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    Live from Music Row, Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed the 2020 National Constitution Bee winner Jackson Carter in studio to explain what it was like running for the Maury County Department of Education seat as a 19-year-old student. Leahy: In studio, our good friend, a seasoned political veteran at the age of 20, the champion of the 2020 National Constitution Bee, a sophomore at the University of Alabama from Spring Hill, Tennessee, in Maury County, Mr. Jackson Carter. Jackson, let’s continue the story. You got your $10,000 scholarship ship from The Star News Education Foundation for winning the National Constitution Bee. You entered Alabama as a freshman. What was your first year like at the University of Alabama? Carter: Preface this with, I’ve always wanted to go to Alabama ever since I was four or five years old; I always knew I was going to end up in Tuscaloosa. So really, it was kind of a manifestation of...
    Governor Mike DeWine announced Monday that the Ohio School Safety Center (OSSC) has finished setting the required training known as the Armed School Staff Essential Training (ASSET) Curriculum. The OSSC developed the curriculum to meet the requirements of House Bill (HB) 99 sponsored by state Representative Thomas Hall (R-Madison Twp.) which gives Ohio school boards and governing bodies the option to arm staff members. “For districts that choose to arm a school staff member, this training will ensure that those individuals are thoroughly prepared to respond to emergencies specific to a school environment,” DeWine said in a news release. DeWine signed HB 99 into law in June which reduces the number of training hours required for armed school staff from 700 hours to 24. After the initial 24 hours of training, individuals must continue training with an additional eight hours annually. Some school boards may require more training, and all must notify parents if armed personnel are on staff. Armed personnel will also be required to undergo an annual criminal background check. Licensed regional peace officers and armed forces veterans...
    The Texas Department of Public Safety has fired the first state officer involved in the Uvalde school shooting, which left 19 children and two teachers dead while cops stood by.  Sergeant Juan Maldonado was fired from the state police on Friday, the first state officer since the public fallout where officers were accused of standing idly while Salvador Ramos, 18, slaughtered 21 innocent people on May 24.  The Department did not give exact reasoning for the termination. Maldonado was one of seven state officers who were under investigation.  He was the highest-ranking state trooper to initially respond to the scene, according to the Texas Tribune. He was also a 23-year veteran of the force.  The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Chief, Pete Arredondo, was also fired in August.  Sergeant Juan Maldonado (middle) was fired from the state police on Friday, a first state officer since the public fallout where officers were accused of standing idly while Salvador Ramos, 18, slaughtered 21 innocent people on May 24 Bodycam footage, released by the Uvalde Police Department, shows Maldonado near one of the...
    A charter school's CEO and President has pleaded guilty to stealing funds from a federal grant program that was meant for the school where he worked, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. Leonard Hart, 50, of Mount Wolf, the CEO and principal of Lincoln Charter School in York has admitted to submitting to LCS nearly 20 false and fraudulent reimbursement requests between 2018 and 2020, on Thursday Oct. 20, according to a release by the Us Department of Justice. Hart "obtained by fraud and misapplied approximately $6,400," starting in May 2018, United States Attorney Gerard M. Karam says.  During that time, the school received grants funded by the U.S. Department of Education. The case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Assistant U.S. Attorney Ravi Romel Sharma is prosecuting the case. If convicted, Hart could face up to 10 years in prison, probation, and a fine. The school welcomed Rob Catten as its new CEO on July 1. 
    Statesboro High School Fine Arts Department will be performing Disney’s The Aristocats this Saturday, October 8 at 7:00 pm and Sunday, October 9 at 3:00 pm. The performances will be in the SHS auditorium. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Tickets can be purchased online using the QR code on the flyer below or by clicking here.   
    Smith noted in a statement that her goal "is to illuminate how many opportunities there are to use storytelling as a tool to expand the conversation and create substantial attitude and policy change." Monika Parekh, president of Psquared Charitable Foundation, emphasized that the purpose of these student films is to "shape the hearts and minds of their peers and broader audiences in ways that can influence culture and decision making." Caren Spruch, a media spokesperson for Planned Parenthood Federation of America, suggested that this initiative constitutes "an invaluable tool" in crystallizing public opinion and achieving the goals of the pro-abortion movement. Spruch also suggested that the "entertainment community plays a critical role in educating people about their sexual and reproductive health and rights." The Hollywood Reporter indicated that script-readers Meryl Streep, Scarlett Johansson, Kerry Washington, Eva Longoria, Amy Schumer, and others have agreed to publicize the initiative.
    (CNN)The US Department of Education has opened an investigation into the University of Southern California after a student accused the university of allowing antisemitism to fester on campus, which led her to resign from her post as student government vice president, according to a Tuesday news release from a Jewish advocacy institution. The investigation stems from a complaint filed by the The Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law on behalf of Rose Ritch, who was elected student government vice president in February 2020. She ended up resigning in August 2020, according to the center. "USC students demanded that Ms. Ritch be impeached and/or resign from the [undergraduate student government] because of her perceived ethnic Jewish identity as a 'Zionist,'" the center's complaint read. "Students falsely equated Ms. Ritch's support for Israel, the Jewish homeland, with hostility towards Palestinians and thereby justified her removal from USG."The center accuses USC of violating Title VI -- which prohibits discrimination based on race, color or national origin -- saying the school "failed to take prompt and effective steps to end the...
