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    A group of House GOP members has introduced legislation that would give pharmacists the power to refuse to provide abortion-inducing drugs, undermining recent guidance from the Biden administration warning that pharmacists who do not provide the medications could face legal and financial penalties. The Pharmacist Conscience Protection Act, introduced by Reps. Buddy Carter (R-GA), Diana Harshbarger (R-TN), and Blake Moore (R-UT), aims to protect healthcare providers from any repercussions or consequences if they decide not to fill a prescription or make a referral for a drug to terminate a pregnancy. SENATORS PRESS BIDEN ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS ON MONKEYPOX RESPONSE MISSTEPS "Your First Amendment rights don’t go away when you put on a white coat," said Rep. Buddy Carter. "This legislation will ensure that pharmacists are able to make the medical decisions that are best for the health of the mother, the life of the child, and the integrity of their practice without threats from non-medically trained bureaucrats. Medical decisions should be made between doctors, pharmacists, and patients — not the federal government.” The Department of Health and...
    A mother who survived the Highland Park mass shooting confronted Republican Senator Lindsey Graham on Tuesday at a press conference where he unveiled legislation to ban abortion after 15 weeks. The woman - Ashbey Beasley, who said she had an abortion at 16 weeks - told reporters afterwards that she 'crashed' the media event while at the US Capitol to lobby GOP Senators Pat Toomey and Mike Braun on gun control. Graham's bill provides exceptions for abortions after 15 weeks when the pregnancy threatens the life of the mother and for rape - though the rape victim must have sought medical treatment and counseling for the trauma at least 48 hours prior to her abortion. At one point the South Carolina senator tore into Democrats' own bill meant to safeguard abortion access, claiming its lax legal window puts the US on par with countries like Syria and Iran. 'Democrats wanted a national standard, and their standard was basically abortion up to the time of birth - putting you in the Iran, Syria club,' Graham said. He also called Democrats' proposal,...
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. Alameda County and the cities of Livermore and Pleasanton in 1993 set out to protect and rejuvenate the South Livermore Valley as a premium wine-producing area and tourist destination. By creating incentives for investment in vineyards, the goal was to preserve the area’s unique rural, scenic and historic qualities while providing a barrier against unfettered suburban sprawl. But the industry has struggled to achieve its full potential, while the need to guard against environmentally destructive development far from job centers is greater than ever. Three decades ago, the plan called for a 5,000-acre target of agricultural acreage. Thus far, it has yet to achieve 60% of that target, according to a county-commissioned environmental report. Two measures on the Nov. 8 ballot — Measure P in Livermore and Measure D countywide — would give the plan and the wine industry a boost. Voters should support both. Livermore Measure P Measure P would allow Livermore to extend sewer lines so property owners south of the city limits could switch away from...
    State leaders are pushing back against a November ballot measure that would allow San Bernardino County to explore secession from California. State Sen. Connie Leyva (D-Chino), Assembly Majority Leader Eloise Gómez Reyes (D-Colton) and Assemblymember Freddie Rodriguez (D-Pomona) expressed their “shock” and disappointment in a letter to the board this week after supervisors gave their final vote to place the measure on the ballot. The measure would allow the county to assess ways to get its “fair share of state funding,” including potentially seceding from California. The legislators wrote that they were “shocked with the reasoning behind this initiative, concerned about the cost to taxpayers to essentially ask local officials to do their jobs, and disappointed in the narrative being created regarding our community. “Your action today to put this question, with unclear outcomes, on the ballot for San Bernardino County voters begs the question of why are we spending public resources to put this before voters in the first place?” they wrote. “Public resources, including staff time being paid for with taxpayer dollars, are being used...
    Oakland and San Francisco soon could become two of the first cities in the country to pursue an audacious strategy to control drug overdoses — safe injection sites where users can shoot up in a protected setting. Senate Bill 57, passed by the state legislature this month, would allow the two Bay Area cities and Los Angeles to open the experimental facilities where users can consume illicit drugs supervised by people trained to reverse an overdose. Users would bring their own drugs but would be provided with clean supplies, such as needles. Oakland and San Francisco already have free needle-exchange programs, and San Francisco offers a sobering center where drug users can safely ride out a high, but SB 57 would take those measures a step further. The injection pilot program would last until 2028. There are about 165 safe-injection sites operating in 10 countries around the world, and New York City opened the first two in the U.S. last year. Advocates say the facilities will save lives, while opponents worry they’ll become a blight on whatever neighborhood is unlucky...
    Ted Cruz has blasted President Joe Biden's refusal to ease the Covid-19 entry restrictions on non-US citizens that see unvaccinated tennis champion, Novak Djokovic, barred from competing in this year's US Open. Speaking exclusively to DailyMail.com Senator Cruz waded into the mounting controversy with the blunt demand, 'Let Novak Djokovic play.' Cruz, 51, is one of several high-profile Republicans to put the President on blast for continuing the restrictions that prevent unvaccinated non-US citizens from entering the country. Speaking to DailyMail.com, the cohort have branded the ban, 'absurd' and accused Biden of 'pushing for a forever pandemic' in a bid to control the lives of Americans. Their comments come as the White House confirms Biden, 79, has contracted Covid himself and is experiencing mild symptoms. They also come after the United States Tennis Association (USTA) confirmed its stance that, while it does not have specific vaccine requirements, it will 'respect the US government's position regarding travel in the country for unvaccinated non-US citizens.' Senator Ted Cruz, 51, is one of several Republicans to blast Joe Biden for continuing...
