Monday, Aug 08, 2022 - 08:51:46
1000 results - (0.004 seconds)

college students:

latest news at page 1:
    The City University of New York deleted a profile of a graduate who was the youngest member of Johnny Depp's legal team in his defamation trial against Amber Heard.  Yarleyn Mena, 29,  a 2015 graduate of CUNY's Hunter College and a Brown Rudnick LLP associate, was originally touted for her work in helping Depp win a $10.35 million verdict in the heated trial that captured the nation's attention.  The show of support for the graduate, however, went out the door after CUNY said it received concerns from students and faculty over the profile piece as they offered an apology.  'We understand the strong negative emotions this article elicited and apologize for publishing the item,' the public university system said in a statement replacing the link to the story on Mena.  'The article was not meant to convey support for Mr. Depp, implicitly or otherwise, or to call into question any allegations that were made by Amber Heard,' CUNY added.  'Domestic violence is a serious issue in our society and we regret any pain this article may have caused.'  Yarleyn Mena,...
    College students these days are certainly prone to ideological dustups: currently, at Imperial College in London, a group of students are moving to block the installation of a sculpture by artist Sir Antony Gormley due to concerns that the steel structure, which certain students are claiming is “phallic in nature,” will “hurt the image and reputation of the college.” The motion to block the sculpture, which is being distributed by the Imperial College Union, claims that while the sculpture is purportedly depicting a squatting human body, it instead evokes a phallus that amounts to a protuberance that sticks out “approximately three meters horizontally.” There’s “nothing inherently wrong with phallic imagery in art,” the motion continues, but the “phallic interpretation’s preoccupation with the penis could be considered inappropriate for a grand public display, especially given the statue’s size.” The Daily Beast reached out to the Imperial College Union for comment. “Despite the support within the union, and that the paper has apparently been seen by senior college staff and Gormley’s team, I doubt that it will affect the installation of...
    Citing a recent surge of COVID-19 cases across the country and in the Volunteer State, Tennessee State University (TSU) recently announced that it will continue to put COVID-19 safety protocols in place for the upcoming fall semester beginning August 22nd. TSU cites in a press release that Davidson County had an uptick in confirmed COVID cases, with an average of 2,842 cases within a seven-day span, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. The average positive COVID-19 test rate for Tennessee is 40.4 percent, according to data collected by The Mayo Clinic. “We have put various protocols in place to assist individuals with safety to minimize the spread on campus,” Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU associate vice president and chief of staff, said in a statement. “We will continue working with faculty and staff to have the necessary PPEs (personal protection equipment) available for students attending classes and for all offices.” Despite not having a mask or vaccination mandate outlined by state law, the university is “strongly encouraging the campus family to wear masks, practice social distancing and to get vaccinated...
    Editor’s note: This story is part of the annual Mosaic Journalism Workshop for Bay Area high school students, a two-week intensive course in journalism. Students in the program report and photograph stories under the guidance of professional journalists. Being thrown into a world pandemic during my freshman year at Santa Clara High School destroyed every ounce of confidence I had for scoring well on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. My main priority was safety – not studying for the single test that would determine my entire future. Though I had ignored studying for the exam, the lingering thought of failure kept creeping back inside of me. What if I’m the only one putting it off? What if I don’t go to a good college? I wish I could go back in time and let 14-year-old me know that she would be fine. I wish I could have told her that success doesn’t come from a standardized test score. However, there was a time when this was true. The SAT, a pencil-and-paper multiple choice exam covering various subjects within mathematics, reading and...
    An unhinged tenured Michigan professor who called his students 'vectors of disease' and warned them to 'keep your f**king distance' settled his free speech lawsuit against the university where he taught for $95,000 and agreed to retire. As part of the deal with Ferris State University, the irritated educator Barry Mehler agreed to a three-year gag order, according to a copy of the agreement obtained by the Associated Press. The professor will have to pay $60,000 if he publicly criticizes the college during that period.  The judge in the case denied his request to be reinstated. Dr. Barry Mehler, a tenured history professor at Ferris State University in Michigan, called his students 'vectors of disease' in a pre-semester video published on Sunday Ferris State (pictured) said Mehler has been placed on leave while his conduct is investigated, but Mehler's attorney now says the university violated his First Amendment rihts Mehler was suspended in January after he posted a 14-minute orientation video for his history class peppered with profanity and instructions about the syllabus, grades, plagiarism, classroom attendance and COVID-19 protocols. In...
    More On: angelina jolie Angelia Jolie’s lawyers tried to subpoena Brad Pitt at SAG Awards Brad Pitt ‘dating’ and ‘living his best life’ years after Angelina Jolie split Angelina Jolie wins battle against Brad Pitt in nasty war over French winery Angelina Jolie rocks out with daughter Shiloh at Måneskin concert in Rome Angelina Jolie’s 17-year-old daughter, Zahara, is set to start her freshman year at Spelman College in Atlanta. The actress, 47, posted an Instagram photo Sunday of “Zahara with her Spelman sisters.” The teenager was all smiles posing for the picture in a white tee and jeans. “Congratulations to all new students starting this year,” Jolie captioned the social media upload. “A very special place and an honor to have a family member as a new Spelman girl.” Spelman, which was founded in 1881, is a “historically black college and a global leader in the education of women of African descent,” according to the private school’s website. The actress shared an Instagram snap of Zahara with fellow Spelman students.angelinajolie/Instagram Jolie, who is also the mother of Maddox,...