    After the high-profile mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, where 19 students and two teachers were killed, many politicians who are opposed to stricter gun laws have been calling for "hardening" U.S. schools. President Joe Biden signed rare, bipartisan legislation to address gun violence late last month. The law provides $1 billion in funding for schools to quote "create safe and healthy learning environments for all students" as well as an additional $300 million to go toward training and equipment that can help during a threat of violence. The private security industry that focuses specifically on the education sector had projected revenue of $3.1 billion in 2021 and is expected to grow by more than 8% annually on average, according to research and consulting firm Omdia. However, these estimates only look at the companies that provide technology that helps control who enters a school, such as cameras and electronic locks. The Department of Justice, Department of Education and the Department of Homeland Security at the federal level each have programs that provide grant money to school districts for security upgrades. The...
    More details have been revealed about the Uvalde Police Department's response to the shooting at Robb Elementary. According to “investigative documents” reviewed by The New York Times, two Uvalde police officers actually had a chance to shoot the gunman, Salvador Ramos, before he entered the school. However, he feared doing so because he was concerned he would hit a child. The report also includes details about what each officer was doing around the time of the shooting. Per NY Times:At least two law enforcement cars arrived in close succession at the school, according to investigatory documents reviewed by The New York Times. One was driven by an officer from the small police force that patrols Uvalde’s schools. Another arrived less than a minute later, at 11:32 a.m., with officers from the Uvalde Police Department.Who would you vote for in 2024?Zavala County Chief Deputy Sheriff Ricardo Rios shared details about his conversation with the officer who hesitated to take the shot. Rios explained that the officer expressed a number of concerns and possible consequences he could face if he...
    "There's years of research that demonstrate that curriculums that include respect for others regarding their sexual orientation and gender identity are more effective," director of the division of adolescent and school health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Kathleen Ethier stated, according to the Post. "When you make a school environment safe and supportive for the most vulnerable youth, you improve the school environment for everyone." The U.S. government has been celebrating the LGBT movement by recognizing June as so-called pride month. President Joe Biden issued a proclamation declaring "June 2022 as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Intersex Pride Month. I call upon the people of the United States to recognize the achievements of the LGBTQI+ community, to celebrate the great diversity of the American people, and to wave their flags of pride high," he said in the proclamation. The Marine Corps issued a tweet that included a graphic featuring bullets with brightly-colored tips, in a nod to the LGBT rainbow symbol. The Air Force also posted a tweet recognizing pride month. Government entities, such as...
    Texas law enforcement authorities said last week that Salvador Ramos got into Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas, by way of a door propped open by a teacher. From there, they said, Ramos found a classroom with two teachers and 19 fourth-graders. He shot them all to pieces. The same officials said Tuesday the door was not propped open. Nor was it propped open by a teacher. Instead, the teacher closed it. The problem was the door didn’t lock, they said. That’s how Ramos got in. The presumption is that we’ll believe this. The new detail, about the unlocked door, gives the impression that the kids weren’t slaughtered because police dithered for an hour. It gives the impression the school is at fault for having a door that didn’t lock. Together, these impressions provide cover for the Uvalde police’s breathtaking incompetence and cowardice. Federal agents were prepared to take the shooter down. Local cops wouldn’t let them. Only after mothers wailed in despair at the sound of gunfire inside the school did Border Patrol officers storm the school and...
    Menstrual products will be made available in school bathrooms for boys after  Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed the controversial Menstrual Dignity Act into law.  The new law will require elementary, middle and high schools to put menstrual products and instructions into all bathrooms on campus, regardless of gender. The Menstrual Dignity Act passed in the Oregon legislature in 2021.     Oregon is the first state to pass such a law. All bathrooms must be fitted with menstrual product machines by June 2023.  According to the law: 'All education providers shall install in every bathroom at least one dispenser that does not require coins or money' and 'is clearly marked as free in at least two languages.' When asked about the act in an April 2022 interview with Oregon Public Broadcasting, Oregon Department of Education director Colt Gill said that the act was designed to help school districts 'to understand how they can be supportive of all students' and 'what pronouns that they choose to use at school.' Gill said that if a district is not in compliance with the new law, students are...
    Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona answers questions during a briefing at the White House Aug. 5, 2021. The administration of President Joe Biden announced last Thursday that it will cancel the debts of tens of thousands of students after the closure of Marinello Schools of Beauty. The administration cited "pervasive and widespread misconduct" at the beauty school sites. "These 28,000 borrowers will receive loan discharges totaling approximately $238 million," Department of Education officials said in a news release. The affected borrowers were enrolled in the beauty schools from 2009 until the sites closed in February 2016. “Marinello preyed on students who dreamed of careers in the beauty industry, misled them about the quality of their programs, and left them buried in unaffordable debt they could not repay,” U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona said in a news release. “Today’s announcement will streamline access to debt relief for thousands of borrowers caught up in Marinello’s lies. Listen to Cody Hounanian, executive director of the Student Debt Crisis Center on Daily Kos’ The Brief x Embedded Content Department of Education officials continued in...
    by Kendall Tietz   Leaders from President Joe Biden’s Department of Education (DOE) met with an education group that supported the FBI targeting parents Monday. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona and Deputy Secretary Cindy Marten met with representatives from the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) to discuss “how they are addressing students’ academic needs, tackling the social-emotional needs of students and staff, and using funds from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to help with recovery efforts,” according to a DOE press release. The NASSP has previously called on federal authorities to intervene in conflicts between school administrators and concerned parents, lauding the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) when it announced plans to “use its authority” against parents. In a Sept. 16, 2021 letter, the NASSP called on “federal officials to provide support for school leaders being threatened and undermined by those who disagree with school guidelines on COVID-19 best practices.” “While the pandemic has impacted every one—school leaders are bearing the brunt of conflicts over masks, quarantines, vaccines, and other highly charged issues,” the letter added. “They have been faced with hostile...
