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    Brie Larson Launches YouTube Channel as She Recalls Making Movies in Her Garage Moderna stock falls 8% after report says late-stage coronavirus vaccine trial delayed WNBA superstar Maya Moore reunites with Jonathan Irons in an emotional video after she fought to have his wrongful conviction overturned © Provided by INSIDER On Wednesday, Jonathan Irons walked free for the first time in 23 years after WNBA superstar Maya Moore helped fight to overturn his conviction. Matteo Marchi/Getty Images Four-time WNBA champion and six-time All-Star Maya Moore put basketball on hold at the height of her career to fight for the freedom of a man she believes was wrongfully convicted. At 16 years old, Jonathan Irons was accused of burglarizing a home in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri, and assaulting the homeowner with a gun. In March, Cole County Circuit Judge Daniel Green overturned Irons' conviction citing exculpatory evidence that he said was withheld during Irons' initial trial. On Wednesday, Irons became a free man for the first time in 23 years. Moore and Irons reunited outside the prison in an...
    SAN JOSE — Lionel Rubalcava has spent the past year making up for a lot of lost time. Seventeen years, to be exact: The period he spent jailed or imprisoned until he was exonerated for a shooting he was miles away from. He has worked to reconnect with his family, including his adult son, who became a man while Rubalcava was behind bars. He has worked to rebuild his life, buoyed by a job with a concrete company. He’s now setting his sights on getting something back, and leveraging his experience to compel changes in the system that wrongfully convicted him. “I missed out on building a whole life for myself, I missed out on the chance of raising my son, getting an education, or getting into a line of work,” Rubalcava, 42, said in an interview Friday. “All that was taken from me. I had to go through a lot of pain and suffering, and they definitely owe me.” Last week, the New York-based civil-rights law firm Neufeld Scheck & Brustin filed a federal lawsuit in San Jose alleging...
    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The Maine supreme court on Thursday upheld the conviction of a disabled motorist who was sentenced to a year in prison for killing a pedestrian. Andrew Bilodeau was convicted of vehicular manslaughter for the crash that claimed the life of 81-year-old Emile Morin in November 2017 in Augusta. Prosecutors contended Bilodeau, who has cerebral palsy, knew he was putting the public at risk by driving. In his appeal, Bilodeau contended it was inappropriate for prosecutors to tell jurors that a disabled person shouldn't be driving after being properly licensed. The Bureau of Motor Vehicles was aware of his physical and vision impairments, he contended. The Supreme Judicial Court said that Maine's criminal code didn't provide a defense to manslaughter related to (physical disability, and didn't prevent the state from presenting evidence of a disability. Morin was walking to his car after attending a funeral Mass and bean supper. Caryn Murphy, his daughter, said Bilodeau knew his limitations and “chose to ignore them.” Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,...
    QUEENS, New York City -- A Queens man imprisoned for 25 years for a murder he did not commit had his conviction vacated Tuesday after new evidence undermined the credibility of the witnesses who testified at his trial and pointed to another suspect.Samuel Brownridge, then 18, was found guilty of first-degree murder in the 1994 execution-style killing of a 32-year-old man in St. Albans based on two eyewitness identifications, but District Attorney Melinda Katz said the new evidence implicates a violent felon, Garfield Brown, as the actual shooter."I don't think one who has never been incarcerated knows how it feels to be locked up, especially when they are innocent," Brownridge said in a statement. "I feel that law enforcement had the opportunity to make this right years ago."Queens Supreme Court Justice Joseph Zayas used a tissue to wipe away tears during the video conference before granting the motion to dismiss Brownridge's case."To many of you, this may look like a victory, but...I cannot help but see all that I lost," Brownridge said. "But I also see hope. Hope for my...
    Kansas' 1st Congressional District Rep. Roger Marshall (R) The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Kentucky, New York, and Virginia held their downballot primaries on Tuesday, while runoffs took place in Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina. You can find the results at the links for each state, and we’ll have a comprehensive rundown in our next Digest. Note, though, that we will not know the final results for some races for several days or more: Kentucky’s Board of Elections, for instance, has advised all counties to wait until June 30 before releasing any results, while New York will not count its absentee ballots for at least a week after the primary. Leading Off ● KS-Sen: Republican Rep. Roger Marshall earned some ugly headlines this week after the Kansas City Star reported that the prosecutor who erased Marshall's 2008 conviction for reckless driving was the son of the congressman's business partner. The news comes six...
