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    (CNN)A court hearing in Brooklyn on Tuesday gave the public its first glimpse of how Judge Raymond Dearie, a senior judge who's been tapped to serve as a special master in the Mar-a-Lago search dispute, will approach the job of reviewing materials seized from former President Donald Trump's Florida home. Dearie, a seasoned and widely respected jurist, showed skepticism of Trump's arguments about how the review should proceed, while stressing a desire to move quickly. His appointment order -- issued by US District Judge Aileen Cannon in Florida -- said he must finish his review by the end of November. Special master questions Trumps claims about Mar-a-Lago docs being declassifiedCannon ordered the third-party review after Trump filed a lawsuit claiming that the review was necessary to filter out materials covered by attorney client privilege, as well personal items that do not belong in the hands of the investigators. While Dearie gets going on sifting through the approximately 11,000 documents seized in Mar-a-Lago, the Justice Department is asking an appeals court to revive its criminal investigation into the materials marked as...
    (CNN)A federal judge in Florida dealt the Justice Department another setback in its investigation into the handling of documents from former President Donald Trump's White House with a trio of orders Thursday night. US District Judge Aileen Cannon appointed Raymond Dearie, a Brooklyn based senior federal judge, to be the special master to review the materials that were seized. In an order setting the parameters of the review, she mostly sided with Trump's proposals for the shape it could take, creating a much slower and extensive process than what the prosecutors had recommended. Special master appointed to review documents from Mar-a-Lago search; DOJ request to resume criminal probe rejectedIn what was perhaps the biggest shot at the Justice Department, she also denied its request that the documents it seized that were marked as classified be carved out from the review, keeping in place her order blocking the criminal investigation from using them. That move by Cannon sets the stage for the Justice Department to quickly put the dispute over the materials in front of an appeals court and perhaps even...
    The crest of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is seen at their headquarters in Washington, D.C., U.S., May 10, 2021.Andrew Kelly | Reuters Significant changes are coming to the ways federal prosecutors will handle white collar criminal cases, putting a greater emphasis on prosecuting individual executives who commit fraud, a senior official at the Department of Justice said Thursday. DOJ is changing the incentive structure for companies negotiating with the government over cases of corporate wrongdoing, according to the official. The government will give credit to companies that come forward with information and names of individual executives involved in criminal activity, the official said. "Timeliness for information about key individuals will be a key metric for prosecutors who are judging the credit companies get for their for their cooperation," the official said. "If the company comes forward, people may go to jail, and that is the intent here. But the company itself on behalf of its shareholders may avoid a guilty plea." The Department it will also make it much more difficult for companies to get successive...
    California Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom is urging Attorney General Merrick Garland to investigate “possible criminal or civil violations of federal law,” including possible “kidnapping” or “RICO” charges after Florida and Texas shipped thousands of undocumented immigrants across state lines to states including Massachusetts, New York, and to Washington, D.C. “Like millions of Americans, I have been horrified at the images of migrants being shipped on buses and planes across the country to be used as political props,” Newsom’s letter begins. “Clearly, transporting families, including children, across state lines under false pretenses is morally reprehensible, but it may also be illegal.” “Several of the individuals who were transported to Martha’s Vineyard have alleged that a recruiter induced them to accept the offer of travel based on false representations that they would be transported to Boston and would receive expedited access to work authorization. The interstate travel at issue provides a basis for federal jurisdiction over this matter.” READ MORE: Martha’s Vineyard Welcomes Planes of Migrant Families Sent ‘Like Cargo’ by DeSantis: ‘We’re Going to Take Care of You’ Florida GOP Governor...
    Washington (CNN)The Justice Department and former President Donald Trump's legal team have found rare agreement in a potential candidate to serve as the special master tasked with reviewing the documents seized from Mar-a-Lago. Judge Raymond Dearie, whom Trump's legal team put forward, is an acceptable option to serve as the third-party attorney to independently review the seized materials, the Justice Department said in a court filing Monday evening. While it remains unclear when US District Judge Aileen Cannon will decide who will serve as the special master, here's what you need to know about Dearie and the role he could play in the investigation. Who is Raymond Dearie?Dearie, a Reagan nominee, has served as a federal judge in New York since 1986. He retired in 2011 and is now a senior judge on the circuit. Read MoreHe also served a seven-year term on the US Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISA court. Dearie was one of the judges who approved an FBI and DOJ request to surveil Carter Page, a Trump campaign foreign policy adviser, as part of the federal...
    Donald Trump has raised questions with an unplanned arrival in Washington, DC on Sunday evening, appearing slightly disheveled and still wearing his golf shoes. The former president landed at Dulles International Airport in his white sporting shoes and quickly got into a black SUV with tinted windows, according to the video shot by YouTuber Andrew Leyden. Trump does have a golf course in Virginia, but it's unlikely he rushed to the area for a game given the rainy forecast expected for Monday.  His surprise trip to the national capital has prompted speculation over whether he is facing an indictment or some other legal matter, amid the Justice Department's explosive investigation into his handling of classified documents after leaving office. Trump was seen departing Dulles at around 6:30 p.m. on Sunday night, according to the video. The ex-president was spotted descending down the steps of his private plane markedly dressed down from his usual clean-cut suit and tie. Trump's white polo was worn casually with its top buttons flung open, and he appeared to also be wearing a brown jacket and...
    by Julie Kelly   To no one’s surprise, Alyssa Farah, Mike Pence’s former press secretary, is the newest panelist on “The View.” Farah replaces Meghan McCain, who quit the show last year after suffering from postpartum depression and nonstop bullying by her leftist co-hosts, she claimed. Farah, however, will pick up where McCain left off: using her voice as the only alleged “conservative” to bash Donald Trump and his supporters. She’s been auditioning for the role on the daily talk show ever since she left the White House in late 2020, following a well-trodden path that promises fame and fortune to Trump associates who turn on their former boss. Betrayers earn lucrative book deals, glowing coverage in corporate media, “exclusive” interviews on CNN, and newfound respect from one-time enemies. Such appears to be the case with former Attorney General William Barr. Picked by Trump in the spring of 2019, Barr, who served in the same role under President George H. W. Bush, initially said all the right things about the need to clean up a compromised, partisan Department of Justice....