    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — Illinois officials have announced the first of three applications for violence-prevention grants. The Department of Human Services said there's $50 million for prevention services in Chicago including street-based "interruption" and victims' services. Money for the grants comes through the Reimagine Public Safety Act. It's aimed at root causes of firearm violence through behavioral health services, better economic opportunities and interruption and prevention programs. The first round of money is targeted toward 37 areas which the Reimagine law determined to have the heaviest firearm violence. Applications are due March 9 and grants will be awarded in April. The Human Services Department will open two other funding periods later this month. One will center on youth development programs and after-school and summer programs proven to improve school attendance and performance. The other will make money available to Chicago-based organizations working with young people at risk of becoming involved in violence.
    As part of an Economic Development Partnership designation process, members of the Economic Development Partnership Team from the Georgia Department of Education visited Bulloch County Schools today: An Economic Development Partnership Team from the Georgia Department of Education visited Bulloch County Schools on Friday, January 21. “It was a fantastic experience,” said Patrick Ledford, an economic development liaison with the Department of Education’s Career, Technical, and Agricultural Education division. “ We all enjoyed learning more about Bulloch County and experiencing the  strong stakeholder relationships in the district.” The eight-hour site visit was a key part of a year-long process for Bulloch County Schools to seek a district-wide designation from the state’s Economic Development Partnership program. The designation is endorsed by the Georgia Economic Developers Association. The team from came to learn more about the school district’s Career Technical and Agricultural Education program and its collaboration with local post-secondary institutions, businesses, industries, economic developers, and workforce development partners. The school district was admitted into the Economic Development Partnership program in...
    Bulloch County Schools welcome students and staff back after the break. Staff is set to return tomorrow, January 3 and students on Wednesday, January 5. Message from the school district: Happy New Year. We are ready to welcome everyone back for the second semester. As employees return on Monday, January 3 and students return January 5, please remember our school district’s quarantine and isolation requirements to help slow the spread of  illness. Influenza and the COVID pandemic are present in our community, and cases of illness are sometimes higher just after a school break or holiday. Continue to refer to our Daily Health Guide for Employees and Students. It can assist you in monitoring the health of those in your household. We also encourage families who are able and eligible to get the COVID-19 and flu vaccines. They are available at the Health Department, local pharmacies, primary care physicians, and through local pop-up clinics. The Bulloch County Health Department is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
    The Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning (DECAL) and the Georgia Foundation for Early Care + Learning have recently named its inaugural Georgia’s Early Childhood Educators of the Year for 2021-2022. The infant winner is Diana Black from Pookie Bear Learning Center in Savannah, the toddler winner is Maria Claudia Ortega from My Little Geniuses in Marietta, and the preschool winner is Hannah Beth Reeves from the Academy for Little People in Chickamauga. As Educators of the Year, Black, Ortega and Reeves will receive $3,000 for their personal use, $2,000 for a classroom makeover, and up to $2,500 for their school to cover travel costs and stipends for substitute teachers as the teacher fulfills their duties as Georgia’s Early Childhood Educators of the Year. Winners serve as ambassadors for Georgia’s Early Childhood Educators of the Year program through activities related to modeling effective classroom practices and public speaking appearances. The new program recognizes outstanding early education teachers of children ages birth to preschool with an Infant Teacher of...
                 The United States Department of Justice U.S. Attorney’s Office Eastern District of Tennessee on Thursday announced Hamilton County Schools would receive a $266,314 grant under the Students, Teachers and Officers Preventing School Violence Act (STOP) School Violence Act. The grant is a part of a more than $125 million nationwide program aimed to help keep schools safe. “The Justice Department has no greater responsibility than protecting Americans from harm,” Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a statement. The grants were awarded by the Office of Justice Programs’ Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) to help advance school safety. Safety measures under the STOP School Violence Act include implementing safety measures in and around primary and secondary schools, supporting school violence prevention efforts, providing training to school personnel and students, and implementing evidence-based threat assessments. Passed in 2018, the STOP School Violence Act authorizes the DOJ to direct taxpayer funds to “units of local government, Indian tribes, and public agencies (such as school districts and law enforcement agencies)” for...
    A brave Oklahoma 11-year-old boy who rescued two people in one day this month is no ordinary Okie from Muskogee - even if the sixth-grader played down his acts of heroism as simply 'the right thing to do.' Davyon Johnson saved a classmate from choking and pulled an elderly woman from her burning home on on December 9 and has become the toast of his Oklahoma town.  There have been pizza parties, award ceremonies and national news attention. He was made an honorary member of both the Muskogee Sheriff's Department and the Muskogee Police Department. His mother told the New York Times that he had asked her why he was being rewarded for doing the right thing.  'I told him, "You saved two people’s lives,"' said LaToya Johnson, Davyon’s mother.  '"That is special."' Johnson is pictured receiving thanks from Muskogee officials on December 15 Davyon Johnson is pictured accepting certificates naming him an honorary officer of both the Muskogee Sheriff's Department and the Muskogee Police Department Since Davyon Johnson, 11, (pictured) rescued two people on December 9, his month has been...
