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    Should America Drop Tomahawk Missiles on Cartel Mountains? www.youtube.com U.S. Customs and Border Protection reports that there have been more than 2 million southwest land border encounters during the 11-month period from October 2021 through August 2022. Many GOP figures have called for Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas to resign — in a September 21 letter to Mayorkas, Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri declared, "Your intentional disregard for our country's immigration laws makes you unfit to remain in office. You should resign." A group of GOP lawmakers has backed a measure to put the kibosh on catch and release policies, but the bill likely has no chance of advancing through the Democrat-controlled Congress. "Catch and release is incentivizing historic levels of illegal immigration, stretching Border Patrol resources thin, and making our communities unsafe," Republican Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona, said, according to a press release. "My legislation restores integrity in our immigration system by explicitly prohibiting DHS from paroling or otherwise releasing illegal aliens into the country. DHS can either detain the illegal alien...
    Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) said Vice President Kamala Harris is “dead wrong” on the issue of whether the southern border with Mexico is secure. Appearing on Tuesday’s edition of Special Report with Bret Baier, the West Virginia senator was asked for his reaction to remarks made by the vice president on Sunday’s Meet the Press. “The border is secure, but we also have a broken immigration system, in particular, over the last four years before we came in, and it needs to be fixed,” she said. Baier asked Manchin for his reaction. “Vice President Harris said this weekend the southern border is secure,” the anchor stated. Manchin responded: It’s wrong. She’s dead wrong on that and I have said this: if we don’t secure–I voted every time for the wall. But we need the wall and a lot more. Technology, more agents. The 2013 immigration bill was still the best piece of legislation I think that we’ve ever had before us. We couldn’t get it passed through the Republican House at that time because of some politics involved there. Amnesty...
    Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) appeared cool to the federal abortion ban proposed by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC). On Tuesday, Graham introduced a bill that would ban abortion in the United States after 15 weeks of pregnancy. The legislation contains exceptions for rape, incest, and when the woman’s life is at risk. Appearing on Tuesday’s Spicer & Keith, Paul said abortion laws should be decided by the states. “Is the timing of this bill, right?” Lyndsay Keith asked as midterm elections loom. “I’m 100% pro-life and always support the pro-life position,” Paul began. “That being said, I think it’s more likely than not, and probably the better part of valor to see how the states sort this out.” The senator noted the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, where in 1973 the court ruled that abortion is a constitutionally protected right. That decision – Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization – said abortion is a matter for the states or Congress to decide. “I think the best thing would be to sort this out at the state level and see what happens,”...
    In a subtle departure from his national image as a liberal champion, Gov. Gavin Newsom successfully pushed state lawmakers to support a series of tough policies in the final weeks of the legislative year that bucked progressive ideals and ultimately could broaden his appeal beyond California. Democratic and Republican lawmakers at the state Capitol heeded his call to extend operations at Diablo Canyon, reversing an agreement environmental groups drove six years ago to shut down California’s last remaining nuclear plant out of safety concerns. The governor won support for his plan to provide court-ordered treatment for unhoused Californians struggling with mental illness and addiction amid outcry from powerful civil rights organizations. Newsom vetoed legislation to allow supervised drug injection sites in pilot program cities, drawing criticism that his decision was politically motivated as speculation swirls around his prospects as a potential presidential contender. “He is making political calculations on all of these decisions in a very deep and nuanced way that considers where he wants to go next,” said Mary Creasman, chief executive of California Environmental Voters. “That doesn’t...
    SACRAMENTO —  For the fourth time in five years, the California Legislature rejected a bill to allow its staff to unionize, parting with other West Coast states that have approved similar legislation to try to improve workplace conditions and offset power imbalances between politicians and their legislative staff. The bill died after Assemblyman Jim Cooper (D-Elk Grove) initially refused to allow a vote in his committee on the final night before the lawmakers adjourned for the year. Cooper reversed his decision minutes later and allowed a vote on the bill, which failed to earn enough support for passage. “The reason I held this is because not to make these folks take a hard vote,” Cooper said when he spoke in opposition of the legislation. “So you can get on Twitter. I don’t care. You can get on Facebook. I don’t care. It’s doing what’s right.” For decades, legislative employees have not received the same right to unionize as other private and public sector workers despite the Democratic Legislature’s close ties with unions at the state Capitol. The...
    McDonald's USA President Joe Erlinger slammed a California labor bill in an open letter on Wednesday The head of McDonald's US operations has publicly slammed a proposed California law that could force large fast food chains to pay workers up to $22 an hour, saying the plan 'should raise alarm bells across the country.' McDonald's USA President Joe Erlinger spoke out in an open letter on Wednesday, arguing that California's plan is unfairly designed and will raise costs further for consumers. He was responding to a bill that could set wages at fast-food chains with more than 100 restaurants at $22 an hour next year, well above the existing statewide minimum of $15.50 an hour for all other jobs.  'This lopsided, hypocritical and ill-considered legislation hurts everyone,' wrote Erlinger, pointing out that a McDonald's franchisee who owns one location would be subject to the new wage requirement, while a company with 20 locations would be exempt. Erlinger argued that the plan would raise costs for consumers at a time when inflation is already running high, citing estimates that the cost...