    (CNN)The Justice Department and former President Donald Trump's lawyers faced off yet again in the Mar-a-Lago investigation, this time in a court filing late Friday where they offered vastly different proposals for how the critical special master review of seized documents should work.Although the document Friday appeared on the court docket as a "joint response," the two sides unsurprisingly didn't agree on much.READ: DOJ and Trump team proposals for special master reviewThe new filing revealed the names of the former judges and one lawyer that the respective sides proposed to serve as special master -- the third-party attorney reviewing the documents. The candidates bring some interesting experience to the table -- one co-wrote a report debunking Trump's 2020 election lies, and another was involved in the controversial surveillance of an aide for Trump's 2016 campaign.It'll be up to US District Judge Aileen Cannon to figure out the path forward in the legal fight that could determine how far the Justice Department is able to proceed in its investigation of how White House documents ended up at Mar-a-Lago.Here are the takeaways...
    Apple stands to lose up to $15 billion a year if the Justice Department forces Google to stop paying the company to be the default search engine on all iPhones - as regulators question the legality of the longtime arrangement.  Anytime iPhone users open a web browser to enter a search query, it always defaults to Google. Even though anyone can change this setting, almost no one does, resulting in a huge amount of traffic (and ad revenue) to Google from over a billion iPhone users worldwide.  Analysts from Bernstein estimated that Google's payment to Apple would increase to $15 billion in 2021 and as high as $18-$20 billion this year, reports 9to5Mac.  Apple stands to lose up to $15 billion a year if the Justice Department forces Google to stop paying the company to be the default search engine on all iPhones The contracts are the basis of the DOJ's antitrust against the California-based company, which began in the closing days of the Trump administration and won't head to trial until sometime in 2023 Last year, Apple's total gross...
    The United States Department of Justice's Thursday response to Southern District of Florida Judge Aileen Cannon's Monday order assigning a special master to determine whether the trove of classified documents that were seized during the Federal Bureau of Investigation's search warrant execution at former President Donald Trump's unsecured Mar-a-Lago estate on August 8th are covered by executive privilege has provoked a bellicose reaction from the embattled ex-commander in chief. The Justice Department wrote in its motion to Cannon, a Trump appointee, that declassification power "falls upon the incumbent President, not on any former President, because it is the incumbent President who bears the responsibility to protect and defend the national security of the United States." The filing also states that "Trump himself declined to assert any claim of executive privilege over the classified records at the point when it would have been appropriate to do so." READ MORE: 'The public would suffer irreparable harm': Justice Department responds to special master order After news of the development broke, Trump rehashed his debunked conspiracy theory that his 2020 presidential campaign was...
    Washington (CNN)The federal criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump's potential mishandling of classified documents ramped up this week in significant and unprecedented fashion, with the FBI executing a search warrant at Trump's home at his Mar-a-Lago resort. The Justice Department inquiry is about documents that Trump removed from the White House as his term was ending in January 2021. Earlier this year, officials from the National Archives and Records Administration, known as NARA, recovered 15 boxes of presidential documents from Mar-a-Lago. Trump's lawyers previously worked with NARA to voluntarily turn over some documents, but the Mar-a-Lago search clearly indicates a new phase of the probe. Trump has denied all wrongdoing and claims the investigation is a politically motivated sham, intended to derail his potential bid to return to the White House. Here's a timeline of the key moments from the blockbuster investigation. May 2021 Read MoreAn official from NARA contacts Trump's team after realizing that several important documents weren't handed over before Trump left the White House. In hopes of locating the missing items, NARA lawyer Gary Stern reaches...
    The United States Department of Justice on Thursday filed a response to Southern District of Florida Judge Aileen Cannon's Monday ruling that granted former President Donald Trump's request for a special master to determine whether the trove of classified documents that were seized during the Federal Bureau of Investigation's search warrant execution at Trump's unsecured Mar-a-Lago estate on August 8th are covered by executive privilege, which Trump has claimed in his lawsuit against the FBI. Cannon, whom Trump appointed, additionally required the Justice Department to pause its probe into how and why Trump had a foreign country's above-top-secret nuclear capabilities hoarded in his beach house. The Justice Department asked Cannon "to stay the part of her order that halted the investigation and would require showing classified docs to special master, and says will appeal if she doesn't do that," New York Times national security and legal reporter Charlie Savage tweeted along with a copy of the motion. DOJ is "willing to let a master be appointed and see the unclassified docs," Savage explained. READ MORE: 'Legal equivalent of Mr. Toad’s...