    Based on a simple reading, Proposition 1 would seem to push California abortion law far left by allowing pregnancy termination right up until birth. Could that be correct? No, that’s a false read, according to the legislation’s author and two law professors. The measure on the November ballot merely cements into the state Constitution current law, they say. But the language sure doesn’t read that way to most voters, I suspect. At least to those of us who aren’t lawyers. It says the state cannot restrict abortion — any abortion — period. Read for yourself: “The state shall not deny or interfere with an individual’s reproductive freedom in their most intimate decisions, which includes their fundamental right to choose to have an abortion and their fundamental right to choose or refuse contraceptives.” Another sentence states that the measure is “intended to further the constitutional right to privacy …and the constitutional right to not be denied equal protection.” Both have been interpreted to protect abortion rights. The first sentence seems to be legalese for guaranteeing unrestricted late-term abortions. Current law states...
    SACRAMENTO —  Based on a simple reading, Proposition 1 would seem to push California abortion law far left by allowing pregnancy termination right up until birth. Could that be correct? No, that’s a false read, according to the legislation’s author and two law professors. The measure on the November ballot merely cements into the state Constitution current law, they say. But the language sure doesn’t read that way to most voters, I suspect. At least to those of us who aren’t lawyers. It says the state cannot restrict abortion — any abortion — period. Read for yourself: “The state shall not deny or interfere with an individual’s reproductive freedom in their most intimate decisions, which includes their fundamental right to choose to have an abortion and their fundamental right to choose or refuse contraceptives.” Another sentence states that the measure is “intended to further the constitutional right to privacy …and the constitutional right to not be denied equal protection.” Both have been interpreted to protect abortion rights. The first sentence seems to be legalese for guaranteeing unrestricted late-term abortions. Current...
    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Biden administration on Friday proposed up to 10 oil and gas lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico and one off the Alaska coast over the next five years, scaling back a Trump-era plan that called for dozens of offshore drilling opportunities, including in undeveloped areas. Administration officials said fewer lease sales — or even no lease sales at all — could occur, with a final decision not due for months. The Interior Department had suspended lease sales in late January because of climate concerns but was forced to resume them by a U.S. District Judge in Louisiana. The Biden administration cited conflicting court rulings about that decision when it canceled the last three lease sales of the previous offshore leasing cycle. That prior five-year cycle, a program adopted under former President Barack Obama, expired on Thursday. There will be a months-long gap before a new plan can be put in place. The oil industry says the delay could cause problems and potentially lead to decreased oil production if sales are significantly delayed. But...
    Republican lawmakers introduced a bill Wednesday which would allow adults to sue doctors who performed sex-change procedures on them as minors. The legislation, titled Protecting Minors from Medical Malpractice Act, was created in response to the Biden administration’s promotion of puberty blockers, cross-sex hormones, and sex-change surgeries for minors who believe they are the opposite sex. Republican Study Committee (RSC) Chairman Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN) and Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-CA) are cosponsoring the legislation, and Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) is leading a Senate version of the bill.  Lawmakers say the legislation is meant to help individuals who suffer from potentially sterilizing sex-transition procedures as minors “seek justice in court.”  If there’s one thing you read today it should be this. Heartbreaking. pic.twitter.com/6wyj37JRtw — Kyle Kashuv (@KyleKashuv) June 5, 2022 Banks said in a statement: The Biden administration released official guidance recommending irreversible and life-altering surgery for minors too young to apply for a learner’s permit. These procedures lack any solid evidence and have been rejected by public health agencies around the world. Ten years from now, there will be hundreds...
    The new rules proposed by international soccer’s governing body, FIFA, are looking to erase testosterone requirements and allow trans female athletes to play against natural-born women just by “self-identifying.” Taking the exact opposite track as the ruling announced last weekend by swimming’s governing body where trans athletes will find more restrictions to participation, soccer looks to be ready to throw out all restrictions and allow any trans athlete to play just because they claim to be a woman, the Daily Mail reported. FIFA’s proposed rules change is only in the early stages of consideration and still must go through a debate session. Still, if adopted, the rules would throw the door wide for all transgender participants without any restrictions. The organization’s current rules require trans women athletes to have a testosterone level of five nanomoles per liter. In addition, they must have undergone testosterone suppression for 12 months before joining the league to compete as a woman. But the new rule would throw out all such restrictions. The Mail notes that some sports officials are shocked by FIFA’s proposal. For...
