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    FULLERTON (CBSLA) — Coins have become something of a treasure due to a nationwide shortage caused by the pandemic. Shoppers like Liz Savage say she recently had to stand her ground to get 12 cents in change at a Ralphs in Fullerton. She gave the cashier $6 in cash for her $5.88 in purchases. “He bags my stuff, gives me the bag and the receipt and he doesn’t give me my change,” she said. So she asked for her 12 cents. “’Oh, we have a shortage. We don’t have coin,’” Savage recalls the cashier telling her. “And I said, ‘well that’s not my problem.” Savage says she finally got her change. But when she looked at her receipt, she noticed the cashier had put the 12 cents “coin change” back into the total of her purchase so it was a round amount. She later learned the money had been put onto her rewards hard. “There were no signs, there was no warning. There was no explanation. Nothing,” she said. John Breyault said that what the cashier did was akin to...
    Coronavirus updates: Florida reports new daily death toll record What happens when you reach your limit online Chick-fil-A locations offer free food for coins amid national shortage Two Chick-fil-A locations have offered free food in return for $10 in change to combat coin shortages. The special offer requires bringing in $10 in any combination of rolled coins for $10 in bills and a card for free food, including a sandwich. Both locations attributed the need for change to a national coin shortage, which has been the result of coronavirus-related economic closures. © Provided by CNBC Workers at a Chick-fil-A deliver meals to customers in their vehicles at the drive-up window after the restaurant closed its indoor seating in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic on March 20, 2020 in Pembroke Pines, Florida. Two Chick-fil-A locations have gotten creative to combat coin shortages at the restaurants as they offered free food in exchange for $10 in change. Load Error The restaurants in Huntsville, Alabama, and Lynchburg, Virginia, announced the special offer for bringing...
    Fact check: Expanded COVID-19 testing shows more cases, doesnt cause high positivity rate McDonalds to close 200 U.S. restaurants. Heres where some of the closures are expected Your Kids Can Help With the Nationwide Coin Shortage The coronavirus has gifted us many tragedies and inconveniences both large and small this year, and among the latest is one that most of us probably wouldn’t have predicted a few months ago—a nationwide coin shortage. © Photo: Billion Photos (Shutterstock) Reduced retail sales activity this year has slowed the pace of coin circulation to the degree that adequate amounts are no longer available in some areas, causing businesses to request or require that customers pay for purchases with cards or exact change. But the U.S. Mint says in a recent statement that the coin shortage is one part of this pandemic that we can solve, if we each do our part: You can do so by paying for things with exact change and by returning spare change to circulation. Until coin circulation patterns return to normal, it may be more...
    LYNCHBURG, Va. -- Passing through central Virginia? If so, there's a Chick-fil-A offering you a free meal.To address the coin shortage in the U.S., one Chick-fil-A restaurant is asking customers to bring in their spare change. A Virginia Chick-fil-A is offering its customers a free meal if they come in with $10 in rolled coins. The customer would get their money back in dollar bills and a coupon for a free entrée.This national coin shortage is affecting countless businesses, including many in the Southeast.Right now the only Chick-fil-A restaurant offering the deal is on Wards Road in Lynchburg, Virginia. Employees will collect coins until they get all they need.There is a maximum of 10 coupons per guest.
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- If you've tried to scramble up some change recently, you might have noticed there is a coin shortage. Now, the federal government is setting up a task force to get coins back into circulation.You may have seen signs posted on banks, gas stations and stores saying they don't have coins to make change. A big component of the shortage is coins piling up at home that aren't being circulated during the COVID-19 pandemic.The shortage is affecting people like Alsip resident Beverly Corey, who needs quarters to do laundry."I asked my son to go to the bank to get some quarters so I could do laundry downstairs," she said, "No quarters, he went to another bank on the way home, no quarters, and he went to a gas station, no quarters.""Nobody has change they can sell," said Corey's son Matthew Brandt, who says he stopped at five or six businesses.Why is there a coin shortage?The U.S Mint closed briefly, which stopped the production of money. At the same time, people stayed home and were handing over less cash...