    Disgraced actor Bill Cosby has won the right to appeal his 2018 sexual assault conviction. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that allowing testimony regarding allegations that were uncharged could have been prejudicial, according to a report published by NBC News. The court will also hear arguments regarding the use of statements made by Cosby during a civil lawsuit in his criminal trial. In a stunning decision that could test the legal framework of #MeToo cases, comedian Bill Cosby wins the right to fight his 2018 sexual assault conviction in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. https://t.co/5GITakyurh — The Associated Press (@AP) June 23, 2020 The court will decide if Cosby “reasonably relied upon those oral and written statements by providing deposition testimony in the civil action, thus forfeiting his constitutional right against self-incrimination.” Prosecution had women testify regarding “allegations of uncharged misconduct involving sexual contact” during the 2018 trial. (RELATED: Bill Cosby Maintains His Innocence During First Interview From Prison) Cosby is currently serving three to 10 years in prison after being convicted on three counts of aggravated indecent assault...
    (CNN)Pennsylvania's Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that Bill Cosby is allowed to appeal two key issues in his 2018 conviction on sexual assault charges.Cosby, the 82-year-old actor and comedian, is less than two years into a 3-to-10-year sentence at a prison outside Philadelphia for drugging and sexually assaulting a former Temple University employee at his home in 2004.Tuesday's ruling grants Cosby the ability to appeal two issues in the case. One issue focuses on the "prior bad act" witnesses who testified about alleged assaults that were not part of the charges, and the second focuses on the prior district attorney's decision not to charge Cosby a decade ago.At his criminal trial, Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill allowed five other women, including supermodel Janice Dickinson, to testify that Cosby had incapacitated and assaulted them in other incidents. Prosecutors said these "prior bad act" witnesses showed Cosby had a pattern in his assaults.Cosby's legal team has argued that their testimony was dated and dissimilar from the criminal accusations and should not have been allowed in court.Read MoreIn addition, the trial featured Cosby's deposition...
    Comedian Bill Cosby will get a chance to appeal his criminal convictions to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, Philadelphia’s WPVI-TV reported. Cosby, 82, has been behind bars since September 2018, serving a sentence of 3 to 10 years for aggravated indecent sexual assault. The comedian has maintained his innocence throughout, and indeed, his first appeal was denied in September 2019. On Tuesday, the state’s Supreme Court agreed to allow him to appeal his sentence, on four specific grounds on which his attorneys have argued that he didn’t get a fair trial and sentence. Specifically, according to a 2019 USA Today report, Cosby’s team has argued that the court should not have allowed the prosecution to call 5 accusers to testify that he had given them quaaludes in the past. Cosby was not being criminally tried for any of those accusations, his team argued, so there was no need to bring them into court. The prosecution, however, maintained that the accusers’ claims established a “signature” pattern of drugging and molesting women. An appeals court sided with the prosecution. “We conclude that the...
    For the second time in his life, Timothy Chavira has been convicted of murder, acknowledging in a guilty plea entered Monday that he killed a 76-year-old woman in December, county prosecutors said. Upon entering the plea, Chavira, 57, immediately began serving a life sentence in state prison without the possibility of parole, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. He had previously served a nearly 30-year sentence for murdering his stepmother. Chavira was arrested in December and charged with the murder of Editha Cruz de Leon, a retired gynecologist and grandmother. Her body was found in her El Sereno home the morning of Dec. 8, 2019. She had died of strangulation and sharp force injuries, the Los Angeles County medical examiner-coroner found. Deputy Dist. Atty. Cynthia Barnes, who prosecuted Chavira, described the killing as “out of the blue.” “We honestly don’t know the motive and we don’t know why he picked her,” Barnes said. “It’s just so sad. Why her?” Chavira had been released on parole two and half years earlier, having spent nearly three...
