Thursday, Sep 29, 2022 - 10:28:06
248 results - (0.003 seconds)

mental health services:

latest news at page 1:
    The pandemic has affected our mental health in myriad ways. Let our list of resources empower you and those around you.Crisis Hotlines BlackLine: Provides a space for peer support, counseling and affirming the experiences of those affected by systematic oppression, through an LGBTQ+ Black femme lens. 24/7. (800) 604-5841, callblackline.com CalHope Redline: A phone, chat and video chat service providing trauma-informed support for urban Indian and tribal populations. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (888) 368-4090, ccuih.org/redline The California Peer-Run Warm Line: A nonemergency resource for anyone in California seeking mental and emotional support. 24/7. (855) 845-7415, mentalhealthsf.org/peer-run-warmline East Los Angeles Women’s Center: A bilingual crisis hotline for people of all genders who have experienced sexual violence. 24/7. (800) 585-6231. elawc.org/ How To Save A Life Pandemic stress, traumatic events and economic uncertainty have upended our world. This series aims to make the cascade of threats to your mental health a little easier to manage. More Stories Institute on Aging Friendship Line: For older adults and others living with disabilities. Both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for...
    California has a new statewide approach to treatment for people struggling with serious mental illness: the CARE Court. The program connects people in crisis with a court-ordered treatment plan for up to two years, while diverting them from possible incarceration, homelessness or restrictive court-ordered conservatorship. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the measure (Senate Bill 1338) into law Wednesday. Because it does not go into effect immediately, however, most California counties will not see the program’s implementation until 2024. The law takes a phased-in approach, with Glenn, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, Stanislaus, Tuolumne and San Francisco counties implementing the program by October 2023. The remaining counties are required to start the program no later than December of the following year. California Newsom’s plan seeks to give hope to families of mentally ill, homeless Californians Gov. Gavin Newsom signs CARE Court proposal into law, a sweeping plan to order mental health and addiction treatment for thousands of Californians. How will CARE Court work? To initiate a treatment plan, a family member, behavioral health provider or first responder petitions a...
    Despite the court order, Jay remained in jail because there was no bed available at a mental health facility, the state Department of Social and Health Services stated. Because he did not receive the court-ordered services, another judge ordered that DSHS pay Jay $250 for each day he remains in jail. As a bed at Western State Hospital is expected to become available on October, Jay is slated to receive a total of $36,750. Woods's family and DSHS have both slammed the decision. "It’s ridiculous," said Nathan Wood, Brent Wood's younger brother. "It’s not right. He shouldn’t be getting money." The DSHS argued that such "compensatory sanctions" actually punish the victims under DSHS's care. "We believe these fines take money out of the very system that is designed to help them and provide them services," a department statement reads. Should a judge rule that Jay is entitled to the money, Jay will not be issued a check himself. Rather, a "protective payee or agreed responsible adult" will act as steward of the funds on Jay's behalf. A court has not...
    The stories of our unhoused neighbors reveal unexplored causes of our biggest homelessness-related challenges. Homelessness, a countrywide pandemic that is particularly visible in the East and South Bay (San Jose’s homeless population ranks fourth in the nation, and Oakland’s seventh) has become a staple topic of discussion and debate. Every day, different policy ideas are presented, and myriad organizations work to address this issue. But one thing lies behind all systemic human rights crises such as homelessness: humans. Rarely are the stories of our unhoused neighbors included in policy and community discussions, let alone the unhoused individuals themselves. We discuss statistics and data and demographics but not the stories, the people, behind these numbers. I didn’t know the importance of this until I became a case manager for people experiencing homelessness. Through working closely with them, the causes of the drug abuse, refusal of shelter and services and mental health issues became surprisingly clear. But these causes weren’t apparent on the surface, and they haven’t been included in policy discussions. Only 22% of individuals become homeless due to substance abuse....
    Share this: The latest in State Comptroller DiNapoli’s series of audits of health and safety in schools finds that, in the face of a mental health crisis among youth, the NYC Department of Education (DOE) can do more to ensure that public school students receive the supports and services that they need and that are supposed to be available. The audit found that too many NYC public schools are understaffed with mental health professionals, are not adequately training staff and too few have services readily available—and that DOE provides little oversight to ensure students receive the required mental health instruction critical to developing their awareness and resilience. “While DOE has shown a willingness to confront these issues, many of New York’s school children still face a mental health emergency, and schools are not equipped to provide them with the support they need,” said DiNapoli. “At a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated a worsening mental health crisis among youth in New York State, the DOE should step up efforts to improve oversight of public schools’ mental health curriculum...
    (CNN)The Biden administration announced new plans Thursday that should make it a lot easier for millions of kids to get access to mental and physical health services at school. The announcement specifically impacts the tens of millions of children who get their health care through Medicaid, but all school age children will benefit from the change because the new guidance makes it clear that schools can use Medicaid dollars to hire additional school counselors, nurses and social workers who could treat all students. More than half of kids in public school get their health care through Medicaid and CHIP programs. How to talk -- or not talk -- to kids about weightWhile the guidance applies to physical and mental health, the Biden administration is emphasizing how much this could help children's mental health. "We really have a mental health crisis in our country, particularly with our nation's children. And so the guidance that we are releasing today is really around encouraging states to try to expand access to mental health services for kids," Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)...