    Civil rights groups and Democrats in the Keystone State have said the bill could lead to 'an increased risk of voter intimidation.' The Republican-controlled Pennsylvania Senate passed a bill Monday that would empower poll watchers across the state. The bill, S.B. 573, is sponsored by Republican gubernatorial nominee state Sen. Doug Mastriano. It would increase the fines and criminal penalties for interfering with a poll watcher, mandate that poll watchers be able to stand "six feet or less" from election officials performing their duties, allow poll watchers inside the polling place to observe ballot counting, increase the number of poll watchers each candidate may appoint per precinct, and remove the county residency requirement for poll watchers. The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania previously urged lawmakers to vote against an earlier version of the bill, which they said "needlessly invites opportunities for confrontation, unfounded challenges to voters' eligibility by out-of-county watchers, and, in some cases, an increased risk of voter intimidation." The Pennsylvania bill is part of a broader national effort. In the wake of their failed attempt to overturn...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KABC) -- The third time could be the charm in the fight to keep California's bars, clubs, and restaurants open later.State Senator Scott Wiener of San Francisco announced a bill over the weekend that would allow the sale of alcohol from 2 a.m. to 4 a.m.He's been trying to change the law for years.Wiener says extending nightlife could have a major impact on tourism, small businesses and local economies. ???? It’s Friday so time to announce something FUN, like extending nightlife to 4 am!Specifically, I’m partnering with @MattHaneySF on new legislation (Senate Bill 930) to allow, but not require, 7 pilot cities to extend to 4 am alcohol service at bars, restaurants & nightclubs.— Senator Scott Wiener (@Scott_Wiener) June 3, 2022"No, it won't lead to mischief & mayhem. But it will lead to better, more diverse & more interesting nightlife in the cities that decide to participate," Wiener said. "It will also help the nightlife sector, which has been battered by the pandemic."Seven cities including West Hollywood have asked to be part of a five-year pilot program.The other...
    A person walks down the sidewalk near the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C., February 16, 2022.Jon Cherry | Reuters The Supreme Court blocked a controversial Texas' social media law, which the tech industry cautioned would allow for hateful content to run rampant online, from taking effect in a decision released on Tuesday. The law, HB20, prohibits online platforms from moderating or removing content based on viewpoint. It stems from a common charge on the right that major California-based social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are biased in their moderation strategies and disproportionately quiet conservative voices. The platforms have said they apply their community guidelines evenly and it's often the case that right-leaning users rank among the highest in engagement. "HB20 would compel platforms to disseminate all sorts of objectionable viewpoints," two industry groups that represent companies including Amazon, Facebook, Google and Twitter claimed in their emergency application with the court, "such as Russia's propaganda claiming that its invasion of Ukraine is justified, ISIS propaganda claiming that extremism is warranted, neo-Nazi or KKK screeds denying or supporting the Holocaust,...
    The man at the gun show lifted a 2.2 pound rifle and pulled back the stock with an audible “chock,” presenting it to the YouTube segment’s host. “When we set out to produce a small firearm for children in an AR-looking package, we were pretty sure we needed to have a ‘wow factor’ in the safety area,” Eric Schmid, owner of Wee 1 Tactical, said in a video uploaded in January. What Utah-based Wee 1 Tactical produced was a smaller model of the AR-15, called the JR-15. Schmid was in Las Vegas in January to promote the smaller weapon, which the company pledges will look and feel “just like Mom and Dad’s gun.” Schmid demonstrated a safety pin intended to keep the weapon’s trigger locked. He and the host noted that it would likely prevent small children from operating a firearm without their parents present. “It takes a lot of tension to be able to pull that out,” said host Barret Kendrick. “Your 12-year-olds are gonna unlock it really quickly,” Schmid replied. A bill that passed out of the Assembly...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California could soon hold social media companies responsible for harming children who have become addicted to their products, permitting parents to sue platforms like Instagram and TikTok for up to $25,000 per violation under a bill that passed the state Assembly on Monday. The bill defines “addiction” as kids under 18 who are both harmed — either physically, mentally, emotionally, developmentally or materially — and who want to stop or reduce how much time they spend on social media but they can’t because they are preoccupied or obsessed with it. READ MORE: Man Surrenders After Standoff At Modesto HomeBusiness groups have warned that if the bill passes, social media companies would most likely cease operations for children in California rather than face the legal risk. The proposal would only apply to social media companies that had at least $100 million in gross revenue in the past year, appearing to take aim at social media giants like Facebook and others that dominate the marketplace. It would not apply to streaming services like Netflix and Hulu or to...
    What did the Army say? "The Army does not comment on leaked draft documents," said Army spokeswoman Angel Tomko. "AR 600-100 and 600-200 establish the criteria for which soldiers may request for a compassionate reassignment. The chain of command is responsible for ensuring Soldiers and Families' needs are supported and maintain a high quality of life." The proposal was reportedly dispatched through military wires before the leak of a Supreme Court opinion draft indicating the court had voted to overturn abortion precedents. Whether the policy proposal would apply to so-called "reproductive health care," i.e., the ability of women to obtain an abortion, is not clear.
    (CNN)House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced in a letter to her colleagues Friday morning the chamber will vote on legislation that would allow Capitol Hill staffers to unionize next week, a major development for labor activists who have pushed for the option for years."Congressional staffers deserve the same fundamental rights and protections as workers all across the country, including the right to bargain collectively," she wrote in the letter.While it's unlikely the Senate will be able to pass similar legislation because of the 60-vote threshold needed to break the filibuster and the lack of Republican support, the expected-House passage of the bill would mean it would go into effect in the chamber because of the Congressional Accountability Act.Pelosi also announced in the letter she has raised the base pay for House staffers to $45,000 starting September 1."With a competitive minimum salary, the House will better be able to retain and recruit excellent, diverse talent," she wrote. "Doing so will open the doors to public service for those who may not have been able to afford to do so in the past....