    By BRANDON HOLVECK, The Delaware News Journal WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — At Mr. Kleen, a laundromat near New Castle, more people are wandering in searching for coins than depositing them for a trip through the spin cycle. The washing machines, which take nickels and quarters, have been lighter than usual, while the cash-for-coin exchange machine is nearly tapped out, said employee Cynthia Watts. “I wish people would bring their own,” she said. “We have a lot of coins going out. Not as many coming in.” It’s a problem faced by laundromats, convenience stores, grocery stores and many other businesses throughout the country. The U.S. is experiencing a coin shortage as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Officials say it will pass as the economy opens more broadly, but in the interim, some stores are asking for exact change or encouraging customers to donate their change because supplies are dwindling. Others aren’t giving out coins at all. The U.S. Mint’s production of coins slowed during the spring, it says, because of safety measures implemented to protect employees amid the pandemic. But...
    Fb Kroger On July 24, a photograph began going viral on Fb which appeared to indicate a receipt from Kroger with a “BLM cost.” Individuals sharing the picture are claiming that Kroger is charging prospects a price to help Black Lives Matter. Nonetheless, the corporate confirmed that the picture is fake and the precise receipt mirrored a “change scarcity.” The picture was first shared on Fb exhibiting a receipt with a “BLM cost” of 59 cents circled in pink. The corporate has since clarified, nonetheless, that the picture was photoshopped and the unique receipt was posted just a few days in the past as a part of one other declare that Kroger was overcharging prospects. Eric Halvorson, a Kroger Spokesperson, informed ABC57: “It isn’t a price; we’re not charging something. That is simply adapting to the scarcity of cash within the system and we’re making an attempt to be as inventive as we are able to to assist work by means of this.” Right here’s what you might want to know: The...
    Facebook Kroger On July 24, a photo started going viral on Facebook which appeared to show a receipt from Kroger with a “BLM charge.” People sharing the photo are claiming that Kroger is charging customers a fee to support Black Lives Matter. However, the company confirmed that the photo is false and the actual receipt reflected a “change shortage.” The photo was first shared on Facebook showing a receipt with a “BLM charge” of 59 cents circled in red. The company has since clarified, however, that the photo was photoshopped and the original receipt was posted a few days ago as part of another claim that Kroger was overcharging customers. Eric Halvorson, a Kroger Spokesperson, told ABC57: “It is not a fee; we’re not charging anything. This is just adapting to the shortage of coins in the system and we’re trying to be as creative as we can to help work through this.” Here’s what you need to know:The Original Photo Was Posted a Few Days Earlier Before the Photoshopped Version Was Sharedhttps://m.facebook.com/100000737007811/posts/3393686387332561/ The original photo was posted...
    (CNN) — Uncle Sam wants YOU to dig under your couch cushions and unearth your spare change. No, really. The United States is in the midst of a nationwide coin shortage brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, making life difficult for banks, retailers and anyone who regularly pays with cash. The US Mint, which is in charge of producing new money to replenish the country’s supply, is working on addressing the issue, and now it’s asking Americans to help out, too. The Mint is asking people to pay with exact change and to find other ways to return coins they may have lying around to circulation, it said in a press release Thursday. “We ask that the American public start spending their coins, depositing them, or exchanging them for currency at financial institutions or taking them to a coin redemption kiosk,” the Mint said in the release. “The coin supply problem can be solved with each of us doing our part.” The impact of COVID-19 has resulted in the disruption of the supply channels of circulating coinage. The U.S. Mint...
