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    California became the first state to sue the Trump administration over a new visa rule that says international students must leave the United States if all their classes are online, the state’s Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced Thursday. The suit, which is supported by California State University (CSU) and California Community Colleges officials, claims it unfairly harms international students and puts "themselves, teachers, other students and the community at large at risk of getting and spreading the coronavirus -- or be subject to deportation." "Shame on the Trump Administration for risking not only the education opportunities for students who earned the chance to go to college, but now their health and well-being as well,” Becerra said in a statement.  “Not on our watch…Today’s lawsuit rests on America’s enduring principle that everyone who works hard and plays by the rules can earn a chance to get ahead. We'll see the Trump Administration in court." CSU plans to mainly hold online classes in the fall due to the virus, The Los Angeles Times reported. Cal State Chancellor Timothy White called the policy “callous and...
    AMHERST (AP) — A western Massachusetts college is promising to offer “sanctuary” to international students as President Donald Trump’s administration moves to expel foreign students if their school is only offering online courses. Hampshire College President Ed Wingenbach said in a statement this week that the private, liberal arts college in Amherst isn’t directly impacted by the new measures since it is offering a mix of online and in-person classes for the upcoming fall semester. But he said the school has capacity to safely add students on campus and is “actively seeking to help international students at other colleges whose education is threatened” by housing them. Wingenbach also called the new measures “deliberately cruel and manifestly unjust.” U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which issued the new measures Monday, declined to comment, citing pending litigation. Download the NEW CBS Boston App for iOS or Android Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filed a lawsuit Wednesday to try to block the new measure. That lawsuit has also been joined by Northeastern University in Boston. ICE said international students will be...
    AMHERST, Mass. (AP) — A western Massachusetts college is promising to offer “sanctuary” to international students as President Donald Trump's administration moves to expel foreign students if their school is only offering online courses. Hampshire College President Ed Wingenbach said in a statement this week that the private, liberal arts college in Amherst isn't directly impacted by the new measures since it is offering a mix of online and in-person classes for the upcoming fall semester. But he said the school has capacity to safely add students on campus and is “actively seeking to help international students at other colleges whose education is threatened" by housing them. Wingenbach also called the new measures “deliberately cruel and manifestly unjust.” U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which issued the new measures Monday, didn't respond to an email seeking comment. The agency said international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - TikTok is under investigation for allegedly violating a settlement reached with U.S. authorities last year that resolved charges the popular app broke rules governing how children's personal information is treated online. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which enforces the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, and the Justice Department, which often files court actions for the FTC, have opened a preliminary investigation into the matter involving the China-based video-sharing app. Under rules dating to 1998 legislation, COPPA requires websites to get parental permission to collect data on children under the age of 13. Websites or online services are also expected to ban third parties from collecting the data. COPPA also applies to mobile apps, gaming platforms and internet-connected toys, among others. Under pressure from the FTC, TikTok, owned by China's ByteDance, agreed in early 2019 to pay a $5.7 million civil penalty for violating COPPA by collecting kids' first and last names, phone numbers, email addresses and pictures. In a bigger settlement, highlighting that TikTok was not alone, Alphabet's YouTube agreed in September 2019 to pay...
    Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) over new student visa guidelines. The lawsuit, filed in a district court in Boston, seeks a temporary restraining order and preliminary and permanent injunctive relief to prevent ICE from enforcing its new guidelines, BBC News reported. The court filing also alleges that the new rules “threw Harvard and MIT— indeed, virtually all of higher education in the United States—into chaos.” BREAKING: MIT and Harvard just filed suit against ICE and the DHS seeking to reverse their ban on international students being able to stay in the US while taking classes remotely. Full complaint: https://t.co/swEIoV2TTV pic.twitter.com/uNzLeWfnyO — MIT CSAIL (@MIT_CSAIL) July 8, 2020 The Student and Exchange Visitor Program, operated by ICE, released new guidelines Monday which state that foreign students currently in the U.S. on an F-1 or M-1 visa must either depart the country if they wish to take a full term of online classes or transfer to a school offering in-person classes. The rule...
    Unlike many international students, Grace Wang of Claremont McKenna College opted against returning to Beijing and moved to a friend’s home in March when her campus switched to online classes and sent students home amid the coronavirus emergency. She felt it was best to stay in America. But as Wang awaited news of the college’s fall reopening policies, her plans were further upended when federal officials announced new visa guidelines that prohibit international students from staying in the U.S. if they continue to take all of their courses online. “If we go online, I don’t have a choice but to go back to China,” she said Tuesday. Wang is among the more than 1 million international students whose lives — already thrown into turmoil by sudden suspensions of classes, campus closures and sealed borders — suddenly became more complicated and uncertain by rules widely condemned by many higher education leaders. “We couldn’t have envisioned the situation getting worse but somehow it did,” Wang said. If she is forced to return home, the rising senior majoring in international relations and...