    A Livermore man who was convicted of murder for drunkenly speeding in his Corvette through city streets, until he crashed and killed a mother and her toddler, won an appeal of his convictions this week. Brian Zachary Jones, 40, was serving a sentence of life without the possibility of parole for 30 years until Monday, when a California appeals court ruled 2-1 that trial Judge Paul Delucchi violated Jones’ right to a fair trial by dismissing a juror who had reported misconduct by another juror. One of the appeals court judges wrote a dissenting opinion defending Delucchi’s decision. The rulings means that the case against Jones is back to square one; he will likely be transferred from Folsom State Prison to Santa Rita Jail, where the Alameda County District Attorney can move to re-try him on the murder charges. Jones was convicted in 2017, after a high profile trial in which the defense argued he should be found guilty of manslaughter, not murder. Jones’ appeal came down to the dismissal of Juror #10, who reported to Delucchi that another juror,...
    The brother of former U.S. Marine Paul Whelan – who was sentenced to 16 years of hard labor in Russia on charges of espionage – is urging the U.S. government to "find a way to have him freed," after what he says was a "set up" and a "sham trial." AMERICAN PAUL WHELAN RECEIVES 16-YEAR RUSSIAN JAIL SENTENCE: REPORT "The United States government won't stand for its citizens being treated this way and as Ambassador (John) Sullivan said on the courthouse steps, subjected to a mockery of justice," David Whelan said on Fox News' "America's Newsroom" on Tuesday, just a day after his brother was banished to a maximum-security colony in Russia. Paul Whelan was arrested in December 2018 when he says he was in Russia celebrating the wedding of a fellow Marine. Paul Whelan, a former US marine accused of espionage and arrested in Russia in December 2018, stands inside a defendants' cage as he waits to hear his verdict in Moscow on June 15, 2020. (Photo by Kirill KUDRYAVTSEV / AFP) (Photo by KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images) He has insisted that...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) - A federal appeals court grilled lawyers Tuesday about whether Penn State’s former president deserved to have his misdemeanor child endangerment conviction, related to his response to a complaint about Jerry Sandusky, overturned last year. The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals focused on whether Graham Spanier was wrongly convicted under a 2007 law for acts that occurred in 2001. The three judges did not say when they might rule. Spanier’s attorneys say the 2007 version expanded the child endangerment law to apply to those who employ or supervise underlings, while the attorney general’s office said it simply put into words and clarified what already was the law - and that he was prosecuted under the 1995 version. “This jury was never told, never, that it could convict the defendant solely on the basis that he supervised other people that were supervising the welfare of children,” argued Ronald Eisenberg for the attorney general’s office. The judges are reviewing a decision by U.S. Magistrate Judge Karoline Mehalchick in April 2019 that Spanier was improperly convicted under the 2007...
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expressing his outrage at the conviction of a former US marine on spying charges in Russia, slamming the trial as illegitimate and demanding the man’s release. In a statement released Monday, Pompeo decried the conviction and 16-year prison sentence delivered to Paul Whelan, a 50-year-old man with US, British, Canadian and Irish passports who was arrested in December 2018. “The United States is outraged by the decision of a Russian court today to convict US citizen Paul Whelan after a secret trial, with secret evidence, and without appropriate allowances for defense witnesses,” Pompeo said, “We have serious concerns that Mr. Whelan was deprived of the fair trial guarantees that Russia is required to provide him in accordance with its international human rights obligations.” Pompeo went on to condemn how Whelan had been treated by the Russian government, referring to it as “appalling.” “Russia failed to provide Mr. Whelan with a fair hearing before an independent and impartial tribunal; and during his detention has put his life at risk by ignoring his long-standing medical condition;...
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Monday said the U.S. is "outraged" over Russia's conviction of American Paul Whelan on spying charges, slamming the trial that led to a conviction and a 16-year prison sentence as illegitimate. Both Whelan and his family have said that he is innocent, and was in Russia at the time of his arrest to attend the wedding of a friend from his time in the Marines. The United States has for months raised concerns about the lack of due process for Whelan and his deteriorating health in Russian custody, and Pompeo personally demanded Whelan's release in a May 30 tweet. He did so again Monday. "Outraged by the decision today to convict Paul Whelan on the basis of a secret trial, with secret evidence, and without appropriate allowances for defense witnesses," Pompeo tweeted Monday. "Paul’s treatment by Russian authorities continues to be appalling, and we demand his immediate release." AMERICAN PAUL WHELAN RECEIVES 16-YEAR RUSSIAN JAIL SENTENCE: REPORT Pompeo elaborated further in a separate statement Monday. "We have serious concerns that Mr. Whelan was deprived of...
