) (h) of the UEFA Disciplinary Regulations by lack of order or discipline of his followers,...
    The San Jose mass shooter was scheduled to attend a disciplinary hearing stemming from purported racist remarks directed at his co-workers on the day he opened fire at the Valley Transportation Authority, killing nine people and then himself.  Just minutes into the slaughter early Wednesday morning, Samuel Cassidy, 57, was captured on surveillance video calmly crossing rail lines on his way from the building at the transit hub where he began shooting to another building, where he would continue.  The first 911 calls reporting an active shooter at the VTA near 100 West Younger Avenue in San Jose came in at 6.34am.  Less than a minute later, a surveillance camera at the depot captured Cassidy, dressed in his work uniform and carrying a black duffle bag containing multiple guns and high-capacity magazines. He is slowly walking across rails separating two buildings. Newly released surveillance video from the Valley Transportation Authority in San Jose, California, shows mass shooter Samuel Cassidy (circled), crossing rail lines just minutes into the massacre  The first 911 calls about an active shooter came in...
    Patrick Schwarzenegger to Join Brother-in-Law Chris Pratt in New Amazon Series The Terminal List Tesla Is Ordered to Rehire Worker, Make Musk Delete Tweet In the 12 years since the commissioner’s exempt list was popularized as a circumstantial tool to sit NFL players down while continuing to pay their salary, only one thing has remained consistent: The standard for the league’s “timeout” has been as opaque as it is broad. Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad And for this reason, the 16 pending civil lawsuits against Houston Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson could lead him to be removed from NFL activities at any moment this offseason or suspended entirely — or not punished at all. Any of these outcomes could materialize without a single legal outcome tied to Watson. Essentially, nothing could change, yet the NFL could act (or not act) based entirely on the merits of what it finds or the preponderance of evidence it produces. That’s one of the major elements that potential Watson trade suitors are grappling with, leaving each to weigh the...
    Heavy police presence in Brooklyn, New York, following a protest on June 12, 2020 in New York City. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images The disciplinary records of 83,000 New York police officers were made public this month. The records were added to a public online database after a failed challenge by police unions. One expert told Insider the move could "help people feel more empowered and get more accountability." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The disciplinary records of tens of thousands of police officers were made public this month in a push towards transparency — and after police unions failed to prevent the records from being made public. The New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board published the disciplinary records of more than 83,000 active and former police officers in a searchable online database on March 4. The New York Police Department followed up with a database of its own, where the public can view active officer profiles that include awards and honors in addition to complaints. The previously private disciplinary records, which go back decades,...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – After a recent appeals court decision, some disciplinary records of New York City police officers have been released online and are searchable by anyone. Some argue the database doesn’t post all the information owed to the public. READ MORE: Expert: Bidens American Rescue Plan Could Make Historic Impact On Child Poverty As of Monday, you can search NYPD officer records online. Just type in the officer’s name to see disciplinary history, a training summary and awards, among other categories. To do so, CLICK HERE. “When they have a police officer and they respond and they want to know, you know, get a sense of who that person is, now they have a way to do it,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of Police Executive Research Forum, an independent, nonprofit police think tank in Washington, D.C “This goes a long way. There’s not many departments that have taken on this,” Wexler said. But New York Civil Liberties Union Director Donna Lieberman says it doesn’t go far enough since it only shows matters that resulted in a guilty finding...
    The two teenagers, a boy and a 15-year-old girl, “were referred this afternoon for the opening of a (judicial) investigation for facts of assassination with requisition of a committal warrant”, declared Eric Corbaux at a press conference. The bruised body of the 14-year-old victim was recovered from the water on Monday evening by police, shortly after a report from the suspicious boy’s mother. The two college students, who attended the same class as the victim in a private vocational school in Argenteuil, were arrested during the night and have been in police custody since. During their questioning by investigators, “they did not express immediate remorse either,” Corbaux reported. The minority of the two suspects means that they risk a maximum of 20 years in prison, and not life imprisonment. The first elements of the investigation indicate that the victim was struck by the teenager and then thrown still alive with the help of the girl in the Seine, where she drowned. “The victim at that time was still conscious. She was moaning, her eyes open. The young man and...
