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    Christians in Scotland have warned new hate speech legislation could enshrine “cancel culture” in law while rendering expression of biblical morality illegal. The Scottish Parliament is currently debating the “Hate Crime and Public Order” bill that would criminalize communicating “threatening, abusive or insulting material” that is “likely” to stir up hatred against a protected group, which Christians fear could easily include traditional Christian teaching on sexual morality, marriage, and human nature. While eliminating the offence of blasphemy, the new legislation creates a new crime of stirring up hatred against any of the protected groups covered by the Bill. It also creates offences of “possessing inflammatory material” with a view to communicating the material in circumstances where it is likely that hatred would be stirred up. The director of the Catholic Parliamentary Office, Anthony Horan, has warned that the legislation could enshrine “cancel culture” in law. “A new offence of possessing inflammatory material could even render material such as the Bible and the Catechism of the Catholic Church inflammatory,” Mr. Horan said. “The Catholic Church’s understanding of the human person, including...
    As residents have slowly retreated to Scotland's mainland, the local government is hoping to entice new residents. MarkGillow/Getty Images The Isle of Rum, an island off the coast of Scotland, is searching for new residents to fill its nearly deserted community. The isle is home to about 30 people, and to entice new islanders, leaders are building four eco-friendly homes with affordable rent. The call for residents is aimed at young families with children, which the community hopes will help fill the island's practically empty schools.  Applications are due Friday and can be found on the Isle of Rum Community Trust's website.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. To get to the remote Isle of Rum, visitors can hop on a scenic train ride, fly in via helicopter, or take a ferry ride.  The Scottish island is an ideal destination to escape. People can explore the isle's mountains, discover the Kinloch Castle, encounter wildlife, and cycle through winding paths.  For many, the Isle of Rum is a destination to add to a growing bucket list. For others,...
    BRITAIN’S biggest family The Radford’s have headed to Scotland for a family trip, after their ‘holiday of a lifetime’ to Australia was cancelled.  Sue, 45, and Noel, 49, are Britain's biggest family with the mum welcoming their 22nd child, Heidie, in April.  11Sue and Noel Radford took their supersized brood to Scotland for a holidayCredit: Theradfordfamily/Instagram The supersized family had planned a four-week stay Down Under, but had to change their plans due to coronavirus.  Instead the Radford’s, who live in Morecambe, Lancs, headed to Scotland instead, on their first holiday of the year.  The family are staying at a caravan park in Edinburgh, meeting up with another large family, the Walker’s, who have nine children. Sue shared snaps from their trip after they visited the Kelpies, giant horse head sculptures, in Falkirk.  11The family had been planning a 'holiday of a lifetime' to AustraliaCredit: Theradfordfamily/Instagram She wrote on Instagram: “We’ve had such a busy day today with @walkerfamily11 we went to see the Kelpies. “What a beautiful place to visit.” Sue also shared snaps of her kids' faces covered...
    Tony Blair said that Scottish independence is now a “possibility”, warning that Prime Minister Boris Johnson “is not going to be the person who saves the Union”, claiming that only a resurgent Labour Party would keep Scotland in the United Kingdom. On Sunday, the former Labour Party British Prime Minister said that he doesn’t believe it is in the interest of the Scottish people to leave the UK, citing economic and cultural ties, but warned that Brexit may bolster the independence movement. “My view of Scotland is there’s been two problems really over the last decade,” Mr Blair told Sky News, explaining that the Labour Party “went off, in my view, completely the wrong direction on Scotland” and that there was “no proper opposition” to the Scottish National Party, with the exception of the Scottish Conservatives under the leadership of Ruth Davidson. Mr Blair said that if the Labour Party were to revive itself in Scotland, it would be a “significant advantage to preserving the Union”, adding that Prime Minister Boris Johnson “is not going to be the person who...