    A former federal prosecutor accused Donald Trump's Justice Department of attempting to weaponize his office against the former president's political opponents, according to an explosive Thursday report. Geoffrey S. Berman was appointed to head the Southern District of New York, a high-profile office, in 2018 after reportedly being personally interviewed by Trump for the role. He was fired by then-Attorney General Bill Barr at Trump's request in 2020. In his new book, 'Holding the Line,' obtained by the New York Times, Berman describes significant pressure coming from the White House to investigate the current US Climate Envoy John Kerry as well as a Democratic lawyer named Gregory B. Craig. 'Trump’s Justice Department kept demanding that I use my office to aid them politically, and I kept declining - in ways just tactful enough to keep me from being fired,' Berman wrote. 'I walked this tightrope for two and a half years...Eventually, the rope snapped.' Kerry, Berman claimed, had angered Trump by having informal talks with Iranian officials behind the scenes to try and salvage the controversial Iran Nuclear Deal. As Barack...
    Washington (CNN)Hardly a day goes by without a major new development in the Mar-a-Lago investigation, whether it's a document drop from the Justice Department, a stunning comment from former President Donald Trump, a fireworks-filled court hearing or a long-awaited ruling.The Justice Department's criminal probe into potential mishandling of classified materials is ongoing. The damage assessment is underway by US intelligence agencies. And the political fallout is still being shaped, as the November midterms approach and the 2024 election looms. Here's a breakdown of what's going on and where things are headed in the investigation.What's in the classified documents?The government has recovered at least 325 unique classified documents from Mar-a-Lago, according to court filings describing Trump's turnover of materials in January, the subpoenaed documents he returned to the Justice Department in June and the fruits of August's FBI search.Read MoreWe've known that some of these files were at the very highest level of classification, including some in an "SAP" program that severely restricts who can access the information. But since this scandal burst into public view, the big mystery has been:...
    Donald Trump's former attorney general kept up his criticism of the ex-president on Tuesday, saying the evidence against him was clear and that it was plain 'wrong' for a judge to appoint a special master to review documents seized at Mar-a-Lago. A day earlier, a federal judge in Florida gave Trump a win by agreeing to his request for a special master, slowing the pace of the investigation. But Bill Barr blasted the decision and said it would likely be overturned if the government appealed. 'The opinion, I think was wrong, and I think the government should appeal,' he told Fox News. 'It is deeply flawed in a number of ways.' In any case, he said, such was the weight of evidence, 'I don't see it fundamentally changing the trajectory.' It comes after he last week said Trump had 'jerked around' investigators and had no legitimate reason to keep government documents at his Florida home.  Fox News Network, LLC Privacy Policy Bill Barr kept up his criticism of Donald trump on Tuesday, saying the evidence against him was clear...
    Former Dept. of Justice Inspector General Michael Bromwich says “nothing” should stop the DOJ from investigating Donald Trump, not even the department’s unwritten “60-day rule” about not intentionally influencing the outcomes of elections. Bromwich’s resumé reads like a walk through late 20th century political history. As a federal prosecutor at the vaunted U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York (SDNY), which was once headed by Robert Morgenthau, Jim Comey, Preet Bharara, and even the now-disgraced Rudy Giuliani, Bromwich prosecuted Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver L. North. As Inspector General at DOJ, Bromwich investigated the FBI’s investigation into the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, and the Bureau’s investigation into former Central Intelligence Agency counterintelligence officer Aldrich Ames, convicted in 1994 of espionage for spying for the USSR and Russia. He’s also represented former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, and served as the Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management under President Barack Obama. READ MORE: ‘Disingenuous Grandstanding’: Kevin McCarthy Mocked for Trying to Bully Merrick Garland With Powers He Does Not Have “Nothing–not...
    by Harold Hutchison   Republican Rep. Mike Gallagher of Wisconsin, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, denounced a “massive abuse of power” and vowed to use congressional funding powers to get transparency from the Biden administration about the Aug. 8 raid on Mar-a-Lago during a Sunday appearance on Fox Business. “For something of this magnitude, something unprecedented, you would expect the FBI and the DOJ to go to great lengths to insure they are conducting themselves with the highest level of professionalism, but they never notified our committee — which you would expect them to do if, indeed, there was a danger posed by the classified material that was in Donald Trump’s possession,” Gallagher told former Republican Rep. Sean Duffy of Wisconsin, who guest-hosted the show, adding that many committee members found out details of the raid from news reports based on leaks from the Justice Department. “It comes amidst the backdrop of recent failures on behalf of FBI and DOJ leadership that really get to the heart of their credibility and the trust that Americans have in those is...
    Former President Donald Trump went off at his rally Saturday night — claiming the FBI searched the bedroom of his 16-year-old son Barron Trump in a manner he blasted as “deep and ugly.” Speaking to supporters in Wilkes Barre, PA, the former president denounced the tactics of the FBI’s raid on his Mar-a-Lago estate. “They rifled through the First Lady’s closet drawers, and everything else,” Trump said. “And even did a deep and ugly search of the room of my 16-year-old son — leaving everything they touched in far different condition than it was when they started. Can you believe it?” Trump, who once famously said — in an address to a joint session of Congress — that “we must support the incredible men and women of law enforcement” went on to condemn the entire FBI and DOJ as “vicious monsters.” “The FBI and the Justice Department have become vicious monsters controlled by radical left scoundrels, lawyers, and the media who tell them what to do.” Trump then pointed to the cameras in the back of the room and...