    New York : The Disciplinary Commission of Femexfut issued this Wednesday the ruling in which denies there is evidence of alleged racist slurs towards the Ecuadorian Felix torres from Santos Laguna, by the Argentine German Berterame del San Luis, after the controversy unleashed in the match between both squads at the start of the seventh date of Guardians 2021. “There are no elements, nor was reliable evidence provided to impose a sanction against the player Germán Berterame, therefore he lacks elements to sanction the player ”, stated the Commission through a press release. #Disciplinary Commission | Resolution of the investigation process for the events that occurred in the Atlético San Luis vs. Santos Laguna de la @LigaBBVAMX. Read more: https://t.co/lK6Hxzly7K#FMFforNuestroFootball pic.twitter.com/cgCy1CAZOx – Mexican Football Federation (@FMF) February 24, 2021 However, such research acknowledges that there are sufficient elements to prove that San Luis players insulted the refereeing body of the party, reason why in that case an economic sanction to the potosino club does proceed. “The Club Atlético San Luis is considered guilty of transgressing article 52 subsection r)...
    Ever since footage of him outside of the U.S. Capitol went viral on the day of the Jan. 6th siege, Texas-based lawyer Paul M. Davis has embarked upon a self-styled quest of J.R.R. Tolkien-esque proportions. Davis filed a federal lawsuit asking nothing less than the wholesale replacement of the U.S. federal government. He said the FBI visited his home to ask him for his statement, and a federal judge referred him to the Disciplinary Committee for the Western District of Texas. After Law&Crime obtained his once-confidential disciplinary inquiry through an anonymous source, Davis granted what he described as his first interview to the press since he went to Washington. “I’ve gotten so many requests in the media, and I haven’t responded to a single one because I’ve been so focused on the case,” Davis said in a phone interview, referring to his embattled lawsuit asking a judge to block his arrest and topple every 2020 federal election as, he asserted, deficient under the Help America Vote Act. The hourlong interview touched upon various aspects of the well-publicized fallout of Davis’s...
    VIDEO2:1002:10Phillip Mayfield becomes a victim of Christopher Duntsch The American health care system may be buckling under the weight of the coronavirus pandemic, but one number is inexplicably falling. Disciplinary actions against doctors were down sharply in the first 9 months of 2020, with 4,393 adverse action reports recorded against physicians in the National Practitioner Data Bank, a federal registry of health care professionals and facilities. That compares with 5,225 reports in the same period in 2019, a nearly 16% decline, according to figures provided to CNBC by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The totals include 3,752 actions taken by state licensing boards compared with 4,521 in the same period in 2019. Also in 2020, through September, 641 doctors had their clinical privileges limited or suspended compared to 704 such actions in the same period a year earlier.Getty ImagesThe reasons for the declines are unclear. The pandemic forced widespread delays in non-Covid-19 procedures, with one study projecting more than 28 million elective surgeries delayed or canceled in 2020. Patient advocates also point to the shortage of doctors...
    The PSPV-PSOE has opened this Saturday a disciplinary file and has provisionally suspended from membership to the three mayors of the Valencian Community who accepted the Covid-19 vaccine “despite not being included in the risk group stipulated by the Ministry of Health.” The party regrets in a statement the “wrong” decision of the municipalities of Verger, Els Poblets and Rafelbunyol, who “can’t tarnish the great work that both health and public officials are doing in managing the health, social and economic crisis “. From the PSPV they have remarked that in a situation “as complicated as the current one, in which both the health workers, the security forces and all citizens in general are making great efforts to overcome this pandemic, the action by public officials must be more exemplary if it fits”. In this sense, they have pointed out that decision to accept vaccines “does not meet the liability criteria which is required of a public position at a time when, in addition, health resources are very limited. “Therefore, the party has initiated a disciplinary proceeding against the...
    Is it defamatory to falsely claim someone is gay? N.Y. court weighs in Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey warns of destructive consequences from Trump social media bans This rugby player got a red card for using the ref as a celebration prop A cardinal rule in any sport is that you can’t touch the ref. That also includes lifting the ref into the air and using them as a prop while you’re celebrating. Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad Josaia Raisuqe, a player for French D2 side Nevers, was overcome with joy after the ref made the call and blew the whistle to end the game, giving Nevers the win. Raisuqe thought it was a joke, smiling throughout the incident, but others in the sport aren’t laughing. Raisuqe has been informed that he could face an extended suspension for putting his hands on the ref, even though he was simply using the official to celebrate. His coach, Xavier Pemeja, was furious with the player’s actions, telling Canal+: “It’s intolerable. He’ll be punished by the league’s disciplinary...
