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    Back in 1997, an American journalist named Joseph Kahn could be found in Hong Kong covering Britain’s handover of its former colony to the People’s Republic of China. Kahn’s account of the post-imperial pomp and circumstance, published in the Wall Street Journal, was a curiously partisan piece of journalism. On one hand, Kahn managed to be weirdly sympathetic to the communist dictatorship taking over this hitherto-vibrant democracy, at times parroting lines that might have been pinched from its propaganda manual. ‘An ascendant China regained sovereignty over this skyscraper-stacked business colossus with flag-festooned ceremonies amid fireworks, cannon salutes and torrential downpours,’ began his dispatch, before noting that ‘China’s rising status in the world was made clear at the ceremonies’. On the other hand, Kahn’s article seemed curiously hostile to the departing Brits, or at least to the manner in which America’s oldest ally chose to say goodbye. ‘A heavy downpour drenched guests, just as a military band struck up the first chords of God Save The Queen, and Prince Charles’s speech was drowned out,’ it read. ‘A light rain kept up...
    Mike Groll/AP Photo Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.As Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis continues his program of diverting public education funds to charter schools run by Christian conservative ideologues, New York City can offer a cautionary tale of what can go wrong with such government-subsidized religious schooling. In a blockbuster piece, New York Times reporters ⁦⁦Eliza Shapiro and Brian Rosenthal shine a light into the secretive and extremely lucrative world of the private schools run by the city’s Hasidic community.  “The leaders of New York’s Hasidic community have built scores of private schools to educate children in Jewish law, prayer and tradition—and to wall them off from the secular world. Offering little English and math, and virtually no science or history, they drill students relentlessly, sometimes brutally, during hours of religious lessons conducted in Yiddish.”  Not surprisingly, the result has been an academic disaster. The schools have long resisted outside scrutiny of their educational quality. In 2019, many of them relented, subjecting their students to the same standardized tests in...
    The New York Times newspaper has been condemned for publishing an article hours after the Queen died, saying the murder of her cousin Lord Mountbatten by the IRA was ‘karmic’. It also claimed that Her Majesty ‘helped obscure a bloody history of decolonisation’ during her reign. In the favourite newspaper of America’s liberal establishment, Harvard University professor Maya Jasanoff wrote: ‘In a karmic turn, the Irish Republican Army assassinated the queen’s relative Lord Louis Mountbatten, the last viceroy of India (and the architect of Elizabeth’s marriage to his nephew, Prince Philip), in 1979.’ Harvard University professor Maya Jasanoff (pictured) wrote: ‘In a karmic turn, the Irish Republican Army assassinated the queen’s relative Lord Louis Mountbatten, the last viceroy of India (and the architect of Elizabeth’s marriage to his nephew, Prince Philip), in 1979.’ RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next EMILY PRESCOTT: Malfoy's munificence! Harry Potter's Tom... Australians will get a public holiday for a national day of... Share this article Share Lord Mountbatten was murdered when the IRA blew up his fishing boat...
    A former aide for Margaret Thatcher has called the New York Times a 'left-wing propaganda machine' for using a former Russia Today star in an 'opinion' video on Liz Truss' appointment as the British Prime Minister and what it means. The video from fictional broadcast journalist Jonathan Pie, formerly of the Kremlin-backed TV network, claims conservatives have destroyed everything in Britain, including the weather, and mocks Truss as the next leader. 'Unfortunately, Boris' main achievement in office was to set the bar so low that anyone can now become Prime Minister – even Liz Truss,' Pie says during the clip published in the Opinion section of the website. It is one of the many videos the Times has run in the last six months of Pie ranting about Boris Johnson and blaming conservatives for the issues facing Britain. 'This is typical anti-Brexit, anti-British programming from the New York Times,' Nile Gardiner, now Director of Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom at the Heritage Foundation, told DailyMail.com. 'It's the kind of video of Kremlin would put out about Britain,' he added. 'It's a...
    Thanks to the popular TikTok trend known as #BookTok, US author Colleen Hoover has become one of the world's most successful writers - with five of her books currently sitting on the New York Times' Top 10 Best Sellers list. Colleen, 42, who hails from Texas, began writing as a hobby in 2011 while working as a social worker. While she had no plans to make it her full-time job at the time, she self-published her first book, called Slammed, in January 2012 so that her grandmother could pull it up on her Amazon Kindle. However, to her astonishment, the book soon became wildly popular - reaching number eight on the New York Times Best Seller list in August of that year. She then quit her job to focus on writing, and has since gone on to release a whopping 20 more novels. Thanks to the popular TikTok trend #BookTok, Colleen Hoover has become one of the country's most successful writers - with five of her books now sitting on the Times' Best Sellers list Colleen, 42, who hails from Texas,...
    Yuh-Line Niou, Mondaire Jones and Carlina Rivera are competing with Dan Goldman, a wealthy heir to the Levi Strauss & Co. fortune, in the Democratic primary for New York's District 10.Mother Jones illustration; Tom Williams/Congressional Quarterly/ZUMA (2); Mary Altaffer/Pool/AP; John Nacion/NurPhoto/ZUMA Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.Dan Goldman—an heir to the Levi Strauss fortune, former federal prosecutor, lead counsel during Donald Trump’s first impeachment, and MSNBC analyst—is now the Democratic nominee to represent a congressional district that stretches from lower Manhattan to south Brooklyn. The first-time candidate is all but guaranteed to win the general election come November. Goldman prevailed thanks to a key New York Times endorsement and millions of dollars of his own money. In an unusually competitive and diverse field, Goldman was the rich white guy. He defeated Rep. Mondaire Jones, a Black freshman Democrat endorsed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi; Carlina Rivera, a Latina city council member who grew up in the district; and Yuh-Line Niou, a Chinese-American assemblymember backed by the New York Working Families Party and...