    WASHINGTON D.C. (CBS13) — The Department of Justice announced Thursday that the STOP School Violence Act will provide roughly $126 million in funding to improve school safety. The grants will help institute safety measures in and around primary and secondary schools, support school violence prevention efforts, provide training to school personnel and students, and implement evidence-based threat assessments. READ MORE: Rain, Omicron Variant Force New Christmas Traditions for Sacramento Families“The Justice Department has no greater responsibility than protecting Americans from harm,” said Attorney General Merrick B. Garland. “Schools must be safe places to learn, and today’s investment of more than $125 million under the STOP School Violence Act will help ensure that they are.” The Students, Teachers, and Officers Preventing School Violence Act of 2018 (the “STOP School Violence Act”) authorized the Justice Department to make direct awards to states, local governments, Indian tribes, and public agencies (such as school districts and law enforcement agencies) to improve security at schools and on school grounds by implementing evidence-based school safety programs. It also offered funding to support a positive school climate...
    Dr Vinod Menon, a physics professor and chair of the physics department at City College of New York, was stunned after he made the discovery on November 10, 2020. An anonymous surprise package containing a donation of $180,000 in cash was found at the City College of New York (CUNY) in Harlem, a year after it had been delivered to the university's mailroom. After returning to campus to teach in-person this semester, Dr. Vinod Menon, a physics professor at the school, finally went through a pile of mail that had been gathering dust in his office for the past year due to the coronavirus pandemic.  He eventually found a mysterious cardboard box that had been postmarked November 10, 2020. The package, delivered by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), was so heavy that it was worth $90 in postage for priority U.S. mail.  The delivery address written on the box was intended for the 'Chairman, Physics Department' - Dr. Menon's position.  Once he finally opened the box, Dr. Manon had the shock of his life, as he discovered  $50 and $100...
    President Joe Biden’s Department of Education will no longer ask school districts for data pertaining to teacher-on-student sexual assault allegations, according to Fox News. As part of its 2021-2022 Civil Rights Data Collection, the department’s Office for Civil Rights is set to terminate questions put in place by former President Donald Trump Education Secretary Betsy DeVos that sought to provide a fuller understanding of sexual violence perpetrated by teachers and staff against students. The department will no longer ask school districts to “report pending cases or cases in which a school staffer was reassigned to another district school prior to the conclusion of an investigation,” according to the Washington Free Beacon. Though it will still ask districts to report documented cases of rape and sexual assault, the department will no longer report cases in which allegations of sexual assault resulted in the resignation or retirement of school staff. While an Education Department spokesman told the Free Beacon that the changes sought to “reduce burden and duplication of data,” Kimberly Richey, former Trump acting assistant secretary in the Office for Civil Rights,...
    President Biden's Department of Education has proposed rolling back reporting data on the number of alleged sexual assaults and rapes in schools.  The department's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) has proposed new rules to 'retire' data sets, and the proposal is now up for a 60-day period of public comment.    In order to 'reduce the reporting burden,' last week the OCR proposed eliminating accusations of rape or sexual assault. The OCR will still ask schools to submit data on the number of documented incidents of rape or sexual assault within their school system.     However, they will not be asked to report the number of accusations of sexual assault or rape, either student-to-student or staff-to-student, that resulted in resignation or retirement of the accused, or such allegations that resulted in a teacher's reassignment to another school district.    President Biden's Department of Education has proposed rolling back reporting data on the number of alleged sexual assaults and rapes in schools Public schools' mishandling of sexual assault was launched into the spotlight when parents alleged that a school district in Loudoun County, Virginia...
    Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley called on Attorney General Merrick Garland to resign Wednesday over Garland’s support that the FBI and the Department of Justice investigate “violence” from parents at school boards. “I’ll leave it at this, General Garland. You have weaponized the FBI and the Department of Justice, your U.S. attorneys are now collecting and cataloging all the ways that they might prosecute parents like Mr. [Scott] Smith because they want to be involved in their children’s education and they want to have a say in their elected officials. It’s wrong, it is unprecedented to my knowledge in the history of this country, and I call on you to resign,” Hawley said before the Senate Judiciary Committee. WATCH: The White House worked with the National School Boards Association (NSBA) to produce a letter that compared concerned parents appearing at school board meetings to domestic terrorists. The NSBA has since apologized for the correspondence. ‘It’s Disgusting’: Greg Gutfeld Says Unprepared Attorney General Sounds Like He Gets His Information ‘From BuzzFeed’ “All I can conclude from this, is either that you’re...
    The family of an eight-year-old girl who was shot and killed by police outside of a high school game in Philadelphia is suing the officers responsible for her death, claiming they were improperly trained and shot with the 'intent to kill.' The mother and siblings of Fanta Bility say the three officers involved in her death violated her constitutional rights by killing her without due process, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Named in the lawsuit is the Sharon Hill Police Department, chief Joseph J. Kelly, Jr. and the three officers who fired shots - though one is listed as 'John Doe' because the family has not yet learned his identity, the lawsuit says. The officers were responding to unrelated gunfire outside of a football game at Academy Park High School in Sharon Hill, on the outskirts of Philadelphia. They were across the stadium exit when they shot back, according to the Delaware County District Attorney's Office, which has convened a grand jury to decide whether to charge the officers criminally. Fanta Bility, 8, 'succumbed...