    The Los Angeles District Attorney George Gascón has requested a the reversal of a 1994 death sentence of a 'mentally' ill man who killed two college students, calling the penalty 'racist and morally untenable.'  Raymond Oscar Butler, now 46, was 18 years old when he killed Marymount California University students Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura in a 1994 carjacking in San Pedro.  Gascón has now requested to overturn his capital punishment sentence in a 264-page filing earlier this month, according to the Whittier Daily News. The DA said the murderer suffered from 'significant cognitive impairment' during the time of the crime due to mental illness and trauma.  The motion stated that Butler's cognitive impairment caused him to abuse drugs and alcohol to numb his distress, the Whittier Daily News reported.  If the motion is granted, Butler's sentenced will be reduced to life without parole.  However, it does not reverse the separate death penalty Butler received for fatally stabbing another inmate in 2012.  In a video posted to his Twitter, Gascón - who is strongly against capital punishment - said that 'over 50...
    A public interest law professor at George Washington University condemned a 'cancel campaign' to remove Justice Clarence Thomas from the school, saying the protests likely fueled the conservative judge's decision to quit a lecturing role.  Professor Johnathan Turley, the school's public law chair, said it was unclear how much an online petition calling for the university to remove Thomas, which gained more than 11,000 signatures, influenced the justice. But he said 'the prospect of protests planned for the fall could not have helped in his decision making.'  The petition and backlash against Thomas comes in the wake of protests against conservative Supreme Court judges following the overturning of Roe v Wade in June.  Turley warned that Thomas' exit as a lecturer from the school sets a dangerous precedent on thinking differently in higher education.  'What is clear is that his departure is likely to fuel additional efforts to isolate and stigmatize those with opposing views,' Turley tweeted hours after Thomas quit.  'It is only the latest example of how dissenting viewpoints are being systematically eliminated in higher education.'  Professor Johnathan Turley...
    DCPS Persists started in 2020 and is modeled after smaller programs elsewhere around the country that aim to help graduating students who go on to college make it long enough to graduate and get their degrees. WTOP/John Domen Hundreds of students were dropping in at Bancroft Elementary in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood Wednesday to get free swag, some lunch and treats and other items at the first DCPS Persists send-off. WTOP/John Domen A program that’s been helping high school graduates of D.C. public schools since 2020 navigate the college application process, as well as the college experience, finally got to “send off” its students in person. WTOP/John Domen (1/3) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. A program that’s been helping high school graduates of D.C. public schools navigate the college application process since 2020, as well as the college experience, finally got to “send off” its students in person. Hundreds of students were dropping in at Bancroft Elementary in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood Wednesday to get free swag, some...
    WEST CHESTER, Pa. (CBS) – For the first time this week, high school students and graduates on the autism spectrum are finding out what it is like to live on a college campus. Research shows many students with autism struggle to find educational opportunities after high school, but West Chester University hopes to change that. All summer, the university is hosting overnight stays with high school students, as well as recent graduates. READ MORE: Central Bucks School District To Vote On Controversial Policy Change That Could Lead To Books BansThe students will stay in the dorms, explore campus and eat in the dining halls while learning problem-solving and self-determination skills. Rising high school senior Emi Keane is staying in the dorms this week. She says it has been an eye-opening experience. “I don’t know a lot of people, besides myself, in my school or in my area that have autism like me,” Keane said. “And now that I’m here, I realize that there are people out there like me and they have similar interests as me and they’re creative and...
    Whether its due to lowered enrollment or shifting to hybrid virtual and in-person classes, college tuition across the country is only slightly increasing for the 2022-23 school year. But that's small consolation after parents and strapped college students who feel they need the education to get a good job, saw tuition costs increase dramatically in years past.Choosing the right college for your education shouldn't cost you more than an arm and a leg, but sometimes college can break the bank.The Biden administration is trying to help students get their loans forgiven. The Education Department said in early March that it's continuing to identify borrowers eligible for student loan forgiveness in exchange for public service. This movement could wipe out debt for thousands of people - if it gets approved.RELATED: What to do with savings from federal student loan pauseAt the end of June, a group of federal student loan borrowers agreed to settle a class-action lawsuit they filed against the United States Education Department. If approved, the settlement will cancel $6 billion in federal loans for roughly 200,000 people who...