    New York City Mayor Eric Adams has hit back at New York Times journalists who secretly followed him for a month to report that he is a regular at an upscale Midtown Manhattan restaurant. The Times accused him in the article, published on the front page of the national newspaper Monday, of skirting ethics rules, suggesting he may not be paying for his meals as he parties at a members-only club without paying the membership fee. But at a news conference Monday afternoon, the mayor dismissed these claims. 'What's going on with the New York Times?' he asked rhetorically. 'The front page of the New York Times: "Breaking News: Eric Adams likes to go to restaurants," come on.' He went on to say that the Times should be reporting on other issues, telling reporters at the news conference: 'You have to say to yourself, with monkey pox, COVID, crime, the economy, all of the issues going on in this city, they are writing a story that Eric goes to a restaurant that they stood out in front of?' 'I mean,...
    The report, now referred to as the Steele dossier, had been funded both by Trump's GOP primary opponents and by Democrat entities. It contained innuendos about Trump and insinuations that the former president had been compromised by the Russian government. Bensinger took immediate interest. Bensinger, granted the opportunity to photograph pages out of the dossier, later did so in the office of one of late Republican Senator John McCain's aides. Even though Steele's allegations were unverified and his sources were anonymous, BuzzFeed editor Ben Smith decided to publish Bensinger's post, which was entitled "These Reports Allege Trump Has Deep Ties To Russia." Smith reasoned: "We published the dossier, which Ken Bensinger obtained through his characteristically ferocious reporting, so that, as we wrote, 'Americans can make up their own minds about allegations about the president-elect that have circulated at the highest levels of the US government.'" The Washington Post's Erik Wemple criticized Smith, suggesting that for Americans to make up their minds as to the legitimacy of Bensinger's uncorroborated, unverified findings, they would first need to "build their own intelligence...
    Actress Amandla Stenberg has allegedly accused a New York Times film critic of objectifying her in a film review of her new slasher movie 'Bodies Bodies Bodies.'   Lena Wilson of The New York Times shared a screenshot of the message on Twitter Thursday that allegedly shows a message she received from the actress who was seemingly unhappy with the review.  'Ur review was great, maybe if you had gotten ur eyes off my tits you could've watched the movie!' the message allegedly from Stenberg reads.   In Wilson's review that was published on August 4, Wilson wrote: 'The only thing that really sets Bodies Bodies Bodies apart is its place in the A24 hype machine, where it doubles as a 95-minute advertisement for cleavage and Charli XCX's latest single.' The film, which follows a group of rich 20-somethings at a party that goes awry at a remote family mansion, is described by Wilson as 'bloated with pompous irony' and said it is 'perfectly tailored to one of A24's key demographics: bougie 25-year-olds who value branding over substance.' Lena Wilson of The New...
    New York City is planning on renting a further 5,000 hotel rooms to accommodate the migrants arriving on buses in the city from Texas and Arizona, as the city struggles to house the new arrivals. The 5,000 rooms will come on top of the 1,000 rooms the city announced they would rent last week. A solicitation letter was sent on Wednesday by the Department of Social Services, detailing the request. No cost was given, and they did not specify which hotels they planned to use.  Manuel Castro, the commissioner of the Mayor's Office of Immigrant Affairs, is seen on August 12 welcoming new arrivals from Texas and Arizona On Monday it emerged that a luxury hotel in the center of Manhattan is set to become a hub for housing the asylum-seeking migrants. The Row, which is based near tourist-packed Times Square, will become a shelter for as many as 600 migrant families. Sources claim that they are going to place families and single people who have traveled from Texas after Gov Greg Abbott unveiled his plan to start transporting...
    Polio may have been circulating in New York as early as April and the virus has been detected in wastewater samples more than 20 times, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report reveals. The agency released its first investigative report on the potential polio outbreak on Tuesday. The investigation comes as a response to the confirmation of a polio case in a man in his mid-20s in Rockland County, just outside of New York City, in June. Officials fear that there could be hundreds - if not thousands - of undiagnosed cases in the state. While U.S.-borne cases are rare, the infected man had no recent travel outside of the country and had attended a large gathering eight days before the start of his symptoms. It is likely he caught the virus stateside. The man experienced paralysis and was hospitalized. He is now recovering at home.  The CDC reports that the virus has been detected in wastewater sampling in Rockland and nearby Orange County 20 times in samples gathered in May, June and July. A single sample from Orange...
    “The One and Only Dick Gregory,” ShowtimeIn his hometown of Kinloch, Mo. There’s a street named for Dick Gregory. Not sure you’ll find it on Google Maps this way, but I’m sure it’s at the intersection of arts and activism. I’ve always been enamored with Mr. Gregory (he has earned the reverence of Mr.) ever since I read his autobiography, “Nigger.” I become more enthralled when I found out he was a schoolmate of my parents at Sumner High School in St. Louis. Listening to his speeches at Kent State University and other college campuses – recorded nearly 20 years prior to my discovering them – literally changed my life. The essence of the man is wonderfully captured in the Showtime documentary, “The One and Only Dick Gregory.” — Harry Colbert, Jr., managing editor Chipotle’s $20 million settlement with workers is an indictment of the entire restaurant industry, QuartzMichelle Cheng reports Chipotle has agreed to pay $20 million in compensation to 13,000 workers in New York City for violating rights around scheduling and paid sick leave. Cheng notes the COVID-19...