    (CNN)Adam Coy, the Columbus, Ohio, police officer who shot and killed Andre Hill, has been fired, according to a statement from Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus Jr.Coy's termination follows a disciplinary hearing held Monday. The local chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police represented Coy at the hearing."The information, evidence and representations made by Chief (Thomas) Quinlan as the investigator are, in my opinion, indisputable. His disciplinary recommendation is well-supported and appropriate," Pettus said. "The actions of Adam Coy do not live up to the oath of a Columbus Police officer, or the standards we, and the community, demand of our officers."Coy fatally shot Hill last Tuesday within seconds of their encounter, as Hill walked toward Coy holding an illuminated cell phone in his left hand, body camera footage released last week shows.
    Thomas Valva was 8 years old when he died after allegedly spending a night in a cold garage An NYPD transit cop charged with murder of his eight-year-old son has quit the force so that he can keep a portion of his pension.   Michael Valva, 41, has been charged in the murder of his 8-year-old son, Thomas, who was allegedly starved, beaten and locked outside their Long Island home. He died of hypoterhmia after sleeping in an unheated garage on a freezing night on January 17. Valva and his fiancée, 42-year-old Angela Pollina, have been charged with second-degree murder in Thomas' death.   Valva was given custoday of Thomas and his brother in September 2017 despite desperate pleas from Thomas' biological mother, Justyna Zubko-Valva, and concerns from school officials that they were being abused.     While Valva is awaiting his trial next year, he has made the decision to resign from the NYPD, rather than face disciplinary action from the police force. John LoTurco, Michael Valva's lawyer, did this so he can protect what was already in his pension, the New York...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — While stopping short of accusing any officers of actively covering up for former Chicago Police Supt. Eddie Johnson after he was found asleep at the wheel of his vehicle one year ago, the city’s inspector general found several officers failed to follow department policy in their handling of the incident. In all, eight officers were given varying suspensions for their failures that night, including Johnson’s personal driver, who was suspended for driving under the influence herself. Specifically, the report from Inspector General Joseph Ferguson’s office notes only one officer who responded to the scene on the night of Oct. 16, 2019, activated their body-worn camera. All of the officers at the scene failed to ask where Johnson had been or if he’d been drinking, and allowed him to drive home despite signs he was not fit to drive, and despite expressing concerns about his condition. For the first time, the report revealed that Johnson “consumed the equivalent of approximately 10 alcoholic beverages,” and yet not a single officer who responded to the scene when he was found...
    GEO Group, the private prison company that contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to run the Aurora Contract Detention Facility, has a history of coercing immigrant detainees into cleaning common areas under the threat of solitary confinement, newly unsealed documents reveal. The documents are photocopies of disciplinary reports from 2009, 2011 and 2014 that show Aurora ICE detainees being placed in solitary confinement for refusing to clean common areas. They're part of a class-action suit filed in the U.S District Court of Colorado in 2014 by a group of Aurora ICE detainees that alleged GEO significantly underpays detainees for work, and even coerces them into working for free at the Aurora facility. In court proceedings, GEO Group has insisted that its policies and practices are on the up-and-up, and that it hasn't violated any laws or ICE detention protocol through its voluntary work programs and cleaning requirements for detainees.Related Stories Aurora Immigration Court Shuts Down Hearings After Major COVID Outbreak House Subcommittee Report Takes Aim at Aurora Immigrant Detention Facility Joe Neguse Raises Concerns About Due Process at Aurora Immigration...
    Did anyone think this would be easy? On June 12, New York State repealed a law that allowed police and fire departments to keep their disciplinary records secret. It was part of a package of reforms passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to increase transparency at law-enforcement agencies following the deaths in police custody of Eric Garner in 2014 and George Floyd in 2020. Naturally, being the nosy editor of a stubborn newspaper, I filed Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) requests with local departments to see their records. I chose 2010 as a starting point, reasoning that if there are any long-term “bad apples” (which I doubted), the records might show a pattern of complaints.  Although agencies are supposed to respond to FOIL requests within about a month, it rarely happens, especially with the pandemic. In this case, the records have to be located and personal information such as addresses, phone numbers and Social Security numbers must be redacted. Departments can also withhold reports of minor violations of administrative rules. In New York City, the records...