    (CNN) — Uncle Sam wants YOU to dig under your couch cushions and unearth your spare change. No, really. The United States is in the midst of a nationwide coin shortage brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, making life difficult for banks, retailers and anyone who regularly pays with cash. The US Mint, which is in charge of producing new money to replenish the country’s supply, is working on addressing the issue, and now it’s asking Americans to help out, too. The Mint is asking people to pay with exact change and to find other ways to return coins they may have lying around to circulation, it said in a press release Thursday. “We ask that the American public start spending their coins, depositing them, or exchanging them for currency at financial institutions or taking them to a coin redemption kiosk,” the Mint said in the release. “The coin supply problem can be solved with each of us doing our part.” Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell spoke about the coin shortage during a virtual hearing with the House Financial Services Committee last month. He explained that since...
    The United States Mint, the government bureau that produces U.S. coinage, is urging Americans to spend the coins piling up in their homes in order to increase the flow of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters throughout the economy.  The plea comes after the Federal Reserve last month said the coronavirus pandemic had disrupted the coin supply chain, as well as the normal circulation patterns for U.S coinage, causing a shortage of metal in the system.  While the Mint said there is an "adequate amount of coins in the economy," retailers don't always have the coins they need on hand to give change. And so it's asking Americans to start "paying for things with exact change and by returning spare change to circulation," according to a statement Thursday.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "We ask that the American public start spending their coins, depositing them, or exchanging them for currency at financial institutions or taking them to a coin redemption kiosk. The coin supply problem can be solved with each of us doing our part," the bureau added. ...
    New York (CNN Business)Uncle Sam wants YOU to dig under your couch cushions and unearth your spare change. No, really. The United States is in the midst of a nationwide coin shortage brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, making life difficult for banks, retailers and anyone who regularly pays with cash. The US Mint, which is in charge of producing new money to replenish the country's supply, is working on addressing the issue, and now it's asking Americans to help out, too. The Mint is asking people to pay with exact change and to find other ways to return coins they may have lying around to circulation, it said in a press release Thursday. "We ask that the American public start spending their coins, depositing them, or exchanging them for currency at financial institutions or taking them to a coin redemption kiosk," the Mint said in the release. "The coin supply problem can be solved with each of us doing our part."Read MoreFederal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell spoke about the coin shortage during a virtual hearing with the House Financial...
    A Wisconsin bank has launched a Coin Buy Back Program to aid local businesses that have run out of change during the coronavirus pandemic. "We knew we needed to figure something out. We hate the idea of telling our customers, No, we cant give you one of the services were proud to provide, so we came up with a creative way to get things done," Community State Bank Vice President Neil Buchanan told CNN. "Just because this hasnt been done before doesnt mean it isnt going to work — and it has already made a huge difference." The program offers anyone, customer or not, a $5 bonus for every $100 worth of coins they turn in to any of its locations. The maximum bonus is $500, and the bank plans to continue the program until the nationwide coin shortage is over. Already, hundreds of people have dropped off their change, making an "incredible impact," according to Buchanan. Some have not even requested the bonus. Fewer cash transactions have impacted the flow of coins during the pandemic, causing the coin shortage, and...
    (CNN) — A Wisconsin bank is bringing change to their community by helping local businesses struggling because of the nationwide shortage of coins caused by the coronavirus pandemic. On Wednesday, the Community State Bank launched a Coin Buy Back Program which offers a $5 bonus for every $100 worth of coins turned in to any of its seven locations. Anyone who brings by coins, whether they’re a bank customer or not, can receive up to a maximum coin bonus of $500. “We knew we needed to figure something out. We hate the idea of telling our customers, ‘No, we can’t give you one of the services we’re proud to provide,’ so we came up with a creative way to get things done,” Community State Bank Vice President Neil Buchanan told CNN. “Just because this hasn’t been done before doesn’t mean it isn’t going to work — and it has already made a huge difference.” Just days after launching the program, hundreds of people have dropped off their spare change, already resulting in an “incredible impact” on local businesses that were struggling because of the...
