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    A proposal to declare San Clemente an abortion-free city has died after an emotional meeting where dozens of residents spoke on both sides of the issue. The City Council voted 3 to 1 Saturday to withdraw the proposal from the agenda of an upcoming meeting. Despite San Clemente’s reputation as a conservative bastion, the proposal has mostly fallen flat. In heavily Democratic California, where the right to an abortion will continue to be protected by state officials after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade, the proposal’s effect would have been largely symbolic. Many residents, including some opposed to abortion, have argued that the issue is outside the city’s purview and that officials should focus on local concerns like homelessness. The coastal Orange County city has no hospitals or clinics that perform abortions, and it has no power to stop residents from seeking the procedure elsewhere. City Councilman Steve Knoblock wrote the proposal, which declared San Clemente a “sanctuary for life,” stated that life begins at conception and opposed the establishment of clinics that...
    The Portsmouth City Council announced its agenda and legislature for its meeting on Monday, August 8th at 6 p.m in its regular location at 728 2nd Street, Portsmouth, Ohio. The following items were listed on the agenda. Second reading ordinances An Ordinance authorizing the City Manager to enter into the Pilot Operating Agreement with Bird Rides, Inc. First reading ordinances Occupying a Condemned Structure of the Codified Ordinances of the City of Portsmouth – Ohio legislation that establishes a fee for citizens to reenter condemned properties. Whereas, the City is experiencing issues that owners are obtaining permits to enter the properties with the intent to remedy the problems that caused the condemnation but said owners are issued permit after permit with little to no progress being made. It is the intent of this amendment that this fee ensure progress is being made when property owners are permitted enter the property to make corrections. Any occupied structure condemned and placarded by the City of Portsmouth or State of Ohio shall be vacated as ordered by the condemnation official. Any person...
    VINCENT, Ala. (AP) — A racist text message sent by a police officer has prompted officials in a small Alabama town to disband their police department and fire the police chief and assistant chief. Vincent Mayor James Latimore on Thursday confirmed that Police Chief James Srygley and Assistant Chief John L. Goss had been dismissed, al.com reported. The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office on Friday condemned the two officers’ actions and said it stands with the city “in providing emergency law enforcement related service to the citizens (of Vincent) at this time.” In the message, which recently surfaced on social media, someone identified as “752″ texts: “What do y’all call a pregnant slave?” An unidentified recipient responds twice: “?” and “??” “752″ answers: “BOGO Buy one, get one free” “This has torn this community apart. It doesn’t matter what color we are as long as we do right by people,” City Councilman Corey Abrams said during Thursday’s council meeting. On Tuesday, Latimore said “appropriate action has been taken” against the officer alleged to have sent the text, though at the...
    Linda Verraster cannot imagine why elected officials in San Clemente would spend time debating abortion. The coastal Orange County city has no hospitals or clinics that perform abortions, and it has no power to stop residents from seeking the procedure elsewhere. There are other issues that need attention, Verraster says, like homelessness and affordable housing. Still, a debate about abortion has been consuming the city and putting it in the spotlight, after Councilman Steve Knoblock proposed that it become a “sanctuary for life,” which would make it an abortion-free zone after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade. Knoblock’s proposal, which is largely symbolic, has upset residents across the political spectrum, including some of his conservative colleagues as well as abortion rights supporters like Verraster. On Saturday, the council will consider whether to remove the proposal from its Aug. 16 meeting agenda. “It’s so far out of their lane that it seems so ridiculous they would bring up something so divisive,” said Verraster, 68, a registered nurse and Democrat who has lived in San Clemente for...
    PALO ALTO — So far five candidates have filed to run for three open city council seats in the November election whose outcome could lead to a political shake-up in the Peninsula’s NIMBY stronghold. With council members Eric Filseth and Tom DuBois terming out of their seats and Alison Cormack deciding not to run for a second term, three open seats could mean the difference between more slow-growth policies for Palo Alto or a political shift toward building more housing. While lately, residents have seen their leaders tout not-in-my-backyard policies on housing, the yes-in-my-back-yard advocates could get more of a voice during this election. For the past two decades the city has been plagued by infighting on the question of whether to build more housing, where to do it and how best to preserve the neighborhood character that has made Palo Alto one of the most liveable communities in the country. While in the past Palo Alto has had YIMBY city council members and was even run by a progressive, building-friendly mayor, the 2020 election saw a strong NIMBY shift...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Nashville’s metro council has dealt a likely final blow to proponents of bringing the 2024 Republican National Convention to the city, leaving Milwaukee as the almost-certain winner to host the GOP’s biggest party. The council of the reliably Democratic city in a Republican southern state voted Tuesday night to spike a bill that would have set up a draft agreement for hosting the event. In the 40-person council, 10 members voted for convention deal and 22 voted against it. The RNC’s site selection panel recommended last month that Milwaukee host the event after the Nashville council withdrew its proposed agreement to host the presidential nominating convention. A revived push for Nashville fared no better. Milwaukee is also a Democratic stronghold, but despite some mixed feelings approved a similar framework in June that runs through the logistics of hosting it there. Whether and how Tennessee’s Republican legislators take aim at Nashville in response to the RNC rejection remains to be seen. GOP House Speaker Cameron Sexton dismissed the city’s leadership on Wednesday as “the most progressive, liberal...
