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    People leave the Disneyland Resort on Disneyland Park and Disney California Adventure's reopening day amidst the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Anaheim, California, April 30, 2021.Mario Anzuoni | Reuters The nation's largest employers collectively laid off more than 100,000 workers during the pandemic, according to a report released Tuesday by a House subcommittee. Hourly workers were hit particularly hard. Not only were they more likely to get fired in 2019, 2020 and 2021 than salaried employees, but they were also more likely to quit and less likely to be promoted, congressional investigators found. The phenomenon disproportionately affected women, workers of color and older workers. The findings are part of a staff report from the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis, which detailed staffing inequities at 12 large corporations: AT&T, Berkshire Hathaway, Boeing, Chevron, Cisco, Citigroup, Comcast, ExxonMobil, Oracle, Salesforce, Walmart and the Walt Disney Company. None of the companies immediately responded when contacted for comment. "Today's report demonstrates that the inequities observed during this crisis are deeply rooted in our economy and have persisted throughout the pandemic," Rep. James...
    Former President Donald Trump's administration colluded with top-level meatpacking industry executives to exploit the COVID-19 pandemic in order to drive up prices and downplay the severity of the emergency, according to an exhaustive investigation released on Thursday by the United States House Select Oversight Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Representative Jim Clyburn (D-South Carolina), the House Majority Whip and chairman of the Subcommittee, said in a statement that "the shameful conduct of corporate executives pursuing profit at any cost during a crisis and government officials eager to do their bidding regardless of resulting harm to the public must never be repeated." The probe began last year and uncovered a spider web of corruption and flagrant disregard for human life involving American corporate titans and individuals in the highest ranks of the federal government. Officials at the Department of Agriculture – including Secretary Sonny Purdue and Under Secretary for Food Safety Mindy Brashears – "collaborated" with corporate bigwigs to prioritize profits and production over the safety of employees and the public despite being fully aware of the hazards. "Infections and...
    RICHMOND, Virginia- As the legislature approaches its March 12 adjournment, legislators are working on budget negotiations, wrapping up their consideration of other bills, and continuing to return to pre-COVID-19 operations. On Tuesday, the Senate Finance Committee advanced a number of bills from the House of Delegates, but at the beginning of the meeting Committee Chair Janet Howell (D-Fairfax) warned that the committee would add a financial contingency clause to several of the bills that aren’t currently funded in budget proposals. Health and Human Resources Subcommittee Chair Emmett Hanger (R-Augusta) presented the subcommittee’s report on many bills. Addressing Howell, he said, “We had the issue that you referred to as you began the meeting where on a number of them, there was not an allocation of funds coming from the House. So, we’re going to have, obviously, resource issues as we enter conference in terms of whether or not we can support all these good ideas that we’re going to advance today with the clause.” The House of Delegates has advanced a budget with substantial tax cuts, which reduces available revenue...
    New York (CNN Business)Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, is set to testify in a Senate subcommittee hearing in early December about the platform's potentially harmful impact on younger users following months of scrutiny on the issue. The testimony will mark Mosseri's first appearance before Congress. It also makes him the most high-profile executive from Meta, the social media company formerly known as Facebook, to agree to testify since Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen leaked hundreds of internal company documents. Some of those documents showed that the company's own researchers have found Instagram can damage young users' mental health and body image, and can exacerbate dangerous behaviors such as eating disorders. "After bombshell reports about Instagram's toxic impacts, we want to hear straight from the company's leadership why it uses powerful algorithms that push poisonous content to children driving them down rabbit holes to dark places, and what it will do to make its platform safer," Sen. Richard Blumenthal, who chairs the Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety and Data Security, said in a statement to CNN Business. Blumental previously called...