    TOKYO (AP) - A Japanese high court on Thursday upheld a lower court’s decision that the French head of Mt. Gox, a Tokyo-based bitcoin exchange that went bankrupt after a massive hacking attack, was guilty of manipulating electronic data but not embezzlement. The Tokyo District Court last year sentenced Mark Karpeles to two years and six months in prison, suspended for four years. Karpeles, a French citizen, will not have to serve jail time. He says he is innocent and appealed to clear his name. He said he was not yet sure what he would do next. TOP STORIES Gov. Cuomo: Pro-life, pro-gun conservatives have no place in New York Seattle protesters demand city abolish police, hire black doctors to treat black patients Tom Arnold: Liberals should borrow our dads hunting rifles and confront Trumps misfit tools Karpeles has insisted he did not pocketed client funds that went missing when Mt. Gox collapsed in 2014. He said he is not yet sure what he will do next. “Today’s verdict was unfortunate, and I am reviewing...
    CLINTON, La. (AP) — A Louisiana man had his first-degree murder conviction voided by a judge on Tuesday after his lawyer argued that the jury’s split verdict was unconstitutional. A jury had found Ryan Sharpe guilty in December 2019 of killing 48-year-old Brad Defranceschi, a Boy Scouts employee, in an 11-1 verdict. On Tuesday, Sharpe’s lawyer Tommy Damico argued that Sharpe’s conviction should be voided and a new trial held because of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in April that banned non-unanimous jury decisions. A district judge agreed with Damico and set a new trial for Sharpe for December, news outlets reported. “He clearly was entitled to a new trial,” Damico said. Split verdicts were voted unconstitutional by Louisiana residents in 2018. But because the killings in Sharpe’s case were before 2019 and since prosecutors declined the death penalty, the jury was allowed to return a non-unanimous decision. Defranceschi was the second person gunned down in a string of shootings authorities said they believe Sharpe committed. The four shootings, which all happened in a rural...
    Walter Ogrod was one of those death row inmates who wasn’t just convicted of murder but convicted of the murder of a 4-year-old girl. On Friday, however, Ogrod walked out of prison an innocent man, his conviction overturned. Judge Shelley Robins New vacated Ogrod’s conviction and his sentence after hearing “clear and convincing” evidence that the Pennsylvania man did not kill the little girl back in 1988. A hearing was held over Zoom to determine Ogrod’s fate, Newsweek reported. A new trial had been ordered for his case, but the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office filed a motion to decline retrying him. Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner told media outlets he expects the case to be dismissed within weeks. Osgrod was released Friday on bail. His family was waiting for him outside the prison, NBC 10 Philadelphia reported. Ogrod told the outlet he “was glad to get out.” James Rollins, one of Ogrod’s attorneys, told Newsweek that Ogrod’s case is not that unique. “This innocent man and his family lost almost thirty years that they should have spent together. Instead, that...
    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) - Maine’s supreme court has rejected the appeal of a man convicted of manslaughter in the death of a 6-month-old-boy in Millinocket. Jessee Mackin is serving a 5 1/2-year sentence for the death of Larry Lord Jr., who was the son of his girlfriend. Mackin was living with the baby’s mother in Millinocket at the time, in 2015. The baby, Larry Earl Lord, died after being brought unresponsive to a hospital. The medical examiner’s office determined the infant died of a skull fracture. TOP STORIES Sheriff warns rioters of well-armed residents: The people of Polk County like guns Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to turn in badges Trump secured Washington from rioters while New York burned, White House says In his appeal, Mackin contended the evidence was insufficient to convict, but the supreme court unanimously upheld the conviction on Tuesday. The baby was the son of Anthony Lord, who’s serving two life prison sentences for a shooting rampage that claimed two lives and injured four others in 2015. Lord said he...