    (CNN)A Wisconsin bank is bringing change to their community by helping local businesses struggling because of the nationwide shortage of coins caused by the coronavirus pandemic.On Wednesday, the Community State Bank launched a Coin Buy Back Program which offers a $5 bonus for every $100 worth of coins turned in to any of its seven locations. Anyone who brings by coins, whether they're a bank customer or not, can receive up to a maximum coin bonus of $500."We knew we needed to figure something out. We hate the idea of telling our customers, 'No, we can't give you one of the services we're proud to provide,' so we came up with a creative way to get things done," Community State Bank Vice President Neil Buchanan told CNN. "Just because this hasn't been done before doesn't mean it isn't going to work -- and it has already made a huge difference."Just days after launching the program, hundreds of people have dropped off their spare change, already resulting in an "incredible impact" on local businesses that were struggling because of the shortage,...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — In Maryland, some stores are beginning to tell customers they can’t “make change.” COVID-19 slowed the amount of money trickling into the economy from the U.S. Mint, especially coins. “The U.S. Mint slowed their production because fewer employees are working because of social distance measures,” Nick Ruffner, a Public Relations Manager for Sheetz, said. “So retailers like gas stations and convenience stores… we both have been particularly hard hit by the coin shortage.” That means if you go to a store and pay with cash, you might not get exact change back. Businesses like Sheetz say they simply don’t have coins to give. “We have 600 store locations across six states, and each of the locations has been impacted in some way by the coin shortage,” Ruffner said. Many stores are asking customers for help, offering incentives if they bring in coins for cash. “They needed coins, so rather than take them to the bank, we brought them in here,” said David Poteete, who brought in coins, said. But banks don’t have as many coins as they need,...
    (CNN) — First it was toilet paper. Now, grocery stores are facing another shortage as a result of the coronavirus pandemic: coins. Several grocery and convenience stores have warned that they may not be able to provide coins as change when customers pay in cash, thanks to a nationwide coin shortage. Because of coronavirus-related shutdowns, fewer coins are circulating throughout the economy, leaving stores short on nickels and dimes and seeking alternate solutions. Many, including Wawa and CVS, are encouraging customers to pay with exact change, or offering programs through which customers can donate their change to charity. Instead of handing back coins as change, some stores are putting change on gift cards or loyalty cards that can be redeemed on future purchases. Growing problem for low-income consumers The issue could be especially painful for low-income consumers who don’t have credit or debit cards or can’t afford to donate their change — potentially exacerbating the impact of the crisis, which has already hit low-income communities hard. It could also be a burden to some retailers, for which accepting credit...
    (CBS DETROIT) – There’s a lot you can do with a little pocket change. “We need change for parking. We need change for the laundromat and we need change for the vending machine. So yeah change is important. I don’t care how they try to slice it,” said Robert Turner of Detroit. A limited supply of quarters, pennies, dimes and nickels is circulating across the country and now some retailers are breaking the dollar and keeping the change.   Kroger is implementing new policies because of the shortage. Customers paying with cash can get change back by checking out with cashiers or by loading the balance to loyalty cards. Self-service machines will not be electing coins. The grocer said in in a statement the new policy is in connection to the Federal Reserve coin drought.  The Federal Reserve Bank Board Office denied CW50’s interview request about the shortage but in resource links sent to our Cryss Walker via email by the office, it says that low coin inventory is a result of the Covid-19 pandemic due to its slow circulation in...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Retailers like Ralphs and Walmart are no longer giving change to customers due to a “significant coin shortage” across the U.S. When the pandemic shut down much of the country in the spring, the circulation of coins slowed down dramatically. To make matters worse, the U.S. mint had to cut production of new coins because of staffing changes to keep workers safe, then the Federal Reserve put limits on how much change banks would be given. The shortage was noted last month by Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell in a briefing with the House Financial Services committee. “What’s happened is that with the partial closure of the economy, the flow of coins through the economy has gotten all – it’s kind of stopped,” Powell said. “Stores have been closed so the whole system of flow had come to a stop. We’re well aware of this. We’re working with the Mint, and we’re working with the reserve banks, and as the economy reopens, we’re seeing coins begin to move around again.” However, the shortage has apparently become...