    NEW YORK (AP) — For the uninitiated, outfitting a college dorm room can be a dizzying experience. Doing it at a time of high inflation can make it even more daunting. The first step: Meticulously go over what the school allows and provides. If you want a microwave and minifridge, are the energy-saving combo models required? Do you need foam pool noodles to avoid hitting your head under an upper bunk, and if so, might the school provide them? Exactly how thick can a mattress topper be? “You can see the look of terror on parents’ faces,” said Marianne Szymanski, an independent product researcher who has sent two kids to college. “You know, did I get the right mattress pad? It’s crazy.” Etsy’s trend expert, Dayna Isom Johnson, said self-expression is top of mind for dorm-bound kids in such things as faux headboards and unique dresser knobs. “Two of my favorite dorm trends right now are mood-boosting hues that incorporate bright and energetic colors like neon tones, and heritage styles, a nostalgic trend that embodies the traditional collegiate look with...
    (CNN)Harry Styles inspires more questions than he does easy answers. Questions like: How does one make the leap from boy band stud to formidable solo artist, or successfully style sweater vests and high-waisted trousers? And what, exactly, is the true meaning of "watermelon sugar"? We may never get the answers from Styles himself. But a lucky group of Texas State University students will get to parse the particulars of the British pop star for a grade. Louie Dean Valencia, associate professor of digital history at Texas State, announced last week that he'll helm a spring 2023 class entitled "Harry Styles and the Cult of Celebrity: Identity, the Internet and European Pop Culture." Styles' legion of fans quickly took notice, prompting many to contemplate transferring to Texas.But this sojourn through Styles' career is no fluff-filled blow-off class. The course centers the ever-popular Brit in a wider discussion on the "cultural and political development of the modern celebrity as related to questions of gender and sexuality, race, class, nation and globalism, media, fashion, fan culture, internet culture and consumerism," according to a...
    Shelby Press and Amelia Carr are now both elementary school teachers in Fairfax County, Virginia. Courtesy Fairfax County Public Schools Fairfax County teacher Shelby Press receives an Outstanding New Elementary Teacher award. Courtesy Fairfax County Public Schools Amelia Carr was recognized as Outstanding Elementary New Teacher in 2021. Courtesy Fairfax County Public Schools Shelby Press works with students on July 14. WTOP/Scott Gelman Shelby Press works with students on July 14. WTOP/Scott Gelman (1/5) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. Amelia Carr first learned about Shelby Press while working at Top Golf the summer before starting college at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia. A co-worker who went to high school with Press suggested the two become friends. Carr and Press grew up a few miles from each other and went to rival Fairfax County high schools, and they crossed paths several times. Both were active in student government and played field hockey but hadn’t spoken much. More Virginia News More Fairfax County News More...
    Renting an apartment for the first time is an exciting step into adulthood but it's a big commitment financially so you want to make sure you do your homework and make a choice that's right for you — and your budget. First, you have to time it right when you're looking at apartments — you don't want to start too early or too late. If you're in college, you should start at least nine months in advance, since you're negotiating for next year. But if you have graduated from college and are looking for an apartment to move into soon, you should start looking about six weeks in advance of when you want to move in. However, it's never too early (or too late) to prepare yourself for renting your first apartment. You should be doing your research, figuring out what you can afford and start to save money for the move months in advance. Jimmy He, a junior at Northwestern University, started to search for his first place off-campus nine months in advance in order to move in this...
    From left) Lauretta Hannon, executive director of the GNTC Foundation; Jarrod S. Floyd, UCB senior vice president/commercial relationship manager; Scott Tucker, UCB northwest Georgia region president; and Dr. Heidi Popham, president of GNTC, announce the UCB Foundation’s donation to GNTC. The United Community Bank (UCB) Foundation is donating $2,500 to Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC). While the donation is the UCB Foundation’s first donation to GNTC, the local bank supports the GNTC Foundation each year from its local budget; this donation is being made “to improve the financial health of our community” and may be used as needed to assist students, said UCB northwest Georgia region President Scott Tucker, who also represents Floyd County on GNTC’s Board of Trustees. “United Community Bank has been a loyal supporter and partner of Georgia Northwestern Technical College,” said Dr. Heidi Popham, GNTC’s president. “We are especially grateful for this gift from the United Community Bank Foundation. This support will benefit students so that they can stay on track and complete their education.” These...
    VIDEO20:4320:43Student Loan Forgiveness and the Future of Paying for CollegeFinancial Advisor Events Beyond highlighting the overwhelming burden of student loan debt, the last few years of economic turmoil have also shed light on the sky-high cost of college. "Sometimes students feel the sense of 'My parents are going to make it work,'" said Jennifer Finetti, director of student advocacy at ScholarshipOwl. "I think a lot of students don't realize the financial reality: A lot of them can't." In fact, college has never been more costly than it is today. That's largely due to a convergence of factors including inflation's sudden impact on the tuition tab, rising interest rates on student loans and the market decline's effect on investments families were relying on to cover college bills.  Inflation drives college tuition prices higherDuring the pandemic, increases in tuition and fees largely held steady, according to a report by the College Board, which tracks trends in college pricing and student aid. For the 2021-22 academic year, average tuition and fees rose by just 1.3% to $3,800 for students at two-year schools; 1.6% for in-state...