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A political committee has filed a proposed constitutional amendment that would create a “fundamental right to clean and healthy waters” and allow lawsuits against state agencies for harm or threatened harm to lakes, rivers, wetlands and other types of water bodies. The committee Florida Right to CleanWater.org has proposed the initiative for the 2024 ballot, according to newly posted information on the state Division of Elections website. READ MORE: Wastewater Samples Show Increase In South Florida COVID-19 Cases“State executive agencies are instrumental to the effort to protect Florida waters from harm and threatened harm,” part of the proposed amendment says. READ MORE: Grieving Family, Friends Remember Good Samaritan Aden Perry Who Died Trying To Save Teen Who Crashed Into Sunrise Lake“Consequently, to promote the interests of Florida’s people, businesses, organizations, communities, and economies in clean and healthy waters, this section (part of the proposal) provides for equitable remedies against the actions or inactions of state executive agencies that harm or threaten harm to Florida waters, with the goal of clean and healthy waters and...
    by J.D. Davidson   Ohio nursing home residents are a step closer to having visitors during the next pandemic or state of emergency after the General Assembly passed a bill that requires long-term care facilities to create a visitation plan to allow compassionate caregivers to enter facilities. Substitute House Bill 120 outlines criteria for compassionate care visitations in long-term care facilities under CMS guidance during any future epidemic, pandemic and state of emergency. “This bill seeks to ensure necessary compassionate care access for our seniors, so that the isolation experienced during COVID-19 will never happen again,” Rep. Tracy Richardson, R-Marysville, said. “This access will provide meaningful human interaction critical to sustaining life, happiness, and dignity for our seniors and loved ones.” The bill, which now heads to Gov. Mike DeWine, recently was amended in Senate Health Committee to expand beyond COVID-19 to include any future epidemic, pandemic or state of emergency. The changes allow visitation at any time as long as compassionate caregivers adhere to long-term care facility guidelines. Long-term care residents were cut off from loved ones for months during...
    A new bill under consideration by the California State Legislature would allow the state’s medical board to discipline doctors who provide what is considered “misinformation or disinformation” about COVID-19 — and even strip them of their licenses. The bill, AB 2098, introduced in February, “would designate the dissemination or promotion of misinformation or disinformation related to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, or ‘COVID-19,’ as unprofessional conduct. The bill would require the board to consider specified factors prior to bringing a disciplinary action against a physician and surgeon. The bill would also make findings and declarations in this regard.” The legislation also declares: “Major news outlets have reported that some of the most dangerous propagators of inaccurate information regarding the COVID-19 vaccines are licensed health care professionals.” It specifies: (a) It shall constitute unprofessional conduct for a physician and surgeon to disseminate or promote misinformation or disinformation related to COVID-19, including false or misleading information regarding the nature and risks of the virus, its prevention and treatment; and the development, safety, and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines. (b) The board shall consider the following...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — A new bill that has been proposed in the Pa. State House would expand the range of products that medical marijuana dispensaries are allowed to offer. If passed, the measure would allow patients to buy medical marijuana edibles. Sponsors of the bill cite laws in 25 other states and patient benefit. Current laws ban growers and processors from making medical marijuana into any form of food and ban dispensaries from selling the products.
    The Tennessee Senate passed a law Thursday allowing for ivermectin to be sold over the counter in the state. S.B. 2188 clarifies that the drug must be "suitable for human use" to apply. The law will go into effect after the governor signs it, with "the public welfare requiring it." This law also makes pharmacists who sell ivermectin "immune from disciplinary or adverse administrative action" as long as they're "acting in good faith and with reasonable care." BIDEN CAN SAVE LIVES WITHOUT SPENDING ALL THOSE EXTRA BILLIONS ON COVID "Also, a pharmacist or prescriber involved in the provision of ivermectin under this amendment will be immune from civil liability in the absence of gross negligence or willful misconduct for actions authorized by provisions of this amendment," its summary reads. "Ivermectin is one of the many therapeutic options like vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and anti-virals that have proven to be effective in the treatment of COVID-19,” co-sponsor of the bill Sen. Rusty Crowe said. Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration classified the...
    A Republican-proposed bill in Tennessee would remove the age limit for when couple's could exchange wedding vows and clear the way for 'common-law marriages' between 'one man and one woman.'  Representative Tom Leatherwood, 65, of Arlington, introduced the bill into the state's House that would eliminate the current age requirement of 17 and allow for 'alternative forms of marriage' to those who 'conscientiously object to the current pathway to marriage.'   'So, all this bill does is give an alternative form of marriage for those pastors and other individuals who have a conscientious objection to the current pathway to marriage in our law,' the Republican said, according to WJHL. 'There is not an explicit age limit.'  Opponents are worried if the bill passes into law, it could be used to cover up child sex abuse and statutory rape.  Bill sponsor Tom Leatherwood, 65, is proposing 'alternative forms of marriage' to those who 'conscientiously object to the current pathway to marriage' The bill would eliminate statues on marriage licensing and ceremonies and limit the courts in cases involving the definition of 'common-law marriages.'...