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSNEWS.COM) — Don’t expect to receive change in coins when you go to the grocery store. Kroger, a supermarket chain with hundreds of locations in Texas alone, has said it will stop giving customer coin change, citing the nationwide shortage of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarter in circulation as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Customers can switch their payment type (e.g., use debit or credit vs. cash), and through our upgraded technology, we can now load coin change to their loyalty card for use during the next shopping trip, 3/4 — Kroger (@kroger) July 14, 2020 The company, which operates nearly stores in 35 states, has posted signs at many of its stores indicating the change in policy. Kroger is asking customers paying with cash to use exact change. Alternatively, patrons may load the change amount onto their loyalty card or donate what they are owed in coins to its Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation, an initiative aimed at eliminating hunger in the U.S. ◊◊◊ Click Here To Read The Complete Story On cbsnews.com ◊◊◊
    Kroger is making some key changes at checkout as the U.S. experiences a coin shortage connected to the coronavirus pandemic.The grocer announced this week that they will not be returning coin change to customers who pay with cash during the shortage, and are instead offering other solutions.Kroger released the following statement regarding the new plan:"Currently our stores are collecting donations for the Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation by allowing customers to round up their order total to the next dollar. Kroger's Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation supports hunger relief efforts across the communities we serve. For customers that choose not to donate, our cashiers will load the coin value due back through their loyalty card. Customers can redeem the amount on their next transaction We know this is an inconvenience for our customers and we appreciate their patience. The Treasury Department expects the shortage to diminish as more regions of the country reopen."Customers checking out through a manned lane will have the ability to: Round up to support Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation Pay with a form...
    Kroger is making some key changes at checkout as the U.S. experiences a coin shortage connected to the coronavirus pandemic.The grocer announced this week that they will not be returning coin change to customers who pay with cash during the shortage, and are instead offering other solutions.Kroger released the following statement regarding the new plan:"Currently our stores are collecting donations for the Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation by allowing customers to round up their order total to the next dollar. Kroger's Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation supports hunger relief efforts across the communities we serve. For customers that choose not to donate, our cashiers will load the coin value due back through their loyalty card. Customers can redeem the amount on their next transaction We know this is an inconvenience for our customers and we appreciate their patience. The Treasury Department expects the shortage to diminish as more regions of the country reopen."Customers checking out through a manned lane will have the ability to: Round up to support Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation Pay with a form...
    Don't expect to receive change in coins when you go to the grocery store. Kroger, the largest supermarket chain in the U.S., has said it will stop giving customer coin change, citing the nationwide shortage of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarter in circulation as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.  The company, which operates nearly 3,000 grocery stores in 35 states, has posted signs at many of its stores indicating the change in policy. Kroger is asking customers paying with cash to use exact change. Alternatively, patrons may donate what they are owed in coins to its Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation, an initiative aimed at eliminating hunger in the U.S.  Kroger customers can also chose to have their change loaded onto a customer loyalty card and be automatically applied to their next purchase. Patrons may continue using credit and debit cards and avoid any cash hassles altogether, the company said Monday. The Federal Reserve is experiencing a significant coin shortage that is impacting our store operations and ability to provide change. As a result, the company is implementing a...
    The Kroger supermarket chain said it will not be providing coins to cash-paying customers as change for the time being, due to a coronavirus-induced coin shortage.  A Kroger spokesperson told WSAZ that rather than give customers coins for their change, they will add the remaining cents to a balance on their loyalty cards for use on their next shopping trip. The leftover money would then be automatically applied to their next Kroger purchase.  Kroger said that it will stop giving customers coins as their change due to a coronavirus-induced shortage. Instead, leftover change will be added to their store loyalty cards  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Are you a victim of 'batterygate?' Users with older iPhones... Barring the middle seats on planes could HALVE the risk of... Share this article Share Alternatively, the spokesperson said, customers were being encourage to donate the change and 'Round Up' to support the supermarket's charity, Zero Hunger/Zero Waster Foundation, which aims to eliminate food waste in the US. The Kroger spokesperson said that the change to...