    California lawmakers on Tuesday sent Gov. Gavin Newsom a bill to limit solitary confinement in jails, prisons and private detention centers and ban its use altogether for vulnerable populations such as pregnant and elderly people. The fate of the legislation, Assembly Bill 2632, remained uncertain through this year’s legislative session due to strong opposition from law enforcement groups and concerns from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation about the bill’s price tag. The state corrections agency estimated that the restrictions on solitary confinement could add more than $1 billion in one-time costs to expand its programming space and exercise yards, and $200 million annually to maintain the staff necessary to comply with the new regulations. Civil rights and criminal justice reform advocates said those numbers were inflated and that the restrictions are necessary to protect human rights and prevent abusive treatment of people in custody. “The international community has made it very clear that solitary confinement is torture. There needs to be some limitations and some constraints on how it’s used and when it’s used,” said...
    Los Angeles area DACA students and Dreamers walk out of school to march and rally. Ted Soqui/SIPA USA/AP Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.The Biden administration took an important step this week to protect the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, an Obama-era policy that shields undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children from deportation. On Wednesday, the government issued a 450-page final rule set to go into effect on October 31 that codifies the program into federal regulation, replacing a guidance memo that created DACA in 2012 via executive action. Since then, more than 800,000 “Dreamers” have been allowed to stay in the country and received temporary work authorization. The new regulation maintains the eligibility criteria for the program and affirms that DACA recipients, of which there are currently about 600,000, should not be considered a priority for deportation.  “Today, we are fulfilling our commitment to preserve and strengthen DACA by finalizing a rule that will reinforce protections, like work authorization, that allow Dreamers...
    The mid-term elections are upon us, and all signs point to a tsunami. The Republicans are expected to seize control of the House of Representatives by a wide margin, and likely the Senate. Kevin McCarthy is poised to assume the House Speaker role and Mitch McConnell the Senate Majority Leader. And isn’t this as it should be? Afterall, the Republicans have shown extraordinary fortitude in sticking to their game plan in unwavering fashion. They set out with a simple plan to do nothing. And they have succeeded beyond all measure. Article continues after advertisement As the Democrats in the legislature have attempted to legislate, the Republicans have resisted at every turn. Imagine the commitment, the imagination required to serve as a legislator while making every effort to derail all legislation? Remarkable really, and rewarding the do-nothing party in the coming mid-term elections seems only fair when considering just how many policy prescriptions the Republicans have attempted to thwart. Abortion is obviously at the top of the do-nothing list. When the Supreme Court reversed a half-century of deference to a woman’s...
    (CNN)The Democrats are celebrating the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act over unified Republican opposition, claiming that the legislation is a historic breakthrough. Sadly, it's not. Jeffrey D. SachsThough the new legislation takes some steps in the right direction on climate and drug prices, it falls far short of what is needed. The Democrats, with control over the White House and both houses of Congress, squandered the historic opportunity for a progressive breakthrough. There are four big reasons to be skeptical of the Democratic Party's self-congratulation. 1. Despite its title, the new legislation will have essentially no effect on reducing inflation during the next few years. Read MoreToday's inflation, running at 8.5% year-over-year in July, results from economy-wide imbalances of supply and demand. Even the small steps on drug pricing in the new law -- allowing Medicare to negotiate the prices of some drugs as of 2026 -- will have no effect on current inflation, and only tiny effects later. One study at Penn Wharton, for example, expressed "a low level of confidence that the legislation would have any...
    Aerial view of the Diablo Canyon, the only operational nuclear plant left in California, viewed in these aerial photos taken on December 1, 2021, near Avila Beach, California. Set on 1,000 acres of scenic coastal property just north and west of Avila Beach, the controversial power plant operated by Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) was commisioned in 1985.George Rose | Getty Images News | Getty Images California lawmakers are circulating draft legislation that would keep the state's last operating nuclear plant, Diablo Canyon, open beyond its planned 2025 closure date, although there are still significant logistical and political challenges ahead before that could happen. The plan to close Diablo Canyon has been underway since 2016. But as the dire symptoms of climate change -- heat and drought -- have been bearing down hard on the state, and delays have slowed the construction of wind and solar energy sources, lawmakers and representatives for local utility PG&E are reconsidering. The Diablo Canyon power plant currently supplies 8.6% of the state's electricity and 17% of the state's zero-carbon electricity supply. The two operating...
    Virginia Democrats trumpeted the Inflation Reduction Act after the House of Representatives passed the legislation on Friday, putting President Joe Biden on the path to a key win on his goals ahead of the 2022 congressional midterms. At the same time, Republicans mocked the bill’s title and criticized its policies. In a speech on the House Floor, Congressman Don Beyer (D-VA-08) compared the bill to landmark legislation from the country’s past. “This is our generation’s signature contribution to American history. Our social security act, our civil rights act, even the Bill of Rights,” Beyer said. “The act will lower health care costs, reduce prescription drug prices, and create jobs. We have emphatically put people over politics.” Beyer is the chair of Congress’ Joint Economic Committee. No Virginia Democrats voted against the bill Friday, and no Virginia Republicans voted for it. In separate releases, Republicans cited many of the same concerns about policies in the bill: clean energy provisions, expanded IRS enforcement, and higher taxes. Congressman Morgan Griffith (R-VA-09) said in a release, “Under the misleading and inaccurate title of the...