    CHILDREN’S mental health clinics have boosted staff numbers by 40 per cent during the pandemic as they face record demand. Despite the NHS workforce crisis, the number of medics in kids’ mental health shot up by 4,500 between March 2019 and March 2022. 1Record numbers of children are coming forward for mental health support in EnglandCredit: Alamy The number of staff in the specialist clinics increased from 11,036 to 15,486. A record 650,000 children applied for emotional help in England last year, up from 534,000 in 2019. Claire Murdoch, NHS mental health director, said: “There has never been a more important time to work in children’s mental health. “Demand for NHS services has skyrocketed over the last two years with the pandemic taking a significant toll on the nation’s wellbeing. “Becoming a mental health nurse was one of the best decisions of my life and I would encourage anyone who is thinking about a career which can have a positive impact on people’s lives to join the NHS.” The entire mental health workforce increased by 18,583 between 2019 and 2022...
    Congress designated 988 as the universal number for the mental health crisis hotline system in 2020 after nationwide protests against cases of police brutality. JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — On a few occasions, Sitaniel Wimbley's mother grew manic in her front yard. When neighbors were met with screaming and cursing on their street in Natchez, Mississippi, they would dial 911. An officer would arrive to collect Wimbley's mother, who battled chronic bipolar schizophrenia. Her first stop was jail. Then she would be brought to a place she still can't bring herself to drive near decades later: the Mississippi State Hospital in Whitfield. Once there, she would be detained with what she said was little explanation. No one told her how long she would be held for treatment; they just told her she couldn't leave. Stories like these reverberate through generations, stoking mistrust of the mental health system, especially within Black communities. As director of the Mississippi chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, Wimbley, who is Black, is on the front lines of a local effort with national implications. She...
    Prince William County leaders announced $2.5 million in additional funding for a new crisis center in a move meant to prioritize mental health. The new Crisis Receiving Center will increase local access to general mental health resources while providing more community-based services and inpatient psychiatric beds. Likewise, it will provide support for people who need non-emergency mental health services. More Virginia News More Prince William County News “People are suffering coming out of COVID, mentally. This is imperative that we do this for Prince William County,” said Andrea Bailey, the Potomac District Supervisor with the Prince William Board of County Supervisors. Bailey has been working with local leaders to help make it happen. The facility will also be home to the county’s trauma program, assertive community treatment and youth services programs. A total of $11.9 million has been raised to build the new center, which Potomac District Supervisor Andrea Bailey will be used on an 11-year lease in the old Gander Mountain building in Woodbridge, Virginia. Officials say it’s also about making sure mental health professionals are the...
    HIGHLAND PARK, Ill. (WLS) -- Organizations are joining forces to make it easier for immigrants in the community who were affected by the Highland Park parade shooting to seek help."We want to have this conversation to make sure that they feel safe," said Carmen Patlan, executive director at Highwood Public Library. "It feels like yesterday."At first glance, normalcy seems to have returned to Central Avenue in Highland Park. But if you look closer, the pain and the heartbreak still linger in plain sight."We have a health equity program where we provide mental health services," Patlan said. "In the last two weeks, we've seen 460 people coming through our doors."Now, more help is being made available, specifically for the immigrant community left reeling from the lasting trauma of what happened on July 4th.FULL LIST | Mental health resources in the Chicago area, Illinois"Collectively, we have experienced a traumatic event that will impact us all," Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering said.Several Latino community leaders from Highland Park and Highwood came together Monday to speak about the many resources and mental health services...
    HIGHLAND PARK, Ill. (WLS) -- Organizations are joining forces to make it easier for immigrants in the community who were affected by the Highland Park parade shooting to seek help."We want to have this conversation to make sure that they feel safe," said Carmen Patlan, executive director at Highland Park Public Library. "It feels like yesterday."At first glance, normalcy seems to have returned to Central Avenue in Highland Park. But if you look closer, the pain and the heartbreak still linger in plain sight."We have a health equity program where we provide mental health services," Patlan said. "In the last two weeks, we've seen 460 people coming through our doors."Now, more help is being made available, specifically for the immigrant community left reeling from the lasting trauma of what happened on July 4th.FULL LIST | Mental health resources in the Chicago area, Illinois"Collectively, we have experienced a traumatic event that will impact us all," Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering said.Several Latino community leaders from Highland Park and Highwood came together Monday to speak about the many resources and mental health...
    Five local Latino-led startups received welcome news this week — each of their ventures received $100,000 from Google’s Startups Latino Founder Fund. Chicago-based winners OnebitA platform that automates financial tracking for independent business owners; ConnectCare HeroesIt creates online communities for seniors, their families and health care providers; SanaraiA site for Spanish mental health services; Road, a digital cleaning operating system; And Grapefruit healthA health technology company that uses technology services to help healthcare providers reach patients. The announcement comes at a time when only 2% of US firms’ venture capital funding went to startups with Latino founders last year, according to one study. Crunchbase – Although Latinos make up 17% of small business founders. Advertising “A lot of the things we come across don’t involve conventional investment, but these are big issues that we’re addressing within our communities,” said Osvaldo Montelongo, founder and CEO of ConnectCareHero. The origins of Montelango’s business came from his own life experiences – his father was 57 when he was born. “In my early 20s, I had to take care of my father...