    Blame the coronavirus for a new shortage — not of toilet paper, but of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters that is forcing some businesses to change their policies around how patrons pay for good and services. The Federal Reserve, which manages coin production and distribution, last month said it would temporarily limit the number of coins it gives depository institutions, such as banks, noting a significant disruption to both the coin supply chain and the normal circulation patterns for U.S. coinage — all because of COVID-19. As a result, some businesses say they are low on change. The convenience store chain Wawa, for one, is asking patrons of its 850 outlets to use exact change, or else pay with a credit or debit card, or by using the company's mobile app.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "Like many other businesses around the country, Wawa stores have been affected by the shortage of coins nationwide, as reported by the Federal Reserve," a company spokesperson said in a statement to CBS MoneyWatch.  Other retailers, including CVS pharmacies and discount chain...
    Businesses are begging to ask customers to pay with exact change after the coronavirus pandemic led to a nationwide coin shortage.  WaWa, a popular convenience store in New Jersey and the East Coast, has told customers to either pay with credit or debit cards, mobile app or exact change amid the recent currency shortages, 6ABC in Philadelphia reported. The chain is reportedly giving customers the opportunity to round their total to the nearest dollar by donating to their charity foundation.  ROUND UP: @Wawa is asking customers to round their purchases to the nearest dollar to help the USO & local charities. @6abc pic.twitter.com/XCW3LPu2LN— George Solis (@GeorgeSolis) July 9, 2020 A spokesperson for the grocery store chain Giant also told the Fox affiliate that they would only be taking exact change when customers pay with cash. The U.S. Federal Reserve warned about a coin shortage last month.  At a House Financial Services Committee hearing on June 17, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said that coronavirus-related shutdowns have raised concerns about the circulation of coins, which the Fed's 12 regional banks are responsible for supplying to commercial...
    The coronavirus crisis has sparked a nationwide coin shortage that reportedly has retailers pleading with customers for exact change. The Federal Reserve revealed last month that the pandemic had “significantly disrupted” the supply chain and circulation patterns for America’s metal money. The US Mint has slowed production of coins because of measures meant to protect workers amid the crisis, while coin deposits from banks have also fallen in the past few months, the central bank said. With demand for coins rising as states began to reopen, the Fed on June 15 started limiting how many pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters it distributed to banks as part of its efforts to “mitigate the effects of low coin inventories.” Retailers have since started advising customers that coins are in short supply. Some Lowe’s hardware stores have posted signs urging shoppers to pay with exact change or use other forms of payment, as have convenience stores such as 7-Eleven , Pilot and Circle K, according to news reports and social media posts. “At this point we’re having to call daily to get...
    Jamie Grill | JGI | Getty Images This is breaking news. Please check back for updates. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told Congress on Wednesday that the circulation of physical coinage ground to a halt amid the coronavirus outbreak but that the central bank is working to fix the flow. The topic came to light after Rep. John Rose, R-Tenn., said banks in Tennessee are reporting they're receiving smaller-than-usual sums of coinage. Rose asked the Fed chairman if the central bank was aware of any shortages in the production and distribution of currency. "What's happened is, with the partial closure of the economy, the flow of coins through the economy has ... kind of stopped. The places where you'd go to give your coins and get credit ... those have not been working," Powell said. "So, a whole system of flow has kind of come to a stop. We're well aware of this: We're working with the mint and we're working with the Reserve banks. And as the economy reopens, we're seeing coins begin to move around again," he added. Powell...