    \u201c"the Jews are sons of dogs and I am with killing them, and burning them like Hitler did to them (smiley face)" - Fady Hossam Hanona\n\nThis Hitler praising antisemite covers the Israel/Palestinian conflict for the NY Times, Guardian, and VICE News.\u201d — StopAntisemitism (@StopAntisemitism) 1660231847 On August 10, 2014, Hanona quoted Adolf Hitler, writing: "As Hitler said, give me a Palestinian soldier and a German weapon and I will make Europe crawl on its knees, Israel will submit." Eight days later, Hanona reportedly urged the Palestinian guerillas to reject a truce and to "continue hitting Tel Aviv and return to clash from point zero." Koningsveld emphasized that Hanona is "entitled to his personal views, however ignorant and distasteful they may be." Honest Reporting's interest in the matter is that Hanona has and continues to act as a fixer for foreign media organizations and personnel. The Times of Israel noted that fixers, such as Hanona, help foreign journalists and news organizations coordinate logistics and provide translation. According to Koningsveld, a politically motivated personality like Hanona "can be selective...
    Amber Heard has dumped the attorney who defended her in her unsuccessful defamation trial with Johnny Depp as she now tries to appeal the verdict.  Elaine Charlson Bredehoft, who represented the Aquaman actress in the six-week defamation trial, has parted ways with Heard. Attorney's David L. Axelrod and Jay Ward Brown, who represented The New York Times earlier this year in a defamation lawsuit against 2008 vice president nominee Sarah Palin, will take over as the appeal proceeds.  The pair work for Ballard Spahr and have covered various cases, including companies and individuals in high-stakes civil litigation, speakers in First Amendment cases, journalists, and news organizations. Announcing the news, Heard's spokesperson said in a statement: 'When it comes protecting the fundamental right of Freedom of Speech, we look at the jury's decision - to paraphrase a famous quote - not "as the beginning of the end, but merely the end of the beginning."'  'A different court warrants different representation, particularly as so much new evidence is now coming to light.' Heard, 36, was ordered to pay her ex-husband more than $10 million in damages at...
    Journalist Bari Weiss spilled the details of an internal battle at The New York Times over an op-ed piece submitted by Senator Tim Scott during his appearance on her podcast this week. On the Wednesday episode of her show, Honestly with Bari Weiss, she hosted Scott to talk about his time in the Senate and his life story. At one point during the conversation, Weiss recalled a story from her time as a writer for Times, a position she departed from in 2020 citing bullying from colleagues and an “illiberal environment.” The story centered around a behind the scenes debacle in the editing room of the paper concerning Scott. Scott and his staff had submitted a op-ed about a bill he was working on, the Justice Act. It was heavily aimed at police reform in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. “I wanna tell you a little story that I’m not sure if you know,” Weiss began, discussing his proposed bill that was endorsed by a range of people including Senator Chuck Schumer. Scott said the bill eventually fell apart...
    The New York Times's housing columnist is being sued by her landlord over allegations of $35,000 in unpaid rent. Joyce Cohen, who writes the popular series The Hunt, featuring the trials and tribulations of New Yorkers attempting to navigate the city's real estate swamp, was sued on Tuesday in New York Supreme Court. Cohen and her husband, Benjamin Meltzer, are accused of subletting an apartment on the Upper West Side while their own home two blocks away was near another being renovated, and then refusing to pay the rent. The couple took over the apartment in November 2020, after it was advertised on Craigslist. They were looking for somewhere quiet, as Cohen suffers from hyperacusis - a condition of extreme sensitivity to noise, which forces her to wear industrial-grade ear protection when she leaves the home. The original renters, Amit and Jasmine Matta, moved to another property they owned as it was more suitable for their daughter during the pandemic, and Jasmine was recovering from cancer. Cohen and Meltzer agreed to pay $2,999 a month, on the understanding that it...
    Daniel Slim/Getty Images The parent company of The New York Times scored a net gain of 180,000 digital-only subscribers in the second quarter of this year, helping it pull in a healthy profit even after losses from its acquisition of sports site The Athletic. The Times announced the latest financial figures in a press release Wednesday, touting how it had “added approximately 180,000 net digital-only subscribers and 230,000 digital-only subscriptions compared with the end of the first quarter of 2022.” That growth in digital subscriptions was a continuation of a trend, with the Times reporting “a net increase of 1,200,000 digital-only subscribers and 1,480,000 digital-only subscriptions compared with the end of the second quarter of 2021.” Digital subscription revenues were $238.7 million in the second quarter, a 25.5% increase from the prior quarter, representing roughly 43% of the company’s total quarterly revenues of $555.7 million (total revenues increased 11.5%). The Athletic made headlines when it launched in 2016, paying top dollar to lure away marquee talent from other media outlets, but struggled to turn a profit. It’s still a red...
    The New York Times has seen its operating profits tumble by $7.2 million to $51 million after acquiring The Athletic in February, despite revenue hitting $555.7 million, up 11.5% year on year. Operating losses at The Athletic, which was bought by the Times for a whopping $550 million, were $12.6 million for the most recent quarter from April to June, down from about $19.4 million in the first quarter. The Times now has 9.17 million paid subscribers after adding 180,000 last quarter, and aims to have 15 million subscribers by 2027.  One subscriber may have subscriptions to other Times products aside from the newspaper, including The Athletic and Wirecutter. Meredith Kopit Levien, president and chief executive officer of the Times, said in a statement: 'Our second quarter results demonstrate that we are making palpable progress on our strategy of becoming the essential subscription for every English-speaking person seeking to understand and engage with the world.' RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next NYC Mayor Eric Adams reveals just TEN criminals make up... John Hinckley...