    SAN JOSE — As mental health continues to be a top priority for political leaders across the country amid the aftereffects of the coronavirus pandemic, Santa Clara County is launching a new 24-hour hotline Saturday for those seeking mental health help or substance abuse resources. The lifeline — just dial 988 — comes from a push to make similar crisis and suicide prevention services available across the country starting in July, when the national hotline will transition to the three-digit number for ease of access. Like those in the rest of the country, Santa Clara County’s 988 hotline will offer an array of mental health services designed to deescalate crisis situations. “This new lifeline is part of the County’s ongoing efforts to provide compassionate mental health services in all aspects,” Board of Supervisors President Mike Wasserman said. “By calling 988, people will get connected with services as well as receive immediate help for those experiencing a crisis that could result in harm to themselves or others.” For those seeking mental health help in multicultural Santa Clara County, language interpretation is...
    If you or someone you love is in crisis and dealing with suicidal thoughts or mental health issues, here are some organizations that offer help and hope.SUICIDE PREVENTION RESOURCES: If you or your child needs help right away, call the National Suicide Prevention Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), call 911, or take your child to the nearest crisis center or emergency department.Check out the sources below to learn about the signs to watch out for when someone is in crisis:- Know The SignsfromSuicide is Preventable- National Institute of Mental Health Warning Signs of SuicideCrisis Text Line:Text HOME to 741741 to connect with a Crisis Counselor. Free 24/7 support at your fingertips.Website: https://www.crisistextline.org/RESOURCES FOR YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTSCalifornia Coalition for YouthYouth ages 12-24 can call or text 8008435200 or chat online for 24/7 crisissupport.Nine Out of TenOne in 10 college students contemplates suicide. That means nine out of ten students have an opportunity to help! Website and program empower students with the knowledge and resources tohelp their friends who may be thinking about suicide. Find resources HERE.National Alliance for Mental Illness: Young...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Navigating during this time of uncertainty can be stressful and upsetting to many, especially for college students who may be away from home. Whether you are dealing with anxiety, depression or are experiencing a crisis, we have resources that can help. See below for more information that can help you find an ally and get help:RESOURCES FOR YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTSCalifornia Coaition for YouthYouth ages 12-24 can call or text 8008435200 or chat online for 24/7 crisissupport.Nine Out of TenOne in 10 college students contemplates suicide. That means nine out of ten students have an opportunity to help! Website and program empower students with the knowledge and resources tohelp their friends who may be thinking about suicide. Find resources HERE.National Alliance for Mental Illness: Young AdultsYoung adulthood - the period between the ages of 18 and 25 - is a time of significant personal growth and change. The changes and decisions that often define this period of life can feel challenging, stressful and overwhelming for everyone. This is also the time when many people start experiencing...
    When Meera Varma was in high school, she felt like a black cloud followed her everywhere she went. Her struggles with mental health were difficult to explain to family members in their mother tongue, Hindi. Although they were supportive, she needed professional help. She found it in her school counselors, whom she saw almost daily as a senior. After suffering frequent panic attacks in class, she started advocating at school district meetings for mental health services to be made a priority. “I felt really isolated, and I didn’t want anyone to ever feel like I did,” Varma, 21, said. Varma continued that activism after enrolling at UCLA, where she joined Active Minds, an organization whose mission is to change the conversation on mental health among college students. In recent years, that conversation has grown louder. The two years of the COVID-19 pandemic have touched nearly everyone’s lives in some way, but members of Gen Z have been hit particularly hard. Loss of normalcy and routine during a time of immense development has contributed to increasing rates of mental...
    Sponsored Content An emotional support animal refers to an animal companion that provides some level of support and companionship to a person who has some form of disability. An emotional support animal can give you affection, comfort, and companionship to lift your spirits each time your depression, anxiety, panic, or PTSD acts up. To acquire and own a support companion, a mental health or medical expert has to prescribe it through an emotional support animal letter. This guide will help you identify reputable sites that offer legitimate emotional support animal letters. Keep reading to choose one that suits your situation. Psychiatric Vs Emotional Support Animals: Psychiatric Service Dogs: As the name suggests a psychiatric service dog or PSD is considered a service animal and not a support animal. You’re likely used to seeing service animals like seeing-eye dogs provide a service where they help their handler navigate the world. Psychiatric service dogs help with disabilities that can’t be seen like PTSD or anxiety. These days airlines no longer allow emotional support animals on planes but they do still allow...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- A controversial proposal by California Gov. Gavin Newsom to prod more homeless people into mental health treatment is making its way through the Legislature, despite deep misgivings from lawmakers struggling to address a problem that reaches every corner of the state.Legislators are worried that there isn't enough guaranteed staffing or housing for the program to succeed while forcing vulnerable individuals into court-ordered services against their will. Even so, the bill unanimously cleared the Senate last month, and passed out of the Assembly judiciary committee Tuesday, one of several stops before being voted on by the full chamber.But the proposal also received its first no vote and members frustrated by the status quo emphasized how critical that all pieces - housing, services, trained staff, heartfelt support - be in place for the program to work."I know that we all agree that the current system is broken and failing. You can walk outside of this building and go a few blocks ... and see those failures every single day," said Assemblymember Matt Haney, a Democrat who lives in San...