    A TEEN boy suspected of driving a pickup truck in a crash that saw nine people killed was not behind the wheel, police have revealed. Six college students, who were part of the University of Southwest golf team, were among the fatalities following the horror smash in West Texas in March. 4A teen boy was not behind the wheel of a truck that left nine people dead in West TexasCredit: Fox 4Six college students were killed in the horror smashCredit: The University of the Southwest Ricky Siemens, 13, and his father Henrich, 38, were inside the Dodge 2500 truck and also died. Cops alleged that Ricky was behind the wheel and breaking the law. Texans must be 14 to start taking classroom courses for a learner’s license and they can receive a provisional license at 15 but they must drive alongside an instructor or licensed adult in the vehicle. But, DNA testing has revealed that Henrich was driving the truck, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. read more us newsHORROR SMASH College golf team bus crash kills...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A Community College of Philadelphia graduate is giving back to the college to say thank you, and to help a new generation of students. “I think you know we all have, in one way, shape or form, superpowers,” Gunter Pfau said. READ MORE: Police: Pedestrian, Parked Car Hit In West PhiladelphiaPfau says the Community College of Philadelphia helped him discover his superpower. Pfau is legally blind. He graduated from CCP in 2002, went on to Temple University and then founded a successful software company. He gives a lot of credit to CCP professors and the school’s center on disability. “It really did give me a level of confidence in my abilities that I didn’t have when I came in,” Pfau said. Wendy Kohler is now director of the college’s center on disability. READ MORE: Advocates For Abortion Rights Hold Rally Outside Federalist Society Meeting In Center City“We want to make sure that students with disabilities, that they’re able to access all the information services and programs that the college offers,” Kohler said, “pretty much with the same...
    CHICO – A recent report conducted by the Institute for College Access and Success found that Chico State students accrue the lowest amount of federal debt upon graduation among all public four-year colleges and universities in California. According to the report, college students pursuing bachelor’s degrees at public and nonprofit colleges as of 2020 amass an average of $18,350 to $39,950 in student loan debt by their graduation. The report also found that the likelihood of new graduates having student loan debt ranged from 39% to 73% on average. Jerry Ross, Chico State’s associate vice president of enrollment management, said that this news was a testament to the work the university has put in over the years to help students navigate the higher education system. “We try to make sure they’re savvy consumers when it comes to understanding what goes into student loans,” said Ross. “We help them find creative solutions with state and federal grants wherever possible and also scholarships to help them avoid taking out student loan debt whenever possible.” Sameer Gadkaree, the institute’s president, said in the...
    When Meera Varma was in high school, she felt like a black cloud followed her everywhere she went. Her struggles with mental health were difficult to explain to family members in their mother tongue, Hindi. Although they were supportive, she needed professional help. She found it in her school counselors, whom she saw almost daily as a senior. After suffering frequent panic attacks in class, she started advocating at school district meetings for mental health services to be made a priority. “I felt really isolated, and I didn’t want anyone to ever feel like I did,” Varma, 21, said. Varma continued that activism after enrolling at UCLA, where she joined Active Minds, an organization whose mission is to change the conversation on mental health among college students. In recent years, that conversation has grown louder. The two years of the COVID-19 pandemic have touched nearly everyone’s lives in some way, but members of Gen Z have been hit particularly hard. Loss of normalcy and routine during a time of immense development has contributed to increasing rates of mental...
    Share this: To graduate with a science major, college students must complete between 40 and 60 credit hours of science coursework. That means spending around 2,500 hours in the classroom throughout their undergraduate career. However, research has shown that despite all that effort, most college science courses give students only a fragmented understanding of fundamental scientific concepts. The teaching method reinforces memorization of isolated facts, proceeding from one textbook chapter to the next without necessarily making connections between them, instead of learning how to use the information and connect those facts meaningfully. The ability to make these connections is important beyond the classroom as well, because it’s the basis of science literacy: the ability to use scientific knowledge to accurately evaluate information and make decisions based on evidence.
    Grade requirements are responsible for “disproportionately” pushing “students of color” out of STEM disciplines as well as finance and economics fields, according to a recent Salon piece that warned such policies contribute to “persistent racial wage gaps” long after graduation. Salon cites those who suggest adopting a “holistic admissions process” that would “consider not just a student’s GPA but their experiences, their campus involvement, the arc of their academic growth, and other intangibles.” The Sunday essay — titled “In economics, grade restrictions weed out students of color” and penned by Ashley Smart, associate director of MIT’s Knight Science Journalism program — bears the subheading, “GPA requirements push Black and Hispanic students out of STEM majors — and may widen the wage gap later on.” The piece, originally published last month in the science-themed Undark digital magazine where Smart is a senior editor, begins by discussing the many college campuses that were “still coming to grips with the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer” in the summer of 2020, which led to “students of color” at the University of...