    Ever since Britain had the temerity to vote for Brexit six years ago, The New York Times, America's most prestigious newspaper, has had it in for us. Numerous articles — many given front-page billing — regularly depict Britain as a plague-ridden, poverty-stricken hellhole in terminal decline. Sometimes the abuse is so over the top that the only sensible response is to laugh out loud. For example, according to the paper, it's only recently that we stopped existing almost entirely on a diet of 'legs of mutton' and 'bowls of porridge'. Apparently, we still huddle round bin fires to keep warm in winter. And during the summer of 2020 it reported we spent the brief heatwave 'cavorting' in 'swamps'. The political analysis is often even more hilarious. Six months ago we were assured that Boris Johnson's Britain was 'sleepwalking into tyranny'. We already know that wasn't the most perspicacious of predictions. A protester carries a U.S. flag upside down, a sign of distress, next to a burning building in May 2020 It never occurred to the great minds at The New...
    Economist and New York Times opinion writer Paul Krugman has been ruthlessly criticized after claiming the US was not in a recession and that the term 'didn't matter' in a CNN interview Sunday. Krugman, 69, appeared on the network's Reliable Sources talk show to discuss the state of the American economy, and was asked almost immediately by host Brian Stelter: 'Are we in a recession and does the term matter?'  'No we aren't, and no it doesn't,' Krugman responded curtly. 'None of the usual criteria that real experts use says we're in a recession right now. And what does it matter?  'You know, the state of the economy is what it is.' The response prompted a hail of criticism, particularly as it transpired late last week that US GDP shrank for the second quarter in a row - a popular marker of recession.  A recession is defined as a 'widespread and prolonged downturn in economic activity', and was described in 2000 by former president Bill Clinton as 'two quarters in a row of negative growth'.  The Biden administration meanwhile has...
    Former President Donald Trump raged at the New York Times on Tuesday morning over an article by Ross Douthat from over the weekend titled, “Why Trump Is Weakening.” “Incredible how The New York Times just never gives up. One of their third-rate columnists wrote a story on Saturday saying that, despite almost universal victories in every major race, Trump may be losing his power,” began Trump in the statement shared via his Save America PAC. “The article, written by Ross Douthat, doesn’t cover ‘minor’ events like the fact that on Tuesday, in the Great State of Maryland, Dan Cox, a person not known but strongly Endorsed by me, absolutely destroyed the Endorsed and highly campaigned for candidate of RINO Governor Larry Hogan,” Trump added in the lengthy statement. “This was a big upset,” Trump added, noting, “Fox News said it couldn’t happen!” Oddly, Douthat’s opinion piece does not mention Trump’s endorsements in the 2022 midterms and instead focuses on Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) gaining in strength as he jumps on issues energizing Republicans, while Trump continues to focus...
    Former president Donald Trump lashed out at the Pulitzer Prize Board after it rejected his demand to rescind the 2018 prizes it awarded to The New York Times and the Washington Post for their coverage of Russian interference with the presidential election. The former commander-in-chief told Fox News's Sean Hannity that the decision to let the papers keep their prizes discredited America's top journalism award.  'The Pulitzer Board has taken away any shred of credibility it had left with its 'response' regarding the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, which was awarded to The New York Times and The Washington Post for blatant fake news,' the former president said. Former president Donald Trump rejected the Pulitzer Prize Board conclusion that The New York Times and the Washington Post reporting on Russiagate is solid The Pulitzer Prize Board commissioned two independent investigation and found that the prize was properly awarded The award committee said that it had commissioned two separate and independent investigations of the two newspapers' coverage of the so-called Russiagate scandal at his behest and found that the reporting...
    \u201cThe fights for trans rights and reproductive justice are wrapped up together. Our right to bodily autonomy\u2014our ability to make decisions about our own bodies\u2014is under threat. This affects ALL of us. We must be in solidarity to defeat the growing fascist movement to control us.\u201d — Rashida Tlaib (@Rashida Tlaib) 1657566213 Tlaib, who entered office in 2019 and then won re-election in 2020, is a far-left member of the nation's legislature — she is one of the many Democratic lawmakers who are original cosponsors for a "Trans Bill of Rights" resolution. Radical leftist gender ideology remains an issue of raging cultural debate in the U.S., but as the left seeks to push the dogmas, many Americans have remained steadfast in opposing the reality-defying ideology.
    (CNN)"Big Tim" Sullivan was in great form on the day he cajoled fellow state senators into approving a landmark New York gun law, the one that the US Supreme Court has now overturned some 111 years later. His speech "was crude and illiterate, but it was human, forceful and replete with sympathetic illustrations taken from the actual life of the East Side," the Brooklyn Eagle newspaper said of Sullivan, a powerful Tammany Hall district leader who was renowned for the thousands of meals, pairs of shoes and jobs he gave out to his immigrant constituents, but also notorious for his thinly veiled underworld connections. The Legislature passed what quickly became known as the Sullivan Law with only a handful of nays. Paul Moses Now, the Supreme Court's June 23 ruling has found that the law violated the Second Amendment by giving authorities broad discretion to decide who would get a permit to carry a concealed weapon. The lead petitioner in the case, the New York State Rifle and Pistol Association, argued that the licensing process was actually designed to...