    Attorney General Merrick Garland will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, where he is expected to face questions about the politicization of the Justice Department. Garland's Senate testimony comes less than a week after he addressed the same issues before the House Judiciary Committee last Thursday, and during a time when the agency is in the middle of several high-profile cases and controversies. Attorney General Merrick Garland testifies before a House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing of the Department of Justice on Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Greg Nash/Pool via AP) (Greg Nash/Pool via AP) Republican members of the committee will likely focus on issues related to Hunter Biden, school boards, and critical race theory, while Democrats are likely to focus on the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. SEVENTEEN STATES ASK BIDEN, GARLAND TO STOP INTIMIDATING PARENTS INTO SILENCE AT SCHOOL BOARD MEETINGS CRT and school boards An issue that House Republicans seized on during last week's hearing was Garland's recent memo to the Justice Department about its employees intervening in incidents...
    Norman Ornstein, contributing editor for The Atlantic, made the bold assertion that Virginia gubernatorial Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin supports violent threats against school board members. On Sunday, Ornstein tweeted about an Youngkin campaign ad that criticized the FBI and Justice Department for investigating parents protesting school board meetings. In response, Ornstein concluded that Youngkin supported violent threats against school board members. GLENN YOUNGKIN SLAMS MCAULIFFE AFTER OBAMA VISIT: ‘DOING ANYTHING HE CAN’ TO SURVIVE  "Glenn Youngkin's signature commercial, on schools and parents, attacks the FBI for going after Virginia parents. In other words, Glenn Youngkin supports threats of violence against school board members. He is wholly unfit for public office," Ornstein tweeted. Virginians gather to support Glenn Youngkin (Tyler O’Neil/Fox News) In early October, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) wrote a letter to the Biden administration for the FBI and the Department of Justice to investigate "threats of violence" against school board members. The letter faced backlash for comparing parents protesting to acts of "domestic terrorism," but Attorney General Merrick Garland proceeded to announce days following the letter...
    (CNN)A 10-year-old Black girl who was arrested at a school in Hawaii over a drawing was the only Black student involved in the incident and the only one disciplined, the girl's family and their attorney said."It's hard to believe that they were not treated that way because of their race," Attorney Mateo Caballero said about the girl and her mother. "She was really the only student investigated, disciplined, interrogated and arrested."Earlier this week, the American Civil Liberties Union of Hawaii sent a letter to the Honolulu Police Department, the state Department of Education and the state attorney general's office demanding policy changes and compensation over an incident at the Honowai Elementary School in Honolulu.A Black girl was arrested at school in Hawaii over a drawing that upset a parentThe girl was "handcuffed with excessive force and taken to the police station" after a parent called school officials to complain about a drawing made by the girl and demanding to get police involved, the ACLU said.The girl's mother, Tamara Taylor, told CNN's Brianna Keilar on Friday that she dropped her daughter...
    Attorney General Merrick Garland proved himself not sufficiently competent for the role of the nation's highest ranking law enforcement officer throughout his House Judiciary Committee hearing on Thursday, the panel on "The Five" discussed, with some hosts remarking he had no idea about a handful of high profile cases his department should have been following. Garland was grilled by Rep. W. Greg Steube, R-Fla., on whether the Justice Department was prosecuting violent environmentalist protesters who illegally broke into the Stewart Lee Udall Interior Department headquarters in Foggy Bottom, D.C., as fercently as the right-wing protester who broke into the U.S. Capitol on January 6. Steube noted Garland referred to January 6 as "the most dangerous threat to democracy" in his career but testified he was unaware of the incursion at the Interior Department. The Sarasota lawmaker then held up a photo of incursions at the Capitol and Interior Department side by side and noted their similar appearance. Rep. Greg Steube, R-Fla., holds photo from the Jan. 6, attack on the Capitol as he questions Attorney General Merrick Garland during...
    (CNN)The House Judiciary Committee, known for its combativeness, had the opportunity Thursday to question Attorney General Merrick Garland for the first time since he took his perch atop the Justice Department. Republicans repeatedly battered Garland with sensational claims that the department was treating parents like "domestic terrorists" with a recent memo outlining steps DOJ was taking to address threats of violence against local school officials. Democrats defended Garland from those and other GOP critiques, but had a few matters they sought to grill Garland about as well -- including the department's approach to civil rights issues and its handling of a defamation case against former President Donald Trump. Here are the takeaways from Thursday's hearing: Garland defuses the Bannon criminal referral bomb Read MoreOne of the most scrutinized decision that Garland will face as attorney general was about to fall in his lap as the hearing was unfolding, with the House also moving towards approving criminal contempt resolution against Steve Bannon. That move puts before Garland a decision on whether to prosecute the adviser to former President Donald Trump for...
                      by Kendall Tietz  Frustration at school boards boiled over for some parents and activists who protested outside of the Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C. Sunday. A small crowd gathered for the “Parents Are Not ‘Domestic Terrorists’ Rally,” a reference to Merrick Garland’s Oct. 4 memorandum that called on the FBI to “use its authority” in response to the “disturbing spike in harassment, intimidation, and threats of violence against school administrators, board members, teachers, and staff.” Garland’s statement followed a letter from the National School Board Association (NSBA) that asked the federal government to get involved in the alleged “immediate threat” of violence from parents against American public schools and education officials. The letter encouraged President Joe Biden’s administration to use statutes such as the USA PATRIOT Act to address actions that could be “equivalent to a form of domestic terrorism and hate crimes.” Parents are expressing their concerns with how children are being educated, said Brian Schultz, a Fairfax County taxpayer and parent of a former Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) student, who he and...