    Oberlin College is facing $4 million in interest charges after refusing to pay $33 million in court-ordered defamation damages to a mom-and-pop bakery that it slandered as racist. Gibson’s Bakery is reportedly struggling to survive after Oberlin College students and dean of students Meredith Raimondo falsely accused the business of racism. Oberlin President Carmen Twillie Ambar (Oberlin College/YouTube) Gibsons Bakery on the Oberlin campus (Dake Kang/AP) Moreover, students are continuing to boycott the 137 year-old bakery, despite the allegations being proven false. To make matters worse, the woke Ohio college is not paying its court-ordered damage to Gibson’s Bakery. Now, Oberlin College faces paying $4 million in interest on top of what the school already owes, according to a report by Daily Mail. Earlier this year, three judges on the Ninth District Court of Appeals issued a 3-0 decision upholding the 2019 ruling in the case. The award is the largest defamation verdict in Ohio history. Oberlin College was ordered to pay Gibson’s Bakery $33 million for defamation damages in 2019 after Raimondo — now an ex-dean — orchestrated a woke mob into slandering the...
    Some high school students are reconsidering their top college choice based on the abortion laws of the state in which a university is located following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Kristen Willmott, a counselor with Top Tier Admissions in Massachusetts, told Reuters some high school students have removed Texas, Florida, and Tennessee from their top state choices due to their restrictive abortion laws. The CEO of Prepory, a college counseling company in Florida, also noted a priority shift in future college students. COLLEGES OFFER STUDENTS COUNSELING TO 'COPE' WITH ROE V. WADE REVERSAL "Some of our students have explicitly stated that they will not apply to colleges and universities in states which may infringe on their access to reproductive rights," said Daniel Santos, the CEO of Prepory. Some students have even removed their top school choice or their parents' alma maters from their lists of consideration. Maryland high school senior Alexis Prisco said she had planned to apply to Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, the same school both of her parents...
    A woke Ohio college now faces paying $4 million in interest on top of $36 million in damages to a family-run bakery it almost destroyed with false racism allegations. Oberlin College was last month told it must pay the additional fee - equivalent to around $4,000-a-day for each of the 1,000 days it has refused to pony up - to Gibson's Bakery, The Chronicle reported.  Oberlin College led by one of its disgraced ex-deans, Meredith Raimondo, lied that the bakery's staff had racially-profiled three black students in 2016, despite the trio later admitting shoplifting.  That sparked a boycott and protests - led by a bullhorn-waving Raimondo - that almost destroyed Gibson's, who successfully won a defamation payout in 2019.  But Oberlin has refused to pay up, and asked for another stay in paying the Gibsons what they're owed because of a pending appeal against the ruling against them. That appeal is set to be heard by the Ohio Supreme Court, after two lower courts rejected Oberlin's attempts to slither out of paying the Gibsons.  Lawyers for the Gibson family say...
    A proposed bill in New Jersey would require college students and staff at higher education institutions to receive the coronavirus vaccine. Proposed by Democratic Assemblyman Herb Conaway Jr. and co-sponsored by Democratic Assemblyman Ralph Caputo, Bill A4334 would essentially require that all in-person students and staff be fully vaccinated while exempting only those who would work virtually. “If the bill becomes law, it would go into effect in the 2022-2023 school year,” noted News12. The bill will now be reviewed by the Assembly Health Committee and will have to pass the state Senate before it becomes law. A similar bill in the New Jersey Senate has not yet received a vote. Colleges and universities have adopted their own vaccination policies without government mandates up until now. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, no other state in the union has required coronavirus vaccinations for students in higher education: State systems of higher education can also require proof of immunization against other diseases commonly covered by routine childhood vaccinations like measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. Some states allow for certain exemptions such as medical, religious or personal...
    A LOCKDOWN is taking place at the Colorado campus of Pasadena City College. The lockdown is due to "police activity," the college said. 1A lockdown is reportedly taking place at Pasadena City CollegeCredit: Pasadena City College "Lock doors and shelter in place until further notice," Pasadena City College said on Twitter. It is unclear what the active threat is at this time. Pasadena City College said they would share more updates as they come available. The Colorado campus is located in the center of Pasadena. More to follow...For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The-sun.com is your go-to destination for the best celebrity news, sports news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures and must-see video. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheUSSun.
    Betsy DeVos served as the 11th U.S. secretary of education. The following is an adaptation from her new book, 'Hostages No More: The Fight for Education Freedom and the Future of the American Child.' A young, African-American man's eyes brimmed with tears as he told us his story during a listening session that I conducted as Secretary of Education to learn more about what was truly transpiring on America's campuses. His name was Joseph. He is a Navy veteran and had been a student at Savannah State University (SSU), who was just three weeks away from becoming the first person in his family to graduate from college. He woke up one morning in 2013 to find an email from the Office of Student Affairs. Joseph recalled the email in his own words: "'You are hereby summarily suspended and if you step foot on campus, you get the threat of expulsion and arrest.'" The email was followed by a campus-wide alert with Joseph's picture, urging anyone who saw him on campus to report it to campus security. Joseph had no idea...