    When Kent Swig first ran the numbers, they were so shocking, he ran them again. It was 1998. On one side, there was Midtown Manhattan, where most of the city’s real estate titans had made their bets, where vacancies were low and where prices were steep. Then there was the area below City Hall in Lower Manhattan—an area that didn’t even really have a name, but that as far as Swig could tell had the same city government, the same transportation system, and similar demographics. The hotels there had solid occupancy. The retail and office scene was robust. Zoning laws had even been modified to allow landlords to convert antiquated office stock to hotels or condos. Why, then, were prices there so much lower? A few days earlier, a broker had approached Swig with a chance to take over a bid on the old Bank of New York Building at 48 Wall Street. Swig, who’d been looking to do his first big development deal, had toured the property and been blown away. He had always been a history buff, and...
    New York (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.Joe Kahn took over as executive editor of The New York Times on Tuesday, officially ascending to one of the most powerful positions in American journalism. It was the day, as Vanity Fair's Joe Pompeo put it, "that gossipy media types have been breathlessly gabbing about and speculating over for the better part of the past few years." But, what's perhaps most notable about the transition of power, is that Kahn's reign won't usher in any immediate, significant changes. Instead, Kahn, who worked closely with predecessor Dean Baquet, is likely to continue to push forward in the same direction that the newspaper-slash-global-digital-publication has been moving. Kahn has said as much. In an interview published Tuesday with WaPo's Jeremy Barr, for instance, Kahn said, "I wouldn't say that there's going to be some sort of sharp break in the type of stories we're most excited about or the tone of coverage."And speaking to Pompeo, Kahn characterized the transition of...
    (CNN) — Funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley en la escena del tiroteo en la escuela de Uvalde, Texas, el mes pasado, sabían que había personas heridas atrapadas dentro de las aulas antes de que las autoridades decidieran forzar la entrada a los salones de clase, según una revisión de The New York Times de documentos de la investigación y videos de las autoridades. “La gente va a preguntar por qué tardamos tanto”, se podía escuchar decir a un agente de la ley en la escena del tiroteo, según The New York Times, que citó una transcripción de las imágenes de la cámara corporal de la policía. “Estamos tratando de preservar el resto de las vidas”, dice la transcripción, según el diario. Más de dos semanas después del ataque, quedan dudas sobre cómo se desarrolló la masacre y cómo respondió la Policía. Las autoridades han cambiado repetidamente sus explicaciones sobre los hechos del 24 de mayo, frustrando tanto al público como a los funcionarios. “Estamos listos para entrar, pero esa puerta está cerrada”, dijo Pedro “Pete” Arredondo, jefe de...
    Haitians protest for reparations in 2015. A lot has been said in praise of “The Ransom” series on Haiti, recently published in The New York Times. Social media coverage of the series has been particularly intense; thousands of readers were “shocked” to learn this history for the first time—namely, that France made Haitians pay, and pay, and pay for their own liberation from enslavement. I found the endless stream of kudos aimed at the paper of record to be a bit disconcerting. France’s extortion of Haiti been written about over the years in mainstream media, taught in college courses, and is well-known to anyone who has ever read anything about the Haitian Revolution, but it seems like it takes coverage from the Times to make it real to the broader public. As someone who taught this history for a number of years as part of cultural anthropology courses on the Caribbean, and has written about it multiple times here at Daily Kos, it’s not that I’m not delighted that many more people will now connect Haiti’s current abject economic present to the economic rape of the past. Or that people now see the...
    Citing audio of a New York Times customer service representative, Tucker Carlson accused the newspaper of committing fraud in order keep subscribers. The Fox News host said that his producer bought a Times subscription last year, but decided to cancel when the outlet raised the price to $17 a month. According to Carlson, the Times told the producer the cancelation would go through, but the producer was billed again in May. He stated the producer called again this week to reiterate his desire to cancel the subscription and again was told it would go through. The host stated the producer was hit with (apparently) a second $17 bill this month. “So, we called the Times to find what’s going,” Carlson said. “Within minutes, the customer service reps service of the New York Times confessed that the company is committing fraud.” He then played audio of the representative, who confessed to no such thing: It looks like the first time you tried to cancel this, or at least the first time that one of our advocates tried to cancel it, this...
    Senator Ted Cruz held no words back when describing The New York Times after the paper suggested interracial marriage could be overturned in light of the leaked Roe v. Wade decision from the Supreme Court. On Friday’s episode of The Verdict with Ted Cruz, he said, “Now the Democrats have another tale, which if you notice that, when they’re talking about the Dobbs decision, they very, very quickly say if this decision goes into effect, it will strike down the availability of contraceptives.” “Right,” agreed co-host Michael Knowles. Cruz continued, “It will strike down gay marriage and interracial marriage. The New York Times went so far. The editorial board of The New York Times suggested that there were multiple states in the union that if they were allowed to, would ban interracial marriage, what utter garbage!” “You, bigoted moronic, Manhattan leftist, elite lying sacks of crap!” Cruz yelled. “How do you really feel?” Knowles asked jokingly. “Yeah, it, it kind of pisses me off,” Cruz admitted. “And I would note, by the way that these racist...
    ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP via Getty Images Steve Schmidt, a former senior strategist on then-Senator John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign, published a scathing expose and mea culpa late Sunday night and apologized publicly to the New York Times for denying reporting he now claims was accurate regarding McCain. “I would like to apologize to the journalists whose bylines appear on the story,” Schmidt wrote on his newly launched Substack. “Their credibility, integrity, and professionalism were unfairly attacked by the McCain campaign of which I was a part of. I got it wrong. These journalists, like many others, were also victims of this lie.” The story in question was a February 2008 article titled, For McCain, Self-Confidence on Ethics Poses Its Own Risk, in which four reporters detail McCain’s longtime, potentially romantic relationship, with a lobbyist. Jim Rutenberg, the journalist who has the first byline on the story, told CNN’s Oliver Darcy on Monday night, “Of course, it’s good to see Steve set the record straight, but we stood by the story then and continue to stand by it now, as we always...