    (CNN)How important is the climate bill -- named, for Joe Manchin-related reasons, the "Inflation Reduction Act" --- that just passed the US Congress? Huge. To get the disclaimers out of the way: it doesn't, by any means, solve the whole climate problem. We still need to do plenty more to get to zero carbon emissions. And we're still in for more warming regardless. The heat waves, wildfires, floods and the rest of what we're starting to see as routine will still get worse for decades more, at least. The bill also has some negatives from a climate perspective, like its new offshore oil leases, presumably added to appease Sen. Manchin, whose vote was crucial to the legislation's passage.But still: HUGE! Consider the history here. For almost the entire 30-year history of international climate negotiations, the US has been more of a problem for the rest of the world than the leader we should have been. Congress couldn't find its way to ratify the Kyoto Protocol or any other agreement that mandated actual emissions reductions. The Waxman-Markey bill, the last major...
    Tucker Carlson Tonight fill-in host Brian Kilmeade on Thursday engaged in some blatant fear-mongering regarding one of the components of the Inflation Reduction Act, warning that an increase in funding to the IRS would translate to government agents “hunt[ing] down and kill[ing]” modest earning Americans who don’t pay the required amount. The legislation, which passed the Senate over the weekend and now awaits a vote in the House, would allocate $80 billion to the IRS for hiring more agents, improving technology, and for enforcement, including of tax payments on cryptocurrencies. Republicans reacted to its passage in the upper chamber by making misleading and false claims. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA), for instance, said that 70,000 agents will be armed because of it, when in fact the number of armed agents was just over 2,000 last year, according to an Associated Press fact check. Kilmeade, like Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) and Rep. Troy Nehls (R-TX), invoked militaristic imagery to describe the IRS workforce, calling it an “army” of President Biden. “Before the IRS took it down yesterday, there was a posting...
    With the flurry of unfavorable reports circulating about the Republican Party, one report is now highlighting another challenge the political party appears to be facing. HuffPost correspondent Jonathan Cohn is breaking down a number of theories that may explain the party's struggles with debating policy. Over the last several weeks, Republicans have been relatively mum about Democratic lawmakers' sweeping, historic pieces of proposed legislation that are on the brink of becoming solidified law. In wake of Democratic lawmakers preparing to cast their final votes on major healthcare reform and proposed legislation to combat climate control, Republican lawmakers appear to be taking a relatively drastic stance. READ MORE: Republicans have already seized on their strategy for winning in 2022 According to Cohn, "they were going to force votes on an array of controversial amendments, pull out every available procedural delay and rouse their supporters at the grassroots level, all in the hopes of breaking Democratic unanimity or, absent that, making the final vote on the legislation as politically painful as possible." He went on to explain why Republicans weren't...
    Share this: Of all the subjects taught in the nation’s public schools, few have generated as much controversy of late as the subjects of racism and slavery in the United States. The attention has come largely through a flood of legislative bills put forth primarily by Republicans over the past year and a half. Commonly referred to as anti-critical race theory legislation, these bills are meant to restrict how teachers discuss race and racism in their classrooms. One of the more peculiar byproducts of this legislation came out of Texas, where, in June 2022, an advisory panel made up of nine educators recommended that slavery be referred to as “involuntary relocation.”
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. House must pass climate legislation Friends and family back in Australia are struggling through a particularly cold and rainy winter. In some parts of Eastern Australia that has meant fatal flooding, thousands of homes damaged and crops destroyed. It seems worlds away from the hot, dry, wildfire-ravaged summer we are experiencing here in California. On Aug. 1 I enjoyed the first drops of rain I have seen in months. While my Aussie friends smile at the sign of a sunny, rain-free day, I have been grinning all morning, breathing in the glorious smell of fresh rain, hearing the soft pitter-patter on the roof, and feeling droplets on my skin. Although we’re struggling through different extremes, they both lead back to the same culprit: climate change. Extreme weather events like flooding, droughts and wildfires are only going to continue getting worse if the United States fails to act. I urge the House to pass the reconciliation bill. Claire Bailey Stanford A gun for protection makes little...
    They really did it. The Inflation Reduction Act, which is mainly a climate change bill with a side helping of health reform, passed the Senate on Sunday; by all accounts it will easily pass the House, so it’s about to become law. This is a very big deal. The act isn’t, by itself, enough to avert climate disaster. But it’s a huge step in the right direction, and sets the stage for more action in the years ahead. It will catalyze progress in green technology; its economic benefits will make passing additional legislation easier; it gives the United States the credibility it needs to lead a global effort to limit greenhouse gas emissions. There are, of course, cynics eager to denigrate the achievement. Some on the left rushed to dismiss the bill as a giveaway to the fossil fuel industry posing as environmental action. More important, Republicans — who unanimously opposed the legislation — are shouting the usual things they shout: Big spending! Inflation! But actual experts on energy and the environment are giddy over what has been accomplished, and...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks at a press conference in which Democratic Senators were demanding passage of the Inflation Reduction Act.Allison Bailey/AP Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.After years of stagnant climate policy, months of excruciating political negotiations, and a marathon weekend of back-to-back voting, the Senate passed the Democrats’ sweeping climate and health care bill on Sunday.  The estimated $740 billion package, entitled the Inflation Reduction Act, includes close to $400 billion in climate spending—by far the largest climate investment in the nation’s history. The plan would be largely paid for by new taxes, including a 15 percent minimum tax on the handful of corporations with annual profits about $1 billion. The bill includes close to $400 billion in climate spending—by far the largest climate investment in the nation’s history. The bill represents a fraction of the climate investment that Democrats dreamed of when Joe Biden took office, but it includes policies that are expected to help America cut its climate pollution by 40 percent by...