    Donald Trump's attorney general condemned his former boss on Friday, saying there was no legitimate reason for government documents to be kept at Mar-a-Lago. Bill Barr said he did not believe Trump's claim that he had declassified everything before it was taken to his Florida resort, and he hit back at critics of the FBI search saying it was 'unprecedented' for such sensitive materials to be taken to a 'country club.' Barr made his comments as Trump supporters continue to accuse the FBI and Department of Justice of conducted a witch hunt. But on Friday, a court filing revealed the extent of the materials recovered from Trump's Florida home: 18 documents marked as top secret, 54 marked secret, 31 marked as confidential, and 11,179 government documents or photographs that had no classification markings. Barr defended the Department of Justice actions and expressed disbelief at Trump's defense that he had declassified the materials. 'If in fact he sort of stood over scores of boxes, not really knowing what was in them, and said, "I hereby declassify everything in here," that would be...
    George Conway reacted to the Department of Justice’s response to what he called an “insane” request filed by Donald Trump to appoint a special master to review the documents seized in the Aug. 8 search at Mar-a-Lago, saying that the former president’s attorneys had “basically asked for the Justice Department to punch them in the face.” Earlier this month, Judge Bruce Reinhart ordered the release of a redacted version of the affidavit used to obtain the search warrant for Trump’s residence at Mar-a-Lago, and that redacted affidavit was posted to the online court file last Friday. The ex-president has gone through some very public struggles to retain a top-notch team of criminal defense attorneys, and the motion they filed on Aug. 22 in Judge Aileen M. Cannon’s court demanding that the DOJ’s review of the seized documents cease until a special master could be appointed raised a lot of eyebrows among legal experts, many of whom pointed out the thin legal arguments. The delay in filing of two weeks after the Aug. 8 search was especially notable with many commentators observing...
    The Department of Justice, led by Attorney General Merrick Garland, is righteously fighting back against Trump-appointed jurist Judge Aileen Cannon’s attempted meddling in an active federal criminal investigation. DOJ’s late-night 38-page filing with attachments—including a photo of Top Secret cover sheets recovered during the execution of the search warrant—methodically cut the legs out from under the Trump legal team’s arguments. It also exposes the lack of any sound legal basis for Judge Cannon’s potentially ruling in favor of Trump. On Saturday, Judge Cannon stated her “preliminary intent” was to grant former President Donald Trump’s motion seeking appointment of a special master to review the documents recovered by the FBI and DOJ from the search warrant executed at Trump’s residence at Mar-A-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida. Special masters are used in federal courts to assist judges in matters involving some “exceptional condition,” or “complex accounting or computation of damages,” or where a “district judge or magistrate judge of the district” is not available to address the issue. Typically, lawyers or ex-judges with experience in the particular subject matter are appointed,...
    The United States Department of Justice filed an extraordinary legal briefing late Tuesday night revealing that it has “multiple sources of evidence” that former President Donald Trump and his confederates "likely" obstructed its investigation into how and why hundreds of documents containing the most sensitive of state secrets were casually stashed at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida. "The 36-page filing was the department’s most detailed account yet of its evidence of obstruction of justice, raising concerns that Trump and his attorneys sought to mislead investigators about the sincerity and thoroughness of their effort to identify and return highly sensitive records to the government," reported Politico, which was the first media outlet to publish the filing. Incredibly, the Justice Department even released a photograph showing piles of paper labeled with various classifications that were strewn about on the floor of Trump's "45 Office." DOJ also expounded its opposition to Trump's request for a special master and that it never received a declassification notice while Trump was still the commander in chief, despite Team Trump repeatedly declaring the opposite. Judge...
    CNN legal analyst Elie Honig argued on Wednesday that the United States Department of Justice had effectively dropped the hammer on former President Donald Trump with its late-night filing detailing efforts to conceal the presence of top-secret documents at Mar-a-Lago. When asked to break down the filing by host John Berman, Honig summed it up by declaring, "The DOJ strikes back." "Clearly DOJ had something on their minds, something was bugging them and they used this filing to unload all of that," he said. "The first thing that I think you take out of this filing is that, forget about these questions about whether DOJ acted too rationally, too suddenly when they executed the search warrant. they had no choice... the extent of the timeline and how long they were misled and lied to by Trump's attorneys, how many chances they gave Trump's attorneys to just hand over the documents... by a subpoena. They had to do this search warrant." Honig also said the filing gave hints about criminal charges Trump and his lawyers may be facing. "One of the...
    By Jeremy Herb, Marshall Cohen and Tierney Sneed | CNN Former President Donald Trump has pushed an “incomplete and inaccurate narrative” in his recent court filings about the Mar-a-Lago search, the Justice Department said in a historic court filing late Tuesday night. Prosecutors fleshed out new details about the ongoing criminal investigation into Trump’s potential mishandling of classified documents, which he took from the White House to his resort and home in Florida. Trump and his allies have denied any wrongdoing. In total, the US government has recovered more than 320 classified documents from Mar-a-Lago since January, including more than 100 seized in the August search, DOJ says. The filing is in response to Trump’s bid for a “special master” in a civil lawsuit against the Justice Department, weeks after the FBI searched Mar-a-Lago. The judge handling the case, a Trump appointee, has said her “preliminary intent” is to bring in a special master. A hearing is scheduled for Thursday. Here are some key takeaways from the filing, what we learned and where we go from here. Docs were moved...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump has pushed an "incomplete and inaccurate narrative" in his recent court filings about the Mar-a-Lago search, the Justice Department said in a historic court filing late Tuesday night. Prosecutors fleshed out new details about the ongoing criminal investigation into Trump's potential mishandling of classified documents, which he took from the White House to his resort and home in Florida. Trump and his allies have denied any wrongdoing. In total, the US government has recovered more than 320 classified documents from Mar-a-Lago since January, including more than 100 seized in the August search, DOJ says. Justice Department says classified documents at Mar-a-Lago were likely concealed and removed to block investigationThe filing is in response to Trump's bid for a "special master" in a civil lawsuit against the Justice Department, weeks after the FBI searched Mar-a-Lago. The judge handling the case, a Trump appointee, has said her "preliminary intent" is to bring in a special master. A hearing is scheduled for Thursday. Here are some key takeaways from the filing, what we learned and where we go from...