    The New York Times has removed the word "fetus" from its Wordle answers in a bid to keep the popular online game "distinct from the news."In a statement on its website, the Times warned that some users playing the game Monday "may see an outdated answer that seems closely connected to a major recent news event."While the statement didn't specify which word it was referring to, the publisher confirmed to CNN that it was "fetus."The Times said the word was loaded into the game last year -- before the publisher acquired it -- adding: "When we discovered last week that this particular word would be featured today, we switched it for as many solvers as possible."However, some users who have not refreshed their browser window could still get the word from the "outdated puzzle", the statement added.The move comes after last week's leaked draft of a majority opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito that would strike down the US Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade decision.According to the draft, the court would overturn Roe v. Wade's holding of a federal...
    London (CNN Business)The New York Times has removed the word "fetus" from its Wordle answers in a bid to keep the popular online game "distinct from the news," the publisher has said.The move comes after last week's leaked draft of a majority opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito that would strike down the US Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade decision.According to the draft, the court would overturn Roe v. Wade's holding of a federal constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion would be the most consequential abortion decision in decades and transform the landscape of women's reproductive health in America. What overturning Roe v. Wade could mean for decades-old abortion bans still on the books"At New York Times Games, we take our role seriously as a place to entertain and escape, and we want Wordle to remain distinct from the news," the news publisher said in a statement on its website Monday."But because of the current Wordle technology, it can be difficult to change words that have already been loaded into the game. When we discovered last week that...
    The New York Times published a lead editorial on Sunday in which it warned that overturning Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 abortion law, would mean ending interracial marriage, repeating an erroneous argument the left has spread for days. As Breitbart News reported last week, some Democrats reacted to the leak of Justice Samuel Alito’s draft decision by claiming that all other social rights were at risk if Roe were to be reversed, and states could even ban interracial marriage. But Justice Alito specifically distinguished abortion from all other cases, because it involves a potential human life, adding: “Nothing in this opinion should be understood to cast doubt on precedents that do not concern abortion.” Nevertheless, in an editorial titled “America Is Not Ready for the End of Roe v. Wade,” the Times argued: Imagine that every state were free to choose whether to allow Black people and white people to marry. Some states would permit such marriages; others probably wouldn’t. The laws would be a mishmash, and interracial couples would suffer, legally consigned to second-class status depending on where they lived. It seems...
    Washington (CNN)Former Defense Secretary Mark Esper says in his new book that then-President Donald Trump asked him in 2020 about launching missiles into Mexico to "destroy the drug labs" and kill cartels, The New York Times reported Thursday. "We could just shoot some Patriot missiles and take out the labs, quietly," Trump suggested, according to the upcoming book "A Sacred Oath," the Times reported. The former President reasoned that Mexico didn't "have control" over its own country and that "no one would know it was us," Esper -- who objected at the time -- recounted, according to the Times. The exchange is one of several stunning discussions detailed in Esper's book, which will be published on Tuesday, the newspaper reported. While Esper writes that Trump's behavior never became erratic enough to justify an invocation of the 25th Amendment, the book describes a chaotic White House focused almost entirely on Trump's reelection bid. A spokesperson for Trump did not immediately respond to the Times' request for comment. Esper broke with Trump at various times as defense secretary, including over the then-President's...
    According to a report, the sports subscription site The Athletic lost $6.8 million in its first year after being bought up by the New York Times. According to Front Office Sports, the sports site did bring new subscribers to the Times, but it is unlikely that the cost was worth the purchase price. The paper bought the sports site for $550 million this year, but it already lost $6.8 million in the year’s first quarter. In addition, FOS reported that the Athletic’s “first-quarter adjusted operating profits, reported Wednesday, to dip 10.5% to $60.9 million. Operating profits were $68.1 million in the same quarter a year ago.” The Times is preparing to alter the sports site’s operations, too. It was founded in 2016 as an ad-free experience. But the Times is preparing to change that and put ads on “later in the year.” New York Times headquarters in New York City (Drew Angerer/Getty Images) The paper is also preparing to launch bundled subscription offerings this year. FOS added, “The Athletic lost $55 million on about $65 million in revenue in 2021, and...
    Elon Musk's mother bashed a New York Times' article which said her son had 'white privilege' in apartheid-era South Africa and was 'detached from apartheid's atrocities'. Maye Musk condemned the article, published on Thursday, that said her son was sheltered from the segregation and anti-black government propaganda that plagued South Africa throughout his childhood.  In promoting the article on Twitter, the Times wrote: 'Elon Musk grew up in elite white communities in South Africa, detached from apartheid's atrocities and surrounded by anti-Black propaganda.  'He sees his takeover of Twitter as a free speech win but in his youth did not suffer the effects of misinformation,' The Times added, referencing Musk's $44 billion takeover of the social media platform.  Maye snapped back at the paper on Twitter, writing: 'In South Africa, if you publicly opposed apartheid, you went to jail. In Russia, if you publicly oppose the war, you go to jail. @nytimes, are you going to blame children for decisions made by governments?'  The New York Times published an article (pictured) suggesting Elon Musk was sheltered from the horrors of...