    By Andrew MacAskill HELENSBURGH, Scotland (Reuters) - James Henderson has spent most of his life fiercely opposed to Scottish independence. Now, reluctantly he is backing it. The 71-year-old former marine engineer voted against Scotland leaving the United Kingdom during the last independence referendum in 2014. But after Brexit, the election of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the coronavirus pandemic, he now believes Scotland would be better off independent. Henderson lives in Helensburgh, a coastal town on the Firth of Clyde, which is an unlikely home for Scottish nationalists. The area has one of the highest levels of English residents living in Scotland, and everyone knows someone who works at the nearby Faslane nuclear submarine base, a symbol of the shared bonds that bind the United Kingdom. The base is the second-largest single site employer in Scotland and red-white-and-blue union jack flags fly in some residents' gardens. If Scotland wins independence and the nationalists fulfil a promise to remove the submarines from its waters, thousands of jobs are at risk. But Scottish nationalism is rising in places like this and other...
    Trump Turnberry — which has posted multiple years of multimillion-dollar losses — was not selected to hold the prestigious golf tournament. But the incident is yet another instance of Trump trying to use the presidency for personal financial gain. In 2019, Mike Pence took a detour to another Trump golf property in Doonberg, Ireland, that cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars. The resort was nearly 200 miles away from a meeting Pence was scheduled to have with Irish officials. Pence struggled to justify why he would travel so far just to stay at a Trump property. Also in 2019, Trump also tried to hold an important gathering of world leaders at his Trump National Doral resort near Miami, Florida. Doing so would have steered millions toward the resort, which was facing financial troubles due to declining business, according to a Washington Post report. However, Trump backtracked from that plan after an uproar and questions about whether Trump holding an event for foreign leaders — many of whom would be staying at the resort — violated the Constitution's emoluments clause. The...
    By The Associated Press The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ This season’s Scottish Cup final will be played midway through next season. The Scottish soccer federation says the pandemic-delayed competition will be completed on Dec. 20. That is more than seven months after the original date for the final on May 9. The competition was stopped at the semifinal stage. Defending champion Celtic will play Aberdeen and Edinburgh rivals Hearts and Hibernian will meet in the other semifinal on the weekend of Oct. 31-Nov. 1 at Hampden Park in Glasgow. Organizers say players who would ordinarily be barred from playing for a second team in the same competition can play for their new club even if they were earlier fielded by a different team. The 2020-21 season in the Scottish league will start on Aug. 1. The 2019-20 league season did not resume after the lockdown and Celtic was declared champion based on average points per game. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved....
    The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ This season’s Scottish Cup final will be played midway through next season. The Scottish soccer federation says the pandemic-delayed competition will be completed on Dec. 20. That is more than seven months after the original date for the final on May 9. The competition was stopped at the semifinal stage. Defending champion Celtic will play Aberdeen and Edinburgh rivals Hearts and Hibernian will meet in the other semifinal on the weekend of Oct. 31-Nov. 1 at Hampden Park in Glasgow. Organizers say players who would ordinarily be barred from playing for a second team in the same competition can play for their new club even if they were earlier fielded by a different team. The 2020-21 season in the Scottish league will start on Aug. 1. The 2019-20 league season did not resume after the lockdown and Celtic was declared champion based on average points per game. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may...
    July 20 (Reuters) – The British Parliament’s intelligence and security committee’s report on Russian influence in politics will disclose that the Kremlin tried to influence the result of the Scottish independence referendum but not the Brexit vote of 2016, The Daily Telegraph reported. The report, which will be published on Tuesday, will describe that Russia tried to divide the UK in 2014 and that it was “the first post-Soviet interference in a Western democratic election,” the newspaper added, citing comments from the 50-page report. (Reporting by Aakriti Bhalla in Bengaluru; Editing by Leslie Adler)
    Boris Johnson’s place in history is already assured. Less clear is what the British prime minister will be remembered for. At first it looked like Brexit; more recently he seemed set to be the pandemic premier. But this week, as he celebrates his first year in office, a new fear is that he might be known as the leader who lost the Union. Not before time, the prime minister’s team is waking up to the renewed threat of Scottish independence, jarred by the strong pandemic performance of Scotland’s nationalist first minister Nicola Sturgeon and recent opinion polls showing a majority for separation.  Mr Johnson helped cause the problem. The 2014 independence referendum should have killed the issue for a generation. But Brexit, which Scotland voted against, revived it. Scots then saw Mr Johnson topple Theresa May, because her approach prioritised saving the Union above a hardline Brexit. In the 2017 election, Mrs May and Ruth Davidson, the Tory party’s then Scottish leader, had reduced the Scottish National party to 37 per cent of the vote. In 2019, against Mr Johnson...