    Mint Images | Mint Images Rf | Getty Images The Senate passed the most ambitious climate spending package in U.S. history on Sunday, prompting optimism among environmental advocates after months of gridlock around President Joe Biden's emissions-reducing agenda. Called the Inflation Reduction Act, the legislation earmarks $369 billion for U.S. energy security and fighting climate change. Vice President Kamala Harris provided the tie-breaking vote on the bill after senators voted along party lines. The bill will now head to the House. Here's what climate groups said of the legislation:American Clean Power:"This is the vote heard around the world. It puts America on a path to creating 550,000 new clean energy jobs while reducing economy-wide emissions 40% by 2030. This is a generational opportunity for clean energy after years of uncertainty and delay. This unprecedented investment in clean energy will supercharge America's clean energy economy and keep the United States within striking distance of our climate goals."Solar Energy Industries Association:"Today is a monumental day for America's clean energy progress and global climate leadership. With the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act...
    There is one obstacle looming over the Democrats' prospects of enacting their sought-after spending legislative breakthrough dubbed the Inflation Reduction: the enigmatic Senate parliamentarian. Although rarely in the spotlight, Elizabeth MacDonough, who has held the parliamentarian post since 2012, has quickly emerged as a powerful behind-the-scenes figure in the 50-50 Senate, with the potential power to deliver a death knell to Democratic endeavors to finagle the party's signature policy legislation through their razor-thin Senate edge via technical rules. She has vexed both Republicans and Democrats in the past, prompting some on the Left to sound the alarm that her power should be reduced. SINEMA SIGNS OFF ON MANCHIN-SCHUMER SPENDING BILL "The Senate needs to step up, override the parliamentarian, OK. The parliamentarian is not elected. It is not an elected position, and the parliamentarian has been overridden and dismissed in the past," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) demanded last year after MacDonough ruled against the Democrats on immigration. At the time, some Democrats were exploring the prospects of passing a pathway for citizenship for illegal immigrants through...
    Arizona Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema succeeded in knocking out a $13 trillion provision despised by the hedge fund industry before she announced she had agreed to 'move forward' on major legislation heading to its first key vote Saturday. With enormous leverage in the 50-50 Senate, Sinema was able to push to jettison the provision, which the White House and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) touted as a way to force wealthy hedge funders to take ordinary income rather than booking their earnings as capital gains taxed at a lower rate. It would have provided about $13 billion in revenue for the sweeping climate and health package that Democrats have rebranded as the Inflation Reduction Act. But leaders agreed to fill the hole with other revenue provisions, and the latest deal would still reduce the deficit by about $300 billion, Majority Leader Charles Schumer said Thursday night while announcing the latest deal.  'We have agreed to remove the carried interest tax provision, protect advanced manufacturing, and boost our clean energy in the Senate's budget reconciliation legislation,' Sinema said in a statement Thursday,...
    Jon Stewart demonstrated in front of the Capitol on Monday to urge senators to pass legislation providing more funding for veterans who had been exposed to toxic burn pits after President Joe Biden called him to thank him for his advocacy. Stewart issued another explective-filled rant at the lawmakers, who, last week, he referred to as 'motherf***ers.'  'I get it. I am a liberal piece of s***,' Stewart shouted outside the front stairs of the Capitol building. 'I know that I am I'm Hunter Biden's cocaine dealer.' 'But the VFW and the American Legion and the IAVA isn't and DAV isn't and the Wounded Warriors project isn't. So why are they standing here? You can attack me all you want. And you can troll me online,' he added. 'But here's the beautiful thing. I don't give a s***. I'm not scared of you. And I don't care. These are the people that I owe a debt of gratitude to and we all say gratitude to and it's about time we start paying it off,' he said. He called on the...
    Senate Democrats unveiled their long-awaited marijuana legalization bill on Thursday, opening the door to future conversations on Capitol Hill about cannabis legalization despite its slim chances of being advanced in Congress. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) released his Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, which would decriminalize marijuana possession nationwide and allow states to enact their own laws without federal oversight. The legislation comes more than a year after Schumer proposed a draft of the bill and includes propositions that are backed by both parties. SENATE HEARING ON CANNABIS PREVIEWS LONG-SHOT ODDS FOR DECRIMINALIZATION BILL Here’s what the bill would do: Decriminalize marijuana and expunge criminal records Under the bill, anyone with a criminal record related to nonviolent federal marijuana offenses would have his or her record expunged and records sealed within one year of enactment. For those still serving sentences, the legislation would allow them to file for sentence review hearings. After those hearings, courts are instructed to “expunge each arrest, conviction, or adjudication of juvenile delinquency” for the offense, as well as...
    (CNN)Several mass shootings and a sustained rise in gun violence across the United States have spurred law enforcement officials and lawmakers to push for more gun control measures.President Joe Biden in June signed into law the first major gun safety legislation passed in decades. The measure failed to ban any weapons, but it includes funding for school safety and state crisis intervention programs. Many states -- including California, Delaware and New York -- have also passed new laws to help curb gun violence, such as regulating untraceable ghost guns and strengthening background check systems.States with weaker gun laws have higher rates of firearm related homicides and suicides, study finds There is a direct correlation in states with weaker gun laws and higher rates of gun deaths, including homicides, suicides and accidental killings, according to a January study published by Everytown for Gun Safety, a non-profit focused on gun violence prevention. Not everyone agrees that increased gun control is the answer. Some Americans advocate for their right to keep and bear arms, enshrined in the Constitution, while others argue that gun...