    Hundreds of students at the University of California -- Berkeley are privately discussing a plan to create a "dummy" course solely to help international students on F-1 student visas avoid deportation under new U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement  (ICE) regulations -- and they say at least one faculty member is on board, Fox News has learned. The plan, which would likely afoul of laws against immigration fraud if enacted, was hatched hours after ICE announced Monday that foreign students in the country are required to take some in-person instruction or they will not be allowed to legally remain in the country. "berkeley students are creating a 1-unit, in-person, student-run class to help international students avoid deportation due to the new ICE regulations," a Berkeley Urban Studies student wrote in a now-deleted tweet, which has been archived by Google. "love my school sometimes." BERKELEY ADMIN CALLS RURAL AMERICANS 'BAD PEOPLE' The tweet, which was shared more than 25,000 times, linked to a longer post stating that a member of the Berkeley community had "found a faculty member who will sponser [sic] this." The post noted that a syllabus...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities.RELATED: ICE announces students on visas must leave US or transfer to another college if their schools go online-onlyThe guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for campuses to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of the novel coronavirus among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some schools, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely."We spent the entire day yesterday panicking like, 'What will we do with our apartment? Our puppy?'" said 23-year-old Jasmine Jow, a graduate student at Cal State East Bay.Her boyfriend, Seohyeon Park is a 27-year-old undergraduate student studying computer science. He is in the U.S. on an F-1 visa from South Korea."I still can't believe that this is happening in the U.S. I've never thought that I would be forced to go back (to South Korea),...
    VIDEO4:3104:31What college will look like in the fallInvest in You: Ready. Set. Grow. With a growing number of colleges planning to offer fall classes online, many international students will not be able to stay in U.S., according to new rules issued Monday. That could mean a significant hit to school budgets — and student aid. Under the guidelines issued by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, "students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States." Students who are enrolled in such programs "must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction," according to federal immigration authorities. More from Personal Finance:Post-pandemic, remote learning could be here to stayDemand for refunds intensifies among college studentsCollege enrollment could drop if schools stay closed "At a time when new international student enrollment is in decline, our nation risks losing global talent with new policies that hurt us academically and economically," Esther Brimmer, the executive director and CEO of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, said in a statement. International students in...
    International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities. The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for universities to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some institutions, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely. President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and colleges return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. Soon after the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall, adding that Democrats want to keep schools closed “for political reasons, not for health reasons.” “They think it will help them in November. Wrong, the people get it!” Trump wrote. Under the updated rules, international students must take at least some of their classes in person. New visas will not be issued to students at schools or programs that are entirely online. And even at...
    NEW YORK - International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities.  The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for universities to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some institutions, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely.  President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and colleges return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. Soon after the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall, adding that Democrats want to keep schools closed "for political reasons, not for health reasons."  "They think it will help them in November. Wrong, the people get it!" Trump wrote.  Under the updated rules, international students must take at least some of their classes in person. New visas will not be issued to students at schools or programs that are entirely...
    By Collin Binkley | Associated Press International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities. The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for universities to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some institutions, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely. President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and colleges return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. Soon after the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall, adding that Democrats want to keep schools closed “for political reasons, not for health reasons.” “They think it will help them in November. Wrong, the people get it!” Trump wrote. Under the updated rules, international students must take at least some of their classes in person. New visas will not be issued to students at schools or programs that...
    Immigrant rights advocates were angered on Monday after Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced international students whose U.S. schools are moving to an online-only model for the Fall 2020 semester will no longer be welcome in the United States. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a physics and astronomy professor at University of New Hampshire, wrote that the Trump administration is likely attempting to pressure American colleges into abandoning their distance-learning plans even as the coronavirus pandemic rages across the country. “This is a ‘death to Americans’ policy, in addition to a massive ‘fuck you’ to international students,” Prescod-Weinstein tweeted. The Trump administration is using ICE to threaten universities into teaching in person by threatening international students with deportation if they’re all online. This is a death to Americans policy, in addition to a massive fuck you to intl students.https://t.co/VXS2Q4yiMA pic.twitter.com/NeK9rVrISt — #JusticeforBreonna Prescod-Weinstein (@IBJIYONGI) July 6, 2020 ICE, which oversees a large portion of the student visa program through its Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), released guidance Monday afternoon stating that nonimmigrant students in the U.S. on F-1 and M-1 student visas who are “attending schools operating entirely online may not take a...