    (CNN Business)The former Facebook employee whose leaks triggered some of the most intense scrutiny in the company's history revealed her identity Sunday night. Frances Haugen, a former Facebook product manager with stints at several other big tech companies, went public with an appearance on "60 Minutes."Haugen is set to testify in front of a US Senate subcommittee on Tuesday. Here's what we know about her so far. BackgroundHaugen grew up attending the Iowa caucuses with her parents, according to her personal website. That experience instilled "a strong sense of pride in democracy and responsibility for civic participation," the website added. Read MoreFacebooks services start coming back online after outageAfter studying electrical and computer engineering, followed by an MBA, Haugen worked at several tech firms starting in 2006, including Google, Pinterest and Yelp. She specializes in "algorithmic product management," and has worked on several ranking algorithms similar to the one Facebook uses to organize its main newsfeed, according to her prepared testimony obtained by CNN on Monday. She is scheduled to appear Tuesday before the Senate subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product...
    Sen. Russ Goodman (R– Cogdell), was recently appointed by Gov. Brian Kemp to serve on the Fiscal Affairs Subcommittee with the Office of Planning and Budget. A meeting has been called to approve budgetary transfers that are essential for the Amended Fiscal Year 2021 budget (AFY21). “Being able to serve the great people of Georgia is always an honor,” said Sen. Goodman. “I am grateful that I was chosen to serve on this committee, and I look forward to getting to work alongside my colleagues to accomplish the necessary budgetary transfers for the AFY21 budget.” The subcommittee on Fiscal Affairs will meet next month to review the Governor’s recommendations.
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff WASHINGTON (KDKA) – It was announced on Wednesday that Congressman Conor Lamb will serve as the Vice-Chair of the Subcommittee on Aviation. READ MORE: Showtime Series Rust Starring Jeff Daniels Set To Begin This Week The announcement was made by the Chair of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Rep. Peter DeFazio, a Democrat from Oregon and Chair of the Subcommittee on Aviation, a Democrat from Washington. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Weather: More Sunshine Today Following A Cold Morning The subcommittee has jurisdiction over all aspects of civil aviation including safety, infrastructure, and international issues. “I welcome Representative Lamb to this new role on the Aviation Subcommittee, and I know that he’ll work hard for the people he serves, and all Americans,” Chair DeFazio said. “As Vice Chair, Representative Lamb will play a key role as the Committee not only continues its work to ensure the safety of our aviation system, but also as we work to improve our critical airport infrastructure, create good-paying aviation jobs across the country, and integrate new users and...
    After pausing its review of emoji submissions, the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee is back with tips for successful submissions, chair Jennifer Daniel announced. Anything you submit now could come to phones as soon as 2023 — but if you want to fine-tune your emoji, she’s got some suggestions. A good emoji has multiple uses, can be used with other emoji to create an emoji phrase, represents something new, and is distinct from existing emoji, Daniel writes. We won’t get new emoji this year; the Unicode Consortium — that’s the panel in charge of emoji releases — delayed the version release. The delay was because Unicode relies on volunteers, and last year, the pandemic overwhelmed them. The next planned release is in 2022. Our own Jay Peters has contributed to your emoji vocabulary with a yawn and a waffle. He submitted his proposal in 2017, and the new emoji hit phones everywhere in 2019.
    Peter Navarro warned the president on March 1, 2020 to act quickly to invest in drugs, portable tests and other supplies to fight the virus, according to a memo obtained by the House’s special subcommittee on the coronavirus epidemic. Mr Navarro also said he had tried to acquire more protective gear such as masks, criticizing the pace of the administration. At the time, there were around 100 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the United States and only two deaths linked to the outbreak. But after Donald Trump ignored Navarro’s recommendations, the trade adviser embarked on his own strategy of acquiring supplies with little oversight, Democrats say. Mr. Navarro was then said to have led the granting of a $ 765 million loan to Eastman Kodak for the production of generic drug ingredients, when the company had never manufactured drugs before. A $ 354 million sole-source contract for pharmaceutical ingredients with a start-up company called Phlow has been struck. Finally, another $ 96 million sole-source contract for respirators and electric filters has been signed with AirBoss Defense Group,...