    A MUCH needed boost will be coming in the form of monthly cash payments. Austin, Texas is one step closer to becoming the latest city to offer a guaranteed income pilot program. 1The Austin City Council approved a guaranteed income program to start in September The Austin City Council approved the plan in May but this week agreed to expand it to offer monthly money to 135 families. The city is working with UpTogether, an organization aimed at helping the community achieve success. Contracts are being finalized but the city council said 135 families will be chosen to receive $1,000 a month for one year. Who is eligible? The Austin City Council sent a memo outlining the eligibility process. Read more on guaranteed incomeHELPING HAND Low income households to get $1,000 guaranteed income payments for 24 monthsMONTHLY CHECK Teens to get $350 a month to help teach them about money Participants will be considered if they meet all of the following criteria: Live within the city of Austin and Travis County limits Applicant must be at least 18 years...
    (The Center Square) – Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl said it is gratifying to have the city council approve the expenditure of $3 million for 46 Ford K8 vehicles to stay ahead of supply chain disruptions. “We are very happy to see this request move forward,” he said. “A police officer’s vehicle is, in essence, an office they spend their entire day working out of. Having a fleet that is modern and not in disrepair is not only essential for providing the level of safety and service that all officers desire to give the community, but it is also a morale boost for the department.” The Spokane Police Department will now be able to take advantage of a narrow window in late August or early September to order replacement patrol cars through at least 2023, he said. SPD Major Eric Olson recently told the city’s Public Safety & Community Health Committee, comprised of city councilors, that the last state window for ordering vehicles had stayed open less than 24 hours. So many orders were received in that...
    The San Clemente City Council is set to consider a resolution in a couple of weeks that would declare the city a “sanctuary for life,” making it an abortion-free zone. The resolution, which was written and proposed by Councilman Steven Knoblock, states that the City Council “considers life to begin at conception” and stands against the establishment of Planned Parenthood health centers or as well as any other clinics where abortions are performed. “There probably isn’t a family in America that hasn’t been impacted by abortion,” Knoblock said. “The [resolution] will get people thinking about what society has been doing for 50 years.” The resolution, which will be discussed at the next council meeting on Aug. 16, doesn’t provide specific enforcement measures but does state that the resolution will be enforced by all of the “power and authority” of the council. It also provides an exception for abortions in cases in which the mother’s life is at stake and in cases of rape or incest, stating that the council will remain neutral. World & Nation...
    The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to prohibit homeless people from setting up tents within 500 feet of schools and daycare centers, during a raucous meeting where protesters shouted down council members and, at one point, halted the meeting. The new restrictions, approved on an 11 to 3 vote, dramatically expand the number of locations where sleeping and camping are off-limits. And they come amid a furious debate over how the city should respond to encampments that have taken hold in many parts of the city. Audience members repeatedly chanted “shut it down” as Councilman Joe Buscaino, a longtime proponent of increased enforcement, attempted to speak in favor of the restrictions. Council President Nury Martinez then stopped the meeting for more than an hour so police could clear the room. After audience members had exited, council members reconvened, discussed the measure and voted. “I think people were intent this morning to shut this place down and keep us from doing the very job that we were all elected to do,” Martinez said before the vote. “And that I...
    MILPITAS — Milpitas Councilmember Anthony Phan announced that he is running for mayor, adding to an increasingly crowded field of candidates for the city’s top job that oversees its roughly 80,000 residents. The move pits Phan against his fellow council colleagues Karina Dominguez and Vice Mayor Carmen Montano, who announced over the past year that they, too, are in the running for mayor. Current Mayor Rich Tran is seeking a council seat after terming out of his current position. In an interview, the 28-year-old Phan said that he would be running to “reunite the city” and “restore confidence” in light of the challenges Milpitas has faced because of the pandemic and the looming recession. “We need a leader to meet this moment of challenge and opportunity,” Phan said. “I’m committed to productive dialogue. That’s something I can say confidently. I am committed to bringing people together, even when we don’t disagree.” If elected, Phan said that he would want to bolster public safety by shifting around budget priorities, including hiring more dispatchers, restoring traffic enforcement operations and increasing overall patrols....
    SAN JOSE — After discovering the site of one of the city’s latest tiny home communities is set to be built on dedicated park land, Councilmember David Cohen is asking the city to put the project on “pause” and start looking for other alternative sites in North San Jose to house homeless residents. In late June, the council voted 8-2, with Councilmember Matt Mahan and Cohen dissenting, to move forward with six new tiny home villages in the 2022-2023 fiscal year. The dorm-like shelters have become San Jose’s latest strategy in solving a burgeoning homelessness crisis that has grown an estimated 11% since 2019. Earlier this year, the city set a goal of constructing 400 tiny homes that will act as interim housing while homeless residents await more permanent housing. But one of those sites, on Noble Avenue near the Penitencia Creek Trail, has drawn the ire of residents who are concerned about its proximity to an elementary school and a library. In the weeks following the council’s vote, Cohen, who represents the area, said he discovered the Noble site...
    by Roger Simon   The two finalists in the competition for the 2024 Presidential Convention are Nashville, TN and Milwaukee, Wisc0nsin. As of July 15, 2022, Milwaukee is very much in the lead. “Today, the Site Selection Committee voted to recommend Milwaukee to host the 2024 Republican National Convention and it is a testament to the forthright and professional behavior embraced by Milwaukee’s city leaders throughout the process,” RNC Senior Advisor Richard Waters said in a statement. “A final decision will be made by Chairwoman [Ronna] McDaniel and the full RNC in the coming weeks. I have reason to believe that Nashville’s behavior may well not have been  “forthright and professional,” but this still a huge a mistake. One of the major reasons for national political conventions is publicity for the party and its candidate through making people want to attend in person or to watch on television. Indeed, this is likely the most important reason. No city is the USA is more prepared for this than Nashville, other than Las Vegas.  Indeed, downtown Nashville has been nicknamed NashVegas for a...