    (CNN)The Common Application is removing a question asking applicants to report whether they've been cited for a disciplinary violation in high school after their research found that the answer disproportionately impacted students of color, particularly Black students.The non-profit organization, which serves more than 900 colleges and universities, eliminated the question after learning that students who disclose school disciplinary records are less likely to submit their college applications, Common App announced in a news release Wednesday.Black applicants are twice as likely than their White peers to answer yes to the disciplinary violation question, and students who answer yes -- predominantly students of color -- are more likely not to complete the application, according to Common App."When the racial injustices were laid bare this summer with the murder of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, we really expedited our efforts to change the application process by thinking about the reckoning around race and equality in America," Jenny Rickard, president and chief executive officer of Common App, told CNN. "We want to make the admissions process more equitable."Black students are more likely to answer...
    Football : The Disciplinary Commission of the League had work this Wednesday evening, invited to look into the many incidents that had punctuated the clash between PSG and OM last Sunday. Last Sunday, at the Parc des Princes, it was a sad spectacle that the two best teams in the championship offered in the 2019-2020 standings. The players of Paris Saint Germain and theOlympic Marseille have multiplied provocations and bad gestures, so much so that no less than five red cards came out of the pocket of the central referee, Jérôme Brisard. Kurzawa takes it expensive Three days later, the Disciplinary Commission of the Professional Football League (LFP) delivered its verdict. Among the expelled players, Layvin Kurzawa is the most heavily punished. The left side, at the origin of a fight with Jordan amavi, will have to serve six suspension matches! His direct opponent in this brawl, the left side of OM, takes three matches. Neymar well off Leandro Paredes will have to spend two matches in the stands, but will keep a reprieve...
    The trove of NYPD disciplinary records released Thursday includes allegations against several members of department brass — all the way up to Commissioner Dermot Shea. The New York Civil Liberties Union uploaded the database — cataloging 323,911 “unique complaint records” against nearly 82,000 active and former cops — shortly after a federal appeals court blocked a union bid to keep the info under wraps. Top cop Shea was named in eight complaints over four incidents between Aug. 2003 and June 2011, while he was with the department’s Detective Bureau, the data shows. Three of the allegations, stemming from the 2003 incident, were substanti ated by the Civilian Complaint Review Board. The database does not include narrative detail or extensive context for any of the incidents, but indicates that Shea was found guilty of “abuse of authority” in a vehicle stop and search, and ordered to undergo “instruction” as discipline. Shea was far from the only department brass named in the database. Chief of Department Terence Monahan, now the NYPD’s highest-ranking uniformed cop, was named in six “abuse of authority”...
    Second Division Articles 68 and 74 of the disciplinary code contemplate the descent of the offending club Luis Rubiales, in an extraordinary General Assembly of the RFEF. EFE The Federation She has been deceived and plans to go to the last possible instances so that, if so, the culprits pay. The first step has been open file at Fuenlabrada after the complaint of Sports of La Corua. He Competition Committee He has not doubted it for a single moment and plans to clarify, as far as possible, everything that has happened. The complaint has been based on articles 68 and 74 of the disciplinary code of the Federation. The first of them speaks of behaviors contrary to good sports order. As penalties appear a fine of 3,006 to 36,051 euros, for the loss of three points, of the match and of downgrade. Leaders can be disabled if they are found to have intervened intentionally. He article 74 refers to the correct development of the sporting spectacle and which is considered a very serious offense if so. Talk about...
    ARSENAL have the worst disciplinary record out of all of the teams in the Premier League. Mikel Arteta's men have racked up 73 yellow cards in 34 games this season. 2 The Gunners have had five players sent off - which is more than any other team in the league. Eddie Nketiah was the club's latest star to be given his marching orders during the draw with Leicester. He was on the pitch for just four minutes after being introduced from the bench. And just like the official Premier League table, Liverpool are top of the Fair Play standings. Jurgen Klopp's side have picked up just 31 yellow cards and one red during their title-winning campaign. ARSENAL NEWS LIVE: Follow for the latest Gunners news Leicester are in second and Southampton are in third despite receiving four dismissals. The table, shared by talkSport, is based only on statistics from league games. Clubs receive four points for a caution, 10 points for the denial of a goalscoring opportunity or dismissal for 2 cautions and 12 points for violent...