    New York : The Elanco company reported revenue of more than $ 300 million from sales of the Seresto necklace. Photo: Scott Olson / . A congressional subcommittee is demanding the recall of a popular flea collar which has been linked to the deaths of 1,700 pets and it is suspected of causing illness in tens of thousands more. In a letter to the maker of the Seresto necklace, one of the best sellers on Amazon and in major US pet stores, Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi of Illinois demanded his immediate removal, citing reports that he has been involved in 75,000 incidents injurious to companion animals and in nearly 1,000 human incidents, according to data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA, which regulates pet collars because they contain pesticides, was also singled out for not doing enough to address the huge number of complaints it has received, according to a report published by USA Today. The Seresto collar “is the only flea and anti-tick collar that combines two pesticides that could be more toxic...
    (CNN)All baby food manufacturers must consider toxic chemicals when they test their baby food for potential hazards, the US Food and Drug Administration said Friday."We appreciate your attention to your obligation to consider potential chemical hazards, including toxic elements, when conducting a hazard analysis," wrote Susan Mayne, director of the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, and Dr. Janet Woodcock, the FDA's acting commissioner of food and drugs, in a letter addressed to all baby and toddler food manufacturers and processors.The FDA action came one month after a congressional investigation found several baby food manufacturers knowingly sold baby food that contained high levels of toxic heavy metals. "We presented evidence of a pervasive problem of toxic heavy metals in baby foods, and when we asked the Biden Administration's FDA for help in addressing it, they were very concerned and responsive," said Democratic Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi of Illinois, chair of the House Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy, which conducted the investigation, signed by the Democratic members.In the announcement, the FDA put manufacturers on notice that exposure to toxic...
    A House panel plans to examine whether traditional media like cable and network news organizations are creating a “tangible and destabilizing threat” to the country by relying on conspiracy theories. The hearing was prompted by events surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic and also the Jan. 6 insurrection, according to two leading congressmen. The Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Communications and Technology will hear from media experts at 12:30 p.m. ET. on Feb. 24 about the role disinformation and extremism plays in the reporting done by broadcast news and cable news organizations. “The spread of disinformation and extremism by traditional news media presents a tangible and destabilizing threat,” said Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneHouse Democrats urge Amazon to investigate, recall 'defective' products Asbestos ban stalls in Congress amid partisan fight Pharma execs say FDA will not lower standards for coronavirus vaccine MORE (D-NJ) and the subcommittee chairman Mike DoyleMichael (Mike) F. DoyleBiden's gain is Democratic baseball's loss with Cedric Richmond White House getting pushback on possible government-owned 5G network Hillicon Valley: DOJ accuses Russian hackers of targeting 2018 Olympics, French elections | Federal commission issues recommendations for...
    Amazon.com Inc. packages sit in front of a FedEx Corp. delivery truck in New York.Christopher Lee | Bloomberg | Getty Images An Amazon seller complained to lawmakers Thursday of unfair forced arbitration clauses the platform uses to prevent potentially damaging outcomes in court. Jacob Weiss, founder and president of home goods retailer OJ Commerce, told the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust that he, like many other e-commerce business owners, relies on Amazon to survive. Because of Amazon's huge presence in the online shopping market, small sellers have frequently said they feel dependent on the platform to drive sales.  Weiss said that gave him "no choice" but to sign Amazon's contract allowing him to sell on its platform, which included a forced arbitration clause that also prevented him from bringing class action cases against the company. "Amazon's forced arbitration clauses have made it impossible to get a fair shake," Weiss told the subcommittee. "The system is rigged against small- to mid-sized online business owners." Representatives from Amazon didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. Weiss is just one of the...