    MADISON, Ala. (AP) — A federal judge has approved an agreement to settle a long-running desegregation case with a north Alabama school system, prosecutors said Wednesday. The school system agreed to take steps to ensure equal educational opportunities for Black students, including participation in gifted programs and college prep classes, officials said in a U.S. Department of Justice statement announcing the settlement with the Madison County School Board. “It is long past time to deliver on the promises of Brown v. Board of Education for our nation’s students,” Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke said in the statement. The majority-white school system agreed to take steps to: ensure a uniform process for identifying students for gifted services and make all parents are aware of the program; identify students who could succeed in Advanced Placement classes and other college prep programs and encourage them to enroll; ensure non-discrimination in student discipline; and recruit more Black faculty members and school administrators. Rachel Ballard, the director of equity and innovation for Madison County schools, told reporters Wednesday the school system has already...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- In this episode of Tiempo, we highlight a free summer academic program that is helping Latino students prepare for college.Educators at Montclair State University in New Jersey created the 'Hispanic Student College Institute.'They've been featured on 'Tiempo' before, but the coronavirus pandemic prompted some changes to the program.Co-founder Katia Paz Goldfarb details the deadline to apply and what to expect from the program this time around.On this episode, we also talk to folks at the organization Pa'Lante Harlem Inc.Their mission is to empower New York City tenants and hold negligent landlords and property managers accountable for unsafe living conditions.Elsia Vasquez walked us through some of the programs and resources they have available to New York City tenants.WATCH Tiempo on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.MORE: Watch more episodes of Tiempo here!Tiempo airs Sunday mornings at 11:30 a.m. on Channel 7.
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The end of Roe v Wade and a federally-guaranteed right to an abortion is stirring up confusion and fear in college students and those applying to college.Many students are now reconsidering their choices and where they want to spend the next four years of their lives, given the new landscape.RELATED: Roe v. Wade decision can disproportionately impact Black, Latinx women, data showsIn college discussions forums such as College Confidential and Reddit, students are discussing how universities are responding to the Dobbs ruling, and whether they want to attend schools located in states that are moving to ban abortion rights.Questions raised include what if they face an unwanted pregnancy? Will they have to travel out of state to get an abortion? Will their university offer support or assistance? Will their campus health center tell them about contraception and abortion options? Will the college fight for their reproductive privacy against prosecutors enforcing new state laws criminalizing abortion?RELATED: These US companies will cover travel costs for employees who need an abortionABC7 News recently sought out expert advice to help...
    Sdi Productions | E+ | Getty Images The student loan crisis has made it clear that many borrowers have gotten in over their heads, said Sheila Bair, who has served as both a bank regulator and college president. She blames the lack of transparency and confusion around this category of loan. About 44 million Americans owe a combined $1.7 trillion in student loan debt. Roughly a quarter are estimated to be in default or delinquency. "We have a lot of students that have taken out unsustainable debt levels," said Bair, who was chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation during the 2008 financial crisis. She later served as president of Washington College, based in Chestertown, Maryland. More from Invest in You:New college grads underestimate starting salaries by $10,000Millions of students leave college with debt but no degree. Here's whyStudent loan forgiveness could help narrow the racial wealth gap, say advocatesDebt impact 'is not readily apparent' to young borrowersAs college tuition has increased, so has the average loan balance, which has tripled since the 1990s, to $30,000 from $10,000. Some 7%...
    (CNN)The University of Arizona announced this week that it will soon waive tuition and fees for undergraduate students enrolled in one of the state's 22 federally recognized tribes.The program, known as the Arizona Native Scholars Grant, will be open to current and incoming Native American students starting this fall, according to a university news release. More than 400 students enrolled last year are eligible for the initiative, the university said."Serving Arizona's Native American tribes and tribal students is a crucial part of the University of Arizona's land-grant mission, and the Arizona Native Scholars Grant program is another important step among many to do that," university President Robert C. Robbins said in a statement. "I am so proud that that this university has found a way to help hundreds of students more easily access and complete a college education, and I look forward to finding ways to take these efforts even further."University of Arizona is one of several state colleges and universities to announce it would cover tuition and fees for Native American students, with institutions in California, Colorado, Michigan and...
    by Reagan Reese   U.S. college enrollment dropped by nearly 1.3 million students in the past two years, according to a National Student Clearinghouse Research Center report. Post-secondary enrollment declined 4.1% in spring 2022 for a total of 7.4% in the last two years, Clearinghouse’s report found. Undergraduate enrollment is responsible for most of the decline, down 9.4% before the pandemic. Public universities lost more than 604,000 students in spring 2022, with community colleges experiencing the greatest drop, the report showed. Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Utah and West Virginia were states that saw an increase in enrollment in spring 2022 — in part due to the states’ robust number of online universities, the report found. Enrollment fell 3.2% since spring 2021 for students ages 18 through 24, according to the report. In 2020, enrollment from college-aged students was down 5%. Both computer science and psychology majors for undergraduates saw increased enrollment, while other disciplines either stagnated or declined. The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center did not immediately respond to The Daily Caller News Foundation’s request for comment. – – – Reagan Reese is a reporter at...