    The British government on Thursday set out plans for a new UK internal market after Brexit, but was immediately accused by Scottish and Welsh political leaders of destabilising the constitutional settlement between the four constituent nations. British ministers said plans for a UK internal market bill, set out in a 100-page white paper, were designed to enable the “seamless functioning” of commerce between the four nations. With Brussels no longer setting rules following Britain’s departure from the EU, UK business secretary Alok Sharma said the legislation was necessary to give business the “regulatory clarity and certainty” it needed. But leaders of the devolved administrations warned that the move was a “power grab” by the UK government that could shrink their existing powers and see England in effect forcing Scotland and Wales to accept lower standards in areas including food and the environment. More from the Financial Times Despite government assurances that “hundreds” of policy areas will be repatriated from Brussels to Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast, the devolved administrations believe the proposed UK internal market “overseen” by the British parliament encroaches...
    3 NICOLA Sturgeon and the SNP are using a global health pandemic to cynically pursue the independence agenda – and the BBC is helping them to do it. The scheming First Minister’s egregious threat to impose a border between Scotland and England is as divisive as it is illegal. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3 Sturgeon’s dangerous position adds to her constant undermining of the UK governmentCredit: Getty - Pool How can the mainstream media be giving her a free pass on such an outrageous Trump-like threat? Make no mistake that this is the SNP suggesting the imposition of some sort of border that doesn’t exist by stealth between the countries of the UK under the cloak of a public health emergency. As Andrew Bowie – the Scottish vice chairman of the Tory party – told my talkRADIO show yesterday such a move would put thousands of Scottish jobs in the hospitality and tourism industry who rely on visits from England in jeopardy. But luckily he said the UK Government will not...
    A Scotland-wide ‘Clap for Nicola’ event is being organised for Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s First Minister and the leader of the left-separatist Scottish National Party (SNP). The nationwide clap is currently set to take place on July 19th to coincide with Sturgeon’s 50th birthday. She leads the Scottish Government — a devolved executive roughly equivalent to a state government in the United States — and the Scottish National Party (SNP). The SNP is a notionally civic nationalist party, which seeks to break Scotland off from the rest of the United Kingdom and declare “independence — but it also wants the rejoin the European Union (EU), which would involve ceding sovereignty on a swathe of issues including control over European immigration, international trade, and the management of national fishing waters. SNP: Scotland Needs ‘More Migration’ to Replace Declining ‘Native Population’ https://t.co/yWy8jRqq5F — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) October 22, 2019 “Our First Minister has done an exceptional job throughout what’s been a strange year so far, to say the least,” claimed event organiser Siobhan Mc in the Facebook post announcing the event. “We clapped...
    Steven Gerrard. Getty/Mark Leech/Offside WARNING: This story is not for the squeamish. Liverpool FC's former doctor recalled the time he once had to sew Steven Gerrard's penis back together after a match. The Reds were playing Bournemouth in the 2014 FA Cup when Gerrard injured his genitals in a challenge with Harry Arter. "Stevie came over to me at the end of the match and said 'Doc, you are going to have to have a look at this,'" Andrew Massey told The Scottish Sun. "I looked down and saw blood everywhere." Gerrard required four stitches in his penis, which he said in his autobiography his teammates found "hilarious." "A bunch of footballers are the last people you want discussing the state of your sliced penis." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Liverpool FC's former doctor recalled the time he once had to sew club and England legend Steven Gerrard's penis back together after a match. The Reds were playing Bournemouth in the fourth round of the 2014 FA Cup when Gerrard injured his genitals in a challenge...