    (CNN)The Justice Department on Tuesday responded to Judge Aileen Cannon of the Southern District of Florida regarding former President Donald Trump's request for a special master to oversee the FBI's review of materials seized in the Mar-a-Lago search. A hearing has been scheduled for Thursday to consider Trump's request for a special master -- a third-party attorney appointed by a court to oversee part of a certain case.Read the Justice Department's filing here:
    Growing up in working-class Black Los Angeles, Desiree Cormier Smith was the brainy Catholic school kid who knew she wanted a career in public service, “but I didn’t know what was possible,” she said. Now Smith is in the process of finding out, in a very high-profile way: she’s the nation’s new “Special Representative for Racial Equity and Justice,” leading the Biden administration’s State Department campaign to make human rights for marginalized groups a foreign policy priority. The initiative grew out of an executive order issued by President Biden on his first day in office, requiring every federal agency to “recognize and work to redress inequities in their policies and programs that serve as barriers to equal opportunity.” For the State Department, that means addressing the plight of racial and ethnic minorities in regions where they’ve been persistently oppressed, and evaluating whether U.S. policies contribute to that. What it does not mean is imposing our judgements on other countries, or grabbing the mic when we should be listening. Smith understands the tensions inherent in that. “We have to talk to...
    Washington (CNN)Former President Donald Trump's push for a special master to oversee the Department of Justice's review of the evidence gathered at Mar-a-Lago is entering a critical week. A federal judge has signaled a "preliminary intent" to grant the request, which could bring new complications to the DOJ's closely watched investigation into the White House documents Trump took to his Florida residence. Here's what a special master is and what it would mean for the materials seized from Mar-a-Lago.What is a special master?A special master is a third-party attorney appointed by a court to oversee part of a certain case.Read MoreIf appointed in Trump's case, the special master would oversee the Justice Department's review of the evidence gathered from his beach club and filter out privileged material that may have been seized in the search.Why does Trump want a special master?Trump's legal team is broadly arguing that a special master is necessary to ensure the Justice Department returns any of his private documents seized during the search of Mar-a-Lago.The former President's attorneys say his constitutional rights were violated, and that...
    A former prosecutor who assisted in the Mueller investigation into Donald Trump says he believes the Department of Justice will prosecute the 45th president. On Friday, the Department of Justice released a heavily redacted affidavit that was used to obtain a search warrant of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate earlier this month. Agents retrieved boxes of official documents, including classified material that Trump was supposed to leave with the government when he left office. The government retrieved some official documents from Mar-a-Lago in January with the cooperation of Trump’s team. However, officials came to realize the former president had more material. The DOJ subpoenaed Trump to gather the remaining documents. In June, lawyers for Trump claimed he had no more official materials in his possession. That turned out not to be the case, as the FBI raid this month demonstrated. Andrew Weissman, who assisted in the Mueller prove and also served as the top lawyer for the FBI, said on Friday’s Deadline: White House that based on what he’s seen, including the redacted affidavit, signs point to a prosecution of Trump: I...
    University of California-Berkeley law professor John Yoo said the government should release classified documents it took from Donald Trump’s Florida residence in order to show just how sensitive they are. On Friday, the Department of Justice released a heavily redacted affidavit that was used to obtain a search warrant for Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate earlier this month. FBI agents retrieved boxes of government documents – including classified material – that Trump was supposed to give to the National Archives upon leaving office. Appearing on Friday’s Your World with Neil Cavuto on Fox News, Yoo, who authored the infamous memos justifying the torture of “enemy combatants” during the George W. Bush administration, called on the government to release the classified documents. “If all the Justice Department and the White House and the intelligence agencies want is the documents back, well, they’ve got them back,” Yoo said. “And now that they’ve got them back, they shouldn’t be pressing forward with any kind of investigation. It’s over. That’s why I don’t think there’s any real block other than declassifying and making the affidavit more...
    (CNN)The Justice Department has submitted under seal its proposal for redacting the Mar-a-Lago search warrant affidavit, the department said Thursday.Justice Department Spokesman Anthony Coley said: "The United States has filed a submission under seal per the Court's order of Aug. 22. The Justice Department respectfully declines further comment as the Court considers the matter." US Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart will now consider whether to release the affidavit, and with any redactions. The timeline for that decision is not known. The affidavit lays out why investigators believe there was probable cause that crimes had been committed. The warrant authorized the FBI to search former President Donald Trump's home and private club earlier this monthJustice Department prosecutors have emphasized that they need continued secrecy as to not disrupt the ongoing criminal investigation -- especially as they keep confidential grand jury activity and protect witnesses who have or could share information. Read MoreWhats next in the fight over the Mar-a-Lago FBI search affidavitThis story is breaking and will be updated.