    On July 8, Minneapolis City Council Member Michael Rainville held a public safety meeting for his Ward 3 constituents at which he made several troubling generalizations about recent crime downtown. Notably, he said he was “going over to a mosque in Northeast to meet with Somali elders and tell them their children can no longer have that kind of behavior.” He went to the Dar Al-Qalam Islamic Center that afternoon. Generalizing the actions taken by a group of young people on one night to an entire nationality is racist and dangerous. Assuming that those youth are also Muslim and visiting a mosque to confront religious leaders about their behavior demonstrates incredible ignorance and willingness to scapegoat our fellow Minneapolis residents. Many local leaders and organizations quickly realized the harm his actions would cause and released public statements condemning Rainville’s behavior. To date, more than 60 people and groups have made statements, including nine council members, 15 Minnesota legislators and the Guthrie Theater. Noticeably absent from the list? Council Vice President Linea Palmisano. After days of constituents reaching out, Palmisano responded...
    by Pafoua Yang   Two Minneapolis City Council members have joined forces with pro-choice organizations in an effort to push the city to pay for abortions. Council Member Robin Wonsley said last week that she and Council Member Aisha Chughtai are launching “Fund Reproductive Care Minneapolis” with nonprofits Our Justice and Pro-Choice Minnesota to secure municipal funding for abortions. Proud to be out at the @UnRestrictMN rally with my sisters @aishaforward10 and Wintana standing up with people across this state who support the right to choose. Especially as we launch #FundReproCareMpls with @OurJusticeRJ and @ProChoiceMN to secure city funding for abortions. pic.twitter.com/3wGJvkHUif — Robin4mpls (@robin4mpls) July 17, 2022 Our Justice is an “abortion fund providing direct financial and logistic support for people seeking abortion care,” according to its website. The two nonprofits are asking supporters to sign a petition to pressure Mayor Jacob Frey and the City Council to directly fund abortion. “Now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, abortion will become even more inaccessible for poor people, people of color, queer and trans people. It’s not enough to protect the access...
    Antioch took a step this week toward helping tenants facing large rent hikes by agreeing to craft rules to stabilize rental costs and add other protections. Though no action was taken at a special meeting Tuesday, council members directed staff to draft a rent stabilization ordinance and bring it back for a vote next month. Dozens attended the packed meeting where more than 25 spoke about pending rent hikes – some as large as $300 or more a month – that could force some families to move or even wind up on the streets, they said. Josefina Mercado, a resident of Delta Pines Apartments, said in Spanish that her apartment had cockroaches and that she supported controlling rents and hoped the city would do it quickly. Dulce Franco of Casa Blanca apartments said she received notice her rent was increasing by 33%, too much for the single mom with two children. The big increase is causing her much “angst and anxiety,” and she will have to move out of the city because rents are too high, she said in Spanish....
    PORTSMOUTH – The Portsmouth City Council has voted to table its proposed Standard of Care Legislation that targets addiction treatment facilities. The legislation would require a $10,000 registration fee on addiction treatment facilities, as well as impose a 1% tax on inpatient facilities and a 2% tax on outpatient facilities. Mayor Dunne has previously said the funds from the fees and taxes would be used to offset the cost of the additional emergency services and code enforcement department due to the influx of those seeking, graduating, or leaving treatment. “This acknowledges the amount of cost the city experiences,” said Mayor Dunne. “From police, fire, to code enforcement…there is a strain on our departments. We really don’t know the number of facilities or the proportion of individuals treated from Scioto County, or even the surrounding region, as compared to other areas throughout Ohio. Portsmouth has been asked to take on quite a lot and our departments have told us this.” Mayor Dunne said the legislation was also proposed to eliminate bad actors in the treatment field. However, treatment facility owners and...
    A Texas House investigation condemned what the lawmakers called "an overall lackadaisical approach" by federal, state, and local authorities to the shooting. There were 376 responding law enforcement officers at Robb Elementary School, yet the report found that it took authorities 77 minutes from the time the gunman entered the school building to breach the classroom he had occupied and neutralize him. The report also said that numerous law enforcement officials abandoned police protocol and training for active shooter situations. "They failed to prioritize saving the lives of innocent victims over their own safety," the report said. The Uvalde City Council has already placed Lt. Mariano Pargas, who was the police department's acting chief on the day of the massacre, on administrative leave pending an investigation into whether he should have assumed command. Additionally, the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District has put its chief of police, Pete Arredondo, on administrative leave and suspended Robb Elementary School principal Mandy Gutierrez, who was found to have been aware of security issues with improperly locking doors but failed to act....