    Four officers with the New York City Department of Correction have been suspended without pay after a report detailed their actions leading up to the death of a trans woman in Rikers Island last year, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week. Layleen Cubilette-Polanco died in solitary confinement on June 7, 2019, after suffering epileptic seizures in her cell in solitary confinement, according to a report released on June 23 by the New York City Board of Correction. Officers did not check on Cubilette-Polanco as required and waited 90 minutes before calling for medical help after she was found unresponsive on her ninth day in solitary confinement, surveillance video showed. Thirteen other officers will face some sort of disciplinary action, though the nature of those consequences remains unclear. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Seventeen officers with the New York City Department of Correction will face disciplinary action for their involvement in the death of Layleen Cubilette-Polanco, a Black transgender woman who died last year while in solitary confinement at Rikers Island, Gothamist reported. Four have been suspended...
    (CNN)A review of newly obtained disciplinary records of the former police officer who held Eric Garner in a chokehold before he died shows the officer had seven misconduct cases investigated against him in the five years before Garner's 2014 death. The release of the records comes on the heels of the New York State legislature repealing a law known as 50-a, which shielded police disciplinary records from being viewed by the public for years. "I'm so glad for the transparency," Garner's mother, Gwen Carr, told CNN Tuesday. "I just think going forward we shouldn't have to fight and wait five years to get the disciplinary records of the police officers who recklessly kill." Gwen Carr, mother of the late Eric Garner, after meeting with federal prosecutors who announced last year they would not bring charges against NYPD cop Daniel Pantaleo in the death of her son.Cellphone video shows Daniel Pantaleo, a White New York Police Department officer, maintaining a chokehold as Garner, who is Black, is taken to the ground in Staten Island, crying out, "I can't breathe." Police were...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — After years of secrecy, a contentious leak to a news website and a recent change in state law, New York City’s police watchdog agency disclosed Monday the complaint history for the police officer fired for the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner. Records showing former Officer Daniel Pantaleo was the subject of seven misconduct complaints prior to Garner’s death were provided to the Associated Press by the Civilian Complaint Review Board in response to a request under a new state law making police disciplinary files public. Pantaleo’s complaint history was first revealed by the now-defunct website Think Progress in 2017 amid a legal dispute over whether the records could be made public. At the time, state law shielded police personnel files from disclosure. A review board investigator resigned after being identified as the leaker. The cloak-and-dagger approach to the records changed this month when state lawmakers, spurred by protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, changed a law that for decades had blocked police disciplinary records from public disclosure. GEORGE FLOYD PROTESTS CBS2’s Maurice DuBois, Documentary Filmmaker Marshall Curry Discuss Where The Conversation...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — After years of secrecy, a contentious leak to a news website and a recent change in state law, New York City’s police watchdog agency disclosed Monday the complaint history for the police officer fired for the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner. Records showing former Officer Daniel Pantaleo was the subject of seven misconduct complaints prior to Garner’s death were provided to the Associated Press by the Civilian Complaint Review Board in response to a request under a new state law making police disciplinary files public. Pantaleo’s complaint history was first revealed by the now-defunct website Think Progress in 2017 amid a legal dispute over whether the records could be made public. At the time, state law shielded police personnel files from disclosure. A review board investigator resigned after being identified as the leaker. The cloak-and-dagger approach to the records changed this month when state lawmakers, spurred by protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, changed a law that for decades had blocked police disciplinary records from public disclosure. GEORGE FLOYD PROTESTS CBS2’s Maurice DuBois, Documentary Filmmaker Marshall Curry Discuss Where The Conversation...
    By MICHAEL R. SISAK, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — After years of secrecy, a contentious leak to a news website and a recent change in state law, New York City’s police watchdog agency disclosed Monday the complaint history for the police officer fired for the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner. Records showing former Officer Daniel Pantaleo was the subject of seven misconduct complaints prior to Garner's death were provided to the Associated Press by the Civilian Complaint Review Board in response to a request under a new state law making police disciplinary files public. Pantaleo's complaint history was first revealed by the now-defunct website Think Progress in 2017 amid a legal dispute over whether the records could be made public. At the time, state law shielded police personnel files from disclosure. A review board investigator resigned after being identified as the leaker. The cloak-and-dagger approach to the records changed this month when state lawmakers, spurred by protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, changed a law that for decades had blocked police disciplinary records from public disclosure. The...