    Savannah Rychcik October 30, 2020 0 Comments The House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis is releasing a report detailing its assessment of President Donald Trump’s response to the outbreak. “The Select Subcommittee’s findings demonstrate that the Trump Administration’s response to the coronavirus pandemic is among the worst failures of leadership in American history,” the introduction to the report reads. It added, “The virus is a global scourge, but it has been an American fiasco, killing more people in the United States than in any other country. President Trump’s decision to mislead the public about the severity of the crisis, his failure to listen to scientists about how to keep Americans healthy, and his refusal to implement a coordinated national plan to stop the coronavirus have all contributed to devastating results: more than 227,000 Americans dead, more than 8.8 million Americans infected, and a dangerous virus that continues to spread out of control nine months after it reached our nation’s shores.” The committee criticized the Trump administration for failing to “implement a national plan on testing, contact tracing,...
    Izusek/Getty For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.This story was published in partnership with ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. In the spring, Congress created a program to save aviation worker jobs. Then the Trump administration undermined that program by granting hundreds of millions of dollars in relief to aviation companies for jobs they’d already largely eliminated, according to a House report released Friday. As a result, thousands of workers at airline caterers and other contractors are out of work while their employers received public funds that were supposed to be passed to workers. What’s more, at least two companies that received hundreds of millions in taxpayer funds restored full pay to management, the report found. The report follows a monthslong investigation that the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis launched in July, citing ProPublica reporting on the program. The $32 billion Payroll...
    GEO Group, the private prison company that contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to run the Aurora Contract Detention Facility, has a history of coercing immigrant detainees into cleaning common areas under the threat of solitary confinement, newly unsealed documents reveal. The documents are photocopies of disciplinary reports from 2009, 2011 and 2014 that show Aurora ICE detainees being placed in solitary confinement for refusing to clean common areas. They're part of a class-action suit filed in the U.S District Court of Colorado in 2014 by a group of Aurora ICE detainees that alleged GEO significantly underpays detainees for work, and even coerces them into working for free at the Aurora facility. In court proceedings, GEO Group has insisted that its policies and practices are on the up-and-up, and that it hasn't violated any laws or ICE detention protocol through its voluntary work programs and cleaning requirements for detainees.Related Stories Aurora Immigration Court Shuts Down Hearings After Major COVID Outbreak House Subcommittee Report Takes Aim at Aurora Immigrant Detention Facility Joe Neguse Raises Concerns About Due Process at Aurora Immigration...
    An immigration court located at the Aurora ICE facility is shutting down hearings for ten days following a large outbreak of COVID-19 among detainees. "Nobody knows what's going on. People are scared. People are anxious. Nobody is getting their court dates," says a detainee who recently tested positive for COVID while staying at the facility, and asked that his name not be used for fear of retaliation. Westword spoke with multiple immigration attorneys who say they were recently told by the court's clerk that hearings would be canceled for ten days.Related Stories COVID Outbreak in Aurora ICE Facility, Nineteen New Positives Detainee Transfers Lead to COVID-19 Increase at Aurora ICE Facility House Subcommittee Report Takes Aim at Aurora Immigrant Detention Facility "When I asked whether it was regarding the COVID outbreak, [the clerk staffer] simply said, 'That’s all of the information we are being given by ICE,'" says immigration attorney Ariana Fuentes, who has a client with an upcoming bond hearing that has now been delayed over three weeks because of the closure. Nicole King, a third-year law student...
    US womens soccer team plans camp in Colorado this month Fun and little-known facts about Coca-Cola House antitrust report accuses Amazon of using third-party seller data to copy popular products — something the tech giant has repeatedly denied © Reuters Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos. Reuters Amazon uses third-party seller data to copy the site's most popular products, an antitrust report by the House Judiciary Committee alleged on Wednesday. Former Amazon sellers told an antitrust subcommittee the company released new products almost identical to their own and "killed" their sales. Amazon has denied accusations of this behavior in the past. "We have a policy against using seller-specific data to aid our private-label business," Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said in July. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee said it has uncovered evidence that Amazon uses detailed data from third-party sellers to copy popular products and push some sellers out of business — something the tech giant has consistently denied.  Load Error The subcommittee said it had heard "repeated" concerns from...