    (CNN)The Georgia State Senate on Friday gave final approval to legislation that would allow eligible residents to carry a concealed gun in public without a license. The state's Constitutional Carry Act, or SB319, was approved by the Senate following a 34-22 vote. The measure passed the House on Wednesday. The measure now heads to Gov. Brian Kemp, who will likely sign it into law. The move would make Georgia the 23rd state to not have a policy that requires a permit to carry concealed guns in public, according to data compiled by Everytown for Gun Safety, a non-profit that focuses on gun violence prevention. The controversial "constitutional carry," or permitless carry, legislation has gained momentum during this year's legislative sessions in several states, including Wisconsin, Alabama, South Carolina, Indiana and Nebraska. In March, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine signed legislation that will allow adults to carry a concealed handgun without a license or training. The legislative push comes as law enforcement officials and advocacy groups nationwide continue to raise the alarm about the policy's safety risks. They will come to know...
    SAN JOSE (KPIX) — The City of San Jose could soon allow religious institutions to build affordable housing on their properties under a proposal put forth by the mayor’s office to amend the city’s charter. Dubbed “YIGBY,” the effort is a direct response to opponents of development projects often referred to as NIMBYs, an acronym for “Not in My Backyard.” READ MORE: UPDATE: Ongoing Electrical Problems Shut Down BART's Red Line Indefinitely For Repairs“YIGBY stands for Yes in God’s Backyard. Many churches, synagogues, temples, and mosques stood up and said ‘Look, we have parking lots, we have extra lots that we can build in. Can we build affordable housing in those spaces?’” said Mayor Sam Liccardo. Still in its early stages, city staff are working with the state to obtain the necessary environmental approvals. A city charter amendment of this nature would only require a simple council majority to pass. Liccardo expects the YIGBY proposal to pass unanimously by the end of the year, calling it a “win-win.” “NIMBYs have drawn fire, and perhaps appropriately so in many cases, where...
    State Rep. Michelle Udall (R-Mesa) has dropped out of the race for state superintendent of public instruction after voting with four Democrats and four other Republicans in the Arizona House to defeat HB 2009. The bill would have provided a mechanism for the Arizona Attorney General to investigate allegations of wrongdoing by school districts that is reported by state legislators. A law was passed in 2016 creating this system for complaints about city and county governments, which has been used effectively many times. Shiry Sapir, who is also running for schools chief, expressed her surprise that Udall voted that way to The Arizona Sun Times. “Republican lawmakers who killed HB2009 that would have added a measure of accountability are astonishingly flippant and reckless. Especially during a time where accountability of schools is of the highest priority for Arizona families and the future of our children’s lives. HB 2009 asked for nothing more from the school districts than the law already requires other political subdivisions (state agencies, cities, towns, and counties, etc.) in Arizona. Voting against a mechanism to hold school...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Los Angeles County is reportedly set to issue a new Health Order that will allow vaccinated individuals to remove their masks indoors within places that check for proof of vaccination, according to Supervisor Janice Hahn. The order would reportedly go into effect Friday. The Department of Public Health has yet to issue a confirmation on the order. This is a developing story. Check back for details. 
    SAN DIEGO (AP) – A new bill in California would allow private citizens go after gun makers in the same way Texas lets them target abortion providers. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday backed legislation that would let private citizens enforce the state’s ban on assault weapons. It’s modeled after a Texas law that lets private citizens enforce that state’s ban on abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected. READ MORE: Abbott Recalls Baby Formulas After Four Infants Reportedly Fall Ill“If Texas can use a law to ban a woman’s right to chose and to put her health at risk, we will use that same law to save lives and improve the health and safety of the people in the state of California,” Newsom said at a news conference Friday. Texas and other conservative-led states have tried for years to ban abortions once a heartbeat is detected, at around six weeks of pregnancy, which is sometimes before the person knows they are pregnant. But the states’ attempts have been blocked by the courts. But Texas’ new abortion law is unique in...
    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A California bill would allow private citizens to go after gun makers in the same way Texas allows them to target abortion providers. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday backed a new bill in the state Legislature that would let private citizens enforce the state’s assault weapons ban by filing civil lawsuits. It’s modeled after a Texas law that allows private citizens to sue abortion providers for performing abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected. The U.S. Supreme Court has allowed the Texas law to stay in effect pending a legal challenge. The California bill would let people get up to $10,000 in damages for each offense. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    A new proposal aimed at achieving gender-equal sun tanning rights would allow people to go topless on all Nantucket beaches. Dorothy Stover, 40, proposed the “Gender Equality on Beaches” bylaw amendment, which would allow women, as well as men, to go topless on the Massachusetts island's world-famous beaches. UFC CHAMPION DEFENDS EMBATTLED PODCASTER: 'I'M BLACK ... THAT'S MY N***** JOE ROGAN' “In order to promote equality for all persons, any person shall be allowed to be topless on any public or private beach within the Town of Nantucket," the amendment reads. The proposal is on the agenda for consideration at Nantucket’s next town meeting, scheduled for May 2, CBS Boston reports. If the amendment is approved in the meeting, state law would still need to be changed to allow women to go topless in public. "This is really antiquated and this is inequality," Stover said of the law, according to the Cape Cod Times. "Some men have bigger breasts than I do." "I'm not saying that everybody has to be topless," Stover continued....