    By JANIE HAR | The Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO — A controversial proposal by California Gov. Gavin Newsom to prod more homeless people into mental health treatment is making its way through the Legislature, despite deep misgivings from lawmakers struggling to address a problem that reaches every corner of the state. Legislators are worried that there isn’t enough guaranteed staffing or housing for the program to succeed while forcing vulnerable individuals into court-ordered services against their will. Even so, the bill unanimously cleared the Senate last month, and passed out of the Assembly judiciary committee Tuesday, one of several stops before being voted on by the full chamber. But the proposal also received its first no vote and members frustrated by the status quo emphasized how critical that all pieces — housing, services, trained staff, heartfelt support — be in place for the program to work. “I know that we all agree that the current system is broken and failing. You can walk outside of this building and go a few blocks … and see those failures every single day,”...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A controversial proposal by California Gov. Gavin Newsom to prod more homeless people into mental health treatment is making its way through the Legislature, despite deep misgivings from lawmakers struggling to address a problem that reaches every corner of the state. Legislators are worried that there isn’t enough guaranteed staffing or housing for the program to succeed while forcing vulnerable individuals into court-ordered services against their will. Even so, the bill unanimously cleared the Senate last month, and passed out of the Assembly judiciary committee Tuesday, one of several stops before being voted on by the full chamber. READ MORE: Elon Musk's Child Tells Court She No Longer Wants 'To Be Related' To Her DadBut the proposal also received its first no vote and members frustrated by the status quo emphasized how critical that all pieces — housing, services, trained staff, heartfelt support — be in place for the program to work. “I know that we all agree that the current system is broken and failing. You can walk outside of this building and go a...
    By Rebecca Smith | Bay City News Foundation San Francisco Mayor London Breed announced a proposal Thursday to increase funding by $500,000 for services to Asian victims of crime who are limited in their English proficiency. Breed said in a press release that while accountability and arrests are important in dealing with hate crimes, the victims also need mental health support, which can be difficult for those with language barriers. The proposed funding would get support to those who need it in a way they can accept and understand it. The investment would be split between three categories of services. Nearly half of the investment is dedicated to trauma recovery clinical services in Cantonese as well as training and technical assistance for community-based providers. The proposal would allot $160,000 to expand community-based mental health services in Cantonese. The goal is to aid Asian seniors with mental health support as part of their recovery. Another $59,000 will go to senior escort services citywide to help disabled people get to medical appointments and increase social interaction. Christina Shea, deputy chief and director...
    (CBS DETROIT) – A new mental health resource is making its way to underserved communities. Honor First is a telehealth mental health service. READ MORE: Oxford Students Sue For Review, Changes After High School ShootingThe organization is expanding to connect with rural communities, following recent mass shootings that shook the country. “What we did with Honor First we created a program where over 75 mental health providers actually take out their time and actually go out to these remote areas so that they’re able to reach people who need the help and support,” said Honor First C.E.O. Dr. Jaschon Proctor. Dr. Proctor is leading the initiative to create crisis prevention programs through art therapy, medicine, and counseling. “Crisis such as school shootings and mall shootings and suicides, etcetera, because no one is addressing the real cause of the problem,” Dr. Proctor said. According to the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, 65% of nonmetropolitan counties don’t have psychiatrists. A 2021 report by U.S. Department of Agriculture shows 1.8 million people live in remote areas in Michigan. READ MORE: Detroit Police: Phase...
    by Scott McClallen   The Michigan Senate approved a $565 million bill, which appropriates mostly federal funding to improve the state’s mental health system. Senate Bill 714 aims to fund jail diversion, create treatment units to reduce emergency room overcrowding, and bolster substance abuse programs. Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey, R-Clarklake, prioritized improving the state’s mental health system earlier this year. “Our state’s mental health system is failing patients, their families, health care providers, and taxpayers,” Shirkey said in a statement. “Everyone in our state should have access to quality mental health services regardless of their means or where they live. Today, we’ve taken a critical step toward making sure they do.” The bill, passed on a 36-1 vote, aims to include: $100 million for infrastructure grants for pediatric inpatient services. $50 million for community mental health services. $35 million for the expansion of mental health services. $25 million for the clinical integration fund. $25.0 million for crisis stabilization units. The package, if it becomes law, will provide $25 million for Michigan essential health provider loan repayment, $25...
    President Joe Biden announced Sunday his support of the Senate bipartisan gun control agreement, despite his misgivings that it was not enough. “Obviously, it does not do everything that I think is needed, but it reflects important steps in the right direction, and would be the most significant gun safety legislation to pass Congress in decades,” Biden said in a statement. The agreement does not include Biden’s demands for a ban on so-called “assault weapons,” raising the minimum age to 21 for the purchase of some semi-automatic rifles, or banning high-capacity magazines. But Biden urged Congress to pass the legislation, thanking Republicans for working with Democrats to get something done. “With bipartisan support, there are no excuses for delay, and no reason why it should not quickly move through the Senate and the House.,” he wrote. The agreement offers support for states to enact red flag laws and also requires an enhanced background check for gun buyers under 21 that include juvenile and mental health records. “Each day that passes, more children are killed in this country: the sooner it...