    A small crowd gathered at the Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C. Sunday for the “Parents Are Not ‘Domestic Terrorists’ Rally” to express frustration at the government’s reaction to parents concerned about the direction of education in the country. “They are forcing children to hate each other through CRT (Critical Race Theory), and they are also not listening to us when it comes to things like having porn in schools,” one parent told the Daily Caller News Foundation. “We want that to end.” “What they’re doing is using taxpayer money to bring their very bad ideas to the school systems, including Black Lives Matter at schools, ideas of affinity groups that separate kids based on their race and their skin color… it’s just the opposite idea of humanity and civil rights,” said education activist Asra Nomani. Frustration at school boards boiled over for some parents and activists who protested outside of the Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C. Sunday. A small crowd gathered for the “Parents Are Not ‘Domestic Terrorists’ Rally,” a reference to Merrick Garland’s...
                      by Laurel Duggan  Northern Virginia parents plan to protest in front of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. Sunday, according to a flyer posted online. A flyer reveals plans for a “Parents Are Not ‘Domestic Terrorists’ Rally Oct. 17. “Stand up, speak up, fight back!” the memo reads. “Bring friends, be heard … you can make a difference!” ???? We invite @NSBAPublicEd exec director + AG Merrick Garland to hear mama, papa + grandparent bears at our pep rally for parents this Sun, Oct 17, 3 PM at the corner of Constitution Ave NW + 9th St NW, in front of… @TheJusticeDept! They need to come + apologize to #wetheparents pic.twitter.com/18lvaQjRUP — Asra Q. Nomani ????Mama Bear “Domestic Terrorist” ???? (@AsraNomani) October 15, 2021 News broke Wednesday that a Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS) student was allegedly raped in a school bathroom in May by a male student who wore a skirt. The victim’s father, Scott Smith, was arrested at a LCPS school board meeting weeks later...
    Northern Virginia parents plan to protest in front of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. Sunday, according to a flyer posted online. A flyer reveals plans for a “Parents Are Not ‘Domestic Terrorists’ Rally Oct. 17. “Stand up, speak up, fight back!” the memo reads. “Bring friends, be heard … you can make a difference!” (RELATED: Left-Wing Member Of Loudoun County School Board Announces Resignation) ???? We invite @NSBAPublicEd exec director + AG Merrick Garland to hear mama, papa + grandparent bears at our pep rally for parents this Sun, Oct 17, 3 PM at the corner of Constitution Ave NW + 9th St NW, in front of… @TheJusticeDept! They need to come + apologize to #wetheparents pic.twitter.com/18lvaQjRUP — Asra Q. Nomani ????Mama Bear “Domestic Terrorist” ???? (@AsraNomani) October 15, 2021 News broke Wednesday that a Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS) student was allegedly raped in a school bathroom in May by a male student who wore a skirt. The victim’s father, Scott Smith, was arrested at a LCPS school board meeting weeks later for resisting...
    A Lancaster teenager has filed legal claims against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and her school district alleging she was slammed to the ground by a deputy at school after refusing to give him her phone. MiKayla Robinson, a 16-year-old Black student at Lancaster High School, was waiting to speak to the vice principal on Aug. 30, when a deputy assigned to patrol the school approached and demanded to see her phone, according to the legal claims, which are a precursor to a lawsuit. When Robinson refused, the deputy tried to grab the phone and she started to walk away, the documents said. The deputy then followed her, grabbed her arms and forcibly took her to the ground, according to the documents. A bystander recorded the incident in a 43-second video that shows the deputy knocking Robinson to the ground and pinning her face down. The deputy is seen straddling her for more than 30 seconds while she yelled for him to get off and not to touch her phone. The video clip ends as a...
    Former Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on "Friday" blasted the Department of Justice’s effort to coordinate a nationwide investigation into an "increase" in "threats of violence" against school officials and teachers across the country. "It is a completely disproportionate, over-the-top response to real and valid concerns that parents across this country are having, and they need to have the opportunity to express their voices, their opinions. School board meetings are the appropriate place, and of course, no one is condoning any violence. But local law enforcement is there to address those issues should they arise," DeVos told "America’s Newsroom."  DeVos argued that the DOJ’s decision stems from the "fact" that the "far-left of the Democrat Party wants to continue to control children as they have for decades." "[Parents'] voices are not heard, they're considered a nuisance, and the whole effort is essentially right out of the Marxist playbook to separate parents from their kids and control kids' futures." DOJ LAUNCHING EFFORT TO COMBAT THREATS OF VIOLENCE AGAINST SCHOOL OFFICIALS The Department of Justice is launching an effort to combat...