    Elon Musk's mother bashed a New York Times' article about the white privilege her son allegedly enjoyed growing up in apartheid-era South Africa. Maye Musk condemned the article, published on Thursday, that suggested her son was sheltered from the segregation and anti-black government propaganda that plagued South Africa throughout his childhood.  In promoting the article on Twitter, the Times wrote: 'Elon Musk grew up in elite white communities in South Africa, detached from apartheid's atrocities and surrounded by anti-Black propaganda.  'He sees his takeover of Twitter as a free speech win but in his youth did not suffer the effects of misinformation,' The Times added, referencing Musk's $44 billion takeover of the social media platform.  Maye snapped back at the paper on Twitter, writing: 'In South Africa, if you publicly opposed apartheid, you went to jail. In Russia, if you publicly oppose the war, you go to jail. @nytimes, are you going to blame children for decisions made by governments?'  The New York Times published an article (pictured) suggesting Elon Musk was sheltered from the horrors of apartheid in South...
    The Bulwark’s Charlie Sykes weighed in Monday on the recent series from the New York Times on Fox News’s top-rated host Tucker Carlson and offered his take on why Carlson seemed to delight in the Times calling him a “racist.” Sykes noted, both in his newsletter and his podcast, that the Times pulled no punches in calling Carlson the “R-word” – a racist. Sykes quotes one of the three articles published over the weekend, noting, “The Times bluntly declared that the Fox News host ‘has constructed what may be the most racist show in the history of cable news — and also, by some measures, the most successful.’” “No embarrassment, no shame, no chagrin at being accused of the vilest sort of racist demagoguery,” wrote Sykes of Carlson’s response to the Times article, arguing his response was indicative of a trend on the right. Sykes argued on his podcast in a conversation with Will Saletan, “What is really striking about it … he [Carlson] tweeted out a picture of himself with the headline, with him on the front page...
    Elon Musk has defended himself against The Washington Post's claim that he set his online 'attack dogs' on Twitter executives, pointing out that the newspaper attacks him 'all the time'. Musk, who on Monday agreed the terms of a $44 billion buyout of Twitter, on Tuesday took issue with a decision made by the company's top lawyer, Vijaya Gadde. Gadde hit the headlines for breaking down in tears in a Monday meeting while briefing her 350 employees over what changes Musk could make to the company. When political podcast host Saagar Enjeti noted that Gadde was instrumental in the decision to temporarily suspend The New York Post's account for its reporting on Hunter Biden's laptop, Musk replied: 'Suspending the Twitter account of a major news organization for publishing a truthful story was obviously incredibly inappropriate.' On Wednesday he doubled down on the criticism of Gadde, sharing a meme with his 86 million followers showing Gadde and suggesting the company's decisions are affected by a 'left wing bias.' The Washington Post, in response, published an article entitled: 'Elon Musk boosts criticism...
    As the new head honcho of the The New York Times, Joe Kahn can expect a fair degree of public flack.   But being likened to a Playboy cover star and roasted for posing seductively in his socks probably wasn't the first fire thought he'd be putting out.   Kahn, 57, has been savaged by Twitter users after posing for a profile for New York Magazine's Intelligencer where he is seen sitting on the floor next to a chair with his shoes off but wearing a buttoned-up shirt and tie, with the newspaper sprawled out in front of him.  Next to the paper sits a mug with a Chinese symbol on the front of it.  The photo, taken by Chris Buck, was included in the profile and shared on Twitter on Wednesday.   New York Times editor Joe Kahn is shown in this image from a profile in New York Magazine, posing for an interview to announce his new role at the newspaper  Immediately, Kahn was compared to Zoolander and George Costanza in the infamous Seinfeld episode where he poses in his underwear...
    Monica Schipper/Getty Images Let the parlor games end: The New York Times has announced its next top editor. Joe Kahn, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and longtime Beijing bureau chief who was promoted to managing editor at the paper in 2016, will succeed Dean Baquet as its executive editor. “For many people, especially those who have worked alongside Joe — a brilliant journalist and a brave and principled leader — this announcement will come as no surprise,” Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger wrote in a memo announcing the promotion to Times staff. “Joe brings impeccable news judgment, a sophisticated understanding of the forces shaping the world and a long track record of helping journalists produce their most ambitious and courageous work.” According to a Times report on the news, Kahn will take over from Baquet in June. This story is breaking and will be updated… Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    You have to credit the Gray Lady: this is really quite the scoop. And I hesitate even to point it out, lest my mild criticism that follows be misinterpreted. So let me be clear, I’m all for American media outlets policing each other. I think it’s perfectly OK for one media outlet to call out another for bias or dissimulation. That’s what makes journalism such an integral part of our democracy, so much that its inherent value is literally enshrined in the Constitution. “Keeping them honest” should be the watchword governing all journalism. That being said, you may wish to remain seated, because this is guaranteed to make you faint with shock. Hold onto your hats — here it comes. As reported by the New York Times’ Stuart A. Thompson: The narratives advanced by the Kremlin and by parts of conservative American media have converged in recent months, reinforcing and feeding each other. Along the way, Russian media has increasingly seized on Fox News’s prime-time segments, its opinion pieces and even the network’s active online comments section — all of...