    Nineteen detainees in the same dormitory at the Aurora Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility have tested positive for COVID-19 in recent days, according to a report from Congressman Jason Crow's office, marking the most significant outbreak at that detention center. "This spread within a single dorm shows the inherently dangerous nature of congregate settings like ICE detention centers," says Liz Jordan, an attorney with the Denver-based Civil Rights Enforcement and Education Center. "Even if the facility were following all CDC recommendations, an outbreak like this is not only possible, but likely. The safest thing ICE can do is release people to shelter at home with their families. Aurora Fire Rescue confirmed that it had been notified of the outbreak by facility staffers on October 2, per local ordinance.Related Stories Detainee Transfers Lead to COVID-19 Increase at Aurora ICE Facility Aurora ICE Facility Now Offering COVID-19 Tests to All Detainees House Subcommittee Report Takes Aim at Aurora Immigrant Detention Facility Over the course of the pandemic, nineteen staff members at the center have tested positive for COVID-19, and 73 detainees...
    [The stream is slated to start at 9:00 a.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] The U.S. House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis is holding a hearing Friday to question Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on the U.S. response to the pandemic. It is Azar's first appearance in Congress since February, Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), the subcommittee chair, said. The hearing will focus on "the Trump Administration's unprecedented political interference in the work of scientists and public health experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Food and Drug Administration," according to the subcommittee's website.  Last month, HHS announced Michael Caputo, the department's former top spokesman, announced he would take a 60-day medical leave after he accused scientists at the CDC were engaged in "sedition" against President Donald Trump. And the hearing comes hours after Trump announced he and the first lady both tested positive for the coroanvirus. Representatives of HHS did not immediately return CNBC's request for comment on whether Azar would attend the hearing in person.  Read...
    Colorado politicians are pushing back against a rumored Immigration and Customs Enforcement operation that could hit Denver before the election. “The President’s proposed ICE raids are intended to incite fear for political gain," says Representative Joe Neguse. "His attempts to demonize immigrants will not work in Denver, and will not work in Colorado. We need humane and comprehensive immigration reform, not an administration that cruelly rips people away from their homes and their families." On September 29, the Washington Post reported that the Trump administration was preparing an "immigration enforcement blitz" focusing on cities that have adopted so-called sanctuary policies. The "sanctuary op" would begin in California, likely in early October, and then expand to other places, including Denver, according to the Post piece.Related Stories House Subcommittee Report Takes Aim at Aurora Immigrant Detention Facility Asian Americans Protest ICE Head Tony Pham, Vietnamese Refugee Detainee Transfers Lead to COVID-19 Increase at Aurora ICE Facility President Donald Trump is down in the polls, and launching a high-profile ICE operation just weeks before the November 3 election would take a page from his...
    Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) speaks during a House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing on July 31, 2020 in Washington, DC. the virus.Erin Scott | Pool | Getty Images A federal coronavirus small-business loan program has helped millions of companies stay afloat during the pandemic, but may have also sunk billions of dollars on "fraud, waste, and abuse," House Democrats said Tuesday. The conclusion from majority staff on the House coronavirus subcommittee came in a new report on the Paycheck Protection Program, a key piece of the more than $2 trillion bipartisan stimulus law signed into law by President Donald Trump earlier this year. Trump signed off on additional funding for the program in April, giving it a total of about $670 billion. As the Covid-19 crisis rages on, Democratic lawmakers and the White House are at an impasse over the details of another relief bill that would replenish funds for small businesses that have struggled to survive under strict social distancing measures. But the Democrats' report Tuesday says that "a lack of oversight and accountability" may have diverted large...