    A bipartisan group of senators announced a deal on gun control legislation Sunday in the wake of recent mass shootings — though the compromise excludes President Joe Biden’s “assault weapons” ban and a raised minimum age for rifle purchases. The deal includes Republican priorities such as expanded mental health services and school safety. It nods to Democratic priorities by adding expanded background checks for those under the age of 21, who will now have juvenile records screened before gun purchases. A press released from the bipartisan group outlines the contours of the proposed legislation (original emphasis) : BIPARTISAN GROUP OF SENATORS ANNOUNCE AGREEMENT WASHINGTON–U.S. Senators Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), John Cornyn (R-Texas), Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Cory Booker (D- N.J.), Richard Burr (R-N.C.), Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Susan Collins (R-Maine), Chris Coons (D-Del.), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), Mark Kelly (D-Ariz.), Angus King (I-Maine), Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), Rob Portman (R-Ohio), Mitt Romney (R-Utah), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) issued the following statement: “Today, we are announcing a commonsense, bipartisan proposal to...
    Longtime teachers are slated to receive a pay raise, and virtual mental health services are expected to be made available to students under Fairfax County, Virginia, Public Schools’ recently-passed budget. As part of the $3.3 billion budget, school board officials allocated $0.5 million for telehealth mental health services for students. The county is still in the early stages of identifying a vendor for the services, but county officials said program possibilities include access to physical and behavioral health providers and mobile services that would allow students to use their devices for symptom management or tracking. School board member Abrar Omeish said the program has been in the works for over a year, and that she and the board assembled a student mental health working group with representatives from every high school to seek feedback on the initiative. The school system’s Department of Special Services is evaluating potential vendors to offer the virtual mental health services to students, and Omeish said the department expects the program to begin next school year. The program, Omeish said, is intended to be similar to...
    by Eric Lendrum   Over three-fourths of American public schools have reported a rise in the number of students seeking mental health assistance in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. As reported by Fox News, the data was released on Tuesday by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), which operates under the guidance of the Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences (IES). The report shows that 76 percent of public schools saw staff express concerns about the mental health of their students, including depression, anxiety, and trauma since the coronavirus pandemic began in early 2020. “We know COVID-19 disrupted our schools and colleges,” said Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, “and this report serves as an important reminder of the work left to be done on the road to recovery.” As such, he said the department’s “urgency has shifted from getting institutions open to, now, keeping them open; providing the necessary academic, financial and mental health supports for students and families; and strengthening our K-12 and post-secondary education systems.” In addition to the 76 percent, a separate question in the report...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — During Mental Health Awareness Month the Maryland Department of Health is highlighting one of the most common complications in pregnancy and childbirth: maternal mental health conditions. The department encourages Marylanders to learn the signs and symptoms of mental health conditions pregnant women may experience, such as depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar illness and substance use disorders. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Hot & Sticky, Plus Thursday's An Alert DayResearch suggests one in five women is affected by a maternal mental health condition, the department said. Signs and symptoms may include feeling like you never should have become a mother, difficulty bonding with a baby and having problems with eating or sleeping. READ MORE: Johnny Depp Wins Libel Lawsuit Against Ex-Wife Amber Heard“People who are pregnant and new mothers should look for signs of depression and be encouraged to share their feelings with their health providers at all stages of pregnancy,” said Behavioral Health Administration Acting Deputy Secretary Dr. Lisa Burgess. “This knowledge and open communication can help reduce pregnancy-related mental health conditions.” The department encourages...
    Former HUD Secretary Julian Castro, now an MSNBC analyst, said Monday on “MSNBC Reports” said that there was a “quiet growing anger and impatience” in Texas over a lack of gun legislation to address mass shootings. Anchor Lawrence O’Donnell said, “What did you learn in Uvalde?” Castro said, “Well, I learned that there was a tremendous amount of anger, of this quiet growing anger and impatience. The phrase that I heard most often from residents, from some of the extended family members of victims that I spoke to, was something has to change.” He added, “People seem to want an all of the above approach to ending these types of situations. They recognize that there are problems with their gun laws. I also heard a lot of folks say, why in the world did an 18-year-old have access to this type of a weapon? They agreed to school should be as secure as possible. They also think that mental health is an issue in some instances, and truth be told, Uvalde, which is only a city of about 20,000 people,...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- New York City is launching a new mental health treatment model in an effort to bridge the gaps in the mental health care system.Continuous Engagement between Community and Clinic Treatment or CONNECT is a pilot program for now.It will be launched at nine clinic sites in high-need areas throughout The Bronx, Manhattan, and Brooklyn. They are currently accepting referrals.Once at full scale, CONNECT will serve up to 900 new clients and will broaden the spectrum of services for everyone who receives mental health services at the clinics."New Yorkers struggling with their mental health deserve compassion and support - which is exactly what CONNECT provides," New York City Mayor Eric Adams said. "The city is constantly innovating to provide the best possible care for New Yorkers who need it the most and CONNECT will center communities in care and bridge gaps, making sure that more New Yorkers will get the help that they need and don't fall between the cracks of the system."Based on community needs, some clinics may have a legal clinic available a couple...