    NANTUCKET (CBS) – There’s a proposal on Nantucket to allow anyone to go topless on any of the beaches on the island. Dorothy Stover has proposed the “Gender Equality on Beaches” bylaw amendment, which reads, “In order to promote equality for all persons, any person shall be allowed to be topless on any public or private beach within the Town of Nantucket.” The proposal is one of dozens of articles included in a long agenda for Nantucket’s next town meeting on May 2. According to the Cape Cod Times, even if the amendment is approved, state law would have to be changed.
      Tennessee State Representative Jason Powell (D-Nashville) introduced a bill that would allow the state of Tennessee and other municipalities to invest in bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, and NFTs. The bill, HB2644/SB2882, would “authorize a county, municipality, or the state to invest in cryptocurrency, blockchains, and non-fungible tokens.” The bill text defines blockchain as a “decentralized data system in which the data stored is mathematically verifiable, that uses distributed ledger technology or databases to store specialized data in the permanent order of transactions recorded.” Cryptocurrency, as defined in the bill text, is “virtual currency that utilizes cryptography to validate and secure transactions that are digitally recorded through distributed ledger technology.” NFTs, also known as non-fungible tokens, are defined in the bill as “a non-fungible cryptographic asset on a blockchain, which possesses unique identifiers or other metadata that distinguishes the asset from another token or asset in a manner that makes the asset irreplaceable and non-exchangeable for a similar token or asset.” Powell also introduced bill HB2643/SB2855 that would “establish a blockchain and cryptocurrency study committee” in order to “help determine how to...
    by Mary Stroka   An Iowa representative introduced Tuesday a bill that would allow parents to watch live footage of their children in public school classrooms. “I think we need to showcase the great work our teachers do,” Rep. Norlin Mommsen, R-DeWitt, a farmer, told The Center Square in a phone interview Tuesday. He said that through the COVID-19 pandemic, parents learned they wanted to be more involved, and this is a mechanism of facilitating parental involvement. “Similar to a body camera on a policeman, a camera takes away the ‘he said, she said’ or ‘he said, he said,’ type argument and lets them know ‘hey, we are doing a good job.’ It takes that argument away,” Mommsen said. He said he believes the video surveillance would shut down the “sinister agenda” remark Sen. Jake Chapman, R-Adel, made. The comment has been widely circulated in social media and news stories. Chapman had advocated for the removal of certain books from Iowa school district libraries. “One doesn’t have to look far to see the sinister agenda occurring right before our eyes. The attack on our...
                 State Representative James Burchett (R-Waycross) said Friday that he believes members of the Georgia General Assembly will pass a bill that would, if enacted into law, clamp down on obscene material in public school libraries. But the bill still has a long way to go. Members of the Georgia Senate voted for the bill, SB 226, last year. Now members of the Georgia House have it. Burchett, who sponsors the bill in the statehouse, said it’s in the subcommittee and legislators are revising certain parts. Aimee Nobile, with the Georgia chapter of No Left Turn, said this week that the state’s public-school libraries have “an unbelievable amount of obscene material.” What she described was too graphic for The Georgia Star News to elaborate upon. “The bill that is happening right now is supposed to allow an appeals process for questionable books. What it would do is put in a specific timeline and allow an appeals process for parents if there is objectionable material,” Nobile said. “If the school turns it down then there are some school districts that...
    An arch conservative member of Arizona’s state House of Representatives has proposed a mammoth overhaul of the state’s voting procedures that would allow legislators to overturn the results of a primary or general election after months of unfounded allegations and partisan audits. The bill, introduced by Rep. John Fillmore (R), would substantially change the way Arizonans vote by eliminating most early and absentee voting and requiring people to vote in their home precincts, rather than at vote centers set up around the state. Most dramatically, Fillmore’s bill would require the legislature to hold a special session after an election to review election processes and results, and to “accept or reject the election results.” The proposal comes after President BidenJoe BidenNorth Korea conducts potential 6th missile test in a month Clyburn predicts Supreme Court contender J. Michelle Childs would get GOP votes Overnight Defense & National Security — US delivers written response to Russia MORE became the first Democrat since Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBiden: A good coach knows when to change up the team Perdue proposes election police force in...
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia lawmakers are considering a proposal that would allow people to make liquor at home for themselves and for family members. According to West Virginia state law, it is already legal for people to make beer and wine at home. READ MORE: University Of Pittsburgh Warns Of Email Phishing ScamHouse Bill 2972 would allow people over the age of 21 to make up to 50 gallons of liquor at home in a year. If there are two or more people over 21 living in a household, families can make up to 100 gallons of liquor per year. READ MORE: Biscuit World Workers Say No To What Would’ve Been First West Virginia Fast-Food UnionThe proposal bans the sale of any liquor made at home. It passed the West Virginia House of Delegates on Monday and is now headed to the state Senate. A similar piece of legislation was introduced last year during the state’s legislative session, but it failed. It passed the House but stalled in the Senate. MORE NEWS: West Jefferson Hills School Board...