    \u201cThank you to @RepJeffDuncan @Congressman_JVD @RepGrothman @TXRandy14 @RepGregSteube @RepBobGood @RepJimBanks @RepThomasMassie @RepBoebert @Rep_Clyde for co-sponsoring.\u201d — Rep. Dan Bishop (@Rep. Dan Bishop) 1659121869 The measure will likely fail to make any headway in the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives. Bishop has previously pushed legislation to prohibit the federal government from supplying funds to any entity that teaches concepts such as the idea that America is a "fundamentally racist" nation or that a person is "inherently racist or oppressive" because of their race. He has also pushed legislation to bar the military from promoting such concepts.
    Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed TN-5 Republican candidate Beth Harwell in-studio to talk about her past legislation and set the record straight on accomplishments for the state of Tennessee. Leahy: As promised, in the hot seat, Beth Harwell, former Speaker of the Tennessee House of Representatives and now a candidate for the 5th Congressional District GOP nomination. The election, August 4th, a week from tomorrow. Good morning, Beth. Harwell: Good morning. Good to be with you all this morning. Leahy: Crom Carmichael … Carmichael: Yes. Leahy: You’ve known Beth for some time? Carmichael: I’ve known Beth a very long time. Leahy: And I guess were you in her district when she was in the Tennessee General Assembly. Carmichael: I think I was. Yes, I was. Leahy: And you were first elected when? 1988? Harwell: That’s correct. Leahy: And you served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1988 until, what, 2018?...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said the Senate lacks the votes to pass landmark bipartisan legislation that would rein in Big Tech. Schumer made the remarks while speaking to a group of donors at a fundraiser Tuesday in Washington, where an attendee asked him about the American Choice and Innovation Online Act, a bill that would empower federal agencies to prevent the largest tech companies from unfairly giving preference to their own products on their platforms. FEAR OF LOSING AMAZON PRIME DRIVES SKEPTICISM ABOUT ANTITRUST BILL: INDUSTRY POLL Schumer said the bill was a "high priority," but the Senate doesn't have the 60 votes required to pass it, according to Bloomberg. While Schumer had said in the past that he was working with the bill's co-sponsor Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) to give it attention, this is the first time the Senate leader has said the bill does not have the support it needs to pass. The New York senator said that people had urged him to put the bill on the floor in hopes of forcing...
    (CNN)Several Republican senators said Tuesday they had not made decisions about whether they will vote in favor of a bill codifying same-sex marriage, but three supporters of the legislation were upbeat they would find enough GOP votes to overcome a filibuster and eventually pass the bill. "There are more," said Sen. Thom Tillis, a Republican from North Carolina, when asked if backers had added more GOP names to the list of supporters -- which stood at five last week -- although he refused to say exactly how many."There are others who are privately mulling and leaning in that direction," agreed Wisconsin Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin, another sponsor, who said Democratic absences due to Covid could impact the timeline of when Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer schedules a vote, meaning it could be pushed past the August recess. "We will move when we're sure we have 10. But I think I would not be surprised if we had significantly more in the end."Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, a co-sponsor of the Senate version of the bill, told CNN on Tuesday...
    Arizona Representative Andy Biggs introduced legislation Tuesday called the Stop Imposing Woke Ideology Abroad Act, which seeks to prohibit federal funding for the State Department’s Equity Action Plan (EAP). “Using taxpayer dollars to fund the Biden Administration’s woke programs abroad is a complete misuse of federal funding and further strains our relationships with countries abroad,” Biggs said in a press release. “This legislation ensures we protect American interests and curb the Biden Administration’s detached social agenda abroad.” The bill text states that upon its enactment, no federal funds may be used to carry out the EAP or for the salary and expenses of the Department of State’s Special Representative for Racial Equity and Justice. The bill is co-sponsored by five other House Republicans, including Arizona Representative Debbie Lesko (R-AZ-08). “Americans have already rejected the Biden Administration’s radical social agenda, and yet it continues to try and force it on countries that have also rightly rejected it. Imposing woke ideology on other countries is just another example of the Biden Administration’s foreign policy failures,” Biggs said in justification of his new...
    (CNN)Ten GOP senators are needed to join all 50 Democrats in order to overcome a legislative filibuster in support of the House-passed bill to codify same-sex marriage into federal law. CNN asked all 50 Republicans where they stand on the legislation. It's not yet clear how many Republicans will support the bill, but GOP and Democratic senators said Wednesday they expect it could eventually win the 60 votes needed.Here's what we found:Four Republican senators, so far, have either said they will support or will likely support the House-passed same-sex marriage bill, and that includes: Rob Portman of Ohio, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska (likely) and Thom Tillis of North Carolina (likely). Eight Republican senators, so far, have indicated they would vote "no," and oppose the same-sex marriage bill.Read MoreSixteen Republican senators, so far, are undecided or did not indicate support for the House-passed bill.Twenty-two Republican senators have yet to respond to CNN's inquiries.YES Susan Collins of Maine is a yes on the bill. She's one of the co-sponsors of the legislation. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska...
    Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin and Republican Sen. Susan Collins led a group of 16 bipartisan senators who introduced new legislation Wednesday to overhaul the 1887 Electoral Count Act, which former President Donald Trump tried to exploit to stay in power.  The Electoral Count Reform Act of 2022 would clear up, among other things, the role of the vice president - explicitly making his or her role ceremonial when the Electoral College votes are counted during the joint session of Congress on the January 6th following a presidential election.  The vice president 'does not have any power to solely determine, accept, reject, or otherwise adjudicate disputes over electors,' explained a one-sheeter on the fresh legislation.   It also identifies a state's governor - unless state law says otherwise - as the person submitting electors to Congress, so a plot to send 'alternate electors' to Congress wouldn't be possible.  Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin (left) and Republican Sen. Susan Collins (right) led a group of 16 bipartisan senators who introduced new legislation Wednesday to overhaul the 1887 Electoral Count Act, which former President Donald Trump tried to...
    Angry remarks by Sen. Bernie Sanders against Sen. Joe Manchin were hardly the first time the West Virginia Democrat has made far-left lawmakers spitting mad. Sanders, the Vermont independent socialist, accused his colleague of “intentionally sabotaging” President Joe Biden’s agenda on Sunday. Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sunday castigated Sen. Joe Manchin after the West Virginia Democrat said he wouldn’t support legislation focused on climate change and tax changes, citing his concerns over high inflation. ABC News' @KennethMoton joins us for more. https://t.co/SV1dS3r3NM pic.twitter.com/v1Ii0s3EXM— ABC News Live (@ABCNewsLive) July 18, 2022 Leaving Manchin’s intentions aside, the centrist Democrat has bucked his party’s liberal flank on a number of key items. HOUSE AGAIN PASSES SWEEPING ABORTION RIGHTS BILL ON TRACK TO FAIL IN THE SENATE Climate agenda Manchin said last week he would not support provisions in Democrats’ proposed economic legislation that would allocate spending toward climate change or increase certain taxes, citing his concern over rising inflation. The announcement, a blow to revived negotiations that ended shortly before Christmas over a bigger version of the...
    While President Joe Biden made headlines Friday for a controversial fist bump with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, long-running domestic issues resurfaced as Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) announced ambivalence about yet another Democratic-led spending bill. Manchin, often a thorn in the side of liberals thanks to his refusal to cement Democratic legislation in the 50-50 Senate, announced he won't support provisions in economic legislation that would allocate spending toward climate change or increase taxes for the wealthy. BIDEN FIST-BUMPS SAUDI CROWN PRINCE LEADER SIDESTEPPING HANDSHAKE HEADACHE “Political headlines are of no value to the millions of Americans struggling to afford groceries and gas as inflation soars to 9.1%,” Sam Runyon, a spokeswoman for Manchin, told the Washington Post. “Sen. Manchin believes it’s time for leaders to put political agendas aside, reevaluate, and adjust to the economic realities the country faces to avoid taking steps that add fuel to the inflation fire.” Though Manchin later walked those statements back a bit, saying he only wanted to see July's inflation numbers before signing off on green...
    (CNN)Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia dealt a huge blow to his party when he and his staff told Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer he won't support the climate or tax provisions of a reconciliation package the two had been negotiating for months.This comes months after the senator torpedoed the Biden administration's original tax and spending package, otherwise known as the Build Back Better Act, sharing concerns over certain provisions of the massive tax and spending bill and how it may exacerbate soaring inflation in the country. Democrats needed Manchin's support to pass the legislation along party lines in a process called budget reconciliation, which requires all 50 members of the Democratic caucus to agree to advance legislation. But Manchin's decision -- while a step back for Democrats who were hoping to see progress on a climate and spending package -- could free up room to get a few other Democratic priorities to Biden's desk before the chamber leaves for August recess. Here's where the negotiations stand:A narrower version of the reconciliation packageWhile Manchin didn't agree to climate provisions...
    The House passed a bill 219-210 to codify the right to an abortion on Friday and passed one 223-205 to ensure women can travel across state lines to get the procedure if necessary. Every Republican voted against the 2022 Women's Health Protection Act to codify abortion rights, and every Democrat except Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, voted for the bill.  The House voted to pass the Ensuring Access to Abortion Act, which would enshrine protections for interstate abortions, with three Republicans joining all Democrats in voting yes.  Neither bill is expected to go anywhere in the Senate.  The House first passed an updated version of the Women's Health Protection Act (WHPA) after first passing the measure in February. The bill failed the Senate 51-49 in a procedural vote in May.  The bill would have needed 60 votes, 10 from Republicans, to pass, but failed to garner even a simple majority as Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., voted against it, as did pro-choice Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski, Alaska, and Susan Collins, Maine.  Congress has faced increasing heat to act on abortion rights after the...
    It’s easy to see Sen. Joe Manchin as a feckless boob. A man who places his personal interests far above those of the nation. Someone whose thinking on any topic is thinner than the rainbow oil-smear on the top of a puddle in a Cracker Barrel parking lot. That guy who would chase a buck even if it meant walking on the faces of babies. Well, an inside look at how Manchin trashed any chance at reasonable legislation to address climate change, compiled by The New York Times, shows that every one of these presumptions is definitively correct. And then some. For months, as the administration and other Democrats in the Senate tried to bargain in good faith, Manchin “led his party through months of tortured negotiations that collapsed on Thursday night, a yearlong wild goose chase.” In the process, Manchin destroyed plans to fund support for renewable energy, derailed efforts to help consumers buy electric cars, and ended any chance that the United States would take significant action to address the greatest essential threat facing the nation … all while...