    A woman who operates a mental health services business in Colorado Springs allegedly stole $240,000 from Medicaid through fraudulent billings, according to the Colorado Attorney General’s Office. Martha Sutherland, of Front Range Mental Health and Summit Assessments, submitted Medicaid claims and was paid for psychological testing services that never happened, according to an AG’s office news release. Sutherland is charged with theft and cybercrime, both felonies, the release said. Related Articles Crime and Public Safety | Woman serving life sentence for murder charged with heading $2 million COVID-19 fraud scam Crime and Public Safety | Santa Cruz business owner caught in federal COVID-19 fraud-related case scheduled to change plea Crime and Public Safety | Woman charged with faking credentials as dental hygienist in South Bay Crime and Public Safety | California’s seniors lost an estimated $10.9 billion to fraud in 2020 Crime and Public Safety | Fraud targeting California’s seniors spiked in 2020 “Medicaid provides essential health care services for many of our state’s most vulnerable residents,” said Phil...
    Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images A new report says Georgia Republican Senate candidate Herschel Walker falsely exaggerated his ties with a veterans group that is currently under investigation for allegations of fraud. The Associated Press took a deep dive into Patriot Support, an organization that boasts of providing mental health support and treatments for service members and the families of veterans. The article notes that Walker has claimed credit for founding the organization, even though it exists under the umbrella of Universal Health Services, and it was around for over a decade before Walker was hired to be their celebrity spokesman. From the AP’s report: Well before his candidacy, Walker received plaudits for his work with Patriot Support. His visits to bases were touted in military press releases. And in 2014, as a celebrity contestant on a Food Network game show, Walker won a $50,000 prize to donate to his charity of choice, Patriot Support. But Patriot Support is not a charity. It’s a for-profit program specifically marketed to veterans that is offered by Universal Health Services, one of the...
    Not so long ago, when a person in Dakota County called 911 for a mental health emergency, odds were high that the dispatcher would send a police officer to the scene. It was standard protocol — even if the person in crisis hadn’t broken the law, wasn’t violent or armed with a weapon. This approach changed last year, when state lawmakers enacted Travis’ Law, legislation requiring 911 operators to refer calls involving mental health issues to crisis teams rather than to law enforcement.    Tom FolieTom Folie, executive director of the Dakota Communications Center, the department that handles the county’s 911 calls, said that this change helped streamline his department’s operations while improving safety for callers and emergency responders.  “Some people really don’t want a law enforcement officer involved in their crisis,” Folie said. “When officers show up as the default it’s not ideal. When there is no crime, no threat of violence, no weapon, they are not the right response.”  In the past, Folie explained, “Very occasionally,” his operators would “send callers directly to the [mental health] crisis unit,” but...
    By Victoria Franco | Bay City News Foundation A 20-year-old man in distress and carrying a sword surrendered on Saturday near Stockton, the San Joaquin County Sheriffs’ Office said in a Facebook post. Deputies said their office received reports around noon about a man standing in the roadway in the area of Wilson and E Streets holding a machete. The caller said they were afraid for their safety and vacated the area, according to the sheriff’s office. After locating the man, deputies noted that the weapon was a three-to-four-foot sword and that the man appeared to be in an altered mental state but would not communicate with deputies. Related Articles Crime and Public Safety | S.F. launches program to connect mentally ill with available services Crime and Public Safety | Opposition mounts as Newsom’s mental health care overhaul clears first hurdles Crime and Public Safety | San Jose community briefs for the week of May 6 Crime and Public Safety | Cupertino community briefs for the week of May 6 ...
    Bay City News Service SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco officials announced Friday the launch of the Office of Coordinated Care, as part of the city’s expansion of behavioral mental health resources. The new office will assign case managers to people who are disconnected from behavioral health services, or who are making transitions in care from one setting to another, according to a news release Friday from the office of Mayor London Breed. The aim is to help people remain in care and avoid falling back into a cycle of crisis, officials said, adding that previously little follow-up services existed. Breed worked in partnership with Supervisor Hillary Ronen and then-Supervisor Matt Haney to craft the Mental Health SF legislation that created the new office. Related Articles Health | Opposition mounts as Newsom’s mental health care overhaul clears first hurdles Health | San Jose community briefs for the week of May 6 Health | Cupertino community briefs for the week of May 6 Health | Letters: Water data | Candidate’s courage | Code violations...