    NEW YORK (AP) — After years of secrecy, a contentious leak to a news website and a recent change in state law, New York City’s police watchdog agency disclosed Monday the complaint history for the police officer fired for the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner. Records showing former Officer Daniel Pantaleo was the subject of seven misconduct complaints prior to Garner’s death were provided to the Associated Press by the Civilian Complaint Review Board in response to a request under a new state law making police disciplinary files public. Pantaleo’s complaint history was first revealed by the now-defunct website Think Progress in 2017 amid a legal dispute over whether the records could be made public. At the time, state law shielded police personnel files from disclosure. A review board investigator resigned after being identified as the leaker. The cloak-and-dagger approach to the records changed this month when state lawmakers, spurred by protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, changed a law that for decades had blocked police disciplinary records from public disclosure. The Civilian Complaint Review Board moved...
    NEW YORK (AP) — After years of secrecy, a contentious leak to a news website and a recent change in state law, New York City’s police watchdog agency disclosed Monday the complaint history for the police officer fired for the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner. Records showing former Officer Daniel Pantaleo was the subject of seven misconduct complaints prior to Garner’s death were provided to the Associated Press by the Civilian Complaint Review Board in response to a request under a new state law making police disciplinary files public. Pantaleo’s complaint history was first revealed by the now-defunct website Think Progress in 2017 amid a legal dispute over whether the records could be made public. At the time, state law shielded police personnel files from disclosure. A review board investigator resigned after being identified as the leaker. The cloak-and-dagger approach to the records changed this month when state lawmakers, spurred by protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis, changed a law that for decades had blocked police disciplinary records from public disclosure. The Civilian Complaint Review Board moved...
    City councilman Andy King doesn’t want to face the music over Zoom so he’s asking a judge to delay his upcoming disciplinary hearing until New York’s Pause order is expected to be lifted next month. The Bronx Democrat filed an emergency application Tuesday for a judge to intervene and postpone the hearing set for next Monday since he says the city council won’t budge on his request to delay it until a hearing can be held in person. The council brought a third round of charges against King in February for allegedly continuing to abuse his staff, misuse public funds and violate anti-discrimination policies — after having already been charged, fined and suspended in October in a similar case. Now, King alleges in his Manhattan Supreme Court papers, that the council has “arrogantly and dismissively ignored any and all requests to briefly delay this matter until the Governor’s Executive Order expires on or about July 6, 2020.” King says the Zoom hearing will make it difficult to give testimony, cross examine witnesses and speak with his lawyers throughout the proceeding,...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Forging ahead on police reforms, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday that the city is launching an online database that will let New Yorkers track disciplinary cases against police officers accused of excessive force and other violations and view their administrative records. The New York Police Department will also adopt tighter deadlines to speed up the disciplinary process, the mayor said. The latest reforms are meant to bring more transparency to a system long criticized for being too secretive and plagued by lengthy delays in holding police officers accountable for misconduct. “We have to know that if something’s done right, it will be recognized and when something’s done wrong, it will be acted on,” de Blasio said. “When people know that, that’s what helps them have greater faith.” He added: “I want everything we have to be put on online.” The move drew a swift rebuke from the head of the Police Benevolent Association, the city’s largest police union, who said it undermines privacy protections. “It allows employers to release whatever they want, whenever and...
    The investigation into the shooting death of a black man during a Friday  night confrontation with police is gaining pace Tuesday after the Atlanta Police Department released a 911 call and the disciplinary histories for both responding officers. PRESIDENT TRUMP: SHOOTING 'VERY TROUBLING' The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Monday that Garrett Rolfe, the officer who shot and killed Rayshard Brooks, worked for the department for over seven years and received a written reprimand in 2017 over a use-of-force complaint involving a firearm. The paper reported that details of the incident are murky because the documents provided by police offered few details about the incident and the reprimand. The paper reported that there were 12 other incidents during his career, but he was exonerated nine of those times. The incidents included five vehicle accidents, four citizen complaints and a firearm discharge in August 2015, Fox 5 Atlanta reported. The paper reported that there was no conclusion of the 2015 firearm discharge in the documents. VideoDevin Brosnan, the other officer who was at the scene, had no disciplinary history prior to June 14. Rolfe,...