    ARLETA, LOS ANGELES -- A new state bill would require all K-12 students in California be vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to attend in-person classes.State Senator Dr. Richard Pan introduced the proposed legislation at Arleta High School Monday morning alongside representatives from the Los Angeles and San Diego Unified school districts.The bill would add the COVID vaccine to the list of required vaccinations for children attending school in person."Mandates work and they save lives. A vaccinated person has less severe reactions. The virus is less transmissible if a person is vaccinated and this reduces the opportunity for the virus to spread and mutate to another variant," said interim LAUSD Superintendent Megan Reilly.Gov. Gavin Newsom's student vaccine mandate announced last year was blocked by the lower courts, and now the state legislature is weighing in.Pan's bill would not allow students to opt out of receiving the vaccine over personal beliefs -- only with a medical exemption."We continue to keep in-person learning to be an important option for the students who wish to do so. And the way we do that is...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA/AP) — A new bill proposed by California Senator Scott Wiener would allow children ages 12 and up to receive vaccination without parental consent. In a press conference on Friday, he told reporters, “Those kids deserve the right to protect themselves.” READ MORE: Shawn Smith Charged In Murder Of Brianna Kupfer Inside Hancock Park Furniture StoreAs detailed by The Associated Press, this would apply to any vaccination that is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As it stands, minors from the ages of 12 to 17 are unable to be vaccinated without parental consent – unless the reason for vaccination specifically relates to the prevention of a sexually transmitted disease. Other states, like Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. allow children the right to get the COVID-19 vaccination without parental consent, from the age of 11 and up, but should this bill pass, California would become the state with the lowest minimum age requirement when it comes to full-vaccination, not just in relation to Coronavirus. “Giving young people...
    A bill introduced in the California Legislature on Thursday would allow teenagers and preteens to get the COVID-19 vaccine without parental consent. The proposal from state Sen. Scott Wiener, a Democrat representing San Francisco, would allow Californians 12 and older to consent to receive any vaccine approved by the Food and Drug Administration and endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s panel of vaccination experts. CLOTH MASKS USELESS, EXPERTS SAY IN OMICRON MESSAGING SHIFT “COVID is a deadly virus even for young people,” Wiener told the San Francisco Chronicle. “While teens will do better, on average, than older people, there are teens who end up in the hospital, who end up on a ventilator, who end up dead.” S.B. 866 is the first vaccine-related bill to come out of a new legislative caucus announced earlier this week called the Vaccine Work Group, whose members aim to boost vaccination rates across the state. “This won’t be the only bill,” Wiener said. California overall has seen high uptake of people receiving the coronavirus...
    The Federal Reserve has released a long-awaited paper weighing the pros and cons of creating a central bank digital currency (CBDC), a digital form of cash in your pocket. The paper released on Thursday cautiously weighed the pros and cons of a digital dollar, and did not take a position on whether the central bank should pursue such a project. A CBDC would differ in some key ways from the online and digital payments that millions of Americans already conduct. Those transactions are funneled through and between banks, which wouldn't be necessary with a digital dollar.  Essentially, a CBDC would be a digital token with a direct claim on the central bank, in the same way that physical dollars are all 'Federal Reserve Notes' held by the bearer.  Last year, China began testing its own CBDC, known as the digital RMB and e-CNY, which aims to be cheaper and faster than other forms of payment, and allows transactions to take place between two offline devices. It raised concerns that the US needs to consider similar moves in order to remain the world's...
    BOSTON (AP) — A bill that would let people adopt a younger brother, sister, uncle or aunt has been approved by the Massachusetts Senate. Currently, Massachusetts is one of only two states that prohibits adoption by close relatives. READ MORE: Uxbridge School Athletic Center Being Dedicated In Memory Of Holy Cross Rower Grace RettSupporters of the legislation say it would let families stay together and ensure a stable home environment — a necessary component for development as well as physical and emotional health. State Sen. Joan Lovely, a Salem Democrat and bill sponsor, said it will better support residents across Massachusetts who love and care for another. “The COVID-19 pandemic has left many of our vulnerable youth without parents, making familial relationships and bonds more important than ever,” she said in a written statement. READ MORE: Port Of Boston Welcomes 'Ever Fortune,' Its Biggest Container Ship EverThe bill would let adult siblings adopt their younger siblings, aunts and uncles with the permission of county probate courts, sparing youth the additional trauma of family separation, Lovely said. “Our children deserve to...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) – Could payment apps soon be the way of the future on the Pennsylvania Turnpike? READ MORE: 'Am I Protected?' Vaccine Concern Grows As COVID Cases Climb Amid Omicron VariantState Senator Marty Flynn has plans to introduce legislation that would allow drivers to pay turnpike tolls with payment apps such as Venmo and PayPal. Senator Flynn said that the Pennsylvanians he spoke with are frustrated with the current system of fees being collected through the mail. READ MORE: Police: 28-Year-Old Shot After Bar Fight In Stowe TownshipHe wants to add the apps as a way to have instant invoices sent to phones for payment. Flynn said this legislation wouldn’t get rid of any current options, just add another option. MORE NEWS: Pittsburgh Weather: Winter Storm Watch Goes Into Effect Sunday Afternoon Take Our Poll
    A Florida lawmaker proposed allowing school districts across the state to place cameras and microphones in classrooms. Republican Rep. Bob Rommel, who hails from Naples, on Dec. 28 introduced House Bill 1055, which would authorize "school districts to adopt a policy to install video cameras in public school classrooms" and allow certain teachers to be required to "wear a microphone." The bill is listed on the Florida Senate website as still in the House. "I think if we can do it in a safe way to protect the privacy of students and teachers, I think we should do it," Rommel said to CBS Miami. "I haven't heard a response, good or bad, from any teachers, but you know what? It's not their private space — it's our children's space too." PARENTS SUPPORT SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS IN FAIRFAX SCHOOLS Broward County Public Schools seems to be one step ahead of Rommel, having already placed cameras in certain classrooms. "That is happening right now, yeah," said Anna Fusco, the president of the Broward Teachers Union, according to...