    UPLAND, Pa. (CBS) —  Nurses, paramedics, and other healthcare workers in Delaware County rallied to stop possible closures within the Crozer Health System. They say the loss of certain services could cost lives. Wednesday’s rally outside of Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland called attention to four hospitals in Delaware County.  READ MORE: 'Unamerican And Unacceptable': Gov. Tom Wolf Says Potential Overturning Of Roe V. Wade Puts Right To Make Own, Private Medical Decisions At RiskCrozer Health is owned by a for-profit management company, which is in the process of selling the hospitals. The company has already made several service cuts and is now reportedly threatening to halt paramedic services. READ MORE: Comedian Visiting Philadelphia Reacts To Dave Chappelle Being Attacked On Stage“We have got to have ambulance services,” Peggy Malone, the president of the Crozer-Chester Nurses Association, said. “Nobody should wait 30 minutes, 40 minutes when you have a loved one having a heart attack waiting for someone to get to your door to try to save their life. We’re not going to stand for this. Not for our...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The stakes are high for propositions that would legalize sports betting in California if approved by voters.The group Californians for Solutions to Homelessness and Mental Health Support is backing a proposition that would legalize online sports betting.On Tuesday, the organization announced it's gathered the necessary signatures to place the initiative on the November ballot.According to the group, the initiative would bring in around $500 million earmarked for housing and mental health programs. Southern California would get just over $208 million."Homelessness service providers, like myself and others, are here with you today to tell you providing an ongoing permanent revenue source is critical for California if we are going to solve and create long-term solutions needed to end homelessness," said Quentin Mecke with EveryOne Home, a group based in San Francisco that offers help to the homeless.Meanwhile, tribal casinos have banded together to oppose the online initiative.They're spending $100 million on a campaign to defeat the online sports betting proposition."Our concern with their measure is that it violates the historical decades-old sovereignty granted to tribes by California...
    ‘Romeo’ at Lynbrook Studio 74, Lynbrook High School’s drama department, is staging its first-ever outdoor show this May. “Romeo and Juliet” is also the first full-length play to be produced in person at Lynbrook after two years. Students are not just acting in the play but directing, stage managing, building sets, creating props and lighting the production. Showtimes are Friday- Saturday, May 6-7, and Friday, May 13, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 14, at 11 a.m. at Lynbrook, 1280 Johnson Ave., San Jose. Opening night pre-show activities begin at 5 p.m. Tickets are available at https://lynbrookdrama.wixsite.com/studio74/romeoandjuliet. Crisis team expanding The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors last month voted to expand the county’s Mobile Crisis Response Team services for young people ages 16-24. The program, which started in 2018, unites specialized clinicians with law enforcement to respond to people who may be having a mental health crisis. Supervisors approved a $2 million agreement to support the expansion of mobile crisis services through 2025. Funding will be allocated to the county’s Behavioral Health Services Department from a state grant. A pre-existing contract...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Better data on bills would help save water Re. “Bay Area water use rules are tightening,” Page B1, April 22: Some of us are really trying: fewer showers, less flushing and irrigation etc. But exactly how is the consumer to know whether we are saving 15%? Water bills should be mandated to show: 1) what the anchor year usage was; 2) current year usage; 3) the percentage we are individually up or down. And if we are not meeting the goal, the bill should include examples of ways to save the required additional percentage. We have no idea. Few of us will do the online research and math that would be required. Water company computers can easily calculate and share the data with us and stop beating us up when we have no convenient data to work with. Mandate accessibility to reliable data for the consumer so we can do our part. Cindy Castillo Sunnyvale Nagaye’s courage worthy of a new sheriff How refreshing, and...
    Students in Howard County, Maryland, will have access to mental health services for at least the next two years, thanks to a more than $2 million expansion of the school system’s mental health program. That’s nearly 58,000 children in 77 public schools, said County Executive Calvin Ball. The money will also be used to subsidize mental health resources in the community for vulnerable youth. “Even before the pandemic exacerbated this crisis, we recognized the gap in mental health services, especially for our students and young residents,” Ball said. Some $1.7 million, along with $980,000 from the American Rescue Plan and contributions by The Horizon and Kahlert foundations, will be used to expand the county’s School-Based Mental Health program. The program makes social workers available at Howard County schools and aims to create a culture of acceptance of mental health. Ball also highlighted the $380,000 in his proposed 2023 budget to expand mental health services through HoCo STRIVES, which serves vulnerable students and families. More Local News More Maryland News More Howard County News More Education News In announcing...
    (CBS DETROIT) – Governor Gretchen Whitmer is proposing to make a big investment in mental health services for Michigan students. The governor met with mental health professionals, educators, parents and students Monday at Pontiac High School for a roundtable discussion on crisis intervention. READ MORE: Bailey Lake Elementary In Clarkston Exceeds Coin Drive Expectation For Ukrainian Refugees, Raises Over 13k In 5 days“None of us is immune from the stress of the last couple of years and we have a tendency to say kids are resilient and leave it at that, and they are but they need support,” Whitmer said. The governor is submitting a recommendation to invest $361 million on school-based mental health services. A portion of the funds will be used to hire mental health professionals, train teachers and to open 40 new health centers on school grounds. Currently the state operates 100 sites, but the governor says now is the time to expand mental health services as kids transition back to in-person learning. READ MORE: Grand Rapids Police Chief Eric Winstrom Releases Name Of Officer Who Shot Patrick...