    Antioch moved a step closer toward creating bridge housing for the homeless by agreeing to lease a downtown motel for that purpose. The council approved the lease with the Rudram LLC on a 3-to-2 vote on Tuesday, with Vice Mayor Mike Barbanica and Councilwoman Lori Ogorchock dissenting. The owners of the Executive Inn motel at 515 E. 18th St. will be paid $1,168,000 per year for the two-year lease, money that will come from the American Rescue Plan Act funds, which the council approved spending for this purpose in April. Under the agreement, the master lease includes furnishings for the 33-room motel – minus phones and TVs – and an option to purchase the 11,040-square-foot motel when the lease ends. The owners also will provide maintenance, repairs and maintain the landscape. Long in the making, the city’s Non-Congregate Bridge Housing Program aims to provide chronically unhoused adults with a safe place to stay while connecting them with resources to transition into more stable or permanent housing, according to Rosanna Bayon Moore, assistant city manager. Trained staff will be on site...
    The Uvalde City Council announced Tuesday that it will investigate every city police officer who responded to the May 24 shooting at Robb Elementary School. The council has appointed former Austin, Texas, police detective Jesse Prado as the lead investigator. Prado will be tasked with individually interviewing 25 officers from the city's 39-member police force as part of the investigation, according to the city council. The pledge to investigate the responding officers is the latest attempt by officials in the small Texas town at holding people responsible for the law enforcement response to the shooting that a state investigation has found was plagued with failures. "This investigation is looking at every single officer and what his actions, what he did, what our policy says, and basically, we're gonna get a report on everybody," Councilman Ernest "Chip" King III said, according to CNN. King added that the city "will act" on the results of the investigation and that "everybody that's Uvalde PD that was there will be held accountable for their actions." ROBB ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL SUSPENDED BY UVALDE SCHOOL...
    Welcome to the Glean, MinnPost’s twice-daily roundup of Minnesota news. In the Star Tribune, Liz Navratil writes: “Minneapolis officials announced Tuesday that they will resume work on development projects that had been postponed after a judge tossed the 2040 Comprehensive Plan that guides development in the city. Hennepin County District Judge Joseph Klein on Tuesday granted city officials a reprieve that allows them to enforce the 2040 Plan while they appeal his earlier ruling overturning it. Klein wrote in a six-page order that he sought to weigh environmental concerns brought by local activists against the city’s arguments that blocking it from enforcing the plan would cause a cascade of logistical and legal problems.” WCCO-TV reports: “The last two former Minneapolis police officers to be sentenced for violating George Floyd’s civil rights are scheduled to learn their penalties Wednesday, which could set in motion another round of plea deal discussions in state court over a killing that sparked a reckoning on racial injustice. J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao were convicted in February of two counts of violating Floyd’s civil rights...
    SACRAMENTO — Sacramento city leaders on Tuesday approved a controversial plan to open a homeless center near a children’s receiving home. City councilmembers voted unanimously to turn the former Powerhouse Science Center on Auburn Boulevard into a shelter where homeless people can escape the weather 24/7. READ MORE: Modesto Police Release Bodycam Footage Of Deadly Shooting After Family Announces Legal ActionNeighbors have opposed the plan saying it puts kids in the receiving home at risk. But Mayor Darrell Steinberg said he refused to let the facility sit empty. He cited a recent count that found Sacramento’s homeless population has almost doubled in three years. READ MORE: Crews Stop Forward Progress Of Fire That Forced Evacuations In El Dorado CountyJust hours before that vote, Sacramento business leaders released their own plan to solve the city’s homeless crisis. MORE NEWS: Tahoe City Downtown Association Employee Riding Golf Cart Dies After Being Rear-Ended On Highway 28The Sacramento Chamber of Commerce wants to implement a no-camping ordinance across the county, add temporary shelter sites and would require the county to offer treatment for substance...
    Uvalde, Texas (CNN)The Uvalde City Council vowed Tuesday to investigate every city police officer who responded to the massacre at the Robb Elementary School in May."This investigation is looking at every single officer and what his actions -- what he did, what our policy says -- and basically, we're gonna get a report on everybody," council member Ernest "Chip" King III said, adding, "we will act on it, and we promise that to you."Uvalde police officers who responded to the scene will be interviewed by the council's appointed lead investigator, Jesse Prado, a former Austin police detective, King said."He's gonna be conducting the investigation and we're gonna let the investigation go, see what he determines, but everybody that's Uvalde PD that was there will be held accountable for their actions," he said."We owe it to, to the families. We want to get it right," another council member, Everardo "Lalo" Zamora, said, alluding to the heartbreak suffered by the Texas community since the assault that left 19 students and two teachers dead.Read MoreThe law enforcement response to the massacre, the second...
    The Columbus, Ohio City Council this week indefinitely tabled an ordinance to spend $253,000 on the possible reinstallation of the Christopher Columbus statue that stood outside of City Hall until the summer of 2020.  If adopted, the policy would permit the municipal Department of Development to agree to a contract with Designing Local Ltd., a planning company, to initiate a series of public meetings about whether the statue would return.  Residents of Genoa, Italy, presented the statue to the city as a gift in 1955. Mayor Andrew Ginther (D) ordered the figure’s removal in June 2020, alleging Columbus’s expeditions to the Americas were destructive and racist. The statue has been in storage since it was uninstalled at a cost of $90,000.  “For many people in our community, the statue represents patriarchy, oppression and divisiveness,” Ginther said in a statement at the time of the removal. “That does not represent our great city, and we will no longer live in the shadow of our ugly past. Now is the right time to replace this statue with artwork that demonstrates our enduring...