    (CNN)The next steps in the legal fight to bring more transparency into the FBI's search of former President Donald Trump's Florida home will largely take place in secret. In the coming days, US Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart -- who approved the warrant the FBI used to search Mar-a-Lago earlier this month -- will be considering in private the Justice Department's proposals for redacting parts of the affidavit it filed when seeking the warrant, if the affidavit is to be released at all. In the document, the investigators who are probing the handling of classified documents from Trump's White House would have had to lay out for the judge why they thought there was probable cause for a crime and that evidence existed of that crime at the Florida resort.The affidavit contains "substantial grand jury information" a Justice Department attorney told Reinhart at a hearing last week, where media organizations and other entities advocated for the public release of the document, which was filed under seal.Trump has called for the release of the affidavit, as it was not part of the...
    The Justice Department on Wednesday released the unredacted 2019 memo that concluded nothing President Donald Trump did - including firing the FBI director - amounted to obstruction of justice or warranted a prosecution in relation to the Mueller investigation.  Even without constitutional barriers to charging a president, it says, there is no case to answer. The former president sent out a statement welcoming the release of the nine-page document, and ridiculing the Washington watchdog group that applied for its publication. 'It was stated that my "conduct primarily reflected a frustration with the Mueller probe and what [I] perceived to be the politics behind it," in addition to what I believed were absolutely flawed and Fake News reports.  'Sound familiar?' he asked. 'Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington is devastated by these findings, that they worked so hard to "expose," but may now move on to the even more ridiculous Witch Hunt that has already caused a great Mar-a-Lago Red Wave with the voters of our Nation!' he said. Former President Donald Trump welcomed the release of a nine-page memo...
    On Thursday's edition of MSNBC's "The Beat," former Justice Department prosecutor Andrew Weissman — a key official who worked on special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation — identified a clear piece of evidence that could, without much redaction, be released from the DOJ's affidavit to obtain the Mar-a-Lago search warrant, and provide damning new evidence against former President Donald Trump. This comes after a federal magistrate judge signaled intent to release portions of the affidavit, pending redactions. "What portion do you expect — for people to understand, because we've heard a lot of legal terms and redactions, there is more information coming — how much it is and how much of that is a win or loss is to be explained?" asked anchor Ari Melber. "So remember that the district court — the magistrate judge has seen the entire affidavit, so when the government was saying it's all something that's sensitive to a criminal investigation or it's all something sensitive from a national security perspective or witnesses, he has in front of him the affidavit," said Weissman. "So he can...
    (CNN)An extraordinary dispute will play out in a federal courthouse in South Florida on Thursday afternoon over what transparency the American public is owed into the Justice Department investigation of the handling of classified documents from former President Donald Trump's White House.US Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart is holding a hearing at 1 p.m. ET on requests by various media organizations and others that he unseal materials secretly filed by the DOJ in his court when the department sought approval for a warrant to search Trump's residence at Mar-a-Lago. Some of the documents have already been unsealed, with the Justice Department seeking to unseal them last week and Trump not opposing their release. But some news outlets -- including CNN -- are pushing for more of the sealed court filings related to the search to be made public. Of particular interest is the affidavit that federal investigators would have had to file with the court under seal laying out why they thought there was probably cause that a crime had been committed and why they believed that evidence of the crime...
    Donald Trump's former trade adviser Peter Navarro told FBI agents to 'get the f*** out of here' when they came to serve him a subpoena after he defied the House January 6 committee, a new court filing revealed on Monday. Federal prosecutors said the incident took place days before Navarro was arrested on the tarmac in Virginia's Ronald Reagan International Airport. The former Trump adviser has made his treatment at the hands of federal agents a central point during his trial for contempt of Congress.  Last month, the judge overseeing Navarro's case expressed concern about the manner of his arrest - which Navarro claimed included handcuffs and being denied food and water. Prosecutors said the incident at the airport took place after Navarro 'refused to open the door' for officers and swore at them while telling them to leave, according to the filing obtained by the Washington Examiner. They suggested Navarro is an 'unpredictable subject' whose arrest was in-line for someone with 'an extensive history of seeking news coverage.' To 'avoid a media circus, the arresting agents encountered the Defendant...
    The Department of Justice asked a judge Monday to keep the Mar-a-Lago search warrant affidavit sealed from the public, arguing it included too many sensitive details about the ongoing probe.  'The affidavit would serve as a roadmap to the government's ongoing investigation, providing specific details about its direction and likely course, in a manner that is highly likely to compromise future investigative steps,' prosecutors argued Monday in a court filing.  CNN and other media outlets sued the government to get access to the affidavit, which provided the legal argument for why last Monday's FBI raid of former President Donald Trump's Florida property was necessary.  The Department of Justice asked a judge Monday to keep the Mar-a-Lago search warrant affidavit sealed from the public, arguing it included too many sensitive details about the ongoing probe Former President Donald Trump has expressed outrage over last Monday's raid of his Florida home and private club, where a receipt says boxes of classified documents were removed  Attorney General Merrick Garland gave the go-head for the warrant and property receipt to be released, but the DOJ doesn't...
    On September 8th, 1974, then-President Gerald Ford pardoned his predecessor Richard Nixon "for any crimes that he might have committed against the United States." Ford claimed at the time that his decision to grant clemency to Nixon, who resigned on August 9th amid the Watergate scandal, was necessary to help the country heal from "our long national nightmare." It was deeply unpopular with the American public and ultimately led to his defeat to Democrat Jimmy Carter in the 1976 election. Ford's legacy-defining act was based on a memo that the Department of Justice authored as Nixon's troubles mounted. It stated that "the indictment or criminal prosecution of a sitting President would impermissibly undermine the capacity of the executive branch to perform its constitutionally assigned functions." By clearing Nixon of wrongdoing, Ford established a de facto precedent that sitting and former presidents should be immune from prosecution – other than impeachment by Congress – for crimes that were committed while they were in office. READ MORE: 'Ever-shifting explanations': Donald Trump’s defenders struggle to keep their stories straight On Monday,...