    DENVER (CBS4)– Gov. Jared Polis joined other state leaders to visit locations that are focused on reducing homelessness with support systems including mental health care. It’s part of an effort to ensure more people can exit homelessness and thrive. (credit: CBS) “We need to draw a clear path to recovery and work for Coloradans experiencing homelessness. Colorado’s excellent community partners who are providing keys to a safe home, opening doors to jobs, access to mental and behavioral health care, and meeting people where they are with the services they need,” said Polis in a statement. “Our administration will continue to turn transformative state and federal dollars into real solutions that work with cities to reduce homelessness, improve public safety, and save people money.” (credit: CBS) Polis toured Sanderson Apartments, a permanent supportive housing community operated by the Mental Health Center of Denver, on Friday. According to the governor’s office, “Sanderson residents who have experienced long lengths of homelessness and face complex barriers to housing stability are provided with wraparound services, supported by the physical building design which includes trauma-informed...
    FORT COLLINS, Colo. (CBS4) – Fort Collins Police Services will be the first agency in Colorado to partner with “Vitals Ap,” a technology that will help first responders identify and properly interact with community members who live with intellectual disabilities. In partnership with UCHealth, the health provider that has covered the associated costs for the police department in order to launch the app in Fort Collins, Fort Collins police and mental health responders will be able to better serve those who have profiles through the app. (credit: CBS) The app, which was developed by former law enforcement officers and experts in mental health response, is subscription-based. For as little as $2.99 a month families can create a profile on the app for their loved ones. A profile includes a photo of the individual, their name and information about their disabilities that the family feels comfortable sharing. The app also includes information on what types of actions an officer can expect from the user that is experiencing distress, contact information for loved ones and even best practices for that individual’s preferred...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A major effort to overhaul care for people in the United States with mental health and drug problems is gaining traction as Congress and the Biden administration work on overlapping plans to address concerns across dividing lines of politics, geography and race. Top goals include responding to the mental health crisis among youth, increasing the supply of professional counselors and clinicians, narrowing a persistent gap between care for physical and mental health problems, and preserving access to telehealth services that proved their usefulness in the pandemic. COVID-19 has laid bare the need. The U.S. was already in a mental health crisis, with suicide rates climbing and chronic problems accessing treatment. The opioid epidemic had a firm grip on cities and small towns. But the coronavirus made everything worse. An analysis of government data found that about 4 in 10 adults reported symptoms of anxiety or depression in the first year of the pandemic, compared with about 1 in 10 before that. More than 100,000 people died of drug overdoses from May 2020 to April 2021,...
    Hayes Collins, born two weeks early in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), is seen at Intermountain Healthcare's American Fork Hospital on Dec. 16, 2019 in American Fork, Utah. Hayes' Mother, Jenny Collins, had difficulty producing milk due to stress of being in the NICU and because Hayes arrived early, so he was fed with milk from the Mountain West Mothers Milk Bank. by Pamela Appea This article was originally published at Prism. Brooke Jones was in her late 20s when she became pregnant with her first child. Employed full time as a medical assistant in Connecticut, Jones fully expected to work right up until her due date. Jones described her pregnancy as “normal” and didn’t believe she had any symptoms that were significantly worrisome. But that changed when a routine ultrasound at 25 weeks revealed that her amniotic fluid levels were dangerously low. Shortly after, medical professionals realized Jones’ blood pressure had spiked “through the roof,” she told Prism. She was diagnosed with preeclampsia and was admitted to the closest hospital for immediate treatment. “They told me...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Maryland Department of Health and 211 Maryland on Thursday announced the launch of a new database that improves access for residents looking for mental health or substance abuse disorder resources. The database on PressOne.211MD.org, a Maryland resource site for those in crisis, has dropdown filters that narrow search results and identify the specific treatment and recovery options visitors are looking for. READ MORE: Hopkins Brings Back Mask Mandate Amid Uptick In COVID-19 CasesThose filters include age, language, payment options, special populations and service type. It was developed by 211 Maryland and the Maryland Department of Health’s Behavioral Health Administration. READ MORE: 7-Year-Old Boy Dies After Being Hit By Car While Waiting For School Bus In Bethesda“Navigating the behavioral health network can be challenging for anyone. In Maryland we have a robust array of behavioral health services available — if you know how to find them,” said BHA Deputy Secretary Dr. Aliya Jones. “We hope that this enhanced resource will make it easier for people to identify and access treatment resources, so they can maintain or improve...
    by Anthony Hennen   Telehealth in Pennsylvania continues to make strides as temporary waivers approved during COVID-19 are made permanent. A previous bill introduced by Rep. Jeff Wheeland, R-Lycoming, would align state and federal guidance on home health care. The latest one, HB2419, introduced by Rep. Tina Pickett, R-Bradford/Sullivan/Susquehanna, would allow psychiatrists to offer mental health services virtually like they do with in-person services. And on Wednesday, Gov. Tom Wolf signed Act 14 into law, again extending regulatory waivers related to COVID-19 to June 30th. Telehealth has expanded at the federal and state levels in a number of ways. From payment parity (ensuring in-person and virtual visits are reimbursed equally) to approving provision of care so long as a worker has a proper license and building new infrastructure, telehealth has scaled up immensely in recent years. “Patient-care visits conducted via telehealth also rose from 13.1% on average before the pandemic to nearly 60% during the early pandemic period,” according to Healthcare IT News. For it to become a fixture of health care services, some laws and regulations will need to change. “I believe that telemedicine provides...