    A group of activists have gifted former students of a now-defunct for-profit collegiate institution with the gift of a lifetime: full payment of their student loan debt. On Friday, June 24, the Debt Collective —a debtor's union advocating for all forms of debt to be abolished— announced that its subsidiary organization had wiped approximately $16 million in student loan debt. According to Business Insider, Rolling Jubilee Fund has purchased and canceled that debt for more than 7,000 former college students that matriculated at Vista College, a for-profit school that declared bankruptcy before shutting down last year. In its letter to the students, the group announced that it bought and canceled the private student loan debt. Who would you vote for in 2024, Biden or DeSantis? Vote now. "We bought the private student loan listed above and canceled it," the group wrote in its letter to the students whom they canceled the debt for. "You no longer owe the balance of this debt. You do not need to pay us, nor should you pay anyone else for this debt—it...
    The Biden administration has agreed to cancel $6 billion in student loans for about 200,000 former students who say they were defrauded by their colleges, according to a proposed settlement in a Trump-era lawsuit.The agreement filed Wednesday in San Francisco federal court would automatically cancel federal student debt for students who were enrolled at one of more than 150 colleges and later applied for debt cancellation because of alleged misconduct by the schools.Almost all the schools involved are for-profit colleges. The list includes DeVry University, the University of Phoenix and other chains still in operation, along with many that have folded in recent years, including ITT Technical Institute.Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said in a statement that the settlement would resolve the claims "in a manner that is fair and equitable for all parties."The deal has yet to be approved by a federal judge. A hearing on the proposal is scheduled for July 28.If approved, it would mark a major step in the Biden administration's efforts to clear a backlog of claims filed through the borrower defense program, which allows students...
    The Biden administration has agreed to cancel $6 billion in student loans for about 200,000 former students who say they were defrauded by their colleges, according to a proposed settlement in a Trump-era lawsuit. The agreement filed Wednesday in San Francisco federal court would automatically cancel federal student debt for students who were enrolled at one of more than 150 colleges and later applied for debt cancellation because of alleged misconduct by the schools. Almost all the schools involved are for-profit colleges. The list includes DeVry University, the University of Phoenix and other chains still in operation, along with many that have folded in recent years, including ITT Technical Institute. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said in a statement that the settlement would resolve the claims “in a manner that is fair and equitable for all parties.” The deal has yet to be approved by a federal judge. A hearing on the proposal is scheduled for July 28. If approved, it would mark a major step in the Biden administration’s efforts to clear a backlog of claims filed through the borrower...
    Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville, Georgia, will pay $800,000 to settle a free speech lawsuit filed by a Christian student it had censored, according to Alliance Defending Freedom. Georgia Gwinnett College is now paying the price after campus police stopped Christian student Chike Uzuegbunam from speaking about his faith or distributing Christian literature on campus in 2016, Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) announced on Wednesday. A convert to Christianity, Chike Uzuegbunam was peacefully sharing the gospel with fellow students on Georgia Gwinnett College campus in 2016 when campus police stopped him and told him he needed to make an advance reservation to speak in one of two tiny campus “speech zones” that were only open a few hours a week. (Screenshot) College officials had repeatedly stopped Uzuegbunam from peacefully sharing his Christian faith with his fellow students on campus, and told the student that he needed to make an advance reservation to speak in one of two tiny campus “speech zones” that were only open a few hours per week. A second Christian student, Joseph Bradford, decided not to speak about religion because of what happened to Uzuegbunam. Both Uzuegbunam...
    Editor’s note: This story was produced for Mosaic Vision, a pilot project of the Mosaic Journalism Workshop for Bay Area high school students. Students in the program report and photograph stories under the guidance of professional journalists. With the University of California reporting a record-breaking number of applications for the next school year, many high school students, including rising seniors, are facing the reality that they may have an even smaller chance of getting accepted into their “dream schools” than did students in previous years. Facing hard choices, some are considering different routes to a four-year university, following the advice of college admission officials who suggest students consider less direct or non-traditional paths to a four-year university, including transferring from a community college or looking at different types of schools. Last year, freshman applications to UC systemwide rose a dramatic 16.8% over 2020. As college admissions change, so do students’ strategies. Some are happy with the options presented to them, but others remain dissatisfied. Abby Jones, executive director of admissions at UC Berkeley, credits the UC system becoming “test free,”...
    VIDEO2:3902:39Here are the options for college savings in a volatile marketSquawk Box Beyond highlighting the sky-high cost of college, the pandemic has also shed light on the overwhelming burden of student loan debt. Average college tuition and fees edged higher again in the 2021-2022 academic year, reaching $10,740 for in-state students at four-year public schools, according to the College Board, which tracks trends in college pricing and student aid. Tuition and fees at four-year private institutions hit $38,070. Next year, some colleges said they will hike tuition even more, citing inflation and other pressures. More from Invest in You:Student loan forgiveness could narrow racial wealth gapDo this with 529 college savings plan if student debt's forgivenHere's how to get the most money towards college Most students borrow to cover at least some of the cost. As a result, more than 40 million Americans now owe a collective $1.7 trillion in student debt, a balance that has tripled since the Great Recession. Still, many believe that getting a degree is worth it. Studies show that college graduates will earn nearly $1 million more over the course of their careers. However, there are...