    By COLLIN BINKLEY, AP Education Writer International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities. The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for campuses to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some schools, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely. President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and universities return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. After the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall. Under the updated rules, international students must take at least some of their classes in person. New visas will not be issued to students at schools or programs that are entirely online. And even at colleges offering a mix of in-person and online courses this fall, international students will be barred from taking all their classes online. It creates an...
    International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities. The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for campuses to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some schools, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely. President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and universities return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. After the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall. Under the updated rules, international students must take at least some of their classes in person. New visas will not be issued to students at schools or programs that are entirely online. And even at colleges offering a mix of in-person and online courses this fall, international students will be barred from taking all their classes online. It creates an urgent dilemma for thousands of international...
    The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic. Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester. The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend school that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government's journal of regulations "in the near future." Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Students already in the U.S. under those programs who are planning to attend colleges or universities that...
    WASHINGTON (CBS SF) — Officials with the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) on Monday announced modifications to temporary exemptions that will require nonimmigrant students to take some in-person classes due to the pandemic for the fall 2020 semester. The temporary exemptions issued  by the SEVP for the fall 2020 semester state that nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students taking classes entirely online at schools attending may not remain in the United States. Those students enrolled in entirely online schools and/or programs will not receive student visas from the U.S. Department of State. Additionally, U.S. Customs and Border Protection will not permit these students to enter the United States. Active students currently in the United States enrolled in the above described online programs will be required to leave the U.S. or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status. Students who do not take such measures may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings. The new instructions also stipulate that nonimmigrant F-1 students attending schools operating...
    By KELVIN CHAN, AP Business Writer LONDON (AP) — British regulators want new rules to foster competition in digital advertising markets and rein in the industry's dominant players, Google and Facebook. The Competition and Markets Authority took aim at the U.S. tech giants in a report Wednesday that recommends the British government take a new regulatory approach to governing big digital platforms making money from online ads. The authority said it was concerned that the two companies have developed “such unassailable market positions" that rivals can't compete on equal terms, resulting in higher prices for hotels, flights, electronics, insurance and other goods and services that are heavily advertised online. Google and Facebook accounted for about 80% of the 14 billions pounds ($17 billion) earned by the U.K.'s digital ad industry last year, the authority said. After a yearlong review, regulators found that existing laws aren't up to the job of effectively regulating the country's digital ad markets. They're proposing a new “digital markets unit" with powers that would include ordering Google to share its data with rival search engines so...
    LONDON (AP) — British regulators want new rules to foster competition in digital advertising markets and rein in the industry’s dominant players, Google and Facebook. The Competition and Markets Authority took aim at the U.S. tech giants in a report Wednesday that recommends the British government take a new regulatory approach to governing big digital platforms making money from online ads. The authority said it was concerned that the two companies have developed “such unassailable market positions” that rivals can’t compete on equal terms, resulting in higher prices for hotels, flights, electronics, insurance and other goods and services that are heavily advertised online. Google and Facebook accounted for about 80% of the 14 billions pounds ($17 billion) earned by the U.K.’s digital ad industry last year, the authority said. After a yearlong review, regulators found that existing laws aren’t up to the job of effectively regulating the country’s digital ad markets. They’re proposing a new “digital markets unit” with powers that would include ordering Google to share its data with rival search engines so they can...
    When it comes to education, the new state budget goes beyond providing $70.5 billion in funding for K-12 schools — it sets fundamental accountability rules for a new era of distance learning in California by requiring teachers to take online attendance and document student learning. The budget bill, which Gov. Gavin Newsom is expected to sign, anticipates that schools will continue to rely heavily on online instruction when campuses reopen in the fall. It also implicitly acknowledges the deep learning losses of the last semester, especially among students from low-income families, when school systems struggled to get all students online. The new directives establish minimum teaching parameters for distance learning while protecting teachers against immediate layoffs. “Educators and teacher unions have won fairly steady funding from Sacramento to reopen schools this fall,” said UC Berkeley education professor Bruce Fuller. “Now the imperative is to deliver a rich blend of online and face-to-face instruction.” Fuller said the emphasis on documentation reflects concern by state leaders that “tens of thousands of kids simply unplugged in the spring, then fell further...
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