    (CNN)Republican House lawmakers are introducing legislation that would require the Biden administration to provide Congress with a detailed report on the status of major arms sales to Taiwan, an effort that comes as there is a mounting sense of urgency about getting Taiwan the weapons it would need to fend off a potential Chinese invasion.The bill, introduced on Friday by California Rep. Young Kim and Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, comes as members of Congress are looking to understand what the current environment -- particularly the demand for weapons into Ukraine and mounting pressures on US supply chains -- means for the delivery timeline of weapons to Taiwan.In total there are hundreds of millions of dollars of arms sales to Taiwan that Congress wants updates on. The hope is to "pull back the curtain" on what is contributing to the delay of US arms arriving in Taiwan and come up with solutions to expedite deliveries, one congressional aide explained.The Republicans have also grown frustrated by the lack of answers the administration has provided to them when asked about the status of...
    SACRAMENTO —  Gun control bills have been shooting through the state Legislature at rapid-fire speed, and Gov. Gavin Newsom is eager to sign them. But it’s anyone’s guess how many will survive this Supreme Court. It’s also not clear which existing California gun controls will remain intact, including biggies such as the ban on sales of military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines holding more than 10 rounds. Many seem in jeopardy because of the conservative court’s ruling that the 2nd Amendment right to bear arms overrides a New York law restricting who may legally carry a concealed gun in public. California and a handful of other states have similar laws. Writing for the court, Justice Clarence Thomas said the Constitution “protects an individual’s right to carry a handgun for self-defense outside the home.” And more broadly, Thomas wrote: “To justify a firearm regulation the government must demonstrate that the regulation is consistent with the Nation’s historical tradition of firearm regulation.” Gun lobbies are hailing that statement. Historical tradition? Meaning, regulations back before there were guns that could fire scores — even...
    Share this: New York will ban people from carrying firearms into many places of business unless the owners put up a sign saying guns are welcome, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Wednesday, describing a deal with state legislative leaders that is being finalized. Hochul said lawmakers have agreed on the broad strokes of a gun control bill that the Democratic-led Legislature is poised to pass Thursday. The legislation — hurriedly written after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the state’s handgun licensing law — will include provisions that make it harder to apply for a permit to carry a gun outside the home and create more rules around firearm storage in homes and vehicles.
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Days after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed more people to carry concealed weapons, California lawmakers on Tuesday moved to limit where firearms may be carried and who can have them, while struggling to stay within the high court’s ruling. They aim to restrict concealed carry to those 21 and older; require applicants to disclose all prior arrests, criminal convictions and restraining or protective orders; require in-person interviews with the applicant and at least three character references; and allow sheriffs and police chiefs to consider applicants’ public statements as they weigh if the individual is dangerous. READ MORE: Firefighters Battling 350-Acre Rice Fire In Nevada County; Some Evacuation Orders Issued“We’re going to push the envelope, but we’re going to do it in a constitutional way,” said Democratic Sen. Anthony Portantino. It’s the latest example of California, where Democrats hold sway, pushing back against recent decisions by conservative U.S. Supreme Court justices. On Monday, lawmakers advanced a gun control measure modeled after a recent high court ruling in a Texas abortion case, and adopted a ballot measure that would...
    Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.President Joe Biden signed the first federal gun safety legislation in decades today, finally breaking a stalemate on the issue that has long persisted in Congress.  “This time, when it seems impossible to get anything done in Washington, we are doing something consequential,” Biden said.  Passed in the aftermath of the horrific back-to-back mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, the legislation provides $750 million for states to fund violence prevention plans and mental health programs. The bill also shores up background checks for 18- to 21-year-olds and eliminates the so-called “boyfriend loophole”—a gap in existing law that previously allowed domestic abusers to acquire deadly weapons so long as they and their partners were unmarried and childless.  The legislation also includes funding for states to implement red flag laws. However, the red flag provisions aren’t mandatory, and, as my colleague Abby Vesoulis has reported, it’s extremely unlikely that Republican-controlled states will adopt them.  The legislation is notable for breaking...
    This article was originally published at Prism What does it mean for a website to “encourage” abortion? New anti-abortion model legislation released last week by the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) would force anyone who publishes work online to grapple with that question, putting journalists who cover abortion squarely into legal crosshairs. The model legislation—which NRLC hopes will be adopted by state legislatures around the country—would subject people to criminal and civil penalties for “aiding or abetting” an abortion, including “hosting or maintaining a website, or providing internet service, that encourages or facilitates efforts to obtain an illegal abortion.” Unsurprisingly, the text offers no guidance on how broadly or narrowly the provision might be interpreted: Does it cover an article on how medication abortion is accessible by mail or reporting on the medical consensus that it’s safe? What about a story on the opening of a new abortion clinic, or one covering the work of abortion care clinicians, advocates, and doulas? Is it too “encouraging” for a website to simply remind readers that despite the leaked draft Supreme...
    (CNN)Growing up, I was a victim of domestic abuse. When I was 5, my mom and I escaped our broken home and found refuge in a battered women's shelter. Despite the troubles in my childhood, I knew I had a safe haven to escape to every day: school. Tony GonzalesUnfortunately, that is not the case for many children in our nation today. A month ago, a gunman opened fire on Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas -- just 38 miles from where I grew up and a part of the district that I now represent. That despicable crime led to the death of 19 innocent children and two teachers.As a loving father of six children, my heart breaks for my community. As the congressman who represents Uvalde, I am focused on delivering real change. That change starts with addressing the serious lack of mental health resources in our country, while passing laws that don't infringe on Americans' Second Amendment rights.On Friday, with a final tally of 234 to 193, the House passed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, a piece of...