    Once Tina Sloan Green took over the lacrosse program at Temple University in the years after the passage of Title IX, the landmark gender-equity law, she never stopped thinking about the girls who weren’t playing. At practices during the 1970s, Sloan Green, the first Black woman to coach a college lacrosse team, noticed neighborhood kids peering through the fences at her players as guards kept them out. And when high school athletes were welcomed on the university’s fields for training camps, most were white and from predominantly white suburban schools. “That was very, very disturbing to me to see that,” she said. “And that was — that was the reality that I had to face … Title IX was a complete help for women in sports but in my mind, there were still disparities.” For girls of color, some women’s college sports, such as lacrosse, equestrian, rowing or even softball, are ones they are unlikely to be exposed to in grade school. The reasons vary, though availability and costs can be major challenges for youth programs. Thursday is...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — New Flyers head coach John Tortorella is wasting no time contributing to the Philadelphia community. Tortorella and Flyers Charities presented five high school and college-aged students battling cancer with $5,000 college scholarships on Tuesday. The students were winners of the 2022 Michael’s Way Scholarship. The scholarships will support the students’ education for the 2022-23 school year. READ MORE: Civil Jury Finds Bill Cosby Sexually Abused Judy Huth When She Was 16 At Playboy Mansion In 1975“It was an honor to be involved with this announcement and be a small part of these students’ courageous journeys,” Tortorella said. “I along with the entire Flyers organization are so inspired by each one of them and couldn’t be prouder of all they have accomplished.” READ MORE: Wildfire In Wharton State Forest In South Jersey Burns At Least 13,500 Acres, Forces Several ClosuresMichael’s Way’s mission is “to improve the lives of children with pediatric cancer and to support their parents struggling under the financial strain of such a devastating diagnosis,” according to the nonprofit’s website. MORE NEWS: Republic Of Philippines Officials...
    With final exams in the rear-view mirror, the Miami Marlins are giving college students a much-need break with the return of their student passes gameday offer. Over the summer break, the Marlins will be hosting division rivals Atlanta, New York Mets and Philadelphia as well as some of the best teams in the major leagues in the Los Angeles Dodgers, San Diego and Tampa Bay. During the week, college students can enjoy games for $5, and weekend games are $8. Individuals can sign up for the student pass by registering at mlb.com/marlins/fans/student-pass. ()
    Georgia Northwestern Technical College’s (GNTC) Office of Adult Education held its 2022 Commencement Ceremony on Thursday, June 16, for students who have earned their General Educational Development® (GED®) diplomas. The ceremony was held at the Conference Center on GNTC’s Gordon County Campus in Calhoun to accommodate students and families from all nine counties of GNTC’s service area. The evening began with a welcome and introductions by Lisa Shaw, vice president of Adult Education at GNTC, followed by opening remarks by Dr. Heidi Popham, GNTC president. “Dreams don’t happen unless you work for them,” said Regina Casteel, GNTC Adult Education career specialist, during her special remarks. She encouraged graduates to dream, set goals and work on a plan to make that dream become a reality. Listed are the graduates who participated in the 2021-22 GED® Commencement Ceremony. This list does not include students that have graduated, but did not participate in the ceremony, or students that registered for the ceremony after the GED® commencement program was printed: Marty Ashley, Ashley Bell,...
    by Kerry McDonald   The past two years have been marked by major education disruption at the K-12 level, as more families questioned the schooling status quo during prolonged school closures and remote learning. They left district schools in droves, choosing instead to become independent homeschoolers, join learning pods and microschools, or find high-quality virtual learning platforms. Public school enrollment plummeted during the 2021/2021 academic year, and continued its decline this academic year in many areas, despite the fact that schools reopened for full-time, in-person learning. Higher education is seeing a similar trend. College enrollment dropped in the 2020/2021 school year as many colleges and universities turned to remote learning, and it has also not rebounded. In fact, The New York Times recently reported that the college enrollment decline may indeed be worsening this year. According to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, undergraduate enrollment this spring is down 662,000 students compared to last year, or a drop of 4.7 percent. Graduate school enrollment also declined this year compared to last year. “Prospective college students may be weighing the relative value of jobs that require...
    California Community Colleges Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley, a champion of equity and access for underserved students, announced Thursday that he is stepping down from the helm of the nation’s largest two-year public college system amid rising academic achievement but declining enrollment. Oakley, the son of a Mexican immigrant who rose to become the first Latino chancellor of the 116-campus community college system nearly six years ago, will become president and CEO of College Futures Foundation, an Oakland-based nonprofit focused on college success for the state’s diverse students. Oakley, who also serves as a University of California Board of Regents member, has been a force to reduce barriers to college access, including eliminating the SAT and ACT as admission requirements and better supporting students aiming to transfer to UC and other four-year universities. He said he would continue that work at the foundation in a role that would allow him to work with all colleges and universities, along with Gov. Gavin Newsom and the Legislature. “The College Futures Foundation is the loudest voice in California on improving access to...