    FREMONT — Raises are in store for almost every city employee in Fremont, even though the city is still leaning on more than $20 million in federal pandemic recovery funds to patch holes in its budget in the coming years. The pay increases mean Fremont might have to pull back some planned additions to its workforce, such as two more police officers and nine positions in the fire department to staff a new fire truck company. The city’s 187 police officers and sergeants and 133 firefighters and battalion chiefs are getting the biggest paycheck increases of 17% spread out over this year, retroactive to July 1, and the coming two fiscal years. Most other city employees will see 14% raises over that time period, according to city reports. As of March, before the raises took effect, a first-year Fremont police officer was earning a base salary of nearly $111,000, with step increases up to nearly $135,000. Some of the longest-tenured officers could earn up to $153,000 in base pay. A new police sergeant was earning $133,000 annually, with steps up...
    Animal rights activists took their complaints about Foster City’s plans for managing a growing population of Canada geese to the city council Monday night, serving the city’s leaders with a “gander slander” citation. For more than three years, Foster City has been trying to deal with a gaggle of Canada geese that just won’t leave a city park and lagoon. Each year, their numbers have grown, rising from 181 in 2020 to 323 the following year. All indications are that the number will increase this year. Last week, the council decided to consider lethal measures while continuing to use other non-lethal methods and exploring other options. The council, however, made it clear that while it doesn’t relish killing the birds, the situation at the park has become unhealthy for bird and human alike. Among the concerns: Lagoon water quality and other sanitation issues continue to grow in the city’s parks and open spaces. A statement on the city’s web site says testing shows elevated bacteria levels in the lagoon which are directly affecting the local waterfowl population. Avian diseases also spread...
    OAKLAND — The city council plans to approve a $1.5 million settlement Tuesday to resolve a case brought by former Oakland Police Chief Anne Kirkpatrick in the wake of her firing by the city’s police commission and mayor two years ago. Kirkpatrick’s contract was terminated without cause in a special February 2020 meeting by Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and the city’s police commission. The former police chief filed suit against the city in August 2020, alleging her firing came in retaliation for exposing abuses of power and corruption within the commission. This May, a federal jury found in a civil trial that Kirkpatrick had been wrongfully fired for blowing the whistle on some commissioners’ questionable conduct. That jury found for Kirkpatrick’s whistleblower claim, awarding her $337,635 in damages, the same amount she would have received in severance pay had she not chosen to sue the city in August 2020. But the jury sided with the city against her claim that she was fired for exercising her First Amendment protected-speech rights. According to a statement by Oakland City Attorney Barbara Parker,...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The Better Government Association helped draft a reform measure directed at the city's board of ethics.The Better Government Association said the ethics ordinance is a step toward reform, but more work is ahead.SEE ALSO | Remote meetings led to skipped votes in Chicago City Council, BGA findsSome of the changes in the new ordinance include strengthening fines for ethics violations, prohibiting lobbying on the Chicago City Council floor including by prior council members, and expanding conflict of interest provisions to cover all city officers.The Better Government Association also pushed for a requirement that alderpersons recusing themselves from a vote be absent from discussion of the matter as well, and for the expansion of campaign finance rules to cover subcontractors on city contracts.Read more here and here.
    On June 30, the Minneapolis City Council passed a resolution to advance its Hiawatha Campus Expansion project in the East Phillips neighborhood. This project aims to demolish the former Roof Depot building and build a consolidated Public Works campus for the city. The project centralizes equipment storage and refueling for hundreds of utility trucks and heavy diesel equipment and adds a 400+ slot parking ramp. The resolution approved a list of terms for a memorandum of understanding (MOU) proposed by the mayor to the East Phillips Neighborhood Institute (EPNI), providing a three-acre parcel of land on the property after demolition. EPNI, largely led by East Phillips area residents, has worked diligently for years to stop the demolition project, which they say will further endanger the health and well-being of community members. They envision repurposing this building as a resource with which to create green jobs and development that would strengthen the community. At council meetings, the city and the mayor hailed this “deal” as a beacon of hope in a tumultuous time and a celebration of the power of good-faith...
    As a community advocate, Joe Delgado has learned to expect dysfunction from the city of Los Angeles. For months, he and others with the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment have been trying to get help for hundreds of Black and Latino tenants living in slum-like conditions at the Chesapeake Apartments, a sprawling complex in the heart of the L.A. City Council’s 10th District. “They’ve identified potentially 160 units that have lead exposure where kids are living,” Delgado told me. “And there has not been any action taken to come and do blood testing to make sure these kids don’t have permanent brain damage.” But, as difficult as it has been for him to get the city to act, chances are, it’s about to get a lot worse. On Tuesday, an L.A. County Superior Court judge ruled that Herb Wesson, the termed-out councilman who has been representing the 10th District on an interim basis, can no longer perform “any functions” of the job. For now anyway. California Judge temporarily bars Herb Wesson from performing L.A. City Council duties A...