    On Wednesday’s broadcast of the Fox News Channel’s “Fox News Primetime,” Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) stated that the Department of Justice didn’t do anything about the mob of people who surrounded him and his wife in D.C., but is now going after “moms at school boards” over areas that have nothing to do with federal law and “the crime of dissent.” Paul said, “You know, both my wife and I have been through a lot, not only being — myself being shot at — the ballfield when Steve Scalise was nearly killed, being there when a mob of 100 surrounded us, threatening to kill us, holding us essentially hostage until policemen came and broke us free. They were assaulting the policemen as they were trying to get us to the hotel. One of the policemen was ultimately bloodied and had a laceration that required stitches above his eye. … We asked them to investigate the mob of 100 to see who paid for them to come to D.C., who was putting them up in thousand-dollar-a-night hotels? Not one thing was...
                      by Christen Smith  A number of Pennsylvania educators said Thursday the Department of Health hands down COVID-19 mitigation orders and doesn’t back them up when it comes to enforcement, leaving schools in a difficult spot. Michael Bromirski, superintendent of Hempfield School District in Lancaster County, told the Senate Education Committee that since pandemic mitigation rules lifted earlier this summer, school districts no longer handle quarantine orders for students exposed to the virus after the department told them it’s the state’s responsibility – and authority – to do so. Except, parents rarely receive such instructions, generating confusion and frustration. “Parents are looking to us, the school districts, and are questioning how we can exclude their child from in-person instruction because the DOH has not contacted them,” he said. “We are attempting to abide by the directions we have been given by the DOH, but they are not following through on their stated responsibilities.” When schools reach out for clarification or guidance on how to interpret the department’s rules, however, officials say they...
    By The Associated Press SEATTLE — A Washington state trooper who helped develop the agency’s use of drones has died after a battle with COVID-19 contracted on duty. The Washington State Patrol said Detective Eric Gunderson died Sunday surrounded by his family and friends. He was 38. Gunderson frequently traveled around the country to speak about the state patrol’s use of drones. The patrol said he contracted COVID-19 on one of those trips. Gunderson helped investigate the 2017 Amtrak derailment in DuPont and his work is credited with reopening roads more quickly after crashes. He is survived by a wife and two sons. Gunderson’s death is the first line of duty death for the agency since it marked its 100th anniversary a few weeks ago, Chief John Batiste said. “How I had hoped our second century of service would be more forgiving. But serving the public, as we do, has inherent dangers and this pandemic has been a foe to our agency and indeed our state and nation,” he said. Gov. Jay Inslee tweeted his condolences to Gunderson’s family, friends...
    By The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Public health officials have identified more than 200 coronavirus outbreaks at police or fire agencies throughout Los Angeles County since the start of the pandemic, according to data obtained by the Los Angeles Times. The 211 outbreaks, accounting for more than 2,500 cases between March 2020 and last month, represent 9% of total workplace outbreaks across the county, the newspaper reported Sunday. However, they have continued to occur regularly even as vaccination rates increased among police and fire personnel and the number of individual coronavirus cases per outbreak has fallen since last winter. The data showed 38 outbreaks at public safety agencies were identified in April of this year — the most in any month since the start of the pandemic. A month later, 35 outbreaks — the second most — were recorded by the county Department of Public Health. Overall, more than half of the outbreaks occurred at the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Fire Department, where some employees have filed lawsuits challenging a new rule requiring them to...
    Last week, a judge ruled that Florida school districts can levy mask mandates on students, according to the New York Times, which noted that the judge issued an injunction barring the education department from hitting school boards with punishments. "The judge had said he would issue his order this week, but that hasn't happened yet, possibly providing a window for the state to take this action," according to the Orlando Sentinel. The outlet reported that Department of Education spokesperson Jared Ochs said in a statement Monday: "Unlike several school districts in this state, our Department plans on continuing to follow the rule of law until such time as the Court issues its ruling, and subsequent to that ruling, we plan on immediately appealing this decision ... from which we will seek to stay the ruling,"
                      by Sydney Fowler  A professor at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities is pushing back against the school’s decision to hire more police officers. Nate Mills, a professor of English, criticized the school in a tweet saying “In consistency with the city of Minneapolis, the University of Minnesota has decided, in the city of the George Floyd Uprising and continued racist police violence, that it too needs *more* police officers.” In consistency with the city of Minneapolis, the University of Minnesota has decided, in the city of the George Floyd Uprising and continued racist police violence, that it too needs *more* police officers: pic.twitter.com/WANoIeaY5S— Nate Mills (@frozenagitation) July 23, 2021 The July tweet came in response to an email that the university sent out to all students, faculty, and staff. It stated that the university’s police department will be beginning the hiring process for three new officers to replace previous ones who had retired. The addition of the new officers will bring the university’s total number to 61. On July 20, UMN had previously announced plans...
    Today, the U.S. Department of Education (Department) released the “Return to School Roadmap,” a resource to support students, schools, educators, and communities as they prepare to return to safe, healthy in-person learning this fall and emerge from the pandemic stronger than before. The Roadmap provides key resources and supports for students, parents, educators, and school communities to build excitement around returning to classrooms this school year and outlines how federal funding can support the safe and sustained return to in-person learning. Over the course of the next several weeks as schools reopen nationwide, the Roadmap will lay out actionable strategies to implement the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) updated guidance for K-12 schools, so that schools can minimize transmission and sustain in-person learning all school-year long. The Roadmap includes three “Landmark” priorities that schools, districts, and communities are encouraged to focus on to ensure all students are set up for success in the 2021-2022 school year. These include: (1) prioritizing the health and safety of students, staff, and...