    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is signing into law a sweeping package of police accountability measures that received new backing following protests of George Floyd’s killing, including one allowing the release of officers’ long-withheld disciplinary records. The measures were approved earlier this week by the state’s Democratic-led Legislature. Some of the bills had been proposed in years past and failed to win approval, but lawmakers moved with new urgency in the wake of massive, nationwide demonstrations over Floyd’s death at the hands of police in Minneapolis. The laws signed by Cuomo, a Democrat, will ban police chokeholds, make it easier to sue people who call police on others without good reason, and set up a special prosecutor’s office to investigate the deaths of people during and following encounters with police officers. Some bills, including body camera legislation, drew support from Republicans, who opposed legislation that repealed a state law long used to block the release of police disciplinary records over concerns about officers’ privacy. Eliminating the law, known as Section 50-a, would make complaints against...
    A bus driver in Israel could lose his job for sharing the Gospel with passengers, according to his employer. The story went viral on social media in the Jewish state, where proselytizing to minors is illegal, but some have come to the driver's defense saying he did nothing wrong, Israel Today reports. ISRAEL THREATENS TO SHUT DOWN NEW TV CHANNEL FOR PREACHING 'GOSPEL OF JESUS' “It’s not the Old Testament and the New Testament — they are one,” the Hebrew-speaking driver says in the video clip. “If you read it, one completes the other, and then you realize that it all comes from the Holy Spirit.” As several passengers tell the driver to stop talking, he continues, urging them to wear headphones. CATHOLIC PRIESTS, ORTHODOX JEWS SUE CUOMO, DE BLASIO OVER REOPENING PLAN: ‘BLATANT DOUBLE-STANDARD’ “Regarding women, [Jesus] respected women,” he also said. “But in Islam, Mohammed married around 20 young girls, so there were many things that he wanted for himself, and that's why he said that Allah permits them. So his followers were deceived ... Do you [Muhammad] believe in the Ten Commandments? If so, when...
    State prosecutors on Thursday added their support for a bill that would help ensure disciplinary actions against officers cannot be later reversed by an outside arbitrator The Oregon District Attorneys’ Association now joins state police chiefs, sheriffs and a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers in urging Gov. Kate Brown to convene a special session to pass the bill, which has twice failed in regular legislative sessions. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports that momentum is growing for lawmakers to pass new police accountability legislation this summer in a special legislative session, as widespread protests against racial injustice and police brutality continue. TOP STORIES Comedian charged with inciting riot in George Floyd protest Seattles autonomous zone is Mad Max movie mayhem come alive Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history “Over the past two weeks, we have watched our nation and state slowly step up to engage in a conversation that is long overdue,” Rep. Janelle Bynum, a Happy Valley Democrat and chair of the House Judiciary Committee, said in a statement. Bynum and other members of Oregon’s all-Democrat People of Color Caucus...
    ALBANY — State lawmakers spent Tuesday continuing to pass police reform bills — chief among them, the controversial 50-a repeal and replace bill requiring release of law enforcement disciplinary records subject to freedom of information laws. The bill first repeals a section of New York’s civil rights law providing privacy protection for the disciplinary records and personal information of police officers, firefighters and corrections officers. It replaces it with a new layer, allowing members of the public and journalists to submit a Freedom of Information Law request for records and claims made against officers. Sensitive information — like addresses, phone numbers, email or health information — will still be kept under wraps, like other public employees. The bill — carried by Assemblyman Daniel O’Donnell (D-Manhattan) and state Sen. Jamaal Bailey (D-The Bronx) — along with nine others, prompted state lawmakers to return to Albany via Zoom and in person to pass police reform bills in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minnesota cop Derek Chauvin. Originally passed in 1976 by the Legislature to shield law enforcement...
    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — As protesters of police brutality demand accountability, New York lawmakers are poised to overhaul a decades-old law that has kept officers’ disciplinary records secret. The state law, known by its section title, 50-a, was passed in the 1970s to prevent criminal defense attorneys from subjecting officers to harassing cross-examinations about irrelevant information in their personnel file. The law applies to jail guards and firefighters, as well. But over the years, the law has draped a veil over most records of police misconduct, including allegations. Formal complaints about excessive force by officers are not public in New York. In recent years, police departments have cited the law in refusing to say even whether officers have been punished. The Democrat-led Legislature planned to pass a repeal Monday as part of several bills that would also ban officers from subduing people with chokeholds and enshrine in state law an executive order giving the attorney general the power to investigate certain types of police misconduct. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that he intends to sign the bills, arguing that police...
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