    (CBS DETROIT) — A move to get Detroiters in the recreational marijuana business is sparking backlash, but Detroit Council President Pro Tem James Tate says the ordinance is meant to ensure ownership opportunities for residents. “Currently, in the city of Detroit we have 75 medical marijuana facilities and the overwhelming majority, I’ll say less than 10, according to our calculations are owned by Detroiters,” Tate said. READ MORE: Ford To Cut 8,000 Jobs To Fund Its EV Efforts, Report SaysBut two lawsuits claim Detroit’s recreational marijuana ordinance violates state law. Jars Cannabis argues it blocks existing medical marijuana centers from getting recreational licenses until 2027. The House of Dank says giving preference to Detroit residents is unconstitutional. Tate believes it’s a matter of fairness. He says the war on drugs disproportionately targeted Black residents for marijuana convictions. “That same plant that has caused so much harm in so many families in the city of Detroit is now being allowed to create generational wealth for others,” he said. READ MORE: Michigan Matters: Roundtable Sizes Up The August 2nd PrimaryTate says the...
    A wealthy Minneapolis neighborhood paid the city's police department $210,000 for extra officer patrols amid a skyrocketing crime surge. Extra patrols were dispatched to Lowry Hill, where more than 40 percent of residents earn six figures, after the community raised funds to pay cops $107 per hour worked. The community requested additional police presence after Minneapolis saw increased violence and criminal activity after outcry over George Floyd's murder prompted the woke city council to cut $1 million from the police department. Despite the budget cut in 2020, the Minneapolis Police Department currently operates on a $196 million budget - about $3 million more than two years ago. The Minneapolis Safety Initiative, a resident-created nonprofit crowdfunding for additional police patrols, calls the program a 'temporary measure to address the current crime wave while MPD continues to rebuild to full staffing levels.' Residents are encouraged to donate $220 monthly, for six months, in order for the initiative to have its 'desired impact.'  Resident in Lowry Hill (pictured), a wealthy Minneapolis neighborhood, paid the city's police department $210,000 for extra officer patrols amid a skyrocketing crime surge...
    Los Angeles City Controller Ron Galperin has cut off Councilman Herb Wesson’s pay and benefits after a judge temporarily barred Wesson from performing the duties of his office. “Because there is a legal order barring Mr. Wesson from performing the functions of a council member, the controller is suspending his salary payments, effective July 19,” Galperin spokesperson Chelsea Lucktenberg said Thursday. On Wednesday, City Council President Nury Martinez appointed Wesson’s chief of staff, Heather Hutt, as caretaker to handle matters in the 10th District, Martinez’s spokeswoman said. Hutt will represent the district but cannot vote on items before the council. Wesson, who had already served three terms on the council, was appointed earlier this year to temporarily replace Mark Ridley-Thomas, who was suspended after being indicted on corruption charges by federal prosecutors last fall. Ridley-Thomas has denied the charges and plans to fight them in court this fall. His allies sued earlier this year to prevent the council from appointing Wesson and requested that he be removed from the post pending the ruling from the judge. In a...
    PLACERVILLE (CBS13) — Placerville city council members say that paying respect to fallen El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Brian Ishmael by naming the post office after him isn’t appropriate due to the building’s rough condition. Deputy Ishmael was killed in a shootout in 2019. He was a longtime resident of Placerville and served on the city’s police force before joining the sheriff’s office. READ MORE: Multiple Dogs Rescued From An El Dorado Hills Home, Woman Arrested For Animal CrueltyA stretch of Highway 50 that runs through Placerville is named in his honor, as is the sheriff’s shooting range. Pride is not a word council member Thomas uses to describe his post office building. Thomas was surprised to learn this is the building Congressmember Tom McClintock wants to be renamed in honor of fallen Deputy Ishmael. “The first thing that came to mind is there is no way I would want my family name on this, let alone the family name of a fallen officer that we really want to honor,” Thomas said. In the council meeting seeking a city...
    ANAHEIM, Calif. (KABC) -- The Anaheim City Council has rejected a proposal to add a 2% ticket tax on theme parks and other big venues.If the measure had passed, it would have asked voters to weigh in on the issue in November.Councilman Jose Moreno proposed the measure and said it could have raised up to $82 million per year for city services and projects.Moreno had previously said the money raised from the tax would have gone toward restoring seven-day-a-week library services, hiring more police and firefighters, or building and staffing a dedicated senior center to serve residents.The Walt Disney Co., which owns Disneyland, is the parent company of this station.
    SANTA ANA, Calif. (KABC) -- A proposed law in Santa Ana to classify attacks on street vendors as hate crimes needs more research, according to City Council members.The proposal was introduced after a video that showed a barber giving a free haircut and $100 cash to a vendor who had been robbed several times. The video went viral on social media.The Santa Ana City Council discussed the proposal at its regular meeting on Tuesday night but did not vote on it, opting instead to send it back to city staff for more research.Instead, council members want to see if hate-crime enhancements for attacks on street vendors would be enforceable.