    PERRIS, Calif. (KABC) -- A controversial resolution considered by an Inland Empire school district to cut funding to campus police has been postponed indefinitely by the school board.The resolution being considered by the Val Verde Unified School District in Perris would have cut funding to the school district police department by 30%, as well as require mental health evaluations for any student who is questioned, detained or arrested by an officer.Critics who spoke out against the resolution accused those in favor of it of attempting to "defund police.""It's very obvious it's not about money, and it's not about mental health," said Riverside County Sheriff Chad Bianco. "It's very obvious that this is a political agenda from anti-law enforcement activists."Rather than being here to defund them, I think we should be here to say thank you."Dozens of community members, campus police officers, parents and volunteers spoke out against the resolution during the public comment period of the Val Verde Unified School District's board meeting. Not a single person publicly spoke in favor of it."If we're defunding the police department, where is...
    More On: critical race theory Biden administration’s school reopening plan included CRT link ‘That’s nonsense, Congressman!’: Maloney gets schooled on critical race theory How ‘equity’ ideology plunged South Africa into inequality and chaos They didn’t warn Germany and other commentary Last week, the Senate Education Committee held a confirmation hearing for a woman who has arguably done more than any other government official to fan the flames of America’s culture war: Catherine Lhamon. President Joe Biden has nominated Lhamon to return for a second stint as assistant secretary in the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. During her previous term, under former President Barack Obama, Lhamon transformed that office from a guarantor of statutorily defined rights into a forward operating base for coercing compliance with liberal social dogma. Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, the ranking Republican on the committee, described Lhamon’s track record as “deeply troubling if not outright disqualifying.” But he and his colleagues seemed focused on fighting the last culture war — over Title IX and allegations of sexual assault and abuse on campus —...
    (CBS DETROIT) – The Detroit Health Department and Detroit Public Schools Community District are joining forces to make COVID-19 vaccines available to the community ahead of the next school year. DPSCD students are set to return to class in eight weeks, and before school starts, the district is bringing vaccines closer to home. READ MORE: Michigan Names 1st Winners Of $50K Vaccination Sweepstakes “One of the things we know is in our communities, a lot of our families do not have transportation,” said Chrystal Wilson, DPSCD Vice President of Communications. “It’s easier for them to walk around the corner or a couple of blocks to a mobile unit such as this to receive information about the vaccine and to get the vaccine.” On Wednesday, July 14, the Detroit Health Department mobile unit kicked off the “school hubs” vaccine effort. Three DPSCD sites will serve as mobile clinics from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. over the next six weeks. “We are concerned about everyone, and the children, of course, is a key part of that,” said Dr. Iris Taylor, DHD Director...
    Joe Biden wants to use taxpayer money to promote critical race theory lessons in schools in a move branded 'politically tone-deaf' by Republicans. The Education Department has this week proposed two new funding priorities covering US history and civics education programs and activities. Federal grant money will be offered to incentivize the 'woke' lessons for teachers and students. Joe Biden wants to use taxpayer money to promote critical race theory lessons in schools in a move branded 'politically tone-deaf' by Republicans The move hopes to 'incorporate racially, ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse perspectives' into the curriculum and improve 'information literacy', The Washington Examiner reported. Republican strategist John Feehery slammed the plans as he accused Biden of ignoring the more pressing issue of opening up schools. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next 'The science is undeniable': Biden and Kamala Harris promise... Yale academic who convened 'woke' CEO summit to protest... Share this article Share He believes that parents would prefer for their children to receive an education that prepares them for college or a...
    The day after a visit by the Minister of Health to Metz, the Prefect of Moselle Laurent Touvet announced on Saturday that the control measures already taken (daily curfew at 6 p.m., closure of large shopping centers, general wearing of masks) ” to date appear sufficient “. No local re-containment or closure of schools therefore, contrary to what some local elected officials had demanded during the visit of Olivier Véran, who came to look into the “worrying” situation of the department. Some of them showed their dissatisfaction on Saturday. The first sequencing conclusions point to a progression in Moselle of the South African variant, one of those which worries epidemiologists the most. The current estimate relates to more than 100 cases per day in the department. No new restrictions, therefore, but a strengthening of vaccination and a … Follow La Tribune Share economic information, receive our newsletters
    Southfield (CW50) – There is no doubt that the people of Detroit love the city they live in, but what kind of impact does the city of Detroit make on the people who grow up here and move away to pursue careers outside of the city? Karinda L. Washington grew up in Detroit, eventually choosing a career path in the medical field. She began as a pre-med student at Eastern Michigan University, but after her junior year, she decided that the path she had chosen wasn’t right for her. Her father pushed her to choose a path in which she’d be happy doing something for free. This led her to change her major in her final year and complete graduate school with a degree in public relations. Washington would go on to spend nearly a decade at the nonprofit Michigan Legal Services, helping people in low-income communities. RELATED: Wayne County Executive Warren Evans on His Role as a Leader, Life in Public Service Karinda L. Washington expressing her love of her home state of Michigan (Courtesy of Karinda L. Washington) A...
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