    Breaking News — Edinburgh (United Kingdom), Jul 3 . .- The British Greenpeace delegation has been found guilty of “contempt” by a Scottish court, which has sentenced it to pay 80,000 pounds (88,000 euros) for violating the ban on carrying out a protest on a platform that the oil company BP manages in the North Sea. During a virtual session, Judge Sarah Wolffe of the Edinburgh Sessions Court said Greenpeace twice admitted to violating the order prohibiting activists from boarding the platform located in the waters of the Cromarty Firth (Scottish North) in June. from last year. On June 9, 2019, several Greenpeace members approached the platform on the Arctic Sunrise boat, and two of them managed to climb to unfold a banner against the actions of the oil companies that favor the climate crisis. The objective, according to what the environmental organization declared at the time, was to stop the drilling of oil wells in the Vorlich field, in the north of the British region, where the platform was heading, some work that managed to delay 12 days....
    The Queen offered royal fans a look inside the grand rooms of the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh.  The palace, founded as a monastery in the early 12th century, is the Queen's official home in Scotland while Balmoral, the Aberdeenshire estate where she spends her summer holiday, is a private residence.  The Queen, 94, was due to spend this week at Holyrood Palace but the visit was cancelled due to the coronavirus crisis.  The Queen offered royal fans a look inside the grand rooms of the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh. The Queen, 94, was due to spend this week at Holyrood Palace but the visit was cancelled due to the coronavirus crisis. Pictured, one of the posts shared by the account Instead the monarch paid tribute to the stunning royal residence by sharing photos taken inside the palace on the Royal Family Instagram. The palace is open to visitors year-round, except for the week when the Queen is in residence, usually at the end of June to early July. This is known as Holyrood Week.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous...
    London (CNN) — Walkers are relieving on their own in the grounds of Queen Elizabeth‘s Scottish home, employees have said.Workers at Balmoral Castle, which the Queen commonly visits for holidays in the course of the year, have complained about damp wipes staying still left on the estate and urged people today not to use the spot as an outdoor bathroom.Most public services are closed in the United Kingdom due to the country’s lockdown, but persons are allowed to work out and socialize outside the house, main a lot of to seek out peaceful public places if nature phone calls in the course of a day out. “Disappointed to see so many wipes discarded on the Estate currently. Following to paths and monuments. Remember to bear in mind there are no community bathrooms open for miles all-around at the second,” staff members at Balmoral wrote. “Portion of the difficulty is that we are observing a whole lot of non biodegradable wipes becoming discarded in the countryside,” they included. “Also, people today are choosing to ease on their own appropriate upcoming to...
    LONDON (Reuters) - At least three people have been injured in an incident in the Scottish city of Glasgow, an eyewitness told Sky News on Friday, after police confirmed they had closed off one of the city's streets. The witness said she had seen people covered in blood being treated by emergency services and armed police on the scene at around 1215 GMT. Greater Glasgow Police said: "Emergency services are currently dealing with an incident on West George Street in Glasgow." "The street is currently closed off and the public are asked to avoid the area at present. The situation is contained at this time and there is no danger to the general public." The Scottish Police Federation said they were aware of reports that a police officer had been stabbed in the incident. Last week three people died in the southern English town of Reading when a man wielding a five-inch knife went on the rampage in a park. Police said they were treating that incident as terrorism. (Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge, writing by William James; editing by Stephen...
    LONDON – In the end, Margaret Payne scaled her mountain, one step at a time. The 90-year-old grandmother who launched an epic climb to raise money for charity completed her fundraiser Tuesday. Paybe scaled the stairs at her home the equivalent of 731 meters (2,398 feet) — enough to reach the peak of Scotland's iconic Suilven mountain. Payne, who is from Ardvar in the Scottish Highlands, calculated that climbing 282 flights of her staircase would get her to the top of a mountain she climbed only once, when she was 15. “I just climbed a few stairs every day until I got to the top, 282 times,’’ Payne told The Associated Press. The feat took her 73 days and kept her busy for 10 weeks while the U.K. sheltered in lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Payne took on the challenge after being inspired by military veteran Tom Moore, who completed 100 laps of his garden just before his 100th birthday to raise money for the National Health Service. The feat captivated the lockdown nation, and Moore ended up...