    (The Center Square) – The Philadelphia public school district must return $35 million to taxpayers after a court decided the city unconstitutionally targeted commercial properties for tax increases. The School District of Philadelphia said the final appeal in a long-running lawsuit over a city tax strategy was denied at its July 14 school board meeting. Local governments will have to return $118 million in total to commercial property owners. The school district said in an email to The Center Square that it already budgeted for the loss of the $35 million in its fiscal year 2022 fund balance. The district's total revenue in 2021 was $3.9 billion. The lawsuit claimed the city selectively reassessed only commercial properties while the state constitution states that reassessments must include all properties within the city. The city of Philadelphia reassessed 41,730 nonresidential properties and levied $118 million in additional taxes on those properties in 2018. However, the city didn't reassess 538,380 residential properties. The court found the City Council pressured the city's tax assessors to complete the commercial reevaluations...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The Chicago City Council will discuss a number of issues Wednesday, including a proposal to raise the threshold for speed camera tickets.However, Mayor Lori Lightfoot has expressed her disapproval of the measure.Speed tickets in Chicago is once again back on the City Council's agenda after being discussed for months.SEE MORE: Chicago City Council speed camera vote delayed again as meeting devolves into chaosThe issue has stalled in Council as aldermen consider whether or not to raise how fast drivers can go before getting a ticket.Right now, it's 6 miles per hour over the speed limit, but Alderman Anthony Beale has proposed raising that back to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit.RELATED: Group says Chicago's new speed camera law unfairly impacts minority driversMayor Lightfoot has said raising speeds for drivers will only increase traffic-related crashes and deaths, while the alderman said residents are being hit with very expensive fines.The speed camera citations have generated $59 million in revenue for the city since being imposed in March of last year.The Finance Committee already approved the higher speed...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- An ordinance that could help stop drag racing in the area goes before the Chicago City Council Wednesday.A vote could come Wednesday to impose harsh fines on drivers caught drag racing on city streets.For weeks now, residents have been dealing with blocked streets and people drag racing or drifting in their cars.SEE MORE: City Council considers drag racing ordinance as video shows cars doing stunts in West LoopSome aldermen came together, proposing the ordinance which would allow police to impound cars involved.Residents have said they are fed up."I can't tell you the number of times I've been woken up, 1:30, 2, 2:30 in the morning, and sometimes it goes on for almost two hours," Pat Glatz said.RELATED: Chicago to host 1st ever NASCAR street race in Grant Park area next summerVideo from drifting cars in the West Loop recently surfaced."It's very, very dangerous," 18th Ward Alderman Derrick Curtis said. "We're not only trying to protect the lives of our constituents, but we're trying to protect your life and your audience's lives. So I'm asking and pleading that...
    A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that L.A. City Councilman Herb Wesson cannot perform the duties of his office, at least temporarily. The move hands a victory to a civil rights group and allies of Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who was suspended after being indicted by federal prosecutors last fall. Wesson, who already served three terms on the council, was appointed as a temporary replacement by the council earlier this year. Representatives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference of Southern California and several other plaintiffs objected to the appointment and sued. They requested that Wesson be removed from the post pending the verdict from the judge. Superior Court Judge Mary H. Strobel didn’t remove Wesson but instead said the longtime Los Angeles politician is “enjoined from performing any functions of a council member.“ California Judge’s order blocks Herb Wesson from serving on L.A. City Council A judge issues a temporary restraining order barring Wesson from participating as an L.A. council member, handing a victory to allies of Mark Ridley-Thomas. Strobel said the plaintiffs, who also...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A Los Angeles City Council committee was scheduled to hold an emergency meeting Tuesday regarding the conditions at city animal shelters.The meeting is in response to a Los Angeles Times story that reported animal shelters are overcrowded and that some dogs spend weeks or months inside their kennels without being walked.Councilman Paul Koretz, chair of the Personnel, Audits and Animal Welfare Committee, called the emergency meeting after what his office described as "disturbing and unacceptable" revelations in the story, published last week.Los Angeles Animal Services relies mostly on unpaid volunteers to walk and exercise dogs, according to the Times.LA animal shelters reach capacity, ask Angelenos to adopt or foster petsEMBED More News Videos Los Angeles animal shelters have reached capacity, and workers are asking Angelenos to help by adopting or fostering animals. Councilmen Marqueece Harris-Dawson and Bob Blumenfield also voiced concerns to the Times after the story was published.In a statement last week, Koretz said he meets with the animal services department every month to discuss "every aspect of the department's operations, including complaints I've received...
    If you were to listen to Fox News, Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva and felon O.J. Simpson, you would think West Hollywood is under assault. They say crime is out of control, residents are cowering in their homes, and the blasé West Hollywood City Council just made the place more dangerous by voting to defund the Sheriff’s Department. If you listen to activists on the left, the City Council is keeping far too many armed deputies on the streets, and those who think differently are being swayed by right-wing “copaganda.” Reality, of course, is more nuanced. The City Council voted in late June to reduce the number of deputies in the West Hollywood sheriff’s station gradually and to increase the number of unarmed security guards — dubbed “ambassadors” — patrolling the streets. Their action has placed the city on the front lines of the culture wars. California Starbucks says these L.A. stores are too unsafe to operate. Not everyone buys that While many Starbucks customers and workers said they understood concerns around stores given the worsening...
    The Anaheim City Council will consider Tuesday asking voters to impose a 2% gate tax on visitors to Disneyland and the Honda Center to generate extra revenues to pay for additional staff and new city amenities. If the council agrees to put the measure on the Nov. 8 ballot and a majority of voters approve it, the gate tax could generate $55 million to $82 million a year to be deposited in the city general fund account, according to a city report. The proposal was made last month by City Councilman Jose Moreno, who said he hoped the gate tax money would bolster a city budget that he said has been stretched thin. Moreno, who is serving his last year on the council, has been a vocal critic of tax breaks for Disneyland. “Given how much we have struggled ... just to help our seniors, we really need revenues,” he said when proposing the gate tax last month. “For a city of our size, we need more revenue.” A Disneyland spokesperson declined to comment on the proposal. A representative...