    The Huangpu River splits the Chinese city of Shanghai between the older settlement on the west and the newer, financial center on the east.Johannes Eisele | Afp | Getty Images China's latest wave of Covid restrictions has forced millions of people — roughly three times as many as live in New York City — to stay home and undergo mass virus testing in the metropolis of Shanghai. As Covid cases began to spike in late February, Shanghai tried to control the outbreak with targeted, neighborhood lockdowns. But the city, a center for global transport, manufacturing, finance and trade, decided in late March to implement a two-stage lockdown that soon applied to all districts, generally forcing people not to leave their apartments. Most people outside China know that Shanghai is big, but few realize just how big economically. The following numbers indicate the scale of Shanghai as an economic center — and may hint at the cost of the lockdown.SizeShanghai's official permanent resident population in 2020 was 24.9 million. That's slightly less than Australia's population of 25.7 million, per the...
    Here’s a story that encompasses the total, flaming, corrupt disaster of U.S. politics and media all at once. In late 2020, Donald Trump told then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell about his plans to overturn his election loss—and McConnell remained silent because saying publicly that Trump should stop trying to overturn the election would have jeopardized Republican chances in January 2021’s Georgia Senate runoffs. That’s the flaming corrupt disaster of U.S. politics part. The flaming corrupt disaster of U.S. media part is that we are learning this now, in 2022, because some New York Times reporters saved it for a book. Yes, once again we are learning information that it would have been good to learn at the time it was happening, or at least as soon as reporters became aware of it, more than a year later so that people with regular salaried jobs as reporters can juice their book sales. RELATED STORY: The way The New York Times reported the story of missing documents says more about them than Trump The reporters this time are Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns. Back in February, it was fellow New...
    Since launching back in October 2021, Wordle has quickly become the go-to game for hundreds of thousands of eager players around the world. The daily word game gives players six attempts to guess a five-letter word, with feedback given after each guess in the form of coloured tiles – green indicating a letter is correct and in the right position, and yellow indicating a letter is correct but in the wrong position. Now, the New York Times, which bought Wordle in January, has launched a new tool called WordleBot. The bot will pick apart your Wordle strategy and offer you patronising advice about what you should have done differently. 'We hope the bot's advice will help you think about Wordle more analytically, which will help you get better at solving the puzzles in the long run,' the New York Times said. The New York Times, which bought Wordle in January, has launched a new tool called WordleBot How to use the WordleBot To use WordleBot, simply play Wordle as usual, before visiting the WordleBot here, where your answer will automatically be...
    The New York Times has told its journalists to get off Twitter after recent concerns of online harassment - and have issued a 'reset' on how the newsroom uses the social media platform.  New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet has written to staff telling them that maintaining a Twitter presence is now 'purely optional' for staff, a memo leaked to The Insider revealed.  Baquet also told staffers who choose to stay on Twitter to 'meaningfully reduce' their time on the platform.   'We encourage you to meaningfully reduce how much time you're spending on the platform, tweeting or scrolling, in relation to other parts of your job,' Baquet wrote in the memo.  New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet wrote in a leaked memo obtained by the Insider, that maintaining a Twitter presence is now 'purely optional' for Times staffers A Times spokesperson told Insider that this 'reset' is 'absolutely not a ban' and that the policy change is in response to an uptick in concerns of harassment. But the top editor made clear that masthead editors will monitor reporters' tweets for...
    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul appears poised to continue to splash the cash on big projects in the Empire State's budget, with the possibility of three new casino licenses - including one catering to the wealthy in the heart of Manhattan. The governor and the leaders of the Democrat-controlled State Senate and Assembly are expected to hammer out a fast-tracked deal that could see a number of different bids for New York City-based gaming, including a Monaco-style casino for high rollers open atop Saks Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, according to The New York Times. The deal would allow gaming licenses to be rushed through as part of the state's budget - due on Friday, April 1, with Hochul's fellow Democrats suggesting a $1 billion price tag for the permits.   Currently, only three of the state's 25 casinos are 'downstate' - one in Queens, one in Yonkers and a third on Long Island.   Betting companies have spent about $300,000 a month to try and bring the casinos to Manhattan, arguing that New York loses billions to neighboring states by not...
    Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist and The Epoch Times’  Editor-at-Large Roger Simon in-studio to comment upon The New York Times‘ admission of Hunter Biden’s laptop and Bill Barr’s recent memoir. Leahy: Roger Simon, our all-star panelist, and a transmitter. Simon: Don’t put me on a diamond. (Leahy laughs) It will go right through my legs. Leahy: Lots of things going on in terms of the news media. I don’t know if you follow this, but The New York Times, I’d like to get your take on it, because we got a certain take earlier in the show. But The New York Times has finally admitted that the Hunter Biden laptop, which was apparently given to the FBI in December 2019 – a story broke in October 2020 where the New York Post said, yeah, this is Hunter Biden’s laptop. It’s got all of this compromising information there. New York Post reported it. All...
    This is an odd line to read in the New York Times: In “a still-emerging story” (exciting, no?), Project Veritas “worked to expose personal information about the Biden family at a crucial stage of the 2020 campaign.” Isn’t that what journalists are supposed to do? Just kidding! As we saw with Hunter Biden’s laptop, the job of journalists is to suppress negative information about Democrats. Instead of reporting news “without fear or favor” — Times founder Adolph S. Ochs, 1896 — the U.S. media now function as the Praetorian Guard for the Democratic Party. Still, you’d think the Times would be embarrassed to attack others for doing the reporting they won’t do. The story was about how Project Veritas got its hands on the diary of the president’s daughter, Ashley Biden. (She’s the good child by virtue of being less of a drug fiend than Hunter.) It was titled: “Ashley Biden’s Diary Was Shown at Trump Fund-Raiser. Weeks Later, Project Veritas Called Her.” Undercover journalist James O’Keefe holds a news conference at the National Press Club on September 1, 2015, in Washington,...