    Democratic lawmakers’ response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s destruction of reproductive rights for the nation has been, let’s say less than urgent. Less than cognizant of the absolute earthquake that just rocked us. Less than aware that we are all looking to them to DO. SOMETHING. Start with canceling recess. Start with acknowledging that the nation is on fire and that it is their job to start putting the fire out. Recognize that that is what we elected them to do in 2018 and 2020. Show us that they understand that we put our faith in them to do this job. We’re paying them to do it. It is their responsibility. Then act. Don’t just hold hearings on how awful it is that we just witnessed the end of federal protections for abortion rights. Put legislation on the floor to codify abortion rights and put everyone on the record. Take Justice Clarence Thomas at his word and put legislation on the floor to codify our right to birth control, and put every Republican on the record on that. Put legislation on the...
    (CNN)Fourteen House Republicans on Friday joined with Democrats to pass a bipartisan bill to address gun violence, the first major federal gun safety legislation in decades. The bill was approved in the House by a tally of 234 to 193 and will now go to President Joe Biden to be signed into law.The bill passed the Senate with bipartisan support Thursday evening, with 15 Senate Republicans voting in favor, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.In contrast, top House GOP leaders opposed the bill and encouraged members to vote against it. But 14 House Republicans still crossed party lines to vote in favor.The measure includes millions of dollars for mental health, school safety, crisis intervention programs and incentives for states to include juvenile records in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System.It also makes significant changes to the process when someone ages 18 to 21 goes to buy a firearm and closes the so-called boyfriend loophole, a victory for Democrats, who have long fought for that.Read MoreHere are the 14 House Republicans who voted for the bill:1. Liz Cheney of Wyoming2....
    (CNN)PJ Rodriguez's 7-year-old son, John, is learning to cope with the loss of his grandmother and great grandmother. He was close to both and at times gets sad that he can't talk to them, but a therapist has taught him to refocus his mind on happy memories when he gets down, Rodriguez said. John smiles recalling a trip to the zoo, a toy they brought him or when his parents instructed them not to bring him chicken nuggets or doughnut holes but they did anyway. One of John's favorite memories, he tells his parents, is when they took him to Gatorland and his grandmother -- no fan of reptiles -- "held a snake for me so I could a take a picture while I was holding an alligator," Rodriguez relayed to CNN. The woman whose voice was heard in rubble of Surfside condo collapse has been identified. This is how it happenedBut John still struggles, as do hundreds of family members who lost loved ones when part of Champlain Towers South in Surfside, Florida, crumbled to the ground a year...
    The Senate passed a bipartisan gun reform bill on Thursday in the wake of a slew of mass shootings in recent months, including the death of 19 children and two teachers in Uvalde, Texas in late May. The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act — negotiated by a group of senators led by Sens. John Cornyn (R-TX) and Chris Murphy (R-CT) — looks to incentivize states to implement red flag laws. The proposal would make it easier for law enforcement to confiscate a firearm and block the purchase of a gun if an individual is deemed to be a danger to themselves or others, tighten background checks, close the so-called “boyfriend loophole” by tightening background checks on gun purchases on those convicted of domestic violence or certain crimes as minors, and provide money for trauma support, school safety and mental health programs. The legislation, passed 65-33, also includes language to strengthen background checks on individuals looking to purchase a gun that is under the age of 21 and cracks down on straw purchases by implementing stronger penalties. HOUSE GOP...
    A group of 30 House Democrats wrote a letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi urging her to bring forth bipartisan legislation to 'refund' the police show constituents they care about rising crime.  'Members should have the opportunity to show our constituents that we are addressing crime in our communities,' the letter read. 'We are also asking that you please meet with us next week to discuss the need to invest in law enforcement to make our communities safer from criminals.' The letter asked Pelosi, D-Calif., to take up a number of standalone bills and not to attach them to the fiscal year 2023 appropriations, so that members can 'publicly show their support for law enforcement.'  The letter, obtained by Punchbowl, called out the House Judiciary Committee and said it made clear it has 'no intention' of bringing forth any law enforcement bills, so members asked Pelosi to use her powers as speaker to bring the bills forth for a direct vote to get everyone on record.  The House Judiciary Committee, chaired by Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., has a number of progressives...
    House Republican leaders oppose the bipartisan Senate gun bill and are formally requesting their rank-and-file members to vote against it.  House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, told members in a closed-door meeting they opposed the bill and would whip against it. Scalise wrote in an official notice urging House Republicans to vote no: 'This legislation takes the wrong approach in attempting to curb violent crimes. House Republicans are committed to identifying and solving the root causes of violent crimes, but doing so must not infringe upon' Second Amendment rights. The legislation is likely to receive support from some moderate Republicans, just as it did in the Senate.  House GOP Whip Scalise wrote in an official notice urging House Republicans to vote no: 'This legislation takes the wrong approach in attempting to curb violent crimes' House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, told members in a closed-door meeting they opposed the bill and would whip against it Rep. Tony Gonzales, a Republican who represents Uvalde, Texas announced on Twitter that he would...