    Live from Music Row Monday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed Karen Moore, candidate for the Davidson County Republican State Executive Committee in-studio to discuss yesterday’s rally against Nashville’s mayor and city council Amendment One proposal. Leahy: In-studio right now, our very good friend Karen Moore, who is a candidate in the 20th district here and for the Republican State Executive Committee. Good morning, Karen. How are you doing? Moore: I’m great, thank you. Good morning. Leahy: Well, we’re glad to have you in. And this is your second time in-studio with us? Moore: Yes, it is. Leahy: How much radio have you done before? Moore: This would be it. Leahy: This is it. So you’ve been in-studio twice? This is the second time. Moore: Yeah, I’m old-hat. Leahy: Now I want to talk about, so you’re running for State Executive Committee? We’ll get to that in a minute. There was a rally in which you were part...
    ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Tickets to Disneyland could soon be getting more expensive.On Tuesday, the Anaheim City Council will consider asking voters for a 2% ticket tax on theme parks and other big venues.Councilman Jose Moreno said the measure could raise up to $82 million a year for city services and projects.Moreno said the funds would go toward building a second public pool, restoring seven-day-a-week library services, hiring more police and firefighters, or building and staffing a dedicated senior center to serve residents.Five of the council's six members would have to vote in favor of the measure to get it on the ballot this fall.The Walt Disney Co., which owns Disneyland, is the parent company of this station.
    ANAHEIM, Calif. (KABC) -- Tickets to Disneyland could soon be getting more expensive.On Tuesday, the Anaheim City Council will consider asking voters for a 2% ticket tax on theme parks and other big venues.Councilman Jose Moreno said the measure could raise up to $82 million a year for city services and projects.Moreno said the funds would go toward building a second public pool, restoring seven-day-a-week library services, hiring more police and firefighters, or building and staffing a dedicated senior center to serve residents.Five of the council's six members would have to vote in favor of the measure to get it on the ballot this fall.The Walt Disney Co., which owns Disneyland, is the parent company of this station.
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Chicago aldermen will consider a drag racing ordinance Monday as a video in the West Loop has people calling for action.Several members of City Council are sponsoring an ordinance that would allow the city to impound vehicles and give hefty fines. A committee will look at that new ordinance Monday.Aldermen and members of several Southwest Side communities are expected to gather Tuesday morning to promote the proposed ordinance.A vote by the City Council is then expected on Wednesday.Neighbors said the intersection of Monroe and Clinton streets was blocked off for hours overnight Saturday.The sounds of screeching tires woke neighbors out of their sleep.Video shows cars drag racing and doing street stunts in the street, which Breckenridge said lasted for hours, starting around 2 a.m. Sunday."The police came, but they didn't have enough police to do anything about it because there were probably over a hundred people here," Breckenridge said.She said when more officers were able to respond, things escalated more.Police said just before 4:30 a.m., fireworks were being thrown at them from the upper level of a...
    Share this: The proposed creation of what the New York City Redistricting Commission calls an “Asian Opportunity District” in parts of Sunset Park, Dyker Heights and Bensonhurst set off controversy and was debated on social media sites. The commission released its map of proposed new City Council districts on Friday. The creation of an Asian-majority district in Brooklyn was expected and was discussed in politics-centered publications for several weeks. Indeed, an organization known as Asian Americans for Equality proposed an Asian-majority district “in the area around Bensonhurst” as early as 2012. The Redistricting Commission is tasked with redrawing City Council maps after every biennial census, to reflect changes in population. The Asian American voting-age population in the proposed district, a revamped version of the 43rd C.D., is approximately 57 percent, the commission said.
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The COVID-19 pandemic forced Chicago City Council members to switch from in-person meetings to remote.A policy analysis by the Better Government Association found that Chicago City Council members were marking themselves present for meetings, but failed to cast votes when called. Council rules require all present members to vote unless recused under conflict-of-interest rules.SEE ALSO | BGA investigates claims former IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike violated Ethics ActThe BGA Policy Team looked at meetings held and votes taken from May 2019 through the end of May 2022. Some of the findings include missed votes per meeting significantly increased, rates of missed votes dropped to pre-pandemic levels once City Council meetings resumed in-person.Click here to read the BGA's Full Analysis.RELATED | 'Milking Medicaid' BGA report cited in ruling allowing safety net hospitals to sue over payments
    Two L.A. city councilmen called Friday for more resources for the city’s struggling animal shelters following a Times article about crowded kennels, shelter dogs that go for weeks without walks and staffing shortages. “Angelenos deserve the services we pay for,” said City Councilman Marqueece Harris-Dawson, whose South L.A. district includes Chesterfield Square Animal Services Center. “We expect animals to be treated humanely and require the city to do better.” Chesterfield Square is the most crowded of the city’s six animal shelters and houses some 300 dogs, some of whom face long confinement periods. The city relies on hundreds of unpaid volunteers to walk and exercise the dogs, but volunteers say that they can’t keep up with the influx of animals. At the same time, staffing shortages are hurting the department. Animal Services lost more than 20% of its workforce through a program that encouraged older city employees to retire. It was launched in the first year of the pandemic in 2020 when it wasn’t clear that federal funding would be available. CaliforniaFor Subscribers ‘It’s inhumane’: Dogs at L.A. animal shelters...