    NASA The US has taken on grand challenges that required complicated coordination earlier than, together with Challenge Apollo. Coping with the social and financial upheaval from the coronavirus pandemic would require the abilities and abilities of many varieties of professions – medical personnel, public well being specialists, mother and father, college students, educators, legislators, enforcement authorities and lots of others. Till now, although, the U.S. has struggled to mount a coordinated nationwide response to successfully stamp out COVID-19, whilst different international locations in Europe and East Asia have proven that the illness may be managed. Prior to now, the US has efficiently mobilized to deal with deeply complicated challenges and I imagine a type of – sending astronauts to the Moon – may be instructive right now, regardless that a pandemic is a really totally different problem. Twelve years after the famed Challenge Apollo to land males on the Moon in 1969, Normal Motors employed former NASA Administrator Robert Frosch to carry space-age know-how to automobile manufacturing. He commissioned a small job power to...
    NASA The US has taken on grand challenges that required complex coordination before, including Project Apollo. Dealing with the social and economic upheaval from the coronavirus pandemic will require the skills and talents of many types of professions – medical personnel, public health experts, parents, students, educators, legislators, enforcement authorities and many others. Until now, though, the U.S. has struggled to mount a coordinated national response to effectively stamp out COVID-19, even as other countries in Europe and East Asia have shown that the disease can be controlled. In the past, the United States has successfully mobilized to address deeply complex challenges and I believe one of those – sending astronauts to the Moon – can be instructive today, even though a pandemic is a very different challenge. Twelve years after the famed Project Apollo to land men on the Moon in 1969, General Motors hired former NASA Administrator Robert Frosch to bring space-age technology to car manufacturing. He commissioned a small task force to incorporate Apollo’s engineering process into the design of vehicles. I began my...
    The House antitrust subcommittee just concluded the highest-profile hearing into antitrust and competition since the 1970s. I wrote on Tuesday that the long-awaited hearing with the CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google was more a test of Congress than of the tech leaders. So, how’d they do? Now that the hearing is over—it lasted some five and a half hours—I’m inclined to give the lawmakers something like a B-minus. With the notable exceptions of Republicans Jim Jordan and Matt Gaetz, who relentlessly flogged the hobbyhorse of supposed anti-conservative bias on the tech platforms, the committee proved that this is a serious and legitimately bipartisan investigation. But the hearing also illustrated how complicated the cases against these companies are, and how difficult they are to make in the brief soundbites that form the basic currency of American political debate. The hearing was the last step before the subcommittee issues its final report, capping an investigation that began in June 2019, and provided the first substantial taste of the fruits of that investigation. The members hit the CEOs with powerful evidence...
    Starting at 12PM ET on Wednesday, July 29th, the leaders of the tech industry are appearing before a congressional subcommittee to defend their business practices. Much of the run-up to the hearing has been centered on the unprecedented guest list, which includes CEOs from Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. It will be the first time some of the men have appeared in front of Congress and by far the most significant hearing since the antitrust against Microsoft in the late ‘90s. The House Judiciary live-streams proceedings from the committee’s official YouTube page, so we expect a link to be posted there shortly before the hearing begins. Once the stream is available, we will update this post to include a direct link and an embed so that the hearing can be viewed from this page. The hearing will center on testimony from four CEOs: Apple’s Tim Cook, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, and Google’s Sundar Pichai. The CEOs will face questions from the members of the House subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law — a subset of the broader...
    The House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee has postponed the July 27th hearing that would have seen the CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google testify before Congress. In a notice posted online, the panel did not provide a reason for the delay, nor did it say when the event will eventually take place. However, the likely cause for the postponement is the memorial that will take place at 2PM ET on Monday to honor recently deceased Congressman John Lewis . The online hearing was scheduled to start at 12PM ET. Provided none of the executives withdraw from the rescheduled hearing, it will be the first time Tim Cook, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg and Sundar Pichai will all testify before Congress together. The hearing will tackle the ongoing investigation the Antitrust Subcommittee launched to determine whether the four tech giants are stifling competition.
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