    Donald Trump's legal predicament may have worsened, legal experts said, after a bombshell report published Saturday evening by The New York Times. "The Justice Department also subpoenaed surveillance footage from Mar-a-Lago recorded over a 60-day period, including views from outside the storage room. According to a person briefed on the matter, the footage showed that, after one instance in which Justice Department officials were in contact with Mr. Trump’s team, boxes were moved in and out of the room," Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush reported. "That activity prompted concern among investigators about the handling of the material. It is not clear when precisely the footage was from during the lengthy back-and-forth between Justice Department officials and Mr. Trump’s advisers, or whether the subpoena to Mr. Trump seeking additional documents had already been issued. Former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti noted the story and tweeted, "It sounds like DOJ has reason to be concerned that it *still* may not have recovered all of the classified material taken by Trump." Watergate prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks said, "obviously that raises many questions since it...
    Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) has introduced articles of impeachment against Attorney General Merrick Garland following a raid on former President Donald Trump’s home. Among the Georgia Republican’s complaints is that Garland is treating the Bureau – the country’s preeminent federal police force – like a “federal police force” that is working on behalf of Democrats. Greene shared a copy of the resolution on Twitter Friday evening. Read my articles of impeachment against Merrick Garland.#ImpeachGarland pic.twitter.com/mfmr0WuGV5 — Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene???????? (@RepMTG) August 12, 2022 On page 2 of the document, which is co-sponsored by Reps. Clay Higgins (R-LA) and Mary Miller (R-IL), Greene makes the following argument: Attorney General Garland has failed to uphold his oath and has instead overseen a denigration of the principles of our democratic republic by politicizing the Department of Justice, and utilizing the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a Federal police force to punish or intimidate anyone who questions or opposes the current regime. Greene goes on to accuse Garland of persecuting Trump while acting on behalf of President Joe Biden in...
    Former President Donald Trump gives a speech during the 2022 edition of the Conservative Political Action Conference. Images taken on a live feed on a computer. Adrien Fillon/ZUMA Press Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.In the days since the FBI raided former former President Donald Trump’s home, the Palm Beach club Mar-a-Lago, Republicans have treated it as the tyrannical act of an out-of-control Democratic administration, conspiratorial social media spaces have hummed with talk of revolution, and an armed Ohio man was killed trying to enter an FBI field office. But it’s only in the last day that the why behind all of this drama began to come to light.   For several days, the press wondered what kind of document recovery had prompted a raid on a former president’s home. On Thursday night, the Washington Post reported that the FBI was looking for documents related to nuclear weapons. Trump, the Justice Department believed, might be keeping documents that are critical to national security and classified at the highest level, in...
    Christina Bobb, an attorney for former President Donald Trump, was vague and evasive when NewsNation’s Leland Vittert asked why Trump does not just release the warrant for the FBI raid on his home. Attorney General Merrick Garland addressed the raid on Mar-a-Lago Thursday afternoon. He said he personally signed off on the warrant before it was approved by a judge. The Department of Justice is asking the same judge to unseal the warrant and make its contents public. Trump can either consent to its release, or file a motion to block it. Given the severity of accusations made against the FBI, and allegations Trump is holding classified information, there seems to be no reason why the former president would object. On NewsNation’s On Balance, the host interviewed Bobb about Garland’s presser and what Trump intends to do regarding publishing the warrant. “Will the president and his team object to unsealing the search warrant and the evidence recovered?” Vittert asked Bobb. The attorney and former One America News host offered a mouthful of a response: It doesn’t appear at this time like...
    (CNN)The FBI sought to locate classified documents related to nuclear weapons, among other items, when agents searched former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, this week, people familiar with the investigation told The Washington Post. The people did not offer additional details to the Post about "what type of information the agents were seeking" or whether any such documents were recovered, according to the paper.The revelation adds key context to the Justice Department's extraordinary decision to search the home of a former president. Timeline: The Justice Department criminal inquiry into Trump taking classified documents to Mar-a-LagoAs CNN previously reported, the criminal investigation started with concerns about missing documents raised by the National Archives, which made a criminal referral to the Justice Department upon discovering highly sensitive documents among the materials retrieved from Mar-a-Lago in January. The 15 boxes contained some materials that were part of special access programs (SAP), a classification that includes protocols to significantly limit who would have access to the information, according to a source familiar with what the Archives discovered in the...
    Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist Clint Brewer in-studio to examine the process in which the Department of Justice and FBI instituted the raid on former President Donald Trump’s home Monday. Leahy: In studio, the great Clint Brewer, recovering journalist, and all-star panelist. Brewer: (Laughs) I’m no longer “the man about town.” I’m now “the great.” Can I put that on my business card? Leahy: “Man about town.” It has a certain … Brewer: Connotation. Leahy: You’re a family man. You’re not a man about town. Brewer: I’m not a man about town. Leahy: Okay, so let’s go into some of the process details here of what should have happened, what didn’t happen, and why this is such a debacle, politically, for the Department of Justice, and for the FBI, and for the Biden administration. This raid. Brewer: Yes. Some of the natural inclinations of the people who actually do work at the Department...