    A bill being co-led by Reps. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) and Mary Miller (R-IL) would place a five-year moratorium on foreign land purchases to protect “American sovereignty” from being “eroded.” Breitbart News exclusively obtained the bill’s text before its official introduction on Wednesday. The legislation, named the “Moratorium on Foreign Land Purchases Act,” would give the president power to prohibit the purchase of public or private real estate in the U.S. “by any foreign person” for the five-year period after the enactment of the law. The bill defines a “foreign person” as “any foreign national, foreign government, or foreign entity; or any entity over which control is exercised or exercisable by a foreign national, foreign government, or foreign entity.” The ban would also extend to any corporation, partnership, or other association created under the laws of a foreign country. Subsequently, the Comptroller General of the U.S. would be required to submit a report to Congress six months after the enactment of the bill detailing the history of foreign public and private real estate purchases located in the U.S. The Comptroller General would...
                 In an effort to limit citizen ballot initiatives, two Republican lawmakers in Florida, State Senator Jason Brodeur (R-District 9) and State Representative Mike Beltran (R-57 District) filed identical bills (SJR 1412 and HJR 1127) that would restrict the subjects addressed in the ballot initiative process. The two bills will be considered during the upcoming legislative session that begins January 11, and are the latest attempts by Republicans to make the citizen initiative process harder in the state of Florida. According to the two measures, if approved, subjects for citizen initiatives would be “limited to matters relating to procedural subjects or to the structure of the government or of this Constitution.” During the past few elections, citizen initiatives such as the legalization of medical marijuana in 2016 and the increase of minimum wage in 2020, are two examples of amendments that many Republican lawmakers in Florida believe should not be in the state Constitution and should not have been decided by citizens in the first place. However, advocates for the citizens’ ballot initiative process contend that it is necessary...
    Jim Green has served as NASA chief scientist for 40 years, but as Green bid the agency farewell on Saturday he left us with one last plan - geoengineer Mars into a planet habitable for humans. The now retired scientist proposed covering the Red Planet in a giant magnetic shield to block it from the sun's high-energy solar particles. Speaking with the New York Times, Green explained the protective shield would stop the sun from stripping Mars' atmosphere, allowing the planet to create a human-friendly climate. 'Yeah, it's doable. Stop the stripping, and the pressure is going to increase. Mars is going to start terraforming itself,' Green said. 'The higher temperature and pressure enable you to begin the process of growing plants in the soils.' Scroll down for video  The now retired scientist proposed covering the Red Planet in a giant magnetic shield to block it from the sun's high-energy solar particles Green discussed his Mars plan with the NYT in honor of his retirement, but the former NASA official has been working on it since at least 2017 when...
    A bill filed in the Florida Legislature seeks to allow video and audio recordings in school classrooms, WFLA reported Sunday. In addition, it would require teachers to wear microphones and permit parents to review video of “incidents,” the outlet said, noting that HB 1055 was sponsored by Florida Rep. Bob Rommel (R-Naples). “It would allow school districts to install video cameras in classrooms for the purposes of recording an ‘incident’ — which it defines as abuse or neglect of a student by an employee or another student,” the article continued: Parents of a child involved in an incident must be allowed to review the video within a week, with a stipulation that the identity of other students who aren’t involved must be blurred. Teachers in schools that adopt cameras would be required to wear microphones. Cameras must be placed at the front of the classroom, capable of monitoring video and audio from all areas except a restroom or other changing areas. However, parents, students, and employees would have to be told prior to the cameras being installed in the room. Principals...
              by Kendall Tietz   An Oklahoma bill introduced on Dec. 16 may allow parents to seek the removal of books that they deem inappropriate from school libraries. The bill, Senate Bill 1142, would give parents a right to ask for the removal of “books that are of a sexual nature that a reasonable parent or legal guardian would want to know of or approve of prior to their child being exposed to it,” according to the bill’s language. “No public school district, public charter school, or public school library shall maintain in its inventory or promote books that make as their primary subject the study of sex, sexual preferences, sexual activity, sexual perversion, sex-based classifications, sexual identity, or gender identity,” the bill says. If a student’s parent or legal guardian believes a public school library is maintaining books in violation of the bill, they would be able to submit a written request to the school district superintendent or charter school administrator to remove the books from the library, if the bill passes, and such books would need to be removed within...