    A Scottish man was fined $350 in a court of law for calling his ex-girlfriend’s new Irish boyfriend a “leprechaun.” Terry Myers, 41, also made “various threats to assault” the woman’s new boyfriend, said prosecutor Susan Love, according to the Evening Express. In his email, Myers made reference to the women’s boyfriend being Irish, calling him a Leprechaun. “This was found to be offensive as the man was born in Dublin,” Love said. “Myers pled guilty to sending a message to his ex partner that was grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character in that it used offensive and derogatory language to refer to her new partner and threatened to assault him,” the Express reported. “Iain Hingston, counsel for the defense, said that there was a history between the two men, and that all charges related to one message or a set of messages,” Irish Central reported. “Hingston said that the history between the men was ‘petty and pathetic’ but that Myers should not have used the language that he did.” “All of this arises out of one...
    That’s going to leave a mark. One airplane ended up wedged underneath another plane after a bizarre accident. Officials are still investigating the cause of the incident. Authorities are investigating an incident at Aberdeen Airport in Scotland when a former Flybe jet collided with a Loganair plane. (DEREK IRONSIDE / NEWSLINE MEDIA) A plane that was formerly part of the Flybe airline fleet struck a stationary Loganair plane at Aberdeen Airport in Scotland, the BBC reports. There were no passengers on the Loganair plane at the time of the incident on Tuesday evening. AIRLINE ARE TEMPORARILY SUSPENDING ALCOHOL SERVICE ON FLIGHTS AMID PANDEMIC The former Flybe plane was reportedly being stored at Aberdeen Airport. While it was being prepared for departure, it collided with the Loganair vehicle. Images from the scene show the former Flybe plane had wedged itself under the other plane enough to lift part of it off the ground. No injuries were reported after the accident. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEW In a statement obtained by the BBC, a spokesperson for...
    Outlander's Sam Heughan has fuelled the rumours linking him with the James Bond role. The Scottish actor, 40, auditioned for the iconic role back in 2005 but was beaten by Daniel Craig. Speaking to Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield on Tuesday's This Morning, the star said he would love another shot at the ultimate acting gig.  Dream role: Outlander star Sam Heughan said he is waiting for a call from the James Bond producers Sam said: 'Obviously it's a dream for every actor. I auditioned for it back when they were doing Bond 21 when Daniel Craig was ccasinoast in Casino Royale and I think a lot of actors were seen in the UK.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next This Morning's Alice Beer fights back tears as she reunites... EastEnders star Dean Gaffney flouts lockdown rules as he... 'That's incredible detective work!' Harry Potter's Jessie... 'I am anti-racist and anti-violence': Ant Middleton issues... Share this article Share 'Of course it would be a dream role and a Scottish Bond, who doesn't want to see another...
    Scientists have identified the world's oldest bug. The 425-million-year-old millipede fossil was found on the Scottish island of Kerrera and is older than any known fossil of an insect or arachnid, according to researchers at the University of Texas at Austin. Scientists say that the discovery sheds light on the evolution of insects and plants, which may have occurred more rapidly than some experts believe. The bugs may have evolved from “lake-hugging communities to complex forest ecosystems” in just 40 million years, the scientists explain, in the statement. 'DINOSAUR STOMPING GROUND' DISCOVERED ON SCOTTISH ISLAND The research was published in the journal Historical Biology. Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin found that the fossil millipede Kampecaris obanensis is 425 million years old, making it the oldest known bug. (British Geological Survey) "It's a big jump from these tiny guys to very complex forest communities, and in the scheme of things, it didn't take that long," said Michael Brookfield, a research associate at UT Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences and adjunct professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston, in...