    The Justice Department has petitioned a judge to unseal the search warrant that led to the FBI's unannounced operation on Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort.  Attorney General Merrick Garland made an in-person statement on Thursday afternoon after growing calls from Republicans for him to speak out about the FBI's unannounced search. The attorney general revealed that he personally approved officials' request to seek a search warrant. Garland took no questions but went out of his way to criticize the recent attacks and threats against law enforcement in the wake of the 'raid.'  The Justice Department only announced Merrick Garland will speak roughly an hour before the attorney general's expected remarks His last-minute appearance comes after the former president claimed his home was 'raided' by federal agents who apparently broke a padlocked door and seized documents sought by the National Archives. Trump has been fuming since revealing news of the search on Monday night, when he said it meant 'dark times for our nation.'  And a day later, FBI agents seized the cellphone of Pennsylvania Rep. Scott Perry, one of Trump's top allies...
    On March 13, 2020, police officers used a fraudulently obtained no-knock warrant to break into Breonna Taylor’s home in Louisville, Kentucky and fire 32 rounds, killing her while she slept. While there was immediate outrage, there has been little in the way of legal accountability for the Louisville metro police officers who shot her or the ones involved in obtaining the warrant. But last week, the US Department of Justice finally announced federal charges against four cops involved with the shooting. READ MORE: Merrick Garland announces bombshell indictments in Breonna Taylor case Prosecuting white power Justice was initially formed to protect the rights of African Americans after the Civil War. While it has mostly abdicated responsibility of its original purpose, prosecuting Breonna Taylor’s murderers and other similar cases could fulfill the promise of early civil rights litigation. The Justice Department was created by a bill signed by President Grant on June 22, 1870. The first full-time attorney general appointed to lead this new “law department” was Amos T. Ackerman. The first mandate of this newly formed...
    (CNN)The FBI and the Justice Department are damned if they do and damned if they don't on the question of whether to promptly explain in public why they searched for missing documents at former President Donald Trump's Florida resort.Attorney General Merrick Garland is facing a cacophony of demands from Republicans to address the operation, including being threatened with withering oversight if the GOP wins the House in November's midterm election.His failure to do so already has created a vacuum filled by Trump's fury, misrepresentations of the search and now conspiracy theories that the bureau planted incriminating evidence at the home of the former President. The conservative media machine is in meltdown mode. Several of the most pro-Trump lawmakers and pundits who excoriated liberal "defund the police" rhetoric are now demanding the defunding and the flushing out of the FBI. This is quite a slogan for a party that prides itself on supporting law and order. And it could portend serious damage to the bureau under a potential future Republican Congress or president -- not to mention the neutering of the...
    The Department of Justice has been ordered to respond to motions to unseal the warrant used in the FBI's raid of former President Trump's Mar-a-Lago home.  The magistrate judge who allegedly approved the unprecedented search, Bruce Reinhart, ordered the DOJ to file a response to motions to unseal from the Albany Times Union and conservative group Judicial Watch.  Reinhart said the DOJ's response may be redacted 'as necessary to avoid disclosing matters already under seal.' The DOJ now has until Monday to respond.  Appointed to his current position in 2018, Reinhart, who is believed to have signed the sealed FBI warrant, recused himself in June from a lawsuit between Trump and Hillary Clinton because of 'personal bias.' Trump had sued Clinton, the Democratic National Committee and other political entities for promoting stories he had colluded with Russia during the 2016 campaign.   Eric said lawyer Christina Bobb was forced to wait at the end of a driveway during the search. Pictured: Armed Secret Service agents stand outside an entrance to former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, late Monday, August 8 in...
    Republican nominee for the 5th Congressional District and Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles critcized the “Department of Justice weaponization of the FBI to advance a partisan political agenda solely aimed to ‘get Trump'” in a campaign press statement issued on Tuesday that decried the FBI raid on the former president’s Florida home. Ogles blasted the move by the Biden Department of Justice’s FBI and compared the organization to a “third-world cesspool.” “The Biden Department of Justice increasingly looks like a banana republic you would find in a third-world cesspool where political payback and partisan persecution have replaced a fair and just system operating under the rule of law. Targeting political enemies to advance the interests of a failing presidency is not the way we expect our leaders to behave. Frankly, it’s a disgusting overreach that deserves the outrage of all decent and law-abiding Americans regardless of political affiliation,” Ogles said in the statement. Ogles added that he believes that Biden, the DOJ, and the FBI have destroyed their credibility. “President Biden and his cronies at the Justice Department and FBI...
    Federal prosecutors are in the final stages of preparing an antitrust case against Google, according to a report, and aiming to file their case in September. The Justice Department has been investigating the tech giant for several years. In 2020 Google was sued both federally and by a coalition of state attorney generals for monopolizing the digital search market.  Google denied the charges, and is petitioning the judge to drop the case: a hearing is scheduled for later this month. On Tuesday, Bloomberg reported that yet another case against Google could be filed next month - this time accusing them of monopolizing digital advertising. Three sources told Bloomberg that investigators with the Justice Department's antitrust division are currently questioning online publishers, to finalize the details for the complaint. The interviews are follow-ups to previous discussions, the sources said.  Google's headquarters are pictured in Mountain View, California. The company could be facing yet another antitrust lawsuit Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google - whose company relies heavily on adverts for its revenue They said